Podcasts about Curator

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  • 2,392PODCASTS
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  • Nov 25, 2021LATEST
Curator

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Best podcasts about Curator

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Latest podcast episodes about Curator

VIBES...MOODS & MOVES - Podcast
Vibes...Moods & Moves - S2 EPI 3- Holiday Season Is Here - w Jannae Jordan

VIBES...MOODS & MOVES - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 36:46


It's Thanksgiving Eve here in the states, which means that Holiday Season upon us here, and everywhere else around the world!  As one who has lovingly observed Thanksgiving as a time for family to gather and give thanks for our many blessings; with so much feeling out of control in the world this year I am heavily relying on memories of Thanksgivings past to catch the vibe of the day, and the season. So in true VM&M fashion, I'm bringing you along with me with some chat and happy shares about things that are lifting my spirits, inspiring and encouraging me to stay the course and remain focused on what we can control, our work and ourselves.   I also take a few minutes to highlight a few things that I think are pretty cool, including telling you guys about a great new book of poetry, and essays by a friend and supporter of VM&M! Allow me to introduce  Poet, Curator, Music Journalist,Author ( and more) Mr. Kahlil Crawford, and his new book ORG/N CITY ( Available online at Barnes& Noble Press and ETSY, this Black Friday, Nov 26th 2021)   And of course I am still at it with "Some things must happen in order for other things to happen..." with another quick inspiring update about Mr.LeVar Burton!  So, grab your tasty beverage and snack. Settle into your comfy seat and come chat!  Holiday Season is here! Wishing you all a warm, healthy, safe,peace filled and happy start to the Holiday Season!   Cheers! Jannae   Additional Show related links! For more info about ORG/N CITY :Official Website To connect with the Author on IG: @k.a.h.l.i.l_      

Sandi Klein's Conversations with Creative Women

For Darsie Alexander, it's all about art. Since 2018, she has been Chief Curator at the Jewish Museum located on New York City's famed Museum Mile. Founded in 1904, it's the first institution of its kind in the US and one of the oldest Jewish Museums in the world. Darsie's resume is an impressive one: Executive Director of the Katonah Museum of Art, Chief Curator of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Senior Curator at the Baltimore Museum of Art and Photography Curator at Manhattan's Museum of Modern Art. Join us for a fascinating, illuminating conversation about the power of art to teach, provoke, bring joy and purpose to our lives.

VOICES ON ART - The VAN HORN Gallery Podcast, hosted by Daniela Steinfeld
Rearranging the collection - BRIGITTE KÖLLE, curator, head of collections for contemporary art at Hamburger Kunsthalle

VOICES ON ART - The VAN HORN Gallery Podcast, hosted by Daniela Steinfeld

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 35:33


Brigitte Kölle, curator and head of collections of contemporary art at Hamburger Kunsthalle talks how she became first interested in art through one of her schoolmates, who went on to study art. She then took art classes herself before deciding to go into art history and cultural studies. She describes the art world of the late 1980s and 90s in detail - an impactful internship at Konrad Fischer Galerie, meeting some of the important artists of that time, before going to New York and encountering for the first time woman curators like Lynne Cook and Marcia Tucker. To once have had practical experiences in creating art enables her now to understand art on a profound level and to look deeply at it, which makes a big difference in her own exhibition making. She talks the process of curating exhibitions, working with and rearranging the collection of the Museum and the discussions and teamwork this requires. She shares some personal and private thoughts about her life as a curator, head of collections, woman and mother. In her practice art always comes first. Recorded November 18, 2021, Language english, 35 min. For more information about the topics Brigitte discusses here some links: https://www.hamburger-kunsthalle.de/ausstellungen/trauern https://www.konradfischergalerie.de/

Microsoft Libraries and Museums Podcast
Experimenting with VR at the National Library of the Netherlands

Microsoft Libraries and Museums Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:11


In preparation for moving to a new library building and separate storage space, the National Library of the Netherlands is embarking on a series of experiments to digitally engage with their collection. In one particular experiment, Karin Vingerhoets, Curator of the Children's Books Collection, and Martijn Kleppe, Head of the Research Department, joined forces to create a virtual reality experience of four children's pop-up books. In this episode, Karin and Martijn share why libraries are a bit behind in the VR space; how they chose VR; and the relatively low cost of their investment, which resulted in numerous lessons for their library moving forward. Plus, commentary by Microsoft's Catherine Devine. Episode resources: VR at the National Library of the Netherlands Interview transcript: https://bit.ly/3rf9kob

The EdUp Experience
353: WISE Words - with Stavros N. Yiannouka, CEO at the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) & Natalie Magness, WISE 2021 Young Curator & Fellow

The EdUp Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 39:59


We welcome YOU back to America's leading higher education podcast, The EdUp Experience! It's YOUR time to #EdUp In this episode, YOUR guests are Stavros N. Yiannouka, CEO at the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE) & Natalie Magness, WISE 2021 Young Curator & Fellow, YOUR host is Dr. Joe Sallustio, & YOUR sponsor is LeadSquared! Hear Stavros & Natalie talk about the impact of the WISE conference in Doha, Qatar & why it's so important for the global voices in higher ed - especially the student voices. Find out what to expect when you register & find out how EdUp is involved! YOU can register to attend online or in person via this link - https://www.wise-qatar.org/wise-2021/ Thank YOU so much for tuning in. Join us on the next episode for YOUR time to EdUp! Connect with YOUR EdUp Team - Elvin Freytes & Dr. Joe Sallustio ● Learn more about what others are saying about their EdUp experience ● Join YOUR EdUp community at The EdUp Experience! ● YOU can follow us on Facebook | Instagram | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube Thank YOU for listening! We make education YOUR business!

The Photo Detective
Ancestral Handbag History with Curator Jessica Harpley

The Photo Detective

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 30:46


This week, Maureen Taylor, The Photo Detective, is joined by Jessica Rose Harpley, an Assistant Curator at The Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Specifically, Jessica works in the Department of Performance, Furniture, and Textiles. Maureen and Jessica discuss one of Victoria and Albert's latest exhibits which Jessica helped curate. Called, “Bags: Inside Out” the exhibit examines the role that bags, be it handbags, briefcases, and yes, the Queen's tiny purses are mentioned, and what role they have played throughout the centuries in regards to fashion. From frivolousness to practicality, this episode looks at these accessories and how a single item can tell a very interesting story about the individual holding it. Related Episodes:Episode 132: The Wedding Detectives Charlotte Sibtain and Cole MoretonEpisode 119: Dressing for the Camera: Rules Our Foremothers Followed and Sometimes BrokeLinks:Bags Inside Out Exhibit at the Victoria and Albert MuseumSign up for my newsletter.Watch my YouTube Channel.Like the Photo Detective Facebook Page so you get notified of my Facebook Live videos.Need help organizing your photos? Check out the Essential Photo Organizing Video Course.Need help identifying family photos? Check out the Identifying Family Photographs Online Course.Have a photo you need help identifying? Sign up for photo consultation.About My Guest:Jessica Rose Harpley is an Assistant Curator at The Victoria and Albert Museum in London, England, within The Department of Performance, Furniture, Textiles, and Fashion, having formerly worked within The Costume and Textile Department at Norwich Castle Museum. Jessica has a Master's degree in Fashion Cultures from The London College of Fashion, and has published on the chatelaine, exploring their use and representation within Victorian Britain. She has specific interests in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, including gender theory and the construction of the self via dress; and, the dissemination and representation of fashion, most notably through women's periodicals.About Maureen Taylor:Maureen is a frequent keynote speaker on photo identification, photograph preservation, and family history at historical and genealogical societies, museums, conferences, libraries, and other organizations across the U.S., London, and Canada.  She's the author of several books and hundreds of articles and her television appearances include The View and The Today Show (where she researched and presented a complete family tree for host Meredith Vieira).  She's been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, Martha Stewart Living, Germany's top newspaper Der Spiegel, American Spirit, and The New York Times. Maureen was recently a spokesperson and photograph expert for MyHeritage.com, an internationally known family history website, and also writes guidebooks, scholarly articles, and online columns for such media as Smithsonian.com. Learn more at Maureentaylor.comDid you enjoy this episode? Please leave a review on Apple Podcasts

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
The Cosmic Curator 11/20/21: Astrology update for the week ahead

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 5:13


This is your Cosmic Curator, Tom Yaroschuk, with your astrological update for today, Saturday November 20th and the week ahead. They day begins with the Moon moving through Taurus, its sign of exaltation. That means The Moon's nurturing, sensitive, emotive energies are in sync with the Taurus expression of art, food, and romance.. About the Host: Tom Yaroschuk is a Vedic Astrologer. His intention is to help people understand their karma and the issues they may confront to cultivate more fulfilling lives. Tom is writing a memoir of the spiritual lessons derived from his work in a Homeless Day Center in between a career as an award winning television and documentary producer. The post The Cosmic Curator 11/20/21: Astrology update for the week ahead first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

Arts & Ideas
Faking It and Trompe-l'oeil

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:43


The dining room at Windsor Castle holds one of Grinling Gibbons's carvings, others are found at churches including St Paul's Cathedral and the sculptor developed a kind of signature including peapods in many of his works. As an exhibition at Compton Verney explores his career: Matthew Sweet is joined by the curator Hannah Phillip, the artist and film-maker Alison Jackson who is known for working with lookalike performers. We also hear from artist Lucy McKenzie who has over 80 works on show at Tate Liverpool and Curator and New Generation Thinker Danielle Thom who has been collecting craft for the Museum of London. Grinling Gibbons: Centuries in the Making runs at Compton Verney until January 30th 2022. https://www.alison-jackson.co.uk/ Lucy McKenzie's work is on show at Tate Liverpool until 13 March 2022 comprising 80 works dating from 1997 to the present which include large-scale architectural paintings, illusionistic trompe l'oeil works, as well as fashion and design. https://daniellethom.com/bio Producer: Sofie Vilcins

The Sword Guy Podcast
Asian and African Arms and Armour with Natasha Bennett

The Sword Guy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 83:35


The Sword Guy Podcast episode 80 Photo credit: The Royal Armouries Natasha Bennett is the Curator of Oriental Collections at the Royal Armouries in Leeds, working with the Asian and African collections. These include an enormous spread of arms and armour mostly dating from between the 14th and 20th centuries, so her research interests are necessarily wide-ranging. She has presented specialist study sessions and seminars on mounted warfare in Asia, South Asian arms and armour, Islamic arms and armour, Asian swords, and textiles in Japanese armour. In our conversation we talk about guns, specifically the “15 Rupee Jezail” and how the popularity of the matchlock mechanism persisted because of its simplicity and functionality, even when elsewhere in the world newer technologies took over. In case you were wondering, this is what a jezail looks like: Photo credit: The Royal Armouries And this is the Tusken Cycler rifle from Star Wars: We also talk about Natasha's work with the Anglo Sikh Virtual Museum and the amazing benefits of 3-D technology. You can have a good, close-up, 3-D look at the objects on the museum's website: https://www.anglosikhmuseum.com/ This leads us into a discussion about the circumstances in which many items ended up in British museum collections, i.e. as colonial loot, which is a tricky issue for museums to navigate. Listen in to find out whether Indian steel weapons are the best, and also how Natasha plans to get her baby doing horseback archery before they can walk.   For more information about the host Guy Windsor and his work, as well as transcriptions of all the episodes, check out his website at https://guywindsor.net/ And to support the show, come join the Patrons at  https://www.patreon.com/theswordguy  

British History Series
Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough with Curator and Historian Antonia Keaney

British History Series

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 44:22


Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough with Curator and Historian Antonia Keaney | Recorded at Blenheim Palace You can also watch this episode on YouTube. This podcast is free and will remain so but if you'd like to support me whilst also accessing exclusive content, perks, free gifts and more, you can join my Patreon club at www.Patreon.com/BritishHistory and support for as little as £3 a month. (Perks depend on tier selected). Support for Free by liking, commenting and sharing this podcast. Sign up to receive my free weekly newsletter with the added bonus of having 7 days to book new tours and events before they are released to the general public! Click Here http://eepurl.com/dvGx2H --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/british-history/message

The Jasmine Star Show
How to Go Up Against the "Big Dogs" of Your Industry | Curator Coaching Session

The Jasmine Star Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 43:52


Are you a small business owner who is chasing big goals?If so, you're in great company with the other entrepreneurs you're about to hear from today!These 5 brilliant souls are some of the lucky winners from a recent Podcast Review Contest I ran, so they were invited to a private Zoom call with me to get their biggest burning business question answered.In this episode, you'll hear me answer their questions:“What advice would you give to a small business owner launching a product that has never been on the market?” “How can I speak to my ideal client when she's 20 years younger than me?”“How do you stop working (even in your head) when you want to be present with family?”“Can I merge 2 very different niches to work under the same business or must I create 2 different businesses?”“How do I grow my podcast and YouTube channel subscriptions through social media?”As always, I kept it REAL with these entrepreneurs in all different industries, so you're about to hear a mixture of real talk, step-by-step advice, and a kick in the pants.Intrigued yet? Let's listen in!As always, thank you for tuning in to another episode of the Jasmine Star Show and if you haven't yet, please subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, iHeartRadio… basically, wherever you get your podcasts!

Masonic Lite Podcast
Episode 129 - Bro. Robert Cooper

Masonic Lite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 74:25


Hello! On this episode we welcome a very special guest, Brother Robert Cooper. He is the Curator of the Grand Lodge of Scotland Museum and Library, a historian, and a published author. We chat about his journey in the Craft, his works, as well as that time Larry crashed his installation. In closing, we hear The Masonic Sports and then wrap in the usual way. To learn more about Brother Robert Cooper, visit his website: https://www.robertldcooper.org [00:00:00] Introductions [00:08:15] First break, brought to you by George J. Grove and Son [00:09:20] Robert Cooper Part 1 [00:29:55] Second break, brought to you by the Historic Smithton Inn [00:31:10] Robert Cooper Part 2 [00:48:50] Third break, brought to you by Hiram & Solomon Cigars [00:49:50] Robert Cooper Part 3 [00:58:35] The Masonic Sports [01:00:05] The Wrap-up and Chickens [01:13:45] Outro MASONIC LITE PATREON www.patreon.com/MasonicLitePodcast Sign up to support the show with an automatic, monthly donation of $1, $5, or $13! SPONSORS: George J. Grove and Son: www.georgejgrove.com Historic Smithton Inn: www.historicsmithtoninn.com The Red Serpent: By Larry Merris: www.amazon.com/Red-Serpent-Larry…ris/dp/1466478608 Intermezzo by Stephanie, Locally Handcrafted Chocolate www.facebook.com/IntermezzobyStephanie/ MEDIA ATTRIBUTION: Bye Everybody!

#US - Unique & Shared Experiences
Five People, One Moment - Flags of America - Matthew

#US - Unique & Shared Experiences

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 11:17


Matthew Skic is Curator of Exhibitions at the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. Over the Summer of 2021 The Museum had an expedition on Flags in America. Matthew tells the story of his own personal connection to the Flag of the United States and discusses his favorite flags in the exhibitions and what they can tell modern day viewers about this nation's history.   Thank you to our media sponsor: Metro Newspaper   Subscribe to First Person Arts YouTube: https://tinyurl.com/SubscribetoFPA Share your COVID Story: https://www.firstpersonarts.org/Stories/COVID-Stories Amazon Charity: https://tinyurl.com/Amazon-Charity-FPA   First Person Arts ON SOCIAL - #US  #StoryPrompts  #Storytelling  #FirstPersonArts First Person Arts Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/firstpersonarts First Person Arts Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FirstPersonPhilly/ First Person Arts Twitter: https://twitter.com/FirstPersonArts   Subscribe to our Email List:: https://www.firstpersonarts.org/signup Support #US:  https://www.firstpersonarts.org/donate

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
The Cosmic Curator 11/13/21: Astrology update for the week ahead

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 4:48


This is your Cosmic Curator, Tom Yaroschuk, with your astrological update for today, Saturday November 13th and the week ahead. Well folks – how are you feeling today? The moon is in the cold, fixed air sign of Aquarius, the sign of he humanitarian. Kind of funny, Aquarians like humanity but people – ah that depends. They are very big on socia justice, innovation, and progress… About the Host: Tom Yaroschuk is a Vedic Astrologer. His intention is to help people understand their karma and the issues they may confront to cultivate more fulfilling lives. Tom is writing a memoir of the spiritual lessons derived from his work in a Homeless Day Center in between a career as an award winning television and documentary producer. The post The Cosmic Curator 11/13/21: Astrology update for the week ahead first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

City Lights with Lois Reitzes
No Time to Waste: The Urgent Mission of Betty Reid Soskin

City Lights with Lois Reitzes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 52:04


Lois Reitzes speaks with Betty Reid Soskin, U.S. National Park Service Ranger at the Rosie the Riveter/WWII Home Front National Historical Park. She was joined by filmmaker Carl Bidleman. His new documentary is “No Time to Waste: The Urgent Mission of Betty Reid Soskin.” And, producer Summer Evans talks with The High's Curator of Photography Gregory Harris and renowned Atlanta photographer Sheila Pree Bright. to discuss the exhibit Picturing the South.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

To The Point - Cybersecurity
Is This The Dreadnought Moment? With Dr. Andrew Hammond

To The Point - Cybersecurity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:15


Dr. Andrew Hammond, Historian and Curator of the International Spy Museum joins us this week - and let's be honest he has just about the coolest job out there today! Hammond takes us through the classic period of espionage and the reliance on physical data and spycraft techniques to transport through to the modern day battlefield of cyber intelligence and espionage. And he provides insights on the historical throughlines of attacks that haven't really changed over the centuries, by and large what is being sought is the same it is simply the mechanism by which exploits are executed have evolved. He also lends perspective on the cyber threat landscape ahead, and asks is this the dreadnought moment? For links and resources discussed in this episode, please visit our show notes at https://www.forcepoint.com/govpodcast/e158

Fly With Us
Episode 125 What Is Hip hop

Fly With Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 66:33


Episode 125 What Is Hip hop Special guest Cooley the Curator, Manny Faces and SupeSoprano MM: Hip hop and Meditation/ Definition of Hip hop SCA: Go Digging BS: why is music good for the Brain? patreon.com/FlyWithUsPodcast

Words by Winter
When We Were Kids, with Robin Rosen Chang

Words by Winter

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 8:13


Who were your childhood friends? Do you remember them? Much happens in childhood, much good, much bad, much of it experienced with the friends we had back then. Sometimes my childhood friends and I look back through the lens of time and talk about long-gone days.  Words by Winter: Conversations, reflections, and poems about the passages of life. Because it's rough out there, and we have to help each other through.Original theme music for our show is by Dylan Perese. Additional music by Kelly Krebs. Artwork by Mark Garry.  Today's poem, “Indian Creek,” is by Robin Rosen Chang, from her book The Curator's Notes, published by Terrapin Books, and is read with the poet's kind permission. Words by Winter can be reached at wordsbywinterpodcast@gmail.com. 

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
The Cosmic Curator 11/6/21: Astrology update for the week ahead

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 4:58


This is your Cosmic Curator, Tom Yaroschuk, and ah, that Cosmic Curator , Someone thought I said Cosmetic Curator. I assure you there are no beauty tips in the next five minutes I will however tell you what's happening in the stars for today Saturday November 6th and the week ahead… About the Host: Tom Yaroschuk is a Vedic Astrologer. His intention is to help people understand their karma and the issues they may confront to cultivate more fulfilling lives. Tom is writing a memoir of the spiritual lessons derived from his work in a Homeless Day Center in between a career as an award winning television and documentary producer. The post The Cosmic Curator 11/6/21: Astrology update for the week ahead first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

The Scoot Show with Scoot
Toy Hall of Fame gets three new inductees - but what are the qualifications?!

The Scoot Show with Scoot

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 34:28


Scoot talks to Nick Ricketts, Curator at the Strong National Museum of Play, about what it takes to become a Hall of Fame Toy See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Let's Argue About Plants
Episode 98: Upgraded Classics

Let's Argue About Plants

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 42:58


Everyone likes an upgrade. Whether it's a faster car or a more efficient cell phone, it's hard to turn down a better version of something you already like. Plants are much the same. If you already love that gorgeous catmint that flowers all season long, what not try one that not only has all the same great attributes but also has an improved habit.  Today we're talking about plants we have a great affinity for, but that plant breeders have made just that much better. Perhaps it's a longer bloom time, or stronger winter hardiness, or even a different color to the foliage. Whatever the change may be, it's an improvement that has made us fall even more in love with these classic plants. Expert testimony: Irvin Etienne is Curator of Herbaceous Plants and Seasonal Garden Design for The Garden at Newfields in Indianapolis.

The Week in Art
Cop26: how can the art world respond? Plus, the Depot: storage as spectacle, and Fragonard's The Swing

The Week in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 68:14


This week, as talks continue at Cop26, the UN's climate charge conference in Glasgow, we talk to Lucia Pietroiusti of the Serpentine Galleries about climate justice and how the art world can go beyond sustainability to "thriveability". As the spectacular Depot Boijmans Van Beuningen opens to the public, we talk to Sjarel Ex, the museum's director, and Sandra Kisters, its head of collections and research, about the building they're calling the world's first publicly accessible art storage facility. And, for this episode's Work of the Week, we discuss Jean-Honoré Fragonard's The Swing as it goes back on display at the Wallace Collection in London after conservation treatment. Yuriko Jackall, the Curator of French Paintings at the Wallace Collection, and Martin Wyld, the conservator, tell us about the French Rococo artist's most famous painting.Related climate crisis discussions on The Week in Art:The Gallery Climate CoalitionVenice's climate emergencyFossil-fuel sponsors and activism at the Science Museum in LondonArtist Richard Mosse on environmental crime in the Amazon rainforest See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Roots to Renewal
Episode Eight: Martina Müller on the Enlivening Forces of Art on Our Lives

Roots to Renewal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 25:01


Sponsored by Tierra Farm. Music by Aaron Dessner.In this episode, Hawthorne Valley's Executive Director Martin Ping had a chance to chat with artist and educator Martina Müller. Together they explore the many ways that art enlivens our lives – from the practice of observation intrinsic in the experience of making art and its impact on our interpersonal relationships, and even society as a whole – to the way that creativity allows us to access our more divine selves. Martina believes that we're all artists because we can all learn to make art.Martina studied art and English at Ruhr University in Bochum Germany and Emerson College in England, and holds a four-year full-time Waldorf Teaching Diploma from the Institute of Waldorf Pedagogy in Witten-Annen, Germany with a specialization in teaching high school art and art history. A faculty member of The Alkion Center at Hawthorne Valley since 2003, and Senior Artistic Director and Curator for the new gallery Lightforms Art Center in Hudson, Martina taught middle and high school art for two decades at Hawthorne Valley Waldorf School. An accomplished artist and internationally published children's book illustrator, Martina is a founding member of Gallery 345 in Hudson. She has exhibited her artwork in numerous venues throughout New York and Massachusetts including Sculpture Now at the Mount in Lenox, MA, Flying Horse Sculpture Show, Hamilton, MA, Diana Felber Gallery, La Mama La Galleria in New York City, Center Point Gallery, in New York City and many others. She creates her paintings, sculptures and installation pieces by bringing meditative content inspired by the work of Rudolf Steiner and great spiritual documents from many spiritual traditions together with the living forces of nature. She lives in Ghent, NY where she maintains her studio.Visit Lightforms Art Center's websiteVisit Martina's websiteDonate to Hawthorne Valley

Industries Most Wanted
Playlist Curator / DJ / Digital Marketing Specialist Jay Mula talks about his day to day business

Industries Most Wanted

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 21:22


Playlist Curator / DJ / Digital Marketing Specialist Jay Mula talks about his day to day business & more on The Industries Most Wanted Podcast. Hosted by TampaMystic

Arts & Ideas
Caesar, Hogarth and images of power

Arts & Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 45:02


Caesars with the wrong beard, faint laurels in the background of a scene from Hogarth's A Rake's Progress and the experiences of the guardian of empty tombs, part of a ruined Neolithic necropolis in the Sharjah desert in the United Arab Emirates: Rana Mitter and his guests discuss the ghosts of history and depictions of power in art. Classicist Mary Beard has traced the collecting of images of Caesar over centuries in her latest book. Ali Cherri's artwork, born out of his experiences growing up in Lebanon, includes films like the Digger and interventions in galleries designed to make us notice what is on display and what is being hidden or erased. Alice Insley is Curator of Historic British Art at Tate Britain and she's been exploring the continental connections between Hogarth and his fellow artists. Hogarth and Europe runs at Tate Britain from November 3rd to 20th March 2022. Ali Cherri is the National Gallery's new Artist in Residence for 2021. He is also making work inspired by the archives held by Coventry's Herbert Art Gallery and Museum. You can find examples of his work https://www.alicherri.com/ Mary Beard's book is called Twelve Caesars: Images of Power form the Ancient World to the Modern Our playlist of conversations about visual arts includes the 2021 Frieze Discussion with three directors of museums and galleries, an exploration of colour, and Aboriginal artworks on show at the Box Plymouth https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026wnjl Producer: Robyn Read

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 135: Part 2 - Why Jewelers of the 60s and 70s Were Part of the Counterculture—Even if they Didn't Realize It with Jewelry Experts Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 24:57


What you'll learn in this episode: The characteristics that define contemporary American jewelry What narrative art jewelry is, and why it was so prevalent in the 1960s and 70s What defines American counterculture, and why so many 60s and 70s jewelers were a part of it Who the most notable American jewelry artists are and why we need to capture their stories How Susan and Cindi developed their book, and why they hope other people will build on their research About Susan Cummins Susan Cummins has been involved in numerous ways in the visual arts world over the last 35 years, from working in a pottery studio, doing street fairs, running a retail shop called the Firework in Mill Valley and developing the Susan Cummins Gallery into a nationally recognized venue for regional art and contemporary art jewelry. Now she spends most of her time working with a private family foundation called Rotasa and as a board member of both Art Jewelry Forum and California College of the Arts. About Cindi Strauss Cindi Strauss is the Sara and Bill Morgan Curator of Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design and Assistant Director, Programming at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH). She received her BA with honors in art history from Hamilton College and her MA in the history of decorative arts from the Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons School of Design. At the MFAH, Cindi is responsible for the acquisition, research, publication, and exhibition of post-1900 decorative arts, design, and craft. Jewelry is a mainstay of Cindi's curatorial practice. In addition to regularly curating permanent collection installations that include contemporary jewelry from the museum's collection, she has organized several exhibitions that are either devoted solely to jewelry or include jewelry in them. These include: Beyond Ornament: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2003–2004); Ornament as Art: Avant-Garde Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2007); Liquid Lines: Exploring the Language of Contemporary Metal (2011); and Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection (2014). Cindi has authored or contributed to catalogs and journals on jewelry, craft, and design topics, and has been a frequent lecturer at museums nationwide. She also serves on the editorial advisory committee for Metalsmith magazine. Additional Resources:  Museum of Fine Arts Houston Art Jewelry Forum  Photos: Police State Badge 1969/ 2007 sterling silver, 14k gold 2 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 3 15/16 inches Museum of Arts and Design, New York City, 2012.20 Diane Kuhn, 2012 PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Portrait of William Clark in a bubble_2 1971                        photographer: Unknown Necklace for the American Taxpayer 1971 Brass with silver chain  17 " long (for the chain)  and 6.25 x 1.25 " wide for the hanging brass pendant. Collection unknown Dad's Payday 1968 sterling, photograph, fabric, found object 4 ½ x 4 x ¼ inches Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg Photo: Lynn Thompson Title: "Slow Boat" Pendant (Portrait of Ken Cory) Date: 1976 Medium: Enamel, sterling silver, wood, copper, brass, painted stone, pencil, ballpoint pen spring, waxed lacing, Tiger Balm tin, domino Dimensions: 16 3/4 × 4 1/8 × 1 in. (42.5 × 10.4 × 2.5 cm) Helen Williams Drutt Family Collection, USA Snatch Purse 1975 Copper, Enamel, Leather, Beaver Fur, Ermine Tails, Coin Purse 4 ½ x 4 x 3/8” Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg The Good Guys 1966 Walnut, steel, copper, plastic, sterling silver, found objects 101.6 mm diameter Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 1977.2.102'                        PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Fetish Pendant 1966 wood, brass, copper, glass, steel, paper, silver 3 ½ x 3 ½ x 5/8 inches Detroit Institute of Art, Founders Society Purchase with funds from the Modern Decorative Arts Group, Andrew L. and Gayle Shaw Camden Contemporary and Decorative Arts Fund, Jean Sosin, Dr. and Mrs. Roger S. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Danto, Dorothy and Byron Gerson, and Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller / Bridgeman Images November 22, 1963 12:30 p.m. 1967 copper, silver, brass, gold leaf, newspaper photo, walnut, velvet, glass 6 ¼ x 5 x 7/8 inches Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Rose Mary Wadman, 1991.57.1 Front and back covers Pages from the book Transcript: What makes American jewelry American? As Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss discovered while researching their book, In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture, contemporary American jewelry isn't defined by style or materials, but by an attitude of independence and rebellion. Susan, who founded Art Jewelry Forum, and Cindi, who is Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what it was like to interview some of the most influential American artists; why they hope their book will inspire additional research in this field; and why narrative jewelry artists were part of the counterculture, even if they didn't consider themselves to be. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Definitely, it's a history book, but it's not, because you really do get that flavor for who they are or what they were passionate about or what they were trying to express. I'm just curious; how did you distill all of this into counterculture? Was that something that you decided in a brainstorm? You could have come up with a lot of different things. Cindi: I'm going to let Susan to take that, because—and I admit this freely—I had a very specific idea of what the counterculture was and how people slotted into that. Through Susan and Damian, my understanding of the counterculture was broadened in such an incredible way. They really pushed me to open up my mindset and think about it in many different, layered ways, and I have benefited from that dramatically. So, Susan led that. Susan, I'll turn it over to you. Susan: O.K., and I'll try and answer. We had decided to focus on the 60s and 70s and limit it to that time period. That was the counterculture time period, and as I said before, there are so many in the craft world, which I was participating in during that time, that reflect the sensibilities of the counterculture. As we were interviewing these people, what was really interesting is that many of them didn't necessarily think of themselves of part of the counterculture. They thought of themselves as hardworking jewelers that couldn't be part of the counterculture because that was the dropout, don't do anything, take drugs part of the world. But that wasn't really the counterculture.  The counterculture was especially young people who were opposed to the way that people were living their lives. That got really defined in the 50s, which was a very austere, go to work, make money, buy a refrigerator, get a house and even if it was killing you, do this kind of life. They said, “We don't want that. We want a life that feels meaningful to us, that has real value.” In all kinds of different ways, that was what the counterculture consisted of: thinking in a different way about how life could be for us, something that's meaningful, something that you love doing, something that has some consideration of ecology and equal rights and all of the counterwar attitudes reflected in it. That was really what people wanted to do. The counterculture is big and broad.  A lot of people who thought, for example, that Fred Woell was a Boy Scout. If you asked Fred or you saw his papers or you asked his wife, “What kind of car did Fred drive?” A VW van. What kind of food did he eat? Natural foods. Did he build himself a house? Yes, he did, with solar panels on it. He was a counterculture guy. He just looked like a Boy Scout. A lot of the things you learn in the Boy Scouts were actually part of the counterculture, too, the survival skills and all of that. It's a funny thing to say, but I think in the process of writing this book, we convinced a lot of the jewelers we interviewed that they were part of the counterculture even though they hadn't realized it themselves either. Sharon: That's interesting. Did you enter this process thinking that these people were part of the counterculture, or was that something that came to you as put everything together? Susan: I think it was kind of there from the beginning, but not really. I think we discovered it along the way. In fact, I don't think we were thinking about having the word counterculture in the title. I think for a long time we thought it would be “American Jewelry in the 60s and 70s.” I think it was a provocative idea to put counterculture in the title. It might be that it was a bad idea because, as Cindi said, a lot of people have a narrow point of view as to what the counterculture is, but I hope that if anybody decides to pick up the book, they can find a much broader definition, which I think is the real definition. To limit it is not fair to the expression. Sharon: I think the book does broaden the definition. Before reading the book or looking at the book, I entered into it thinking of Sausalito. I grew up on the West Coast, so to me, the counterculture was Sausalito. My family and I drove through there once when I was a young person, so that was the counterculture, or Berkeley was the counterculture. I Googled the word counterculture, and it's interesting because it goes through all different periods of history that were counterculture. It wasn't just the 60s and 70s. Who did you feel it was wrenching to leave out of the book when you had make some decisions? Cindi: Before I would answer that specifically, to give a little more context, there were a number of jewelry artists who were personally active in all the ways we were highlighting in this book, but their jewelry itself didn't reflect that. We had long debates about how to deal with that. Ultimately, for better or for worse, it came down to the fact that at the end of the day, the book was about the jewelry. It was rooted in the actual works of art. There were artists whose jewelry did not reflect their personal lives. With those artists, we were able to include them in the book in terms of quotes and information that helped set the stage and provide information, whether it was about things from their own lives, if they were professors, what was in their program, but their jewelry wasn't necessarily featured. I'm thinking of someone like Eleanor Moty, who was incredibly helpful in terms of the interview that Susan did and being a sounding board, but her jewelry didn't make it into the book pictorially. There were others who were also like that.  I think I wouldn't necessarily call it gut-wrenching, but it was something we struggled with over a period of time, because these were artists who were very active; they were active in shows; they were teaching; they were going to Summervale; they were going to SNAG, some of them, some of them not. For me, Wayne Coulter is probably the big regret. I did an extensive interview with Wayne and his wife, Jan Brooks, and it was a great interview. He was very involved with Summervale, and a lot of his jewelry would have fit pictorially in the book, but we were never quite able to get the images and the materials we needed to include the jewelry. He's included, as is Jan, in terms of quotes and things like that. For me, that would be one that I regret. Sharon: This is not to say anybody's second tier. I don't mean that. Cindi: Oh no, not at all. Sometimes there are practicalities. This is a time when a lot of the artists don't even know, necessarily, where their jewelry from the late 60s or early 70s resides. Maybe they had slides of it, but those slides may not exist, or they may have been completely discolored. There were practical issues that made certain pieces and/or certain artists—we were unable to go as far as we wanted to. Susan, what do you think? Susan: Yeah, I completely agree with all that. I would say that we interviewed a lot of people that didn't get in the book. There was a lot of jewelry that started up right at the very end of the 70s and went into the 80s. We squeaked in a couple of those people, but what you have to think about is that we're showing you or talking about examples of people in various phases. Some people were very political. Some people weren't so political in their work necessarily, but they lived a counterculture lifestyle and participated in counterculture activities, and it shows up in their jewelry but not as strongly as in others. We tried to give a mix of examples of the things we were talking about, but as Cindi said, there were lots of people we interviewed that never showed up in the book. We must have interviewed Laurie Hall, for example, about three times. Her work isn't in the book, but Damian went on to write about her. That book will be coming out in the fall. We acquired an awful lot of information that didn't ever get in the book and people we interviewed that didn't get in the book. You just have to go with the most obvious choices at a certain point and think of them as examples of other people that you could have included, but you didn't. Maybe some people were upset by that, but you do have to make some decisions. As Cindi said, there are certain practical limitations. Sharon: I think I gave a birthday party when I was 13, and I was so traumatized by having to make decisions about the guest list. I always wonder about it, if you make decisions about who to put in and who to leave out. Do you know the name of the book about Laurie Hall? What's it called? Susan: It's called North by Northwest: The Stories of Laurie Hall. Or maybe The Jewelry of Laurie Hall. Sharon: That leads into my next question. Is there going to be a part two or an addition to the book you just wrote, In Flux? There's so much more material. Susan: Definitely, there's more material. Somebody needs to look at African-American jewelers. We barely got to include some aspects of that. Native American jewelers, too, have a whole history that we didn't really cover at all. These things are whole topics unto themselves, really. We hope someone will take up the mantle and find out more about that. There's a huge amount of continuing research. We don't have any plans to do that, so anybody listening can definitely take it up. Go for it. It's up to you. Sharon: It sounds like a great PhD project. Cindi: Yeah, it can be a PhD thesis. There could be a series of articles. It doesn't have to be a big book about something. You could do all whole symposium based on this topic. You started off with a question about our jewelry journey. I think this is and will be, for all of us, an ongoing journey. Susan and Damian have written this book on Laurie Hall. There will be other threads that, either collectively or individually, we'll want to take up in continuing our own journey off of this book, areas that piqued our interest and we'll go from there. As Susan said, we're hoping people will pick up the mantle. One of the things we learned through this process, and it's probably a lesson that should have been obvious to us beforehand, but the field of American jewelry is a young field. For most of its history, there have been dominant narratives. I'm part of that group of people who have helped with those dominant narratives. As a field evolves, you lay down the baseline, then you focus on individual artists, then you go back and start to layer in additional histories in a way that you can actually understand the full field. A lot of the artists we included in In Flux worked on the outskirts of what was previously the dominant narrative. I think as we proved, that doesn't make their work any less significant, influential, etc. from artists who were part of the dominant narrative. It's a phenomenal way for the field to continue to grow. I hope that as more institutions of all types focus on contemporary jewelry, it will engender additional layers of that story which will continue to propel the field forward. Sharon: Cindi, I noticed that when you look the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston website, you've been involved in a lot of online programming and symposia and things I didn't realize. I'm wondering when you're going to have a symposium on this subject. Cindi: It would be terrific. Up to this point, Susan and I have been invited to give talks. We did one with Craft in America last fall. We did with MAD. We've been invited on your jewelry podcast. I'm also going to be speaking for the Seattle Metals Guild Symposium next month. I would love to do a symposium. For me, in order to do a symposium right, it's not just about getting speakers together, which you can do virtually, but it's really about them coming together and having that in-person experience where you can have breakout sessions; you have the conversations in the hallways, all of those kinds of things. I would absolutely love to do that when it's safe to do it, which is not to say that—there are no current plans. I think our virtual talks have been fantastic, but it would be great to gather the tribe, so to speak, to gather people we interviewed for this book, to gather people who are interested and to share a day or two together to dive into this. I hope that can happen. Certainly, the door is open to it. I just think right now we're still figuring out what we can do in person and what we can't. Susan: I know many of those people are quite elderly at this point in time. Even as we were writing the book, people were dying. Cindi: Yeah, Ed Woell died. Ron Hill died, and now Nancy Gordon has died. Susan: Mary Tompkins passed away. Cindi: Mary Tompkins passed away. Several people had already passed away, but this history will not be quite the same unless people go and interview these older makers soon. This is part of the problem: with them dies a huge amount of information. It's impossible to know anything concrete about a jeweler unless you actually talk to them. Anyway, I hope that if people do want to take up this mantle or if they do a symposium, they do it soon, because they may be all gone by the time we get there. Sharon: People do it on Cartier and Renee Beauvois, and they're not around. Susan: They also kept better records and took better photographs. With those wealthy jewelry companies, it's very different than being a unique maker on your own in your little studio. Many of these people weren't even taking photographs of the work at the time necessarily, or if they were, certainly they were not great ones. They just clicked on a photo link on a slide back. This is not the wealthy, recorded advertising world of Cartier. This is a very different world. Cindi: As someone who has done a Cartier exhibition, I can also tell you that it's about the firm and about styles. You don't learn about who the individual designers were of X, Y and Z pieces, but Susan's right. For artists who are listening to this, it is incumbent upon you to document your work. Today, there are obviously tools that artists from the 60s and 70s could not have availed themselves of, which would have made it much easier. So, document your work, keep track of your work and update the way you document it, so that somebody 30 or 40 years from now who is wanting to do something in depth on you is not having to battle with an old technology that nobody knows how to use anymore, which then can make things invaluable. I'm old school. I'm a big believe in paper. I know that is completely against the way the world works, but I am wary. I have experience with recorded, even digital formats, that we don't have the equipment to use anymore; nobody knows how to use it. If you have a paper printout, you're never going to have that problem. I know that this is environmentally incorrect, that everybody's moving towards digital files. I have them myself, but I still like paper because it's what's going to be preserved for history. Sharon: That's very good advice about documenting. It benefits the artist now and makes life easier for those who follow as historians and people who want to look at it academically. Susan and Cindi, thank you so much for being with us today. It was so interesting. Susan, we look forward to your next part, 1A I guess we'll call it. Thank you so much. Susan: Thanks for having us, Sharon. It's been wonderful. Cindi: Thank you, Sharon. Sharon: Delighted to have you. Cindi: Please do let your audiences know that the book is widely available. My plug on all these things is that we know you can buy books from Amazon. Please buy your book from a local independent bookseller, or even better, come to the MFAH's website. You can buy it off of our website, which goes to support our museum's programs.   We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

Down The Garden Path Podcast

In this week's episode of Down the Garden Path, Matt and Joanne welcome horticulturist and author Leslie Halleck. Tune in as they discuss Leslie's latest book, Tiny Plants, and explore the fascinating world of tiny indoor plants, inspiring you to creatively get growing indoors. Leslie began her career in horticulture in 1992, where she worked at and helped run a retail plant nursery while operating her own small gardening business. In December 1998, she started at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden as Curator of Plants, and then Director of Horticulture Research. One of her specific duties included the creation of their nationally recognized plant trials program and gardens, design, and plant selection for all the display gardens, plant collections management, teaching, and website development. In 2000, Leslie launched Halleck Horticultural which she operated in addition to her position at the Dallas Arboretum. For almost a decade, Halleck Horticultural has provided a variety of services to the green industry, including horticultural consulting, marketing, and branding plants and development -- as well as garden center design -- and consulting. Leslie has won multiple awards for writing, creative direction, and marketing from the Turf & Ornamental Communicators Association, including the coveted Gardner Award for Writing in 2017. Don't miss our conversation on tiny plants with author Leslie Halleck. Leslie shared that during an internship in Puerto Rico to study the effects of Hurricane Hugo. she discovered a colony of tiny orchids (Lepanthes rupestris) growing and this led to a lifelong interest in “tiny plants” and inspired her latest book. Tiny Plants are defined as species that are genetically determined to grow under 6 inches. During the show, Leslie breaks down the basic plant classification based on how plants grow and uses that to explain the differences in a variety of “tiny” plants in the book. These classifications help us to determine how to best group these plant types together, and the best way in our indoor environments (e.g., window sills vs grown under glass) The book outlines some great ways to display our tiny plants What is the difference between a terrarium and a cloche? Leslie answers some listener questions about indoor lighting and bonsai and tells us about the Garden Society Project. Where to find Leslie Halleck online: You can order all of her books (Tiny Plants, Gardening Under Lights, Plant Parenting) on her website: www.lesliehalleck.com Twitter: @lesliehalleck Pinterest: lesliehalleck YouTube: lesliehalleck Instagram: @lesliehalleck Each week on Down The Garden Path, professional landscape designers Joanne Shaw and Matthew Dressing discuss down-to-earth tips and advice for your plants, gardens and landscapes. As the owner of Down2Earth Landscape Design, Joanne Shaw has been designing beautiful gardens for homeowners east of Toronto for over a decade. And Matthew Dressing is a horticulturist and landscape designer. He owns Natural Affinity Garden Design, a landscape design and garden maintenance firm servicing Toronto and the Eastern GTA. Together, Joanne and Matthew do their best to bring you interesting, relevant and helpful topics. Their goal is to help you keep your garden as low maintenance as possible.

Ignite Your Life
Ep 224: Lisa Evans - Starting Over at 40

Ignite Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 21:57


Lisa Evans helps leaders to transform their communication with high impact public speaking and business storytelling ability. She is a Public Speaking and Business Storytelling Coach, CEO of Speaking Savvy and the Soft Skills Academy, the Curator of Stories From The Heart, TEDx Speaker Coach, Author, Radio Show Presenter, Improv Actor, and host of Business Chat Podcast.  Lisa's website is: https://www.speakingsavvy.com.au/

Highlights from Moncrieff
The first ghost

Highlights from Moncrieff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 7:53


Curator of Ancient Mesopotamian Script, Languages and Cultures at the Department of the Middle East at the British Museum and Author of 'First Ghosts' Irving Finkel joined Sean on the show to discuss the idea of ghosts.... Listen and subscribe to Moncrieff on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or Spotify.    Download, listen and subscribe on the Newstalk App.     You can also listen to Newstalk live on newstalk.com or on Alexa, by adding the Newstalk skill and asking: 'Alexa, play Newstalk'.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 323 with Brian Benstock & Barbara Majeski - The Power of the Pivot

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 61:39


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Brian Benstock & Barbara Majeski!  Brian Benstock: Keynote Speaker, Google Dealer Advisory Board Member, #1 Honda Certified Dealer 16x and #1 Acura Certified Dealer 15x Barbara Majeski: the “Curator of the Good Life”, Lifestyle blogger, Real Estate Investor, TV personality with regular features on the TODAY show, Inside Edition, Good Day New York and many more! 

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 135: Part 1 - Why Jewelers of the 60s and 70s Were Part of the Counterculture—Even if they Didn't Realize It with Jewelry Experts Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 26:30


What you'll learn in this episode: The characteristics that define contemporary American jewelry What narrative art jewelry is, and why it was so prevalent in the 1960s and 70s What defines American counterculture, and why so many 60s and 70s jewelers were a part of it Who the most notable American jewelry artists are and why we need to capture their stories How Susan and Cindi developed their book, and why they hope other people will build on their research About Susan Cummins Susan Cummins has been involved in numerous ways in the visual arts world over the last 35 years, from working in a pottery studio, doing street fairs, running a retail shop called the Firework in Mill Valley and developing the Susan Cummins Gallery into a nationally recognized venue for regional art and contemporary art jewelry. Now she spends most of her time working with a private family foundation called Rotasa and as a board member of both Art Jewelry Forum and California College of the Arts. About Cindi Strauss Cindi Strauss is the Sara and Bill Morgan Curator of Decorative Arts, Craft, and Design and Assistant Director, Programming at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFAH). She received her BA with honors in art history from Hamilton College and her MA in the history of decorative arts from the Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons School of Design. At the MFAH, Cindi is responsible for the acquisition, research, publication, and exhibition of post-1900 decorative arts, design, and craft. Jewelry is a mainstay of Cindi's curatorial practice. In addition to regularly curating permanent collection installations that include contemporary jewelry from the museum's collection, she has organized several exhibitions that are either devoted solely to jewelry or include jewelry in them. These include: Beyond Ornament: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2003–2004); Ornament as Art: Avant-Garde Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection (2007); Liquid Lines: Exploring the Language of Contemporary Metal (2011); and Beyond Craft: Decorative Arts from the Leatrice S. and Melvin B. Eagle Collection (2014). Cindi has authored or contributed to catalogs and journals on jewelry, craft, and design topics, and has been a frequent lecturer at museums nationwide. She also serves on the editorial advisory committee for Metalsmith magazine. Additional Resources:  Museum of Fine Arts Houston Art Jewelry Forum  Photos: Police State Badge 1969/ 2007 sterling silver, 14k gold 2 7/8 x 2 15/16 x 3 15/16 inches Museum of Arts and Design, New York City, 2012.20 Diane Kuhn, 2012 PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Portrait of William Clark in a bubble_2 1971                        photographer: Unknown Necklace for the American Taxpayer 1971 Brass with silver chain  17 " long (for the chain)  and 6.25 x 1.25 " wide for the hanging brass pendant. Collection unknown Dad's Payday 1968 sterling, photograph, fabric, found object 4 ½ x 4 x ¼ inches Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg Photo: Lynn Thompson Title: "Slow Boat" Pendant (Portrait of Ken Cory) Date: 1976 Medium: Enamel, sterling silver, wood, copper, brass, painted stone, pencil, ballpoint pen spring, waxed lacing, Tiger Balm tin, domino Dimensions: 16 3/4 × 4 1/8 × 1 in. (42.5 × 10.4 × 2.5 cm) Helen Williams Drutt Family Collection, USA Snatch Purse 1975 Copper, Enamel, Leather, Beaver Fur, Ermine Tails, Coin Purse 4 ½ x 4 x 3/8” Merrily Tompkins Estate, Ellensburg The Good Guys 1966 Walnut, steel, copper, plastic, sterling silver, found objects 101.6 mm diameter Museum of Arts and Design, NYC, 1977.2.102'                        PHOTO: John Bigelow Taylor, 2008 Fetish Pendant 1966 wood, brass, copper, glass, steel, paper, silver 3 ½ x 3 ½ x 5/8 inches Detroit Institute of Art, Founders Society Purchase with funds from the Modern Decorative Arts Group, Andrew L. and Gayle Shaw Camden Contemporary and Decorative Arts Fund, Jean Sosin, Dr. and Mrs. Roger S. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Danto, Dorothy and Byron Gerson, and Dr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller / Bridgeman Images November 22, 1963 12:30 p.m. 1967 copper, silver, brass, gold leaf, newspaper photo, walnut, velvet, glass 6 ¼ x 5 x 7/8 inches Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of Rose Mary Wadman, 1991.57.1 Front and back covers Pages from the book Transcript: What makes American jewelry American? As Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss discovered while researching their book, In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture, contemporary American jewelry isn't defined by style or materials, but by an attitude of independence and rebellion. Susan, who founded Art Jewelry Forum, and Cindi, who is Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about what it was like to interview some of the most influential American artists; why they hope their book will inspire additional research in this field; and why narrative jewelry artists were part of the counterculture, even if they didn't consider themselves to be. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guests are Susan Cummins and Cindi Strauss, who, along with Damian Skinner, are the co-authors of In Flux: American Jewelry and the Counterculture. Susan is the founder of Art Jewelry Forum and for several decades drove the organization. Cindi Strauss is the Curator of Decorative Arts, Crafts and Design at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. Susan and Cindi, welcome to the program. Susan: Thank you. Cindi: Thank you for having us, Sharon. Sharon: So glad to have you. Can you each give us a brief outline of your jewelry journey? Susan, do you want to start? Susan: Sure. My journey started in the 80s. I had a gallery in Mill Valley, California. I was showing various crafts, ceramics mostly, and a bit of glass, fiber, a whole grouping, and then I decided I should show jewelry. I don't really know why, because I didn't wear jewelry, but it sounded like a good idea. I started showing it, and I was very impressed with how smart and incredibly skilled the artists were. I continued to show that, and the gallery became known for showing jewelry. In 1997, I still had the gallery, and I decided along with numerous other craft groups that we should start an organization that represented the collectors of jewelry. I started Art Jewelry Forum with the help of several other people, of course. That has continued onto today, surprisingly enough, and it now includes not only collectors, curators and gallerists, but also artists and everybody who's interested in contemporary art jewelry. Sharon: It's an international organization. Susan: Yes, it's an international organization. It has a website with a lot of articles. We plan all kinds of things like trips to encourage people to get to know more about the field. I also was part of a funding organization, shall we say, a small private fund called Rotasa, and years ago we funded exhibitions and catalogues. That switched into funding specific things that I was working on instead of accepting things from other people. I've been very interested in publishing and doing research about this field because I feel that will give it more value and legitimacy. It needs to be researched. So, that's one of the reasons why this book came into being as well as Flocks' book. It really talks about the beginnings of American contemporary jewelry in the 60s and 70s. That's my beginning to current interest in jewelry. Sharon: I just wanted to say that people can find a lot more if they visit the Art Jewelry Forum website. We'll have links to everything we talk about on the show. Cindi? Cindi: Sure. My jewelry journey was surprising and happened all at once. The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, had no contemporary jewelry in its collection until 2000, when we acquired an Art Smith necklace from 1948. That was my first real knowledge of post-Arts and Crafts jewelry and post-Mid-Century, people like Harry Bertoia. That led me to Toni Greenbaum's Messengers of Modernism catalogue, a fantastic resource for American jewelry from the 30s through the 50s. It opened a whole new field for me, and I started to think about how we should focus on some modern jewelry from that period to expand on the Art Smith necklace, because that Mid-Century design was a specialty of the institution.  Truly, I would say my life changed in respect to jewelry for the better in every way I could explain. When the museum acquired, in 2002, Helen Williams Drutt's private collection of artist-made contemporary jewelry, dating from 1963 to 2002 at the time of the acquisition, in one fell swoop, we acquired 804 pieces of international jewelry as well as sketchbooks and drawings and research materials. We began to build an extensive library. Helen opened her archives and we had recordings of artist interviews. It was just going from zero to sixty in three seconds and it was extraordinary. It was a field I knew really nothing about, so I was on a very steep learning curve. So many people in the field, from the artists to other curators to collectors—this is how I met Susan—were so generous to me in terms of being resources. The story about how the acquisition happened is familiar to probably many of your audience, so I'll keep it brief, which is to say that there was an exhibition of Gijs Bakker's jewelry that Helen organized for the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft. Sharon: Cindi, I'm going to interrupt you for a minute because a lot of people listening will not have heard of Gijs Bakker. Cindi: Sure. Gijs Bakker, one of the most prominent Dutch artists, began his career in the 1960s, along with wife, Emmy van Leersum, and was part of the group of Dutch jewelry artists who revolutionized the concept of contemporary jewelry using alter-native materials. They created a lot of photo-based work challenging the value system of jewelry and also challenging wearability. It was his photo-based work that was shown in a small exhibition at the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft in March 2002 as part of a citywide festival called Photofest, which is all photography-based work. It was through that exhibition, at the opening weekend—that's how I met Helen. I said to her, “This is something I don't know anything about. I'm interested in exploring it. I'm starting to build a collection for the museum. Could we meet and have coffee and talk?” So we met, and I peppered her with a lot of questions and said, “Could I call on you for advice in terms of building a collection?” Of course, at this time she had the gallery, and she said, “Well, you know, I have a collection,” and I said, “Yes, I know, and I understand it's going to the Philadelphia Museum of Art,” her hometown museum. She said, “Not necessarily. We haven't had any formal talks about that.” So, one thing led to another, and six months later, we signed papers to acquire the collection. That set me off on my initial five-year journey, which resulted in the exhibition and catalogue “Ornament as Art: Contemporary Jewelry from the Helen Williams Drutt Collection” that opened in Houston and traveled to Washington, D.C., to Charlotte, North Carolina, and to Tacoma, Washington. After that point, I felt that I was really steeped in the field. I have, since that point, been adding works to the collection. It was always going to be a long-term commitment and journey for the museum. We have works installed all over the museum in relationship to other contemporary art, whether it's photography, prints and drawings, sculpture, painting. We also have a robust presentation of jewelry in our departments' galleries. It is an ongoing journey, just like with Susan. It's a journey that never ends, happily. There are always new artists to discover and new ideas. Part of that is our meeting of the mind, if you will, and then with Damian, is what resulted in this book. Sharon: How did you come to write the book? Susan, you started to mention it. The research in this is jaw-dropping. How did you decide to write the book? Why this particular period, the two of you? Susan: We decided to write the book because I was wondering what's American about American jewelry. Europeans have done a lot of research and writing about their beginnings, but I didn't see a document or a book that really talked about the American origins. As Cindi mentioned, Gijs Bakker started in the 60s. So did American contemporary jewelry, but it's a very different story than the European one. We wanted to talk to the people who are still alive now, so we did tons of interviews for the book. We specifically concentrated on the pioneers who were responding to the political and social events of the time. In other words, we were investigating those artists who were considered narrative artists, because that was the defining feature of American art to those out of the country. We wanted to discover who was making this work and what were they saying in their narrative, so really answering “What was American about American jewelry?” We did tons of research through old documents of the American Crafts Library. We went all over the country and interviewed, and it was about a five-year-long process to get this point. The book is incredibly condensed. You can feel that there's a lot there, but it took a lot to condense it down to that.  Really, what we hope is that it's an easy-to-read story about the stories that jewelers were telling at the time, which was the origin of all that's come down to us now. It was the beginning of the development of university programs in the country. They just were in the process of expanding them, and people were learning how to make things. Nobody had a lot of skills in this country, so everybody had to learn how to make things. There were a lot of alternative ways of passing around information. The counterculture, we regarded that not as hippies per se, although hippies were part of it, but also a lot about the political and social issues of the time and how people responded to them. The ethos of the time, the values that people developed really became part of the craft counterculture itself. The craft field is based on a lot of those ways of working in the world, a sort of hope and trying to create a new society that had more values than the 50s had aspired to for each individual. People were trying to find ways to have valuable lives, and doing something like making something yourself and selling it at a craft fair became a wonderful alternative for many people who had the skill to do that. That was a very different way of having a life, shall we say, and that's how American jewelry developed: with those values and skills. I still see remnants of it in the current field. That's my focus. Cindi, do you have some things you want to add to that? Cindi: Yeah, the larger public's ideas and thoughts about American jewelry from that period were rooted in a history and an aesthetic that emerged largely on the East Coast, but certainly spread, as Susan said, with the development of university programs. That was an aesthetic that was largely rooted in the organic modernism of Scandinavian influence, as well as what had come before in America in terms of modernist studio jewelry. There's a history there in the narrative, and that narrative played out in early exhibitions. It played out in the first SNAG exhibition in 1970 in St. Paul, which is considered one of those milestones of the early American studio jewelry movement.  Now, we knew that there were artists like Fred Woell, Don Tompkins, Ken Cory, Merrily Tompkins, who were on the West Coast and working in a different vein, as Susan said, a narrative vein, and who were often working with assemblage techniques and found materials and were making commentary on issues of the day. Within the accepted history of that period, they were a minority, with the exception of Fred Woell and really Ken Cory. Their work was not as widely known, as widely collected, as widely understood. Damian and Susan and I started after we thought, as Susan said, “What is American about American jewelry?”  Fred Woell was an artist who immediately came to mind as embodying a certain type of Americanness. We had an extraordinary trip to visit with Fred's widow, Pat Wheeler, and to the see the studio and go through some of his papers. When we went, we thought we would be doing a monograph on Fred Woell. It was on that trip that we understood that it was a much larger project, and it was one that would encompass many more artists. As part of our research, there were certain artists who were known to us, and our hope was that we would rediscover artists who were working intently during that period who had been lost to history for whatever reason. There were also artists whose work we were able to reframe for the reasons that Susan mentioned: because of their lifestyle, their belief system, the way they addressed or responded to major issues during the day. So, we started developing these list of artists. I think what readers will find in the book is looking at some of the well-known artists, perhaps more in depth and in a new frame of analysis, but also learning about a plethora of other artists. For us, it was five years of intense work. There's a tremendous amount of research that has gone into this book, and from what we've been hearing, it has enlightened people about a period. It's not an alternative history, but it is an additional history. We hope it will inspire people to pick up the mantle and go forth because, of course, one has constraints in terms of word counts for publishing. At a certain point, you have to get down to the business of writing and stop the research, but there are so many threads that we hope other scholars, curators, students, interested parties will pick up and carry forth. In some ways we were able to go in depth, and in other ways we were able to just scratch the surface of what has been a fascinating topic for all of us. Sharon: I have a lot of questions, but first, I just wanted to mention that SNAG is the Society of North American Goldsmiths, in case people don't know. Can you explain, Susan or Cindi, what narrative jewelry is? Cindi: There's no one definition. Everybody would describe it a little bit differently, but I think a basic definition is jewelry that tells a story, that uses pictorial elements to tell a story. Whatever that story is can range from the personal to the public, to, in our case, responding to things like the Vietnam War, politics, etc. Susan, do you want to add to that? Susan: It's a very difficult thing to do when you think about. Narratives usually have a storyline from this point to that point to the next point. Here's a jeweler trying to put a storyline into one object, one piece. It is tricky to bring enough imagery that's accessible to the viewer together into one piece to allow the viewer to make up the story that this is about or the comment it's trying to make. You have to be very skilled and smart to make really good narrative jewelry. Sharon: It sounds like it would be, yes. When you realized what this book was going to entail—it sounds like you didn't start out thinking this was going to be such a deep dive—were you excited, or were you more like, “I think I'd probably rather run in the other direction and say, ‘Forget it; I can't do it'”? Susan: I don't think at any point did we stop and think, “Oh, this is a gigantic project.” We just thought, “Let's see. This person's interesting; O.K., let's talk to this person. Oh, gosh, they said these about this other person. Let's talk to them.” You just go step by step. I don't think, at any point, did any of us realize how vast a project this was until the end, probably. Cindi: Yeah, I would say because it happened incrementally, deep dive led to another and another. We would have regular meetings not only over Skype, but we would get together in person, the three of us, for these intense days in which we would talk about—we each had different areas we were focusing on. We'd bring our research together and that would lead to questions: “Should we explore this avenue?” Then someone would go and explore this avenue and come back, and we would think, “Maybe that wasn't as interesting as we thought it was going to be,” or maybe it was far more interesting than we thought, so it spun out a number of different avenues of research.  At a certain point, we started looking at the most important threads that were coming out and we were able to organize them as umbrellas, and then look at subthemes and think about the artists. It became like a puzzle. We had pockets of deep research, whether it was the in-person artist interviews or whether it was the archival research that was done, whether it was the general research. Damian and I were not alive during this time. Susan was, which was fantastic because I learned a lot about this in history class and school. Damian is a New Zealander, so he was coming at it from an international perspective. There was a lot of reading he did about American history, but Susan was the one gave us all the first-person accounts in addition to the artists. She participated in the American Craft Council Craft Fairs and was able to balance the sometimes emotionless history books with the first-person experiences that made it come alive. I think that's what you see throughout the book. It was important to us that the book would be readable, but it was also important to us that it would have a flavor of the times. When you do oral history interviews, there are many different kinds of questions that can be asked. We set out to talk not only about the jewelry that artists were making, but their lives, what was important to them, how they felt. The richness of experiences and emotions that came out in those interviews really inflected the book with feeling like you were there and a part of what these artists were thinking. This is a 2 part episode please subscribe so you can get part 2 as soon as its released later this week. 

MexiCan
EP13-Educating, promoting, and celebrating Mexican culture through the arts and culture field. A conversation with Cesareo Moreno Curator and Visual Arts Director of the National Museum of Mexican Art

MexiCan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 51:36


Join our conversation with Curator and Visual Arts Director of the first Latino museum accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, The National Museum of Mexican Art. Mr. Cesareo Moreno will explain his experiences and his passion in the Education, preservation and celebration of the Mexican culture on both sides of the US-Mex border. He shares with us the amazing experience of having our First Lady, Dr. Jill Biden visit the museum and all the work that came with her extraordinary visit as part of the Three-City Tour in observance of Latino Heritage Month. Find out all the great things The National Museum of Mexican Art has to offer. Website: https://nationalmuseumofmexicanart.org/contact To contact your host Angie Nieto, email us at: MexiCanpodcast21@gmail.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/angie-nieto9/message

Other Record Labels
Case Studies: Nice Guys on Being a Curator

Other Record Labels

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 5:30


Welcome to our monthly series called, Record Label Case Studies, where we take a look at indie record labels who are doing inspiring things, and what we can learn from them! Our third Case Study is with Nice Guys, as we look at this Trojan horse record label... Learn more and get free resources for indie record labels at http://otherrecordlabels.com  

The Drunken Odyssey with John King: A Podcast About the Writing Life
496: TDO vs. The Curator of Schlock #9 (Tokyo Gore Police)

The Drunken Odyssey with John King: A Podcast About the Writing Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 53:53


On this week's show, Jeff Shuster and I discuss the sensitive contribution to cinema that is Tokyo Gore Police. TEXTS DISCUSSED NOTES TDO listeners can get 20% of a premium subscription to Scribophile. After using the above link to register for a basic account, go herewhile still logged in to upgrade the account with the discount. Check out my literary adventure novel, Guy Psycho and the Ziggurat of Shame. Episode 496 of The Drunken Odyssey, your favorite podcast about creative writing and literature is available on Apple podcasts, stitcher, spotify, or click here to stream (right click to download, if that's your thing).

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives
The Cosmic Curator 10/30/21: Astrology update for the week ahead

WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 4:55


This is your Cosmic Curator, Tom Yaroschuk, with a look at what's up in the stars for today Saturday October 30th… and the week ahead. The cosmic spotlight this week is shining right and bright on Libra… About the Host: Tom Yaroschuk is a Vedic Astrologer. His intention is to help people understand their karma and the issues they may confront to cultivate more fulfilling lives. Tom is writing a memoir of the spiritual lessons derived from his work in a Homeless Day Center in between a career as an award winning television and documentary producer. The post The Cosmic Curator 10/30/21: Astrology update for the week ahead first appeared on WERU 89.9 FM Blue Hill, Maine Local News and Public Affairs Archives.

the Fallout Feed
the Fallout Feed #335 Halloween Spooktacular 2021

the Fallout Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 114:59


Good evening and welcome to the Fallout Feed Halloween Spooktacular. Tonight we will venture on a quest so vile, so evil, that listener's dare not proceed. You will hear tales of monsters, despair, depravity so torturous, suicide, cannibalism, mutated murder and transformations ghoulish enough to poison the very soul of all who are brave enough to tread further. Join us… if you dare!    SPECIAL thanks to: Eerie Eric from Tapes from the Wastes show, Lurid Lawrence from the Modus Files show (with Vicious Vitriol as Bethany), Scary Saira Vosslesauce - our former host, Creepy Clint from the Roundtable, Crazy Casey the Curator of Spooky Haiku, the Spooky Space CannaBaker, Rancid Ray's Tasty Treats, Jack O' Lantern Jess, & Evil Andrew.Fallout 76 Worlds RandomizerThis episode of the Fallout Feed is brought to you by Tragically Optimistic. For Fallout Feed Merchandise please visit the Tragically Optimistic store here:https://optimistic.threadless.com/collections/asapodcasting-showsButcher, Baker, Candle Maker in Spaaaace!https://twitter.com/bbcisssDames who Gamehttps://twitter.com/dameswhogameJoin in the Roundtable Fun with our Character Generators!Fallout 76:https://tinyurl.com/F76GeneratorFallout 4:https://tinyurl.com/Fallout4GeneratorFallout New Vegas:https://tinyurl.com/NewVegasGeneratorFallout 3:https://tinyurl.com/F3GeneratorFallout Feed Friends List:tinyurl.com/FFFriendsListASA Let's Play: Fallout 3http://www.buzzsprout.com/139361DONATE:  https://fightcf.cff.org/site/TR/?fr_id=7889&pg=team&team_id=90760Shop:  optimistic.threadless.com/collections/asapodcasting-showsPatreon:  https://www.patreon.com/asapodcastingEmail: thefalloutfeed@gmail.comWeb: http://www.asapodcasting.com/#/the-fallout-feed/Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheFalloutFeedFB: facebook.com/groups/askyrimaddictpodcastSupport the show (http://patreon.com/asapodcasting)

All Ways West Seattle
Spirit Returns 2.0: History Comes Home

All Ways West Seattle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 17:23


Spirit Returns 2.0 A Duwamish and Settler Story is a revival exhibit being presented by two West Seattle cultural institutions in their respective locations with refreshed perspectives. We talk with Jolene Haas, Director of the Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural Center, and Maggie Kase, Curator for the Southwest Seattle Historical Society's Log House Museum about these two explorations into our shared local history and what they say about our past, present, and future. https://www.duwamishtribe.org/ https://www.loghousemuseum.org/ Plus, upcoming November events from West Seattle Blog! https://westseattleblog.com/ Follow All Ways West Seattle on Instagram & Facebook @allwayspodcast All Ways West Seattle is a Made With Bacon production, all rights reserved.

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
Cartoon curator turned detective to solve a cartoon conundrum

RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 5:44


How do you track a cartoon? Sam Orchard is the Assistant Curator of Cartoons and Comics at The National Library of Aotearoa and he was presented with a conundrum. He talks to Jesse about turning into a cartoon detective to solve the mystery that arrived in his emails!

Plant-Strong
Ep. 116: PLANTSTRONG Snackables - The Easiest Way to Eat and Live PLANTSTRONG

Plant-Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 37:25


Welcome to PLANTSTRONG Snackables, a bite-sized podcast where host, Rip Esselstyn dishws on all things plants! Today's guest is Ami Mackey, longtime PLANTSTRONG Team Member, Rescue10x Coach, and Curator of Creative Content. As a health coach, Ami has heard every reason and excuse for not being able to sustain a plantstrong lifestyle: it's too expensive, it's too complicated, you can't cook, you don't like to follow recipes, you don't have the time. Today's episode outlines a lifestyle habit that is faster than a drive-through and, without a doubt, the easiest (and tastiest) way to eat and live PLANTSTRONG. What is this magic bullet? BOWL BUILDING! If you've ever been to a salad bar, Chipotle, or even Subway, you already know the premise. Gather all of your favorite beans, grains, and greens, toss them in a bowl, add your favorite sparks, and enjoy your favorite meal - no measuring, no recipes, and no hassle. In no time, you'll have a gigantic bowl of your own creative PLANTSTRONG concoctions! Episode Resources Watch the Episode on YouTube Visit the Episode Page for Resources and Materials Click here for all PLANTSTRONG Resources, including books, recipes, and Rescue 10x Program Join the PLANTSTRONG Community

Doctor Who: Discussing Who
Episode 256: Review of The Day of the Doctor

Doctor Who: Discussing Who

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 78:33


Join us as we celebrate the Doctor Who 50th anniversary special. What happens when the Doctor's past and futures collide at one very significant moment?  (See what I did there?!) It's the day the Doctor has been running from all their lives. It's The Day of the Doctor! What did we think of the story? Find out as we review The Day of the Doctor, the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary special. What did you think of this episode? Let us know by connecting with us on social media. Just look for @DiscussingWho. The Discussing Network proudly presents Discussing Who Episode 256.  Hosted by Kyle Jones, Clarence Brown, Lee Shackleford, and Shannon Perry.

Built To Go! A #Vanlife Podcast
097a A Week Off, Pantophobia

Built To Go! A #Vanlife Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 25:22


Apologies, but I need to take a week off and focus on some other things. I'll be back next week with more #vanlife goodness! In the meantime, you may be interested in this episode of Pantophobia, a podcast I produced a few years ago, that deals with people's fears and how they overcome them.  See you next week! Averil is afraid of stepping on fish—especially fish that jump out of aquariums unexpectedly. It happened to her sister-in-law once! Pantophobia Main Page Hosts: Jeff Wagg Jeff is the Curator of the College of Curiosity. He spends his days looking for curious people, things and points of view to share through words, audio and travel. You can reach him at jeff@collegeofcuriosity.com. Aubrey Henretty Aubrey is a writer and storyteller in Chicago. She has a lot of questions. You can reach her at aubrey@collegeofcuriosity.com. Mark Graunke Mark is a pipefitter by trade and a mystery seeker by inclination. His hobbies include challenging his own fears and anxieties. You can reach him at mark@collegeofcuriosity.com. Meijer, the grocery store chain with aquariums: Meijer. Herald Times Reporter (Manitowoc) article about dead fish on the beach: Huge alewife die-off a sign of life for the lake.   Credits: Thanks to Averil for sharing her story with us. Logo design by Beth Voigt. Produced with Audacity for Mac.

Third Pod from the Sun
Staff Picks: Mythical monsters & their real-life inspirations (Part 2)

Third Pod from the Sun

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 34:21


We've all heard stories about fantastical creatures that people swear they've seen and have evidence of but can never be confirmed. Think Bigfoot or the Loch Ness monster. Mermaids or the Kraken. While there's no evidence backing the existence of these creatures, either in present day or at any point in the past, there must be a reason why such legends were created in the first place. In most cases, the legend in grounded in fact.While Third Pod is on break, during this Halloween season we're bringing you four stories from scientists who know a little something about the real-life animals that inspired these legendary creatures. In this episode, the second in a two-part series, we chatted with Rodrigo Salvador, Curator of Invertebrates at the Museum of New Zealand, about the connections between giant squids and the Kraken, and Danielle J. Serratos, Director/Curator of the Fundy Geological Museum, about the links between prehistoric aquatic reptiles and the Loch Ness monster, respectively.This episode was produced and mixed by Shane M Hanlon.

Sopi Mix
Sincerely, Carolina: Countdown to a better Aruba

Sopi Mix

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 62:14


Sincerely, Carolina: Countdown to a better Aruba Guests: Oriana Wouters, Beleidsmedewerker - Directie Natuuur en Milieu &Julisa Arends-Hoevertsz, Curator & Co- Organizer TEDxOranjestad CountdownGIVEAWAYS Tune in y participa pa gana awesome giveaways Futuro plannan pa haci Aruba uno mas sostenibelBo tin algun pregunta specifico? Haci esaki den e comments!Sincerely,Carolina  Carolina Thiel-SpanSincerely, Carolina is powered by Sopi Mix Studio , Lindy Boutique , Always, Proframe Aruba , Gelatissimo Palm Beach , Paper Sisters & Aveeno Swift Distribution Aruba .SUBSCRIBE should have https://podcasts.apple.com/.../sopi-mix-studio/id1528240591.Youtube:https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6hdK2fjB855fyA_4u8YWAgSpotify:https://open.spotify.com/show/5UWWwdbYGgFQyXJZEO1r9d...Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/sopimix)

Dancers Doing Stuff
201 | Porshia Derival & Yvonne Chow on H+| The Hip-Hop Dance Conservatory, Dance Mart, and Not Hiding Your Magic!

Dancers Doing Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 60:59


Hello! Today I'm talking to Porshia Derival & Yvonne Chowwhile while making a three way creature drawing! Porshia Derival is the Executive Director of H+ | The Hip-Hop Dance Conservatory. Growing up in Long Island, her journey in hip-hop dance started as a teenager at her local dance studio. In 2013, Porshia ushered in a new era of Dance Sustainability® for H+ at the historic You Belong Here.® Launch Party hosted at the adidas originals store where she was the voice behind the company's next 20-year prospectus. Ever since, Porshia has keenly directed the organization's creative partnerships with top brands spanning a variety of industries, from Pastry Dance Sneakers in footwear and apparel, CORE Hydration in commercial drinks, Chipotle Mexican Grill and Shake Shack in dining, to MAC and Christian Dior in beauty and wellness, and many more. In 2013, Porshia was also appointed as Demi-Soloist of H+ | Theatre of the Mind® {TOTEM®}'s Repertory Company and has since taken on infamous characters such as “Black Barbie.” As the Executive Director, Porshia continues to be the keeper of the Kindness Capital Champions®, the elite chamber of donors and sponsors that graciously fuel the pro-bono services H+ offers to dancers to date: DanceMart®, SPA®, MEDIC®, and Pimp My Style®. Yvonne H. Chow is a 1st generation Chinese American woman from the Bay Area, CA. She moved to NYC to pursue a profession in Hip-Hop Dance and has been training at H+ | The Hip-Hop Dance Conservatory via The BLADE Dance Technique® (S. Thomas, 1995) for over a decade under the mentorship and tutelage of H+ | Founder & Artistic Director Safi A. Thomas. She now serves as the Director of Operations, Education Director, Curator of Works, and Principal Dancer of H+. She works towards Dance Sustainability® daily by cultivating the the NGO's Special Consultative Status at the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations. She also provides experienced oversight of the 30+ programmatic elements/community initiatives aimed at the majority of the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for dancers and artists. Follow Porshia Derival & Yvonne Chow on instagram @porshiaderival @yvonnehchow and don't forget to check out H+ @hiphopdanceconservatory and check out their website https://www.hdcny.org ________________________________ The Patreon is officially live! Check it out here https://www.patreon.com/essentiallyhaley Don't forget to create your profile on Arts Wrk using my special link (and then I might get a prize!) and definitly add me as a connection once you have your profile set up! https://artswrk.com/join/HaleyGrove

Microsoft Libraries and Museums Podcast
Minecraft at the Hans Christian Andersen House

Microsoft Libraries and Museums Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 22:23


"Anyone who has read Andersen's fairytales knows that Andersen fairytales is not about ending up with facts. It's about ending up with a sense of wonderment and it's about the play that goes on...so we wanted to create a place that that was much more telling the story like Andersen." The Hans Christian Andersen House in Odense, Denmark, just reopened over a five year renovation. In addition to creating a space that reflects the playful nature of fairytales, the museum has also created a Minecraft world for students based on the story of Thumbelina. In this episode, Henrik Lubker, Creative Director, Mette Videl Kiilerich, Curator of Education, and Adam Clarke, Minecraft mapmaker and consultant, share their process for creating the experience. Plus, commentary by Microsoft's Catherine Devine.

Inspiring Living with Mark Candelaria
At the High Point Market with Collector's House Jamilyn Fournier

Inspiring Living with Mark Candelaria

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 43:34


For today's podcast episode we are recording from the Alfanso Marina Showroom in Greensboro, NC during the annual High Point Furniture Market. It was so much fun to see all these showrooms and mingle with others in the design field from all over the country! Our guest today is Jamilyn Fournier, Founder and Curator for The Collector's House, a beautiful design studio and store in Scottsdale, AZ. We discuss much more than design in this episode, we are going to dive deep into Jamilyn's life journey, her inner work, taking risks and starting an interiors business.Connect with Jamilyn: Website: www.shopthecollectorshouse.biz/ Instagram: instagram.com/thecollectorshouse/ Facebook: facebook.com/thecollectorshouseaz For photos, links and more on Matt Gottesman and our other podcast guests, visit our official Podcast Page: www.candelariadesign.com/inspiring-living-podcast Join us at the Phoenix Home & Garden Fall Home Tour Nov 13, where I will be serving Paella at our featured VIP home: phoenix-home-garden-home-tour-tickets

The Drunken Odyssey with John King: A Podcast About the Writing Life
495: TDO vs. The Curator of Schlock #8 (Repo! The Genetic Opera)

The Drunken Odyssey with John King: A Podcast About the Writing Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 62:04


On this week's show, Jeff Shuster and I discuss Repo! The Genetic Opera!

The Rest Is History
110. History of India in 10 Buildings

The Rest Is History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:50


Curator and art historian Aparna Andhare gives Tom and Dominic her selection of the ten buildings that best illustrate India's past 4,500 years. Ranging from Mohenjo-daro to Narendra Modi, all the Subcontinent's history is here.A Goalhanger Films & Left Peg Media productionProduced by Joey McCarthyExec Producer Tony PastorTwitter:@TheRestHistory@holland_tom@dcsandbrookEmail: restishistorypod@gmail.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dressed: The History of Fashion
Biba, an interview with Barbara Hulanicki and Martin Pel

Dressed: The History of Fashion

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 64:17


Biba = every cool kid's dream! This week we welcome legendary designer Barbara Hulanicki and Martin Pel, Curator of the 2012 exhibition Biba and Beyond. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 235 with Barbara Majeski - Judgement

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 31:53


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Barbara Majeski, the “Curator of the Good Life”, Lifestyle blogger, Real Estate Investor, TV personality with regular features on the TODAY show, Inside Edition, Good Day New York and many more!