Podcasts about Appalachian

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,894PODCASTS
  • 4,311EPISODES
  • 51mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 11, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Appalachian

Show all podcasts related to appalachian

Latest podcast episodes about Appalachian

Morning Shift Podcast
Which States Are Truly In The Midwest?

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 12:20


It's an expansive region, stretching from the Appalachian foothills to the Great Plains. But the exact states are up for debate. Reset settles the debate with listeners and a data columnist working to define regions in the U.S. using Airbnb data.

Beekeeping at Five Apple Farm Podcast
Bee Radio Reader: Combining Hives Early for Fall (103)

Beekeeping at Five Apple Farm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 27:59 Very Popular


Bee Radio Reader: Combining Hives Early for Fall (103) Reading from "Practical Mergers: Do It Soon" by Zachary Lamas, August 2020, by permission of Bee Culture Magazine.  -- Please become a "Friend of the Podcast" on Patreon and join the folks who make the podcasts possible! In addition to huge gratitude, you get:   • BONUS podcasts and early access episodes • Access to Patreon blog posts including tips and videos • Special Q&A posts to ask me questions about YOUR bees • Input on the podcast topics • Shout-outs on the show because I appreciate you!    If you can support the show with $3 a month or more, please sign up today: https://www.patreon.com/fiveapple -- About Beekeeping at Five Apple Farm: Leigh keeps bees in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. She cares for around a dozen-ish hives in a rural Appalachian forest climate. Colonies are managed for bee health with active selection for vigor, genetic diversity and disease resistance, but without chemical treatments. The apiary is self-sustaining (not needing to buy/catch replacement bees since 2010) and produces honey and nucs most every year.   

6-minute Stories
"Firkins" by Rosemary V. James

6-minute Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 8:08


Rosemary V. James currently resides in Richmond, Kentucky. A retired Occupational Therapist, her pride in life are her eight grandchildren. She is a proud Appalachian woman raised in Estill County, Kentucky. Rosemary began writing in 2019 after the passing of her husband, attending the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning in Lexington, Kentucky. Where she is currently completing the Author Academy 2021-2022, writing a socially informed memoir on child abuse and domestic violence's impact across one's lifespan. Her essay “Fly On” can be found on the online grief site opentohope.com.

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Girls Gone Gravel - Kathryn Taylor

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 44:48 Very Popular


This week on the podcast, Randall sits down with Kathryn Taylor, co-host of the Girls Gone Gravel Podcast and Chief of Staff at Feisty Media. Looking at inclusion in the sport of gravel cycling and how Feisty Media is looking to build a brand centered around helping active, performance-minded women find the resources they need to do the things they love.  Episode Sponsor: Bike Index, a free, non-profit bicycle registry and stolen bike recovery platform.  Girls Gone Gravel Podcast Fiesty Media Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Girls Gone Gravel [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the podcast, my co-host Randall Jacobs is gonna take the reins. Randall did an interview with Catherine Taylor of feisty media and a co-host of the girls gone gravel podcast, Catherine. And the team at feisty media are helping active performance minded women find the resources they need to do the things they love. Many of you may be familiar with Catherine's work with Christie Mon on the girls gone gravel podcast. Christie is also a former guest of this podcast, and you can refer to that episode. We did about the big sugar gravel event. If you scroll back a little while in your feed, before we jump into the conversation I wanted to thank this week's sponsor bike index bike index is a nonprofit bicycle registry and stolen bike recovery platform. In fact, take a moment, hit pause, and go register your bike. It takes five to 10 minutes. The hardest part is locating your serial number, but once it's in the system, it's a free resource. Bike index has no business talking to you. They're hoping to just sit there in the background as a utility, but God forbid your bike goes missing and gets stolen. Bike indexes. One of the only resources you're gonna find online to help coordinate the efforts of recovering your bicycle. They're a nonprofit. Everything they do. Any donation you make is tax deductible. Registration is free, so you really don't have any excuse other than time to register your bikes. Go on, hit up bike index.org and get your bike registered with that said, let's jump on over to Randall's conversation with Katherine. [00:02:05] Randall: Katherine, thank you for coming on the gravel ride podcast. It's great to have this conversation. It seems like we have a lot of alignment in terms of the types of community building projects that we're most interested in and obviously our shared love of this particular sport. So, would just love to start with what's. What's your background with the sport? How did you end up doing a podcast called girls gone gravel . [00:02:26] Kathryn: Well, it's funny. I'm as many of the guests that we've actually had in our podcast, I've learned there's a lot of burnt out triathletes that end up in gravel. And that was definitely me. So I was really involved in triathlon for about 10 years. I raced coached. I even worked at a triathlon store. That was one of the top triathlon online retailers in the company. And I got really burned out from it because it's all about checking your power and your wants and. A lot of training all the time. And a friend of mine that was in the tri club was doing this race at the time called dirty cancer. And sh because she had heard this woman named Alison Terick on a podcast and she had never rid her bike more than 20 miles, but she signed up for the 200 mile event and was training through the company that I coached with. So I wasn't her coach, but one of my coworkers was her coach. And so I just heard all about this journey to this crazy gravel. Race. And I was like, oh, this sounds kind of fun. I think I'm gonna get a gravel bike instead of a traveling bike. And so I got a gravel bike and I would go out, she would go be doing like five laps of this local 20 mile loop. And I would go out and do one lap with her and just started to love it and love the adventure. And then started hosting some rides on the weekends for local community women. And Got into that. And then it's actually a funny story. So I was working at a bike shop at the time. And when I bought the bike, the bike shop owner was like, well, I don't think you're gonna like gravel because it's hard. And that made me really mad yeah. [00:04:00] Randall: oh [00:04:01] Kathryn: yeah. And so I had way too much wine one night and I woke up at two in the morning and I was like, I'm gonna start an Instagram account. It was when Instagram was. Starting to grow. And I was like, girl's gonna gravel, that's it. So I got the handle at two in the morning and I just started sharing like community pictures and it grew. And that ended up eventually turning into a podcast and now has become a whole brand where we have events. We have a little team, we, you know, go do cover, live events. We're done a few other things in the future, so yeah, that's, that's how it got started. [00:04:34] Randall: And I'm curious, where were you living at the time and what timeframe are we talking here? [00:04:38] Kathryn: So it was 2019. It wasn't that long ago. And I was living in Atlanta, Georgia. So, and, and there's not a ton of gravel around Atlanta. You really have to drive. So it was really in the Southeast the gravel scene. Was much behind kind of the Midwest Northwest, Northeast gravel. It was really just starting to come onto the scene. And the, and people didn't know about things like, you know, Unbound or, or any of those things at the time. My friend Lauren was the first person that any of us ever knew that had gone and done, you know, at the time it was dirty Kansas. So, so yeah. That's, that's where I was living. [00:05:15] Randall: One of the obvious questions that, that, you know, came up to me prior to us recording today was, you know, what was your inspiration? And I kind of feel like I got a little bit of a taste of it when you're talking about that bike shop person. I think that the industry has catered to a particular audience that mostly looks like me, frankly for a very long time. And there is a dire need for more accessible on ramps to other people who wanna participate. And it seems like you, you feel a niche And half the population. It's not really a niche I'd love to hear more about that inspiration and how you've gone about it. [00:05:49] Kathryn: Yeah. So I had been a part of Atlanta tri club, which is the. Probably the third largest triathlon club in the country. And I was one of the coaches for Atlanta tri club. I also was on the regional board for USA triathlon. And we were doing a lot of initiatives in the women's space at the time. And so I, I started to see, there were a few things, if you could do, you could really increase women's participation in the sport. And I had a, a good friend that we were doing. A lot of these things kind of side by side in that. And she, she actually passed away very unexpectedly in 2019 and. [00:06:27] Randall: to hear that. [00:06:29] Kathryn: Thank you. It was yeah, she, it was a, a brain aneurysm. So just out of the blue and I kind of looked back at her legacy and I was. I wanna continue this, but the triathlon space, isn't where I feel the passion anymore. At the same, I was starting to get into gravel. And at the same time I had another friend that was an ultra endurance cyclist. Her name is Danny Gable, and she's done all these crazy ultra endurance adventures. And I started hearing her stories about cycling and how male dominated it was and started looking into it. And I was like, oh, I think there are some things that we could do. That will really bring women to the forefront that are really simple things like telling women stories, giving women a place to connect with each other giving them a space and, and everything just happened to come together right around the time of the pandemic. That's when Christ and I started the podcast and we started a private Facebook group. The, I was like, oh, a couple hundred people. And within, I don't know, two months, it was like 5,000 people. And we were doing, you know, all kinds of webinars and stuff. Over the summer, cuz everybody was stuck at home. Laura King actually had connected with me and she said, Hey, we were gonna do this, this camp or this weekend with rooted, but we can't do it because of the pandemic. But do you wanna do it like just a virtual DIY gravel? Summer thing. And so we did like every Friday we would do a webinar where women could come on and learn for free. And, and so it just, everything started to come together and the community really naturally formed. And it it's really cool because now I go to races and people will say, oh, I heard the podcast. Or I followed your stuff or I'm in the Facebook group. And that's the reason I decided to come do this event or, you know, This inspired me or so. And so story inspired me. So, I think I started rambling, but that's kind of my, my very long answer to your question. It was really [00:08:18] Randall: is entirely the point. [00:08:20] Kathryn: Yeah, but, but I it's been driven by what the community wanted all along. You know, so. [00:08:25] Randall: Well, and I was sharing before we started recording that I actually heard about you and your work from one of our listeners who, who came up to me at rooted Vermont, her name escapes me is actually two women. So if you're listening please drop me a note and remind me your name and just thank you for the introduction. And I asked them, who should we be bringing onto the podcast to talk about community and to elevate their work. And you were the first person that they mentioned. So, there's clearly a deep resonance with what you do. So you have a background having worked in shops, you've been a pretty serious triathlete. You had your own journey into the sport. I'm curious to unpack that a bit. What was it like when you were first getting into cycling or endurance athletics generally? How far back does that go? And what aspects of that experience do you think were different as a consequence of being a woman versus a man coming into it . [00:09:16] Kathryn: Yeah. I actually got into triathlon when I moved to Atlanta. So it was like 2010, I think, 2009, 2010, somewhere right around there. And had lived a lot of places. I had moved there. I was living with my parents and I'd always wanted to do a triathlon. I was a swimmer growing up. I was a really bad runner, but I'd never, like, I'd only ridden my Walmart bike around town. I'd never ridden like a real bike. And so I Googled triathlon. Atlanta and team and training was actually having a info session for their summer training program. So the options were like, sit at home with my parents and watch wheel of fortune, or go meet a bunch of strangers and maybe raise money to do an event. So I ended up signing up for team and training and, and that experience really informed everything I did from then on out. The, the team in training chapter in, in Georgia is, is one of the strongest team in training chapters. At that time was one of the strongest team in training chapters in the country. And they were just so great at bringing people in and teaching them everything from, you know, how do you ride a bike? How do you prepare for a race and, and creating a community around it? And I didn't know anything, like I showed up at my first ride with my mom's bike. That was Just a, like a towny bike and Umbro shorts and a t-shirt everybody was there, there, you know, try bikes and their kits and stuff, but people had just made me feel so welcome. And so part of it, even though I felt like I don't belong here at that moment. And then took me through every piece of it from. Falling over in the parking lot, three times is the first time I tried to clip in and, you know, a woman stayed with me and rode with me that whole day to teaching me, you know, everything about the bike. And then on the contrary, I'd be like, oh, I'm gonna go to this group ride, which would be primarily guys and primarily a race instead of a group ride, like the Tuesday night race, but they didn't communicate that. And so I remember one time I was up I. Dog sitting with my parents or something. And so I was at their house, which is in the north side of Atlanta. And it's really hilly. It's kind of, you're starting to get up into the Appalachians. I went on this ride and I didn't have like a Q sheet. They didn't give them out. They didn't communicate. They didn't say hello at the ride. I was like, okay, well I can hang. I'm a travel now. And I got so lost. Didn't know where I was. Didn't have anybody to call to get back. Finally, like somebody came by and pointed me the way back to town. And I thought if that were my experience, like the first time I showed up at a group ride, I would've never, I would've walked away from the bike. I. Forever. And and I've heard that experience from so many women of just having horrific experiences. The first time they walk into a group ride or a bike shop. And so I just want women to feel confident and be excited about, you know, that, and, and so, because I had such a great experience with team and training and saw the difference, it just it informed the way I wanted to contribute to the community. [00:12:23] Randall: That's great. And I have a confession. I was absolutely one of those men who treated every group ride like a race. I came into the sport, very hard charging and just wanted to compete and go hard and crush it and go into the pain cave and all the things that are associated with that very aggressive more ego driven aspects of the sport that make it so inaccessible. And, it's in recent years that I've come full circle and seen the opportunity to not just take what I've learned and to help bring someone in but also the huge benefit that I get personally from just slowing it down and taking the time to connect and facilitating. So I'm curious, how do you define your community? You have your podcast listeners, you have your Facebook group. What is the extent of the community? How do people interact with you now? How many people are in involved ? What's the structure of it? [00:13:12] Kathryn: Yeah. That's well, just real quick before we move on from like the group ride. Cause I do want like, it's okay. If you have a really hard, fast charging group ride, right. Like I think that is totally fine. And it's appropriate for some people. It's the communication and helping people understand and even saying, like being able to say. this isn't for you. If somebody shows up that's not ready or like I'm willing to sacrifice my night for you. So like, I don't wanna get rid of the group rides that people love to go out and smash themselves on. I just wanna make sure there's spaces. What that, when we say we're welcome to new people, that we're actually welcome to do people [00:13:47] Randall: Yeah. I, I think that that's a really valid point. And if you're going to have a ride that you're opening up to a broader audience, having something in place, whether it be, Points where somebody can break off, to cut the ride shorter or having different groups going at different paces and making sure you have a ride leader for each one of those groups I think goes a long way towards avoiding that sort of scenario that you were describing, where you have a bad experience. And then it's like, well, the bike is not for me. [00:14:13] Kathryn: Yeah. Yeah. So at our community, we, we have several different layers. So we have obviously the podcast we have a free Facebook community called women, gravel, cyclists, and that's women from all over the world. I think it's like between 14 and 15,000 women right now. And it's, it's still. I thought it would fall off after the pandemic, but it's still really active. We have a, when people join, we ask them they're how long they've been riding gravel. And I would say at least a third of them are brand new to gravel cycling. So they're coming to look for advice on bikes, saddles, Shammy, how to train, what events to do, how to find friends. And then we do, we have a small team of about a hundred women Or just a little bit more connected within us. And then this past year, we had our first gravel festival, our women's gravel festival, which is not a competitive event. It's literally just three days of hanging out, having parties riding and learning. And our first one we had about 220 women and we're getting ready next week to announce the 20, 22 dates. 2023 dates. What year are we in? So we'll be back in Bentonville next year for our next one. And we may be able to bump that number up a little bit. [00:15:33] Randall: It's a great location, by the way, the bike infrastructure there is, is quite incredible. And the community there too is it's one of the, one of the country's great cycling communities at this point. [00:15:43] Kathryn: yeah, we were lucky we snapped up Amy Ross. Do you know, have you ever met connected with Amy Ross? [00:15:48] Randall: I don't believe so. Tell me more about her. [00:15:50] Kathryn: She has been in the bike world for a long time, worked for different brands like Santa Cruz that she worked for. Wow. One of the big mountain bike things I can't remember, but her husband's NA Ross. He was a professional mountain biker and they moved to Beville. She was the had a bike Beville. and so she had left bike Bentonville. I was going through, and that's the group that like, if you wanna do an event in Beville you go and you talk to them. So she was, we'd had her on as a podcast guest I'd driven through Bentonville was checking it out. She was like, well, I'm leaving bike Bentonville. And I was like, do you want a job? and so we hired her as our event coordinator on the ground. Basically two weeks later. So she contracts for us as our event coordinator for that event, which makes a huge difference when somebody is in the community day in and day out to, to put together a really great community event. [00:16:40] Randall: And in terms of where people gather online and find you online? Is it primarily the Facebook page, what's your software stack look like? [00:16:47] Kathryn: Yeah. We have a website, girls go gravel. We put, I actually write a lot of the articles and then a woman Celine Jager. Everybody probably knows in the gravel space. Also she works with us at feisty media, so she writes some for us. And then I have another woman from CNN that I pull in a little bit here and there to write articles for me. Her name is Claire and we write a lot of stuff based on what people ask for in the Facebook group. So we're taking. Somebody's asking a question and we're like, oh, we see tons of answers. And I'm like, well, that's an article. So we create a lot of content. So we get a lot of visitors to that site just because we're creating content that people are searching for. From our Facebook page we have our Instagram page and then we have just private Facebook communities. We, we tried like things like slack or other communities and it's, it's just hard. It's hard to get people to go off of Facebook. I know everybody wants them to, but it's so hard. [00:17:42] Randall: We had the same kind of discussion when we started the ridership, we built it in slack initially, or I should say we got it started in slack, the community built itself from there. And there were certain challenges that we saw with Facebook that we wanted to avoid. But slack is great because it's a great communication tool and it is something that people are already using for work in a lot of cases. But then you can't do a lot of the things you'd wanna do like event coordination or dealing with club membership. Then again, Facebook has its own issues. I'd actually love to unpack this a little bit because I've had this conversation with Russ over at path, less pedals and Monica Garrison over at black girls do bike. I'm curious, what are the things that you. Like about the platform and that we're enabling. And what are the things that frustrate you that you would ideally avoid in migrating to something different? [00:18:32] Kathryn: What I like about Facebook is people. Whether they say it, they people say they wanna get off Facebook, but they're still staying there. And a lot of people are lurkers, but they participate in groups. And Facebook has gone really in, on groups in the last few years, because they've seen that trend. Right. So. they're promoting that. And I, I also worked for a tech company for a little while in Atlanta, and I learned it's really hard to get people to use something they're not already using from that that experience, you know, that's the biggest challenge. Yeah. And slack, it just felt like the conversation was really, could be really stagnant a lot of times. Because if people. If they didn't use it for work, it was hard to get them to like, get excited about it. And if they used it for work, sometimes people were like, I'm already on slack all day long. I have PTSD from the dings so, We also one of our communities within Feist, the feisty ecosystem, tried to use my new networks and that also wasn't a good fit for the same reasons. So, so that's why I've stayed on Facebook. I think I have somebody that helps manage the posts if it were just, and, and then I have another person on our team that actually helps manage like all the people coming into the community now and like, The community is really good actually at, at self-regulating so if somebody, if a spammer gets in or if somebody we have a no assholes rule, I don't know if I can cus on your podcast, but we have a no assholes [00:19:53] Randall: Oh, go, go, go right ahead. [00:19:55] Kathryn: And so, they're really good at reporting that and. You know, like we watch it and catch those things and delete them, or just kind of, don't let people get away with being jerks. And I've seen that on a lot of other, especially gravel, Facebook groups that I've been on. There's some real jerks in those groups and the way they can give feedback to people is just it's mean what I don't like is I when not everybody's on the platform and then you. Facebook sometimes is like, I don't think you need to see that anymore. So you have to go to the group if you want something. So, and then the, the other thing I've seen, and I think this is a characteristic of women, we really like to give advice. And so I'll see somebody post something I'm like, oh, they're about to get overwhelmed with like, so much advice about, you know, like, like, so and so just ask like, I'm just, I'm new to riding and I wanna do this 25 mile event. What should I do? And somebody's gonna like give them like a step by step nutrition plan. And I'm like, just go ride your bike. right. Make sure you have water and food when you go out. So people and they mean well, but I, I just see I'm like that they're gonna overwhelm this poor person with like so much. About things. So, so that's why I try to take things and then put, put that into good content. That's a little bit more succinct on our website. [00:21:18] Randall: What are the things that you either are doing off platform, so off of Facebook or that you wish you could do, but you just don't have a tool that works well with your current [00:21:27] Kathryn: Sounds like you all are creating a tech product. [00:21:29] Randall: Well, we've been working on the side with a, like constructing a mighty network and we have a concept for that. So whenever I talk to community organizers, I wanna understand those issues cuz , our vision is to create something that's like a community of allied clubs that share a common infrastructure, and then that organization, it would be a nonprofit. And so, we're starting to do little things like coordinate group rides in the mighty network. Chapter for the ridership and then post that within the slack group to, to get people to join. And it's not seamless , but it's a way of slowly experimenting with it. We have a couple of clubs that have brought their members into their club space in the ridership mighty network. So we're not so much building a tech product as much as we see that there's an opportunity to build a better place for people to come and find out, what to ride, how to ride it and take care of it where to ride, who to ride with and what events are happen. And right now, there's not a one stop shop for that. So maybe you find the girls gone gravel podcast or the podcast that we do or some other resource. So you find some forum, but there's not like a clearing house or one place where you can go and just say, I live here, what's happening near me. Who's near me that I can ride with. What are the recommended tires for my terrain? Things like this. It's very fragmented. [00:22:48] Kathryn: Yeah. Yeah. I would agree on that. Like, one of the things that I know the community wants is they would like they would like to find more people to ride with and more local local things. You know, like regional, because we, especially cuz we're a worldwide group. So people are like you know, every day somebody will be like, I'm in Africa, I'm in here, anybody here that I can ride with. So, those connections and that, you know, that would just become a full-time job in our Facebook community. If you started managing all of those little mini groups and, and like you all, like, we don't, the Facebook community's free. Like it's like, everybody's a volunteer. That's doing it. My job is with feisty media and girls go, gravel came under feisty media. So I get quote unquote paid as a part of that. But I mean, I spent, you know, thousands of my own dollars and hours building everything for before that ever happened, or we ever made a dollar off of anything. So I wish we had that. And then also kind of the step back from that, one of the reasons I haven't been willing. Try to create things around group rides, as I would really like some kind of course or training that you need to go through to be a certified like girls can gravel group ride or something like that, just because of the experiences that I've had. And it's not, I don't want like this massive training, but I want things like you should introduce yourself to people when they show up, it seems like duh, but I think people just get nervous a lot of times if they've not led things in the past or. you know, make sure everybody knows the route, like little things like that. And I just haven't had the capacity to create that, [00:24:27] Randall: Yeah. Well, and these aren't unique to women or to any particular demographic, one of the folks that we've had on the group is Monica Garrison over at black girls do bike. She also started that as a Facebook group with people reaching out . And it's now, a hundred plus chapters and a hundred thousand women around the world and they're organizing events and doing all this stuff. And the challenges that they have are no different than the challenges that we have. And what you're describing too, so there should be some basic toolkit for someone to be able to organize a ride and people need to be able to sign up to post a route, to have a legal waiver. Right. That covers everybody. You know, you're not getting sued for trying to get people together. But then also having some protocols that are in place, like you're describing, introduce yourself, you're expected to arrive on this at this time. Here's the equipment that you should have. It's self-supported. And I think that these things can be largely standardized in a shared infrastructure. And if that were created, then you could leverage the expertise that this much bigger community of people who just wanna ride. You'll have some lawyers in there, you'll have some people who have a lot of technical expertise in there. And then this toolkits available to everyone, you don't have to be an expert in any domain to leverage it. [00:25:35] Kathryn: Yeah, that sounds really smart. And, and, you know, back in my triathlon days, I definitely, there were definitely men that I saw that if they didn't come in looking like a triathlon body, they were treated differently often. So it, it is not just a women issue. Like you said, like it's, it's, it's human issue. And every, I, I just go back to, everybody wants to have a place that they belong and they wanna feel. They're wanted places. And so if we can create those spaces for people, like at the end of the day, when I look at group rides, I'm like one ride a week. Me like riding at the very back of the pack at a super slow pace is not the end of the world for somebody to feel like they belonged. [00:26:16] Randall: Yeah. Everyone has something to gain from having a, common space for diverse people to come together. [00:26:22] Kathryn: Yeah, I was actually talking to Abby Robbins. The first non-binary athlete to finish Unbound. And so Abby just received a good bit of attention. And then there was I can't, I don't know which company was doing a, a video about them, but Abby was at Unbound camp and they were tell at the gravel festival. Abby was telling me about an experience that they were on a ride at a gravel camp. Ended up just like talking to this dude for a long time. Like it was a great conversation. And then the guy was like, oh, well, we should ride some Unbound together. And Abby was like, well, you should know, like, there's gonna be a camera crew following me because of this thing. And the guy was like, oh, what's the thing. Abby said, you know, I'm a non-binary athlete and the guy as well, you should know, like I'm a conservative Christian. And Abby was like, I would've never, and they had a great conversation and Abby was like, I would've never had this conversation. I'm like, I'm sure this, this, somebody that's like in this very conservative Christian camp would also have never like sought out a non-binary athlete to have a conversation with coming from a very conservative Christian background in my past. So I'm like, that's the beauty of it. Right? You experienced these people that you would've never experienced in these points of view and these conversations that shape your life. And I, I just love that about our sport, you know, [00:27:37] Randall: I find that gravel amongst all the different cycling disciplines does seem to be especially amenable to those sorts of really healthy and welcoming dynamics because there's no one thing that is gravel and there's no one type of bike that is a gravel bike. You can, much more so than in other disciplines , ride what you got or get started with what you got. If you ride it on mixed terrain, it's a gravel bike. And yes, you can have fancy equipment, but then also, there's lots of different ways to be a part of it. And we see that in our listenership and within the ridership and even amongst customers that ride the bikes that my company makes. But it's also, you have people of all different abilities who are going for it. It's very different than say roadie culture especially competitive roadie culture, or even mountain bike culture had a little bit more of that festivaly type atmosphere, but then also has its aggressive, hard edge to it too. [00:28:29] Kathryn: Yeah. I never feel like I'm cool enough for mountain biking. I'm like I gotta up my game or something. [00:28:36] Randall: So tell me a bit more about feisty media and how that collaboration started who's involved and the scope of its mission and what it's doing currently. [00:28:47] Kathryn: Sure. So feisty media is a, a women focused media company. So it's, we actually all women on our team. Although we, we would hire men and we focus primarily in the endurance sports space and the whole conversation is about creating an empowering culture for women. And, and we go, we really hone in on the culture piece because there's so much within culture that has. Has given women messages, whether it's about motherhood, whether it's about diet culture, whether it's about equality in sport, that, that if you can address the cultural piece, like a lot of the dominoes will fall. So as an example, one of the reasons that women often under fuel on the bike is because the message of diet culture that you need to look a certain way. And so if you go back to like, actually. We should be fueled and we should be fed when we're riding. And like this message of diet culture is causing us to not do that. So, so we really kind of, we kind of addressed that, but we're, we're kind of fun and cheeky and yeah, so feisty was started by this woman. Her name is Sarah Gross and she was a professional triathlete for 14 years. So back in the day when I was doing triathlon, I actually had a. Triathlon podcast with this friend of mine, Bethany who passed away. And Sarah was a guest on our podcast. And then when Bethany passed away, Sarah reached out to me and she said, I'm so sorry. They wanted to do at one of their events, an award in Bethany's honor. And so, we just kind of got connected through that. She came to Atlanta for the marathon trials. Right before COVID shut the world down, but it was the largest women women's field in the marathon trials ever. So, I helped her do some live coverage for that. And I was like, Hey, they came out you know, starting a podcast, everybody keeps asking for it, but I don't wanna edit a podcast on my, like, by myself again, so much work. Would you be interested in expanding beyond triathlon? And she said, yes. And so. And then she was also like, Hey, we're starting to really grow. We could do some contract work. Would you be interested in some contract work? I was like, sure. And so it, it just, we started with the podcast. I was doing a little contract work within. I think six months, six or eight months, I was working full time with them managing some of our brands. We, we have feisty triathlon. We have our women's performance brand. We have feisty menopause, which is what Celine Jager leads. So that was the brand that I was brought on to manage at first. And then the girls gone gravel brand. And is that all that we have? So within that we have about eight podcasts that fall under. Kind of those different topics. And yeah, so then when we decided to launch a gravel festival, we just brought girls gun gravel fully under the feisty brand, which for me is so great because that was, we were talking about systems. That was a lot of what was stopping me is like, these are all things I can do. I can figure out the financials. I can figure out. The contractors, but it's not stuff I wanted to do. [00:31:48] Randall: Mm-hmm mm-hmm [00:31:49] Kathryn: being able to say, we have a team that's gonna put this festival on. We have money that we can invest in the front end. So I'm not risking my own money for things. It just really opened up the door for us to be able to, to try and experiment with some more things. So it's been a, it's been a great partnership and, you know, part of what we do is we highlight what's happening in the women's fields, but then we also create educational materials. For women for training or racing or those cultural pieces. And then we create communities. So that's the third piece of it. [00:32:20] Randall: Well, I wanna take a moment to highlight. I'm just looking through some of the articles and it's like training and breastfeeding for active moms, or how to handle your period when you're on a gravel ride. These are things that are women's issues, but then also you can look at them as part of accessibility. As well, and these are not resources that I see in any of the media that I'm granted, it's not targeted at me of course, but [00:32:42] Kathryn: Yeah. Now you're gonna get the ads. Now that you've come on our site. [00:32:45] Randall: Yeah. But in just looking at some of the content here, it's obvious why this needs to exist. It is obvious why this is such a core part of making this sport accessible. And in fact, I would even add that it would be beneficial for some of, at least these headlines to exist in media sources, that men or people who don't necessarily need them are at least seeing so that they're aware that this is an issue for this particular group of people that you may be riding with [00:33:11] Kathryn: well, because Celine yer, who does our hip play out pause, which is our menopause podcast. You know, she does a ton of gravel writing. Her husband puts on unpaved and she's like I'm out at gravel rides all the time or gravel events and all these guys come up to me that their wives are like hitting perimenopause or menopause. And they're like, thank you so much for your podcast. I understand so much more about what my wife's going through. She's like, it's so weird having these conversations with guys while I'm racing a gravel of it. [00:33:36] Randall: That actually brings up a great question, what would be the bits of wisdom or knowledge that you would wanna share? To our audience, either for women listening or for men listening to help them be more aware of issues that women face when they're entering the sport or participating in the sport. [00:33:53] Kathryn: Yeah. I mean, I think like the more we can normalize conversations around periods and pregnancy and, you know, menopause, all those things even. especially with the guys we ride with. Right. Cuz that's sometimes what makes it awkward is we're like, Hey, I don't wanna say that. I need to stop on this ride because I have my period, but I really kind of need to stop along this ride. You know, so, or pregnancy it's I feel like a lot of times it's expected that the, the mom is gonna just take this long break while the dad, you know, if they're both into cycling. You see with Laura and Ted king, I just put a post up on Instagram the other day, celebrating Laura, because this is her choice. Like she, she wants to do this, but she wanted to come right back to writing. She wanted to come right back to directing the event. That's not what the choice that every person wants to make, but for so long, the choice was you're a bad bomb. If you wanna do these other things well, for the, the message for the dad was. Yeah, good for you. You're making it all work, you know, celebrating them because they were able to, to hold all those things together. And so, so, so I think like that's a, a big thing is just kind of being okay with normalizing those conversations and like, they feel awkward at first, but like, I don't like go around asking women at the group. Right. If they're on their period and they need to stop, like, don't get weird. [00:35:14] Randall: But maybe if you're organizing a really big group ride, be mindful of the fact that you need a place for people to be able to access a bathroom, or an isolated patch of woods where they can get well off the road. [00:35:25] Kathryn: Yeah. Or, or event directors, you know, we've had talk somebody, when we posted that period, article an event director reached out to me and he said I feel really dumb asking this question, but we wanna offer feminine supplies at the aid stops and I don't know what to buy. Can you just tell me what to buy? And I was like, I love that you asked me this question, [00:35:42] Randall: Hmm. [00:35:42] Kathryn: right? Like we're, we're talking to Laura about coming back on the podcast because she's doing Leadville and is it next weekend is Leadville. And she's like, I have to stop and pump along the way. Like this is the first time I've ever done a race. I'm gonna have to stop and pump. Does Leadville have any place to stop and pump? I don't know. but it'll be interesting to hear. you know, how that plays out for her. So, so yeah, I think like the more we can just say this is, this is normal. Just, just like a guy can just stop and pee on the side of the road, because it's easy. I've been on group rides with guys where it's like, everybody just stopped and is going all of a sudden I'm like, I, I don't know what just happened, but I think I'm gonna go too, since everybody else is [00:36:21] Randall: I'm fortunate. I have an older and two younger sisters and my older and immediately younger sister both have three kids each. And so children and breastfeeding things like this. I've been kind of normalized in my world. But I see how culturally, it's still something that's very uncomfortable for a lot of people. And certainly I also had my adaptation too, even being surrounded by it in my family or with female friends who had kids and had to stop and pump, and just understanding that and not having it be a big deal. I think it's part of a broader cultural shift that's needed to support mothers, but also fathers in playing a more involved, more mindful role that acknowledges the biological realities, and doesn't push it into the shadows. But actually celebrates it. [00:37:06] Kathryn: Yeah, I agree. It's I love seeing, like, I, I love watching Ted and Laura because Ted's like, you know, he obviously was a high level pro he's. They both race in the pro category, but Ted's obviously has more visibility in that because of his background. But, you know, he is also saying, well, I'm not gonna do this event, so Laura can do this event or like, we'll switch. [00:37:29] Randall: Yeah. [00:37:30] Kathryn: ride times and just, and just saying, this is a part of our family, this is something that's important to her. You know, and, and just making that the norm. And so I think they're a really great family. That's kind of leading the way for what that can look like. Yeah. [00:37:44] Randall: Yeah, there's there's a very central role that a mother plays early in a child's life in terms of attachment and so on. But at the same time the gender roles that our society generally has people play, has so much of the burden falling on the woman. And I think it's a missed opportunity, frankly, for a lot of men to connect with their kids really early on. [00:38:05] Kathryn: Yeah, and full transparency. I do not have kids. But you know, just having had many conversations with women, seeing, you know, in the sport of triathlon women, once they had kids, they were done. And now we're seeing like all these moms come back and race at the top levels after they've had. Had children and you're seeing that in the sport of running and gravel's such a new sport and especially the pointy under the spear is a really new sport as far as the pro racing. But I think we're gonna start to see that more and more as well with women saying, I wanna have a kid and I also want to continue to race at this level. And, and we know women can for a long time race those long distances at a high level. [00:38:47] Randall: One of the formative relationships I had in high school was with a then student teacher. She was somebody who was very supportive of me during the difficult periods of high school. And I reconnected with her a few years ago, and she was doing elite triathlons . She's in her mid, late forties, I believe has had two or three kids and just crushes it just as competing at a very high level. And it's really impressive to see what is possible. And it also Dispels a lot of the assumptions about what life can be like for women after having kids. [00:39:21] Kathryn: Yeah, well, Scotty Laga she won the outright Arkansas high country. She's twin boys that are, I can't remember how old they're eight or. And she was racing pro when she got pregnant and decided she wanted to continue racing. And you know, Ernie was racing as well and they just made that choice for their family. Like she actually has the more potential in her career. So, you know, which isn't the choice for everybody. Right. But it's, it's just like saying it doesn't have to be the way that society's always said it should be that you're a, you're a bad person or you're a bad mom. If you want to do these. [00:39:53] Randall: There's inevitably trade offs, but I think that there should be a lot more support from the father and the broader community so that a woman can continue to pursue being a complete version of herself even after kids [00:40:06] Kathryn: Yeah, exactly. [00:40:08] Randall: So what is the longer term vision for feisty media? [00:40:11] Kathryn: We really wanna create something. That's a little bit like the south by Southwest for women in endurance sports or women in sports where there's a place where women can come and gather and learn and have experiences together and, and, you know, connect and, and just feel like, feel like all those pieces, the community, the education of what we're learning about women's physiology and how that impacts. You know, our training and the way we approach life. And and yeah, just like the unique ex opportunity for brands all come together. It was really funny Randall. Like we, when we had our gravel festival, one of the brands there, so 220 women, one of the brands made more money at our festival than they did all three Belgium waffle rides last year because women were coming in an environment. They just felt comfortable and they wanted to spend money and we heard people were like we wish you would've had more brands there because we went, we came to spend money at the festival. And so, so I, I just think there's so many opportunities for creating those, those educational and gathering spaces. So, so that's where we're going. We're four years old, so. right now, we're really focused on bringing together the community and, and we really listen to what does the community want? And we try to create, create that from, for the community, instead of saying, this is what we, you know, it's the, the classic tech, right? Know your audience and then build, solve the problem the audience needs solved. [00:41:42] Randall: As I think. The initiatives that we're involved in, that reminder to validate the vision, getting out of one's own head and one's own biases and going out and actually listening. And what is it that, that the people who are already with you, what is it that they need with the problems that they have? So we've covered a fair amount of ground in terms of how you got your start. Both as a, as a cyclist and with girls gone gravel collaborations and so on. Is there any areas that we didn't cover that you wanna dive into before we split up today? [00:42:10] Kathryn: I think those are the big ones, you know, I think just the more we're celebrating, we're creating space for all people and gravel and, and just saying when the whole community is there. We're all better. I think that's really powerful. The, the other big thing that we try to do is to, is to support the pointy end of the field. And it's not because that's who our everyday person is. Right. But I think the more we can elevate the women's field in cycling and, and kind of create fans and create support around that. The more, it gives people opportunities to see somebody. I'll just give an example. My little niece, I was taking care of her. She had COVID a few weeks ago. So aunt cat got called in to take care of her. And she was feeling much better. She wanted to go on a bike ride. So we were out riding bikes. And then I showed her a video of Kate Courtney when we got back. And she's like, Ugh, she's amazing. Do you think I could ever do that? And that was she's six and I was. You can, but like, if I, if there weren't women like Kate Courtney, that I could show her videos of that are doing those amazing things at six years old, she wouldn't like, see that and dream, like I could do that. Right. And so, just, just being able to see those, those amazing women out there, I think is really important for the future cycling. [00:43:24] Randall: Well, I think you definitely set an example as one of those women, who's doing the work to make it a lot more accessible in allowing little girls like your needs to dream. So thank you for coming on the podcast to share your story. And I look forward to continuing the conversation. [00:43:38] Kathryn: Yeah, we'll have to connect at one of the events soon. [00:43:41] Randall: Absolutely. [00:43:42] Craig Dalton: That's gonna do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Big, thanks to Randall and Catherine for that interesting interview. I love what they're doing over there at girls gone gravel, and I hope you go check out their podcast. We'll have links in the show notes for everything they mentioned during the show. And another big, thanks to our friends over at bike index, a nonprofit that's out there helping people get their stolen bikes back. Simply head over to bike index.org and register your bike today. If you're interested in connecting with me or Randall, please visit us in the ridership. That's www.theridership.com. That's a free global cycling community, connecting riders from around the world and sharing information about the sport we love. And if you have a. Please drop a rating or review. That's usually helpful in our discovery until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels.

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 136 with Rachel Yoder, Witty, Prescient, and Skillfully-Creative Author of Nightbitch

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 64:48


Episode 136 Notes and Links to Rachel Yoder's Work        On Episode 136 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Rachel Yoder, and the two discuss, among other topics, her Mennonite upbringing that was rich with books and libraries, her inspirations from her background and from college professors, and the myriad relatable and profound themes that populate her smash-hit Nightbitch, as Rachel shares the excitement that comes with the movie being adapted into a film. Rachel and Pete also discuss archetypes and double-standards and pressures both external and internal that come with motherhood and parenthood.        Rachel Yoder is the author of Nightbitch (Doubleday), her debut novel released in July 2021, which has also been optioned for film by Annapurna Pictures with Amy Adams set to star. She is a graduate of the Iowa Nonfiction Writing Program and also holds an MFA in fiction from the University of Arizona. Her writing has been awarded with The Editors' Prize in Fiction by The Missouri Review and with notable distinctions in Best American Short Stories and Best American Nonrequired Reading. She is also a founding editor of draft: the journal of process. Rachel grew up in a Mennonite community in the Appalachian foothills of eastern Ohio. She now lives in Iowa City with her husband and son. Rachel Yoder's Website   Buy Rachel's Nightbitch   Review of Nightbitch-“a feral debut” in The Guardian    Information from Variety about Upcoming Movie Version of Nighbitch At about 1:50, Rachel talks about the exciting prospects for Nightbitch being made into a movie   At about 3:25, Rachel describes growing up in Ohio and her relationship with language and reading   At about 6:50, Rachel tells of the John Benton books she read as a child   At about 8:55, Rachel describes how writing was a “natural thing” and a hobby and how writing became essential during her time in Arizona   At about 11:00, Rachel cites Raymond Carver, Amy Hempel, Lorrie Moore, Hemingway, Pam Houston, and others as “formative writers” for her   At about 12:30, Rachel talks about short stories that changed the way she viewed the medium; she cites Amy Hempel's “The Harvest”   At about 15:05, Rachel talks about contemporary writers who thrill and inspire her, include Miriam Toews, Ottessa Moshfegh   At about 16:55, Rachel gives background on her immediate post-college jobs and writing background   At about 18:05, Rachel responds to Pete's question about how visual art and the idea of the muse work in with her writing process and writing material   At about 21:10, Rachel reads from the beginning of the book and discusses the genesis of the book's title    At about 25:20, Pete and Rachel ruminate on the dog from the book as a literal thing   At about 26:30, Pete shares the book blurb from Carmen Maria Machado in citing comparisons to Kafka's work; Rachel then discusses the balance between writing allegory and straightforward prose   At about 29:55, Pete contributes to a possible future blurb with another comparison of the book to another   At about 30:30, Rachel explains her thought process in not giving a name to the titular character   At about 31:45, Pete cites a famous quote in pointing out Rachel's work and subject matter work so well as fiction   At about 32:20, Pete and Rachel discuss themes of the singular focus of motherhood and “before and after motherhood”   At about 36:55, Pete and Rachel highlight ideas of ambition and regret and burdens carried by women intergenerationally with regard to moving scenes from the book   At about 40:20, Pete wonders about ideas of blame and culpability for oppression targeting women, and Rachel analyzes Nightbitch's background and how it informed her later life   At about 43:35, Mommy groups (!) are discussed, along with the lasting image from the book   At about 44:50, The two discuss the role and importance of the “mystic, the iconoclast” who was Nightbitch's grandmother   At about 45:50, Rachel discusses the stylistic choice of italicizing certain lines in her book   At about 47:20, The two talk about Wanda White and her Field Guide and their importance in the book   At about 50:00, Rachel explains background on the needs for community and their    At about 51:30, The two discuss themes of art and performance and their myriad meanings in conjunction with the book   At about 55:15, Pete compliments Rachel's writing that serves as informational and affecting without becoming didactic; Pete reads a profound paragraph from page 237 that illustrates this   At about 1:10:00, Rachel outlines some future projects   At about 1:02:50, Rachel gives her social media info and recommends places to buy the book, including Prairie Lights Bookstore, where you can a signed copy     You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form.     The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.     Please tune in for Episode 137 with Jose Antonio Vargas, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, Emmy-nominated filmmaker, and Tony-nominated producer. A leading voice for the human rights of immigrants, his best-selling memoir, Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, was published by HarperCollins in 2018. His second book, White Is Not a Country, will be published by Knopf in 2023.     The episode will air on August 12. 

Rednecks Rising
(Ep 10) Transfemme Gothic Bluegrass: Interview with Clover AKA HillbillyGothic

Rednecks Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 103:13


TW: Coming out to religious family, homelessnessIn today's episode I sit down with Clover Lynn, aka HillbillyGothic, a traditional bluegrass banjo musician with deep roots in Virginia. We explore a few different questions during our conversation: Who defines Appalachia? What are the differences in the Appalachian dialect throughout the region? Why are we taught to be embarrassed by our Appalachian accents? What does it mean to be poor or middle class? What is it like being trans in Appalachia and how is it different from being trans in other areas? What does acceptance from Appalachian family members look like? How do we hold the pieces of ourselves that are in conflict?Check out, follow, and support Clover:https://linktr.ee/hillbillygothicchttps://www.tiktok.com/@hillbillygothic/https://www.instagram.com/hillbillygothicc/Follow & support Rednecks Rising Podcast:https://linktr.ee/rednecksrising

West Virginia Morning
The Wheeling Blues Festival And A Futurist Appalachian Novel Addresses Litter, This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 15:10


On this West Virginia Morning, a music festival in northern West Virginia brings in blues artists and fans from all over the country — and there's a reason the music has a continuing appeal. Reporter Chris Schulz recently sat down with festival organizer Bruce Wheeler to discuss the event.

Subterraneans Podcast
S05E03: Not Deer

Subterraneans Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 19:09


Why have mysterious creatures from Appalachian folklore begun appearing in the roads near Richmond Park? www.patreon.com/subterpod

West Virginia Morning
Saving Appalachian History Amid Historic Flooding And Creating Recovery Friendly Workspaces, This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 16:08


On this West Virginia Morning, the devastating floods in Eastern Kentucky caused loss of life and untold property damage. It may have also cost the Appalachian region something else, part of its history. Inside Appalachia Producer Bill Lynch spoke with Melissa Helton at the Hindman Settlement School in Hindman Kentucky about the flood and the struggle to save some of Appalachia's past.

SBB Radio
The Appalachian Sunday Morning With Host Danny Hensley 8 - 7-2022

SBB Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 120:41


This is a special broadcast to honor Gary Graves - The Gospel Porch. Gary passed away on August 5, 2022 and the program spot will be permanently dedicated as a tribute to Gary. Featured artists this Episode feature Daughters of Calvary, Hoskins Family,Eagle's Wings, The Littles, The Far City Boys & several more. You can find Southern Branch Bluegrass Radio at 91.7 FM Community Radio and streaming around the world at live365 under Southern Branch Bluegrass and www.sbbradio.org

News Headlines in Morse Code at 20 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Rishi Sunak No hope of election win if inflation sticks Judith Durham Former Seekers lead singer dies aged 79 Climate change makes Appalachian life even harder. So why do we stay Croatia bus crash Twelve Polish pilgrims killed and 31 injured Mercedes driver arrested in fiery Windsor Hills crash that killed five Los Angeles Times Flash floods bury cars and strand tourists in Death Valley Alex Jones must pay extra 45m for hoax claims Three dead after lightning strike near White House The last time there was a Taiwan crisis, Chinas low tech military was badly outmatched by U.S. forces. Not now. Democrats suddenly realize open borders are a disaster Sinemas Puzzling Defense of the Carried Interest Loophole US fireman finds 10 dead in house blaze are his family Israel Gaza Palestinian civilians and militants killed amid flare up Not her body, not her choice Indiana lawmakers on abortion ban Jury awards 45.2 million in punitive damages in Alex Jones Sandy Hook trial Monkeypox Can we still stop the outbreak Obituary Gary Schroen, the CIA spy sent to get Osama bin Laden Parkland Trial Reveals Depths of Families Sorrow Pentagon denies plea to help with migrant buses to Washington Russia ready to discuss prisoner swap now that Brittney Griner sentenced

Hike: Explore | Wander | Live
Appalachia: Hiking, Writing and Picking the Mandolin

Hike: Explore | Wander | Live

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 27:43


Author Brian Livingston takes listeners to his Appalachia from his home base of Charleston, SC. We chat about hiking the A.T, writing a book inspired from hiking and how Appalachian music inspires his life. Brian also shares his rendition of Red Haired Boy on the mandolin. Brian's upcoming events:10/7 - Marion Outdoors in Marion, VA10/19 - Washington & Lee Outing Club in Lexington, VA10/22 - Winchester Book Gallery in Winchester, VA10/28-29 - Louisville Book Festival in Louisville, KYConnect with Brian Livingston: Instagram: @brianlivingstonbooksFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/BrianLivingstonBooksWebsite:  https://www.brianlivingstonbooks.comConnect with Lori:Instagram: @thehikepodcastTwitter: @thehikepodcastBlog: thehikepodcast.wordpress.comFacebook: @thehikepodcastEmail: hikepodcast@gmail.com Support the show

Interplace
God's Wrath Meets The Cherokee Path

Interplace

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 25:06


Hello Interactors,Unexpected extreme meteorological events on Biblical scales are happening all around the globe. Their intensity and frequency is only going to increase. Who will survive and who will die may come down to who chooses the right path. As interactors, you’re special individuals self-selected to be a part of an evolutionary journey. You’re also members of an attentive community so I welcome your participation.Please leave your comments below or email me directly.Now let’s go…ONE IN A THOUSAND“As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.For in the days before the flood, people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, up to the day Noah entered the ark; and they knew nothing about what would happen until the flood came and took them all away. That is how it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.Two men will be in the field; one will be taken and the other left.Two women will be grinding with a hand mill; one will be taken and the other left.Therefore keep watch, because you do not know on what day your Lord will come.”Matthew 24:37-42At 2 a.m. their Lord came. And then the flood. A woman, Amber, and a man, Riley, rushed to wake two boys and two girls: Madison, Riley Jr., Nevaeh, and Chance. Ages eight, six, four, and two. The water was filling their trailer home like a bathtub. But this was not just any flood.Civil engineers plan for floods like this. Flash floods. They mold networks of linear concrete channels directing water to rush into cavernous catchments…sometimes at blistering speeds. Civil engineers take great pride in trying to control nature. The British civil engineer credited with birthing the discipline, Thomas Tredgold, once said, “Engineering is the art of directing the great sources of power in nature for the use and convenience of man.” The power of these floods could not be directed. The cleverly engineered network of pipes, culverts, and catchments were eviscerated. Useless. Inconvenient to man.Seeing the water rise around them, gushing from all directions, the family of four headed for higher ground – their roof. But it wasn’t high enough, so onto a dangling limb they climbed. The water followed. Chunks of their home ripped from its frame as they clung to the tree. They watched as their home rose from its footings and swirled in the torrent.Have you ever submerged a rubber ball to the bottom of a pool, released it, and watch as it rushes to the surface with a pop? That’s the work of buoyancy force. It’s the same force that works against you swimming to the bottom to release it. It takes just two feet of flood water to exert 1500 pounds of buoyancy force. Imagine the force of 20 feet of rushing water? This flood was tossing SUVs like pool toys. Those four kids didn’t stand a chance. Only mom and dad survived.The U.S. Southeastern state of Kentucky was hit with a series of sudden thunderstorms last week. The death toll has climbed to 37. The town of Jackson, just west of Lexington, saw their entire average August rainfall of four inches pour down in just 12 hours. The National Weather Service estimated a storm like this may occur just once in 1000 years.They said that in 2015 about a rainstorm in South Carolina. Two regions there saw 10 and 26 inches of rain fall over four days. Twenty people died. Another “once in 1000 year” event happened in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 2016. Thirteen people died. Over ten times more houses in that area had major flooding (18 inches or more) than the last storm of this magnitude in 1983. That’s 33 years ago, not 1000. Suffice it say, the Southeast United States will have ‘once in 1000 year’ flood events at least once every five years, if not every year. What are the odds experts will stop calling them ‘once in 1000 year’ weather events? One in 1000?In 2015 Pope Francis sent a letter to all Catholic churches titled, Laudato si' (Praise Be to You). The subtitle read, “on care for our common home”. It was a seething critique on consumerism, globalism, addiction to continual economic growth, and the social and environmental degradation it has caused. He doesn’t mince words when he writes that it is,“easy to accept the idea of infinite or unlimited growth, which proves so attractive to economists, financiers and experts in technology. It is based on the lie that there is an infinite supply of the earth’s goods, and this leads to the planet being squeezed dry beyond every limit.”He observes it’s resulted in a form of “reductionism which affects every aspect of human and social life.” Especially those who are poor. He says, “the poor and the earth are crying out.” Imagine the sound of cacophonous rushing floodwaters, the clap of angry water-logged thunder clouds, punctuated with screams of terror from a family of four left with two. They clung to an equally terrified tree as their sole possessions rushed away in a gushing deluge. Deranged droplets running scared from the canyons, crevices, and creeks of the battered and bewildered hills of Appalachia.Kentucky is home to perennially poor people. The first Europeans to settle there most likely lived like resident Cherokees. For millennia Indigenous communities hunted and fished in and around the streams and rivers that carved grassy areas amidst hickory-oak forests. They hallowed out poplar trees to make canoes traversing vast networks of rivers and streams to hunt, travel, and trade. Cherokee women were expert horticulturists. They cultivated seeds using slow-burning fires to clear underbrush and germinate seeds, experimented with seed alterations to improve yields, farmed strawberries, and harvested North American native onions, called ramps. Their mountain plateaus were rich with rows of ‘Three Sisters’; beans, corn, and squash grown in clumps of biological reciprocity.Europeans and enslaved Africans then brought sweet potatoes and peaches which Cherokees also adopted. They did all this, as history professor Gregory Smithers learned, “not to commodify and claim possession over the landscape and rivers, but to constantly renew their commitment to living in balance and harmony with local ecosystems.”However, living in harmony with nature ended when European imperialists started competing for land and natural resources in the 17th and 18th centuries. As Europeans immigrant populations grew in the 19th century, so did commodification. By the late 1800s fresh-water mussels of Tennessee and southwest Virginia fed a burgeoning international pearl market. Within a few decades Tennessee was leader in marketing and selling pearls.After the Civil War and the formation of the New South, dams were built, roads were constructed, and timber became easier to extract. Corporations from the North bought large swaths of land. By 1930, over 60 percent of Kentucky land was owned by European, Canadian, and Northern United States companies. Families were forced to sell their land. Companies arranged sophisticated legal schemes in Washington D.C. forcing private land foreclosures they quickly then swooped up.The domination and oppression these Kentuckians experienced is what all Indigenous people had already endured, and continue to endure, across the continent. The taking of land and resources was dehumanizing and starved them of their dignity. Corporations played into these visceral emotions labeling and portraying people of the South, just as they did Indigenous, African, and lower-class European slaves and servants, as backwards, dirty, uneducated, lazy, and violent. The stereotype stuck and is alive to this day. The Pope is right, poor people of Appalachia are crying out alright. But many are crying in anger directed at another stereotype who hear mother earth crying: ‘environmentalists’.DISSONANCE DIFFUSEDKentucky is a deeply red state. Most love Trump and members of the Trump Republican party who gleefully dismantle environmental regulations. As Trump pulled from the Paris Peace Accords many Kentuckians cheered when he trumpeted that he represents the people of “Pittsburgh not Paris”. These people what their land back from corporations but vote for the party who hands land over to those very corporations. They want to farm, fish, and hunt in clean mountains and streams and for their houses to not float away, but many deny climate change and despise environmentalism. To enact revenge on the ’coastal elites’ of ‘the North’ they are inflicting material damage on their own soil and air, their livelihoods, and their mental and physical health. But when identities are threatened, so is reason.And it turns out, distraught, individualist, conservative cisgender male Christians who value patriarchy and masculinized manual labor (like logging and mining) have an especially hard time accepting this essential fact: addressing the effects of climate change will require communal collective action across global, socio-political, cultural, and gender boundaries. This approach is antithetical to their identity, and they feel threatened by it. So how does one teach such a person the hard realities of climate change contributing to their destruction?Scholars working at the intersection of learning sciences and social psychology find it starts with diffusing the dissonance. They advise avoiding threats to identity or attempts to ‘win them over’ through argumentation or value judgement. Researchers also found an educational path into conservative homes may best be through children. One study showed daughters educated on aspects of climate change were particularly effective in educating their fathers.A group of educators in conservative Oklahoma manage to subvert laws restricting the teaching of aspects of climate change by talking openly in the class about its social controversy. This problem-based approach to learning has shown embracing controversy in meaningful dialog opens the door to collective problem solving among conservative students.Professor David Long at Moorehead University in Kentucky takes this approach in his introductory physics class for non-physics majors. He also does research on how political and religious ideology can be used to mediate science education. His class is called “Modern Issues and Problems in the Physical Sciences”. Being in coal country, he focuses on the carbon costs of energy production. Using project-based learning techniques students grapple with the science behind energy production, consumption, and CO2 atmospheric outputs – both the opportunities and the threats.He says “a small number of (always) white male Morehead State students present themselves in class adorned with various types of neo-facist para-military and white supremacist shirts, hats, and other coded iconography that have burgeoned among the political right in recent years.” To diffuse dissonance, he starts the class by identifying as the son of a father who worked in the coal-fired energy industry on the eastern Appalachian slopes of Pennsylvania.He wraps up the course by having the class write up an ‘official’ news release on a future energy policy based on what they learned. To encourage unbiased writing, he exposes them to the realities of media bias by using the ‘ad fontes media’ bias chart. This indirectly teaches them to be more critical of their own personal information choices on climate change. He says that so far only three people “have chosen energy policies which retain high CO2 emissions, and even in these cases, the students have chosen natural gas as part of a larger suite of energy choices in what they describe as a pragmatic stopgap as we move away from carbon.”FROM REDNECK TO RED’S NEXT“People look down on Appalachians, and some people are saying the hillbillies got what they deserved…But it’s not like that. These were good people, God-fearing people that loved their neighbors and looked out for each other. People don’t realize how much has been lost.” Those are the words of Tonya Gibson, a nurse practitioner in Knott County, Kentucky. She’s been dealing with people mourning the loss of those rescued but not saved from the flood. She spoke to the stereotypes that plague people living in this region as a form of her own crying.These are the same God-fearing people Pope Francis knows suffer most from the effects of climate change. Effects due to a fossil-fueled exploitive form of capitalism the Pope is critical of. For his next memo, perhaps the Pope should reflect on the role Catholicism and Christianity played in the unfolding of overly extractive capitalism. He should contemplate the exploitation of Indigenous and African people in pursuit of gold for centuries of Pope’s like him and the nation-states they, and other Christian churches, controlled.The origins of the complete dominion over natural resources in pursuit of prosperity for Kings and their Christian enablers is rooted in interpretations of the Bible. The English Standard Version of Genesis 1:26. reads:“Then God said, ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.’”Other versions say ‘rule’ instead of ‘dominion’. And rule they did. Many still do and authoritative rule has become a part of their identity. But Christians who follow principles of ecotheology believe this is a misinterpretation or poor translation of the original Hebrew text. They contend for humans to be granted ‘dominion’ does not mean they have permission to gluttonously exploit, defile, or destroy it – just the opposite. Ecotheologians believe their God gave humans the gift of nature and they are obligated to apply the abilities God instilled in their big brain to creatively maintain, care, and sustain the gifts of nature.The word ‘dominion’ appears elsewhere in the Bible in plural form. ‘Dominions’ are Christian angels tasked with keeping the natural order of the universe as their God designed it, by enforcing universal laws of nature. Curiously, atheist environmentalists are in fact, in Christian terms, Dominion Angels doing what God told them to do. But getting ‘rednecks’ to listen to these ‘whackos’ won’t be easy. But not impossible.In 2003, two researchers published a paper studying faith-based environmentalism in 20 churches in Appalachia. They found these churches successfully promoted “a transformation of personal values, attitudes, and conduct in support of an environmental ethic of care.” Further, they were able to convince traditional Christians that beliefs surrounding ‘dominion as domination’ are “key reasons for continued environmental degradation.” Other efforts like the ‘Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology’ continue to foster faith-based communities “where religious and spiritual traditions join together for the shared wellbeing of ecosystems.”Whether you’re a secular civil engineer who believes we just need more concrete to control nature or an evangelical God-fearing Christian ruling over your God-given domain, the forces of nature don’t care. That is a cognitive dissonance that needs diffused. The Cherokees have never been confused; they know what needs to happen. Cherokee historical knowledge teaches the importance of gudugi – working together for the good of all. This is done with reverence for all living things while walking the right path – duyvkta.Many scoff at Indigenous knowledge and science. They write it off as primitive and that to embrace their principles somehow would throw us back centuries. But these people survived by adapting to ebbs and flows of nature. They were quick to adopt new technologies, knowledge, and tales and then harmonized them with nature with reverence and reciprocity. They walked the right path so that others after them could too.Before the Cherokees were forced off their land in the 1830s, a knowledge keeper named Thomas Nutsawi (Deer in the Water) would share some of their creation stories with missionaries who were there to share theirs. Reciprocity. As 1830 approached it’s reported he warned them of a time “when the world became ‘full of people who were very wicked. They disregarded all good instructions and would not listen to any thing [sic] good that was said to them’.”Recall the Biblical story of Naoh’s Ark. It was the wicked people, sinners, that led God to flood their land. Nutsawi continued,“an old man was instructed by ‘a certain dog’ to place ‘all kinds of animals’ into a vessel. The old man obeyed, and shortly after closing the door on his vessel ‘rain commenced, and continued forty days and forty nights, while the water at the same time gushed out of the ground, so that as much water came up, as fell down from the clouds. The wicked people could swim but little before they would sink and drown’.”Cherokees didn’t just synthesize European fruits and vegetables into their diet, they syncretized missionary Christian tales into their knowledge transfer. Nutsawi was integrating the Biblical stories with Cherokee concepts of ecological cooperation between man, animal, and nature as a lesson to European missionaries and his people. As we all face what even the Pope sees as undeniable and unmanageable meteorological forces stemming from wicked people and their sinful ways, Nutsawi’s words offered what may be a prescient ending to his story. He said,‘the family saved in the ark were Red…the Red people are the real people…’ Nutsawi made his point by reminding us all that their forebearers, the original inhabitants of the land, survived harsh and intense climatological and geological upheaval, both sudden and enduring, because they rejected selfishness. But Europeans, he observed, were ugasalesgi – greedy. And for that, they drowned.Thank you for reading Interplace. This post is public so feel free to share it. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit interplace.io

News Headlines in Morse Code at 15 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Democrats suddenly realize open borders are a disaster Mercedes driver arrested in fiery Windsor Hills crash that killed five Los Angeles Times Judith Durham Former Seekers lead singer dies aged 79 Parkland Trial Reveals Depths of Families Sorrow Alex Jones must pay extra 45m for hoax claims Climate change makes Appalachian life even harder. So why do we stay Three dead after lightning strike near White House Jury awards 45.2 million in punitive damages in Alex Jones Sandy Hook trial Sinemas Puzzling Defense of the Carried Interest Loophole Russia ready to discuss prisoner swap now that Brittney Griner sentenced Obituary Gary Schroen, the CIA spy sent to get Osama bin Laden US fireman finds 10 dead in house blaze are his family Not her body, not her choice Indiana lawmakers on abortion ban Rishi Sunak No hope of election win if inflation sticks Monkeypox Can we still stop the outbreak The last time there was a Taiwan crisis, Chinas low tech military was badly outmatched by U.S. forces. Not now. Flash floods bury cars and strand tourists in Death Valley Croatia bus crash Twelve Polish pilgrims killed and 31 injured Israel Gaza Palestinian civilians and militants killed amid flare up Pentagon denies plea to help with migrant buses to Washington

News Headlines in Morse Code at 25 WPM

Morse code transcription: vvv vvv Mercedes driver arrested in fiery Windsor Hills crash that killed five Los Angeles Times Israel Gaza Palestinian civilians and militants killed amid flare up Climate change makes Appalachian life even harder. So why do we stay Three dead after lightning strike near White House Flash floods bury cars and strand tourists in Death Valley Jury awards 45.2 million in punitive damages in Alex Jones Sandy Hook trial The last time there was a Taiwan crisis, Chinas low tech military was badly outmatched by U.S. forces. Not now. Rishi Sunak No hope of election win if inflation sticks Parkland Trial Reveals Depths of Families Sorrow Obituary Gary Schroen, the CIA spy sent to get Osama bin Laden Not her body, not her choice Indiana lawmakers on abortion ban Judith Durham Former Seekers lead singer dies aged 79 Russia ready to discuss prisoner swap now that Brittney Griner sentenced Pentagon denies plea to help with migrant buses to Washington US fireman finds 10 dead in house blaze are his family Sinemas Puzzling Defense of the Carried Interest Loophole Croatia bus crash Twelve Polish pilgrims killed and 31 injured Alex Jones must pay extra 45m for hoax claims Monkeypox Can we still stop the outbreak Democrats suddenly realize open borders are a disaster

I've Been Thinking
#102: EKY Floods and Appalachian Culture, Context and Community with Tyler

I've Been Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 96:07


TW: coal camps, Alanna crying, and lots of F bombs. In this episode, my friend Tyler, who grew up just down the road from me in Stinking Creek, KY, joins us ! We discuss the nuances and the context of Appalachia (and specifically Eastern Kentucky) in an effort to bring awareness to the devastating flooding in EKY and the callousness of internet people in response to it. don't be that person, btw. This is a long episode, I know- tyler and I are long winded when we talk about our home. It deserves it, though. Check out the blog for links to help the flood victims

Appalachian State Mountaineers
Shawn Clark Press Conference - App State Media Day

Appalachian State Mountaineers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 15:25


Head coach Shawn Clark meets with the local media for the start of fall campSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Otherworldly Oracle Official
GRANNY Magic, Old Wives Tales and American Witchcraft

Otherworldly Oracle Official

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 54:48


Welcome to Season 5, Oracles!!! Did your granny or mom have witchy customs, folk remedies, and Old Wives Tales they taught you? Things like: hang a horseshoe above the door to ward off evil and bring good luck. Grow mint out your back door to draw in money. Rub a baby's gums with whiskey to relieve tooth pain. Come with us on our broomsticks as we explore our American witchcraft traditions, specifically when it comes to the magic we learned from our grannies...aka granny magic from the Appalachians, Ozarks, Maryland farmland and Tennessee hills!

Appalachian State Mountaineers
App State Football Media Day Show

Appalachian State Mountaineers

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 55:29


Host Adam Witten visits with several coaches and players as they report for fall camp in BooneSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Inside Appalachia
Banjos, Buzzing Bees And No Hate In My Holler

Inside Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 53:27


On this week's episode, we begin our journey through Appalachia in the meadows and woods of West Virginia to catch the buzz on beekeeping.  We'll also revisit our interview with Pocahontas County, West Virginia native Trevor Hammons. The young banjo player decided to carry on his family's traditions of storytelling, wild lore and old time music.  Then, we'll check in with Kentucky artist Lacy Hale, who designed her iconic “No Hate In My Holler” screenprint five years ago. Appalachians are still telling her how much they identify with its message.

The Perks Of Being A Book Lover Podcast
S. 7 Ep. 141 Appalachia is Overflowing with guests Bobi Conn and Kendra Winchester

The Perks Of Being A Book Lover Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 56:23


This week is a hybrid episode as we slowly creep back into a recording schedule after a nice long summer break. We've got Appalachia and Eastern Kentucky on our minds because of the recent catastrophic flooding in parts of the state so we decided that we'd rebroadcast part of an earlier episode with Kendra Winchester, founder of Read Appalachia on Instagram, who champions Appalachian writers on her feed. But we also had the opportunity to speak this week with Bobi Conn, an Appalachian author and friend of the show who we interviewed in June of 2020 about her debut memoir In the Shadow of the Valley, a raw and unflinching look at growing up in Eastern Kentucky and her dysfunctional family. Bobi has a new novel coming out at the end of August call A Woman In Time that incorporates more family stories she heard about her great grandpa, a moonshiner, and her great grandmother, who held the family together. Did you know that helping flood victims can be as easy as buying a book? This Saturday, August 6, Carmichaels Bookstore in Louisville KY will donate all profits from book sales from all 3 stores and their website to Eastern Kentucky flood relief funds organized by Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky and the Hindman Settlement School. Their website is www.carmichaelsbookstore.com. We will be back next week with the true start of Season 7 and an all new episode. Happy Reading! You can find Bobi Conn on social media @BobiConn and her website www.bobiconn.com. You can find Kendra Winchester @readappalachia and @Kdwinchester You can find shownotes for any episode at our website www.perksofbeingabooklover.com. We are also on Instagram @perksofbeingabookloverpod and on FB Perks of Being a BookLover Books Mentioned in this Episode: 1- A Woman in Time by Bobi Conn 2- In the Shadow of the Valley by Bobi Conn 3- Too Bright to See by Kyle Lukoff 4- Embers on the Wind by Lisa Williamson Rosenberg 5- Finna by Nino Cipri 6- Defekt by Nino Cipri 7- Percy Jackson & The Olympians by Rick Riordan 8- Sabriel by Garth Nix 9- Books by Tamora Pierce 10- Twilight by Stephanie Meyer 11- Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray 12- Rise to the Sun by Leah Johnson 13- The Secret Lives of Church Ladies by Deesha Philyaw 14- The Birds of Opulence by Crystal Wilkinson 15- Affrilachia by Frank X. Walker 16- Southernmost by Silas House 17- Black Bone: 25 Years of Affrilachian Poets edited by Bianca Lynne Spriggs and Jeremy Paden 18- Water Street by Crystal Wilkinson 19- Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance 20- Even As We Breathe by Annette Saunooke Cladsaddle 21- Step Into the Circle: Writers in Modern Appalachia edited by Amy Greene and Trent Thomson

FORward Radio program archives
Perks S. 7 Ep. 141 | Appalachia is Overflowing | Bobi Conn and Kendra Winchester | 8-3-22

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 56:23


This week is a hybrid episode as we slowly creep back into a recording schedule after a nice long summer break. We've got Appalachia and Eastern Kentucky on our minds because of the recent catastrophic flooding in parts of the state so we decided that we'd rebroadcast part of an earlier episode with Kendra Winchester, founder of Read Appalachia on Instagram, who champions Appalachian writers on her feed. But we also had the opportunity to speak this week with Bobi Conn, an Appalachian author and friend of the show who we interviewed in June of 2020 about her debut memoir "In the Shadow of the Valley", a raw and unflinching look at growing up in Eastern Kentucky and her dysfunctional family. Bobi has a new novel coming out at the end of August that incorporates more family stories she heard about her great grandpa, a moonshiner, and her great grandmother, who held the family together. Did you know that helping flood victims can be as easy as buying a book? This Saturday, August 6, Carmichaels Bookstore in Louisville KY will donate all profits from book sales from all 3 stores and their website to Eastern Kentucky flood relief funds organized by Foundation for Appalachian Kentucky and the Hindman Settlement School. Their website is www.carmichaelsbookstore.com. We will be back next week with the true start of Season 7 and an all new episode. Happy Reading! You can find Bobi Conn on social media @BobiConn and her website bobiconn.com. You can find Kendra Winchester @readappalachia and @Kdwinchester You can find shownotes for any episode at our website www.perksofbeingabooklover.com. We are also on Instagram @perksofbeingabookloverpod and on FB Perks of Being a BookLover Books Mentioned in this Episode: 1- A Woman in Time by Bobi Conn 2- In the Shadow of the Valley by Bobi Conn 3- Too Bright to See by Kyle Lukoff 4- Embers on the Wind by Lisa Williamson Rosenberg 5- Finna by Nino Cipri 6- Defekt by Nino Cipri 7- Percy Jackson & The Olympians by Rick Riordan 8- Sabriel by Garth Nix 9- Books by Tamora Pierce 10- Twilight by Stephanie Meyer 11- Great and Terrible Beauty by Libba Bray 12- Rise to the Sun by Leah Johnson 13- The Secret Lives of Church Ladies by Deesha Philyaw 14- The Birds of Opulence by Crystal Wilkinson 15- Affrilachia by Frank X. Walker 16- Southernmost by Silas House 17- Black Bone: 25 Years of Affrilachian Poets edited by Bianca Lynne Spriggs and Jeremy Paden 18- Water Street by Crystal Wilkinson 19- Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance 20- 3Even As We Breathe by Annette Saunooke Cladsaddle 21- Step Into the Circle: Writers in Modern Appalachia edited by Amy Greene and Trent Thomson

AP Audio Stories
Steam bath weather adds to misery after Appalachian flooding

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 0:51


AP correspondent Julie Walker reports on Severe Weather-Appalachia.

Right Where You Are Sitting Now
Ozark Magic with Brandon Weston

Right Where You Are Sitting Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 75:11


  This week Ken and Mark venture into the deepest wooded mountains of the Ozark region to discover the hidden magic contained within. Our spirit guide on this quest is author of ‘Ozark Folk Magic', and ‘Ozark Mountain Spell Book', Brandon Weston. This week we discuss: How does one acquire ‘The Power', Plant magic, the myths and monsters of the region, just how do you pronounce ‘Appalachian' and much more. Joining me on his cunning throne this week is Mar(c)k™ Satyr Main theme by Simon Smerdon (Mothboy) Music bed by chriszabriskie.com Check out Brandon's book over at Llewellyn BooksBrandon Weston Bio: My work is a living tradition. It's the work that Ozark healers have been doing for hundreds of years. You can see many different cultures and traditions represented in Ozark folkways. These beliefs and practices, much like the Ozark people who created them, are a mixture of many places, beliefs, and ways of life. Specific folk traditions that have had a great influence on Ozark folkways include the European Cunning craft, Cajun/Creole folk medicine including the path of the Traiteur, Pennsylvania German Braucherei often also called Powwowing, Indigenous healing practices from the diverse nations of the Southeastern US, West African folk traditions by way of Southern Rootwork, Hoodoo, and Conjure, and even Central/South American Curanderismo. An important aspect of my research includes looking into all the traditions that have had such a great impact upon Ozark folkways. In looking at where these traditions intersect, we can start to understand so much more about the lives and practices of our ancestors. While you can look at Ozark folkways and see the fingerprint of all these traditions, remember that these practices remain unique to this specific area and should be approached with that mindset. ​ I'm an Ozarker through and through. This is the land where I was born, the land where my parents and my grandparents were born, as well as many more of my ancestors before that. In this way, my work is my own, the spirits I honour are my own, and while my work may be seen as a part of the larger tapestry of Southern folk magic, there are many practices that are unique to me as I have learned them. I hold true to all these traditions that I've been taught and those that have been Spirit led.​

The Jerry Springer Podcast
The Flooding in Eastern Kentucky: EP - 374

The Jerry Springer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 33:42


The Flooding in Eastern KentuckyJene traveled through flooded regions of Kentucky this week to see the devastation to the Appalachian region. Eastern Kentucky musician Jeremy Short joins the conversation to describe his hometown where buildings have been swept away and people have died and are missing. They discuss where people can get help and where they can donate to. Tyler Childers of Estill County and Jerry sing Down By the Riverside. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Book of Constellations
TEASER: "Hiding Day" from The Love Talker

The Book of Constellations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 3:26


The creators of The Book of Constellations and Delivery are creating a new audio drama: The Love Talker, now in production. We're excited to bring you a short teaser, "Hiding Day." The Love Talker is a folk horror audio drama that launches in 2022. Visit thelovetalker.com for more information. Follow us: Twitter: @lovetalkerpod Instagram: @the_love_talker Facebook: @lovetalkerpod ​Somewhere on the borders between Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee in the most remote parts of the Appalachians, girls have gone missing for decades. When a young woman journeys there to the isolated community of Kilruane, she uncovers the truth about the mysterious man who wanders the woods and his connection to the missing women and puts herself in danger from those who want to protect the town and keep its secrets. Credits: Ghost 1: Ers https://cstng.cc/weirdmoviegeek Discord: Ers#2311 Ghost 2: Devyn Boer devynrboer@gmail.com Pa: W. Keith Tims Earl: MT Goins

The First Episode Of
TEASER: "Hiding Day" from The Love Talker

The First Episode Of

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 3:26


The creators of The First Episode Of & The Book of Constellations and Delivery are creating a new audio drama: The Love Talker, now in production. We're excited to bring you a short teaser, "Hiding Day." The Love Talker is a folk horror audio drama that launches in 2022. Visit thelovetalker.com for more information. Follow us: Twitter: @lovetalkerpod Instagram: @the_love_talker Facebook: @lovetalkerpod ​Somewhere on the borders between Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee in the most remote parts of the Appalachians, girls have gone missing for decades. When a young woman journeys there to the isolated community of Kilruane, she uncovers the truth about the mysterious man who wanders the woods and his connection to the missing women and puts herself in danger from those who want to protect the town and keep its secrets. Credits: Ghost 1: Ers https://cstng.cc/weirdmoviegeek Discord: Ers#2311 Ghost 2: Devyn Boer devynrboer@gmail.com Pa: W. Keith Tims Earl: MT Goins

Start Here
Kentucky's Fatal Flooding

Start Here

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 27:50 Very Popular


Floodwaters kill dozens in the Appalachian foothills. President Biden's latest positive test prompts questions about "rebound COVID." And a surprise agreement infuriates Senate Republicans. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

SBB Radio
The Appalachian Sunday Morning With Your Host Danny Hensley 7 - 31 - 2022

SBB Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 117:12


A weekly Sunday Morning broadcast featuring all Gospel music selections with your program & station host - Danny Hensley. Join us at www.sbbradio.org 91.7 FM Community Radio Quick Listen Link: station.voscast.com/5c2bf0e47fbe8/ Mobile and streaming at https://live365.com/ under Southern Branch Bluegrass

Coffee and BS
Coffee and BS - Ethan Gallogly - The Trail

Coffee and BS

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 62:44


What hiking disaster does he talk about? How many times has he hiked the John Muir Trail? What was hiking in China like? Follow these links:Home (ethangallogly.com)Amazon.com: Ethan Gallogly: Books, Biography, Blog, Audiobooks, KindleEthan Gallogly, PhD (“Po”) has been a leader in the Sierra Club, the Cal Hiking and Outdoors Society (CHAOS) at UC Berkeley, and the Outdoors Club of Southern California. His boots have covered countless miles, including the John Muir Trail, the High Sierra Trail, the Oregon Section of the PCT, the Tahoe–Yosemite Trail, and the Theodore Solomons Trail.He was a reviewer for the Wilderness Press guides: Sierra North, Sierra South, and Yosemite National Park and has read nearly every book on the history of the Sierra Nevada.He has also hiked and explored mainland China, is fluent in Mandarin, and enjoys reading ancient Chinese poetry and philosophy.While not hiking, he can be found teaching chemistry and is co-author of a widely-used General Chemistry textbook published by University Science Books.His future plans include hiking the Camino, the GR-10, and the full length of the Appalachian and Pacific Crest Trails.

Stories-A History of Appalachia, One Story at a Time
The Appalachian Rip Van Winkle

Stories-A History of Appalachia, One Story at a Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 11:36


In the Washington Irving story, Rip Van Winkle partakes in some boozy fun in the Catskill Mountains in New York, then falls asleep for 20 years, waking to find the world completely changed. That story was a fantasy tale.Today we have the true story of a woman who, like old Rip, fell asleep one night in 1936 and didn't wake up until 1948 to a world turned upside down.Thanks for listening to our stories!

Go Mountain Goats
Episode 21 - Tranter's Round Record with Jack Kuenzle

Go Mountain Goats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 86:08


I talk to visiting American Jack Kuenzle who has been over in Scotland gearing up for some big mountain rounds. On 28th July he set out hard on Lochaber's uber-classic Tranter's Round and came in with a new record of 8h38m23s, shaving almost 15 minutes off my best time of 8h52m53s set the day before (more on that in the conversation!). The previous record to that was 9h0m5sec set by me in 2020. It's brilliant to see this aesthetic 60km round of the Mamores, Grey Corries, Aonachs and Ben Nevis getting some hot international attention. Jack has reccied the route extensively over the past month and found some surprising similarities (except the bogs!) to the terrain in the American North East where he holds several FKTs including the 100mile White Mountains record - set just last month on the New Hampshire portion of the Appalachian trail. He has also been known to break skimo records in his underpants! - on Mount Hood in Oregon last winter. The 26 year old ex-Navy SEAL is clearly one to watch, as he turns his focus to the Lake District and a certain round there... https://fastestknowntime.com/athlete/jack-kuenzle https://www.instagram.com/jackkuenzle 

AP Audio Stories
Appalachian floods kill at least 16 as rescue teams deploy

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 0:57


AP correspondent MIke Hempen reports on Severe Weahter-Appalachia.

Too Dope Teachers and a Mic
Habitually Disruptive 19. 2022 Kentucky Teacher of the Year Willie Carver, as Himself

Too Dope Teachers and a Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022


"Oh sure, they're gonna pick the big gay Appalachian" was Willie Carver's first thought when he learned he had been nominated as 2022 Kentucky Teacher of the Year. It was a crowning achievement after fifteen years. Guided by the credo "fear has armor, love has none," Willie supported students, especially LGBTQIA+ students, in being themselves and building a deeper understanding of their identities. Despite being warned by a school leader that being out and advocating for his community "you will be crucified, and no one will protect you, including me," Willie continued to fight for his students. The homophobia and hate reached a boiling point, and Willie Carver, the 2022 Kentucky Teacher of the Year, resigned his teaching position. Hear his thoughts here. Support marginalized and minoritized teachers, students, and communities. Read Willie's Story Here Connect with Quetzal Education Consulting! Too Dope Productions

Smoky Mountain Air
Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music—E4: Dom Flemons, The American Songster

Smoky Mountain Air

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 58:25


On this episode of our mini-series Sepia Tones, Dr. William Turner and Dr. Ted Olson welcome Dom Flemons, a renowned performer of American folk music and a founding member of The Carolina Chocolate Drops. Citing a variety of musical influences—including the legendary Howard Armstrong and the inimitable Elizabeth Cotten—Flemons shares his journey into becoming a tradition-bearer of old-time music and demonstrates the subtleties of rural black musical styles he's learned along the way. Dom Flemons is a founding member of the Grammy-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops, a two-time Emmy nominee, and the creative force behind a number of solo works including, most recently, Black Cowboys and Prospect Hill: The American Songster Omnibus. He is a multi-instrumentalist whose repertoire spans the history of American folklore, ballads, and tunes.Dr. William Turner is a long-time African American studies scholar and retired Distinguished Professor of Appalachian Studies and Regional Ambassador from Berea College. He was also a research assistant to Roots author Alex Haley and co-editor of the groundbreaking Blacks in Appalachia. In 2021, Turner received Western Carolina University's individual Mountain Heritage Award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to Southern Appalachian studies. His memoir called The Harlan Renaissance, available from West Virginia University Press, was awarded the prestigious Weatherford Award at the 2022 Appalachian Studies Association Conference.Dr. Ted Olson is a music historian and professor of Appalachian Studies at East Tennessee State University. He is the author of many books, articles, reviews, encyclopedia entries, and oral histories. Olson has produced and compiled a number of documentary albums of traditional Appalachian music including GSMA's own On Top of Old Smoky and Big Bend Killing. His work has received a number of awards, including seven Grammy nominations. The East Tennessee Historical Society honored Olson with its Ramsey Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2021.Music featured includes:1.    "John Henry" performed by Amythyst Kiah and Roy Andrade from GSMA's album Big Bend Killing2.    “Going Down the Road Feelin' Bad” and “Knox County Stomp,” both from Dom Flemons' most recent album, Black Cowboys, from Smithsonian Folkways Recordings3.    “Po' Black Sheep” performed by Dom Flemons as part of the African American Legacy Recordings series, co-produced with the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Courtesy of the Library of Congress4.    “Dona Got a Ramblin' Mind” and "Cornbread and Butterbeans" both by The Carolina Chocolate Drops and Joe Thompson, from their collaborative album released by Music Maker Foundation5.    And a selection of music performed for our podcast by Dom Flemons

Appalachian State Mountaineers
Nothin' But An App State Podcast - Sun Belt Football Media Day in New Orleans!

Appalachian State Mountaineers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 73:30


Bret and Adam are in The Big Easy with App State football for the annual Sun Belt Conference media day. Hear their takeaways from the event and conversations with Shawn Clark, Chase Brice and Steven Jones. Plus, commissioner Keith Gill speaks about the major topics surrounding the league heading into the 2022 season. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Rednecks Rising
(Ep 8) This Land Is Not Our Land: Interview w/ Sierra Kennedy Appalachian Lawyer-To-Be

Rednecks Rising

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 84:45


In today's episode, I sit down with Sierra Kennedy - an Indigenous Appalachian single mom of three that's going to law school determined to get past the classist barriers and into the belly of the beast. In this episode we touch on how the legal system was shaped to protect profit and power by keeping poor folks & POC in check, we consider the dual reality of Appalachia's deep majesty contrasted with the pain and trauma that is held in these mountains, and Sierra asks the listeners to be the spark that ignites the wildfire so that as our flames come together, we can burn the whole system down (for legal reasons, I mean this metaphorically).Check out Sierra's publication in the American Indian Law Journal here: https://digitalcommons.law.seattleu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1243&context=ailjSupport this podcast at linktr.ee/rednecksrising

Appodlachia
#141: JD Crowe, not JD Vance: A look at Bluegrass in Appalachia

Appodlachia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 81:54


Today, Callie gives us a masterclass on the history and characteristics of Bluegrass music - our favorite Appalachian export. ALSO, Callie and Chuck create the term for a group of 5+ Bachelorettes, check in on the Pennsylvania governors race, and make you aware of the horrific steps you have to go through to restore your voting rights in Mississippi-----------------------------------------------HELP SUPPORT APPODLACHIA!Join our Patreon, for as little as $1/month, and access live events, weekly exclusives, bonus series, and more http://www.patreon.com/appodlachia-----------------------------------------------Timestamps00:30 - Intro: A woo of bachelorettes07:33 - Campaign Check-in: Doug Mastri-oh hell no29:19 - Announcements (Patreon Limericks!)32:33 -  Bluegrass 101 with Callie Pruett01:13:20 - Under-the-Radar in Appalachia: Mississippi's felony voting restorationArticle from Reckon about Mississippi voting rights: https://www.reckon.news/justice/2022/07/one-in-10-mississippians-are-disenfranchised-by-a-jim-crow-era-law.html-----------------------------------------------Check out our wonderful sponsors!CBD and THC gummies & more: (use code "APPODLACHIA" for 25% off) http://www.cornbreadhemp.com/Our website is great, and it's because Starry Eyes Media built it.  Yours can be too! https://www.starryeyes.media/-----------------------------------------------Follow us!-Instagram: http://instagram.com/appodlachia-Twitter: http://twitter.com/appodlachia-Facebook: http://facebook.com/appodlachia-TikTok:  http://tiktok.com/appodlachia-Discord: https://discord.gg/czgUeWzvhT-----------------------------------------------None of the views expressed on this show represent the views of either Chuck or Callie's employersSupport the show

Virginia Public Radio
Book explores memories of Appalachians forced to leave their land to build National Parks, dams and roads

Virginia Public Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022


Imagine being told the government needed your land and you had a few weeks or months to move. This happened to thousands of people, to make room for national parks, and hydroelectric dams. Roxy Todd spoke with the editor of a new book, called “Lost in Transition,” about those who were forced to leave home.

SBB Radio
The Appalachian Sunday Morning With Host Danny Hensley 7 - 24 - 2022

SBB Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 119:27


A weekly Sunday Morning broadcast featuring all Gospel music selections with your program & station host - Danny Hensley. This weeks program brings new music by The Perrys, Statement, Chelsea Estes, Daughters of Calvary, Sisters, Andrew and Mary Beth Jones. Join us at www.sbbradio.org 91.7 FM Community Radio Quick Listen Link: station.voscast.com/5c2bf0e47fbe8/ Mobile and streaming at https://live365.com/ under Southern Branch Bluegrass

Soccer Down Here
Soccer Down Here 1v1: Appalachian FC Head Coach Dale Parker

Soccer Down Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 8:35


From his New Jersey hotel room, App FC head coach Dale Parker previews the match with FC Motown and looks back at a very busy last few days to get to the Eastern Conference Final

Inside Appalachia
Maternal Care Deserts And Seed Saving Inside Appalachia

Inside Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 53:29


This week on Inside Appalachia, amid recent hospital closures, Appalachian women are having to travel farther and farther to give birth. Maternal Medicine In The Mountains We'll talk with reporter Clarissa Donnelly-DeRoven about maternal health care deserts in western North Carolina and hear a report from Crystal Good, about what options Black families in West Virginia have for finding birth workers that look like them. Appalachian PRIDE Following one of the opinions written in the U.S. Supreme Court's Dobbs decision, State legislatures across the Ohio Valley are considering anti-LGBTQ policies, while people across Appalachia took part in celebrations during LGBTQ Pride Month in June. Katie Myers with the Ohio Valley Resource got reactions and spoke to residents. Indigenous Peoples Gather In W.Va. To Discuss The Environment High schoolers with Indigenous backgrounds came from all over the country to the Eastern Panhandle this summer for a leadership congress. They talked about conservation, Native identity, and the growing effects of climate change. Shepherd Snyder has more. Greyhound Racing Series Continues In 2023, West Virginia will be home to the last two remaining greyhound racetracks in the United States. Reporter Randy Yohe breaks down the government policies that sustain dog racing, and considers its future in the state at a time when it's dying everywhere else. Canaries Out Of The Coal Mine As old coal mines are restored, they've been repurposed for an increasingly broad number of new uses. In Pennsylvania, reclaimed mine land is being used for an art project involving birds. Kara Holsapple and Jacqui Sieber of the Allegheny Front have more. Feeding The Hungry In Appalachia's Food Deserts Supply chain issues and rising gas prices are making it harder for people to get food. As David Adkins reports, local entrepreneurs are looking to meet the demand. A Ray Of Hope Mountain View Solar, a solar installation company in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, is training and hiring people in recovery from substance use disorder. Shepherd Snyder has more. Serious About Seed Saving During the pandemic, millions of Americans turned to gardening. In Appalachia, people have long saved heirloom seeds that have been passed down for generations. Today, that tradition continues, partly through organizations like seed libraries and community gardens that collect these seeds to save them from being lost. Folkways reporter Rachel Greene spent time in Ashe County, North Carolina — talking to the people giving new life to old seeds.

ShandeeLand
Chef Matt Welsch is Leaning Hard into the Things he Loves

ShandeeLand

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 28:42


It's been two years since Matt Welsch, the Vagabond Chef, joined us last, and we are thrilled to catch up on all the great work he has done in that time. He is chef and owner of the Vagabond Kitchen and leans hard into the Appalachian culture. In the depth of the pandemic, Matt used the time to best benefit himself and his business; he got focused. He recently celebrated eight years by launching a new menu. He also found a YouTube channel, "Recipes and Roadmaps.” Strap on your helmet and get ready for adventure! This man, his motorcycle, and miles of winding country roads share the best food growing in West Virginia.

MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend
Appalachian Trail Hiking - Brian Livingston

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 64:35


https://www.brianlivingstonbooks.com/PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/minddogtvSponsors:KOA Coffee https://koacoffee.com/?sscid=21k6_79g17FIVERR https://go.fiverr.com/visit/?bta=86037&brand=fiverrcpa&utm_campaign=minddogTVSOUTHWEST RAPID REWARDS https://swa.eyjo.net/c/3290446/517226/4705SUPPORT THE HAPPY MINUTE https://ko-fi.com/minddogtvTRUE FIRE GUITAR MASTERY: http://prf.hn/click/camref:1101lkzyk/pubref:minddogGet Koa Coffee at minddogtv.com/coffee

The Storied Recipe
All About Appalachia with Lauren of Must Love Herbs

The Storied Recipe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 81:48


episode 132 All About Appalachia Lauren of Must Love Herbs Introduction So happy to welcome the utterly delightful Lauren of Must Love Herbs to the podcast today. Lauren is going to speak to an idea that I don't broach quite enough in this podcast, which is the fact that the US itself has many distinct subcultures: Appalachia (or - properly said, Appa - LATCH- a) is one of those subcultures with its own geography, heritage, music, accents, and foodways. Lauren is quickly amassing a huge following on Instagram that love her joyful, bright, and sundrenched photos and videos share her ancestor's knowledge of gardening and herbalism. She also shares the most amazing adorable cakes decorated with the most intricate, skillful, adorable mushrooms - breads covered with edible florals. Lauren's a true ambassador of Appalachia, coming from generations of Appalacians that have lived on the land for over 200 years.If you, like me, only carry only a vague idea of what comprises the Appalachian subculture, Lauren will give us all much deeper appreciation of this resilient, strong people through her charming stories and thoughtful discussion. It's a cliche an apt one when it comes to Lauren - she truly is a ray of sunshine and I'm so happy to introduce her to you right now! Highlights - Who is an Appalachian?- Difference in Appalachian foodways- Lauren's father - a musician from Appalachia who *doesn't* like bluegrass- What's growing in her garden (Market More cucumbers, 500lb cucumbers))- Medicinal herbs for what ails her ;-)- "Big Daddy" - Lauren's grandfather and garden mentor- Pros and cons of growing up and staying near family- "That's a big part of Appalachia - they don't let you struggle alone"- "It's not my knowledge that I'm sharing, it's my ancestor's knowledge"- Melvana - a woman who bought the family land in 1900- A bear that tried to eat her apple pie!- Why herbalism is a private and personal thing to Lauren- "Here you anxious people, have some herbs!"- What's a holler?- Gender norms for Appalachian women and men - Is there an Appalachian aesthetic?- Can you join Appalachia - or can you only leave? Listen Now Also listen on: APPLE GOOGLE SPOTIFY EMAIL This Episode's Storied Recipe Recipe Shared by Lauren of Must Love Herbs Kilt Lettuce Fresh varieties of lettuce are topped with a delicious dressing of bacon fat and vinegar - watch out for the popping and snapping when the hot grease "kills" the moisture filled lettuce! How To Contact Lauren Website: Mustloveherbs.comInstagram: @mustloveherbsFacebook: Must Love Herbs Pin This Episode Related Episodes Soul Food, The White House, and Lemon Icebox Pie with The Soul Food Scholar More About The Storied Recipe Podcast The concept of The Storied Recipe is unique - every guest gives me a recipe that represents a cherished memory, custom, or person. I actually make, photograph, and share the recipe. During the interview, I discuss the memories and culture around the recipe, and also my experience (especially my mistakes and questions!) as I tried it. My listeners and I are a community that believes food is a love language unto itself. With every episode, we become better cooks and global citizens, more grateful for the gift of food, and we honor those that loved us through their cooking. Subscribe to the podcast in Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or simply search for The Storied Recipe in your favorite player. I am also a storytelling photographer celebrating food in extraordinary light Learn Food Photography here.  You can shop The Storied Recipe Print Shop (where every image tells a story) here. ...

The Green Tunnel
Music of the Mountains

The Green Tunnel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 25:18


In this special bonus episode of The Green Tunnel podcast, we sat down with The Green Tunnel's own musicians to hear from them about their connections to the traditions and music of the Appalachian mountains.

Soccer Down Here
Soccer Down Here 1v1: Appalachian FC Head Coach Dale Parker

Soccer Down Here

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 12:22


For a very "mobile" 1v1, we catch up with the head coach of the Southeast Conference, Dale Parker of Appalachian FC, as they prepare for the East Region playoffs against the Alexandria Reds in the NPSL

The Downtown Writers Jam
After Party: Bobi Conn

The Downtown Writers Jam

Play Episode