Podcasts about Appalachian

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  • 1,532PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Appalachian

Show all podcasts related to appalachian

Latest podcast episodes about Appalachian

Inside Appalachia
Plays, Films and TV Shows That Confront the Appalachian Region's Complex Realities

Inside Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021


The story of Appalachia can't be summarized in one book, one article or one movie. Our region goes beyond just ill-considered stereotypes.

I've Been Thinking
#83: Happy Truthsgiving

I've Been Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 30:58


Oh, happy Thanksgiving to all my fellow Americans- or, rather, Truthsgiving. Today I tell you a little story about the history of this "holiday"- and I explain why the context is so important to our observance. I'm not telling you not to celebrate the "holiday", don't worry. I am telling you why it's important to be aware of the context around these things we celebrate. I am also encouraging you to take some time this holiday to remember and honor the lives of the Native Peoples who the European settlers displaced/oppressed and the systems that still, to this day, oppress the descendants of the original stewards of the land we walk on. Follow us:@ivebeenthinkingpodivebeenthinkingpod.com/blogAlso, please support the Patreon this month to donate to underprivileged Appalachians

This Date in Weather History
1950: The Great Appalachian Storm

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 3:47


On November 25, 1950, one of the greatest November storms in recorded North American History blasted the eastern half of the United States and Canada with unprecedented early season snow and cold, paralyzing the region for more than a week and causing untold damage and suffering. Cold air had been scarce in the lower 48 states in November, but was building to prodigious proportions across the artic. It was unleased southward in a bitter blast that would even be extreme in the depths of winter let along November. Caused by a huge wave action high in the atmosphere in the jet stream those high-level winds plunged southward right out of the Yukon. On the eastern side of the continent the wave action cut off into a swirling ball of winds that spawned a monster storm. Known as The Great Appalachian Storm, it achieved the region's greatest sustained wind force when gales continued at many points for 12 hours or more. At coastal cities, such as Newark and Boston, single minute speeds in excess of 80 mph were registered. Peak gusts were recorded of 110 mph at Concord, NH, 108 mph at Newark, NJ, and 100 mph at Hartford, CT. Atop Mt. Washington a wind gust hit 160 mph from the SE early on the 26th. Central Park in the heart of sheltered Manhattan Island set an 80-year record with fastest mile of 70 mph. There were 34 deaths across New York State. Heavy flooding rains along coast. The snowfalls were equally as extreme almost 28” in Pittsburgh. Toronto had its greatest one-day November snowfall of a foot and in Steubenville Ohio snow piled up to a depth of more than 36” – 3 feet! Roads were blocked and roofs collapsed. Just behind the storm came some of the coldest temperature of the winter. Both Louisville, Kentucky and Nashville, Tennessee dipped to 1 below zero the earliest below zero reading on record. In Atlanta the mercury dropped to 2 above, and despite sunshine the afternoon high temperature only reached 17. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Witchcraft Off the Beaten Path
S2 E42 Witchcraft In The Broom Closet

Witchcraft Off the Beaten Path

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:58


I've always been so envious of the freedom my completely-out-of-the-broom-closet witch friends seem to enjoy. And while I know the grass is always greener on the other side, I know there are pitfalls and pratfalls for those witches who get to live out and proud, just as there are for those of us witches who have at least one foot in the broom closet. How valid are witches who have to practice from behind the broom closet door? Find me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter & TikTok Find Twisted.Twigs, Suzee at TerminallyHomosexual and Zandra at Appalachian.Molotov on TikTok --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/molly-dyer/message

The Adventures of Power Dog in Dogland!
Bonus | Three Turkey Songs from Granny

The Adventures of Power Dog in Dogland!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 3:53


Hank's Granny, aka Jeanie Murphy, recorded three fun old-time turkey songs with her banjo for us this year, and we thought they were too great to keep to ourselves--especially in a season of giving! Hank had a lot of fun singing this particular Turkey Lurkey song with his fantastic music teacher at school, so he rang his Granny when he got home and they sang it together. We feel so fortunate to have a musical Granny, and Hank has been musical since before he was born. The two of them have been noodling on songs together since he was knee-high to a penny whistle! "Turkey in the Straw" is an American folk song that first gained popularity in the early 19th century. "Turkey Lurkey Run So Fast" is a classroom rhyme that Hank has really enjoyed. "A Turkey Ran Away" is a traditional Appalachian song. You can find out more about our show and send us jokes at www.powerdogadventures.com This podcast was made possible, in part, by a grant from The Regional Arts & Culture Council in Portland, OR. It was made more possible by listeners like you! Thank you for your support! Support the show: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/powerdog https://www.patreon.com/powerdogadventures https://anchor.fm/powerdogadventures/support We are proud members of Kids Listen, an organization dedicated to high-quality audio content for kids and families. The Adventures of Power Dog in Dogland is created in the ancestral lands of the Multnomah, Wasco, Kathlamet, Clackamas, Cowlitz, bands of Chinook, Tualatin Kalapuya, Molalla, and many other Tribes of the first people who made their homes along the rivers. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/powerdogadventures/support

Finding Monster Right
Far From the Tree: The Appalachian Apple-Snitchin' Ape

Finding Monster Right

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 42:20


If you ever find yourself in the region of Pennsylvania known as "Pennsyltucky", you may encounter a local cryptid known as the albatwitch! Or a Wonka wannabe that sells you gas station ice cream. Or a folk band with really cool hats. It's a bit of a tossup. Email us at: findingmonsterright@gmail.com Leave us a voicemail at: https://anchor.fm/findingmonsterright Twitter: @monsterrightpod

Spooky Soul Sisters Podcast

The Appalachian trail holds mystery and wonder, but it also has its fair share of ghost stories. If you see a fence surrounding a massive stone erupting from the earth, is it there to keep people out ... or to keep something within? Listen in to hear the mystery of the moaning rock unfold. 

Street Fight Radio
Pay Street Fight $5 to beat you with Kendo Sticks

Street Fight Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 149:04


Bryan & Brett are back taking calls and trick shooting you into a new diet and union. // Bryan got kratom in his ear and lost money gambling on football //Bryan tried cheating the karmic system by betting against his favorite team // Looking for help on "Get Motivated"- Send Bryan your favorite/most hated Keith Ablow // Brett is in a better mood and he got tickets to the Indy 500 next year // Stores already preparing for black friday // Brett's Bargains galore experience // Getting treated better with a black eye // 1st Caller - Lucas from Connecticut // Working as a part time organizer for a union who is trying to unionize a home healthcare agency // Company signed a neutrality agreement because they believe the organizers won't be successful because many of their workers do not speak english // Bryan and Brett's way of threatening people with guns to make them join unions // Trick shooting ideas // Favorite sports team is Dude Perfect // Christian nitro circus or jackass for youth groups // Calling the cops on the cops // 2nd Caller - Walt from Rapid City, South Dakota // Sharing his story on how he recently got fired // Kendo sticks to beat each other on stage // Pay Street Fight $5 to beat you // Don't touch your ass with a saw zaw // Street Fight on satellite radio // If someone paid us 100,000 we would hurt each other on air // How to lose something that weighs a ton // B2 is cool looking like a Honda sports car // The reason Bryan never got his pilot license // // B2 bomb mount Rushmore // The library should teach you how to fly planes // Let's congest the sky with average americans // Drone hats to make humans fly // Powered parachutes for Christmas // 3rd Caller- @Laborlifts who is a personal trainer // Calling in to talk shit about working for LA fitness // Customers pay 50 dollars an hour for personal training and the trainer only makes $8 // Bryan's 2 week notice philosophy // Working on sales making less than minimum wage // How a trainer is as a salesman // Bryan is a floppy person who doesn't stretch but he wants crab walk and Crippa in his wrestling singlet // // Bryan is off the mellos and on hostess mini cinnamon bundt cakes // Keeblers soft batch cookies changed his future // The illusive Mrs. Freshley German chocolate cake // 4th caller Goblin who previously walked the Appalachian trail. // Took an odd job working in costume as The Grinch at the zoo for 20 dollars a night // Working with kids can make you happy as long as you don't get beat up // Not being able to see out of the costume // 2 categories of the worst adults // Conservative adults and children in adults body // Frenching the Grinch // The zoo doesn't pay shit // Planning the next walk // Starting in Charleston, South Carolina and then going up to North Carolina through the mountains on the Goblin trail // Follow Goblin on IG - @morninhays 5th Caller - Ezriah (Sorry If I spelled your name wrong) from Columbus // A story about working at UPS while transitioning // Chastised for wearing leggings and a crop top // Coming out and telling your boss your pronouns // Imposter Syndrome // Being who you want to be to new people // 6th Caller - George from Middletown Ohio. // Calling into help Bryan with his shoelace problems and giving him solid advice on footwear issues // Street Fight Mail - P.O Box 82306 Columbus, OH 43202 Street Fight Radio Call In Show - (614) 655-388

Beekeeping at Five Apple Farm Podcast
More experiments in overwintering (92)

Beekeeping at Five Apple Farm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 27:35


  Nucs over double-screen boards, more winter patty love, boxes with wood shavings vs foam board top insulation....the winter testing ground here we come. An extra for patrons--Links to equipment and videos mentioned in this episode:  https://www.patreon.com/posts/58906090   Please become a "Friend of the Podcast" on Patreon and join the folks who make the podcasts possible! In addition to huge gratitude, you get: • BONUS podcasts and early access episodes • Access to Patreon blog posts including tips and videos • Special Q&A posts to ask me questions about YOUR bees • Input on the podcast topics • Shout-outs on the show because I appreciate you!    If you can support the show with $1 a month or more, please sign up today: https://www.patreon.com/fiveapple -- About Beekeeping at Five Apple Farm: Leigh keeps bees at 3000' in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina. She cares for around a 'beekeeper's dozen' of hives in a rural, high elevation Appalachian forest climate. Colonies are managed for bee health with active selection for vigor, genetic diversity and disease resistance, but without chemical treatments. The apiary is self-sustaining (not needing to buy/catch replacement bees since 2010) and produces honey and nucs most every year. 

West Virginia Morning
New Book Celebrates Appalachian Women And Social Justice, And Our Song of the Week, This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 15:46


On this West Virginia Morning, Appalachian history is full of sharp, groundbreaking women who changed the lives of people around them, and those women are the subject of a new book. Also, in this show, our Mountain Stage Song of the Week comes to us from country-tinged songwriter Stephanie Lambring.

Inside Appalachia
‘To Live Here You Have To Fight'- How Appalachian Women Today Are Building On Activist Traditions Of The Past

Inside Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


This week on Inside Appalachia, we'll hear how women in the mountains spearheaded movements to battle racial injustice, defend healthy communities, and fight for the rights of all Appalachians. We'll talk with the author of a book called “To Live Here You Have To Fight,” hear from podcaster Anna Sale, and visit a camp that teaches young people to play rock music.

Positively West Virginia
Episode 194 – Todd Cope – CentralApp

Positively West Virginia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 41:49


As CEO of CentralApp, Todd Cope strives to connect companies in need of tech talent with qualified workers from throughout the Appalachian region. A native West Virginian with a coal-miner grandfather, Todd is deeply committed to promoting equal economic opportunity through the expansion of tech jobs in rural areas. He cut his professional teeth in […]

West Virginia Morning
'Mexilachian' Music And Climate Change Education Through Storytelling, On This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 15:33


On this West Virginia Morning, the Lua Project calls their music "Mexilachian.” It's a blend of Appalachian old-time and Mexican folk songs. But members of the band say their music also draws on Jewish and Eastern European traditions. The Inside Appalachia Folkways Project caught up with a couple members of the band at their home in Charlottesville, Virginia.

daily304's podcast
daily304 - Episode 11.13.2021

daily304's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 3:37


Grab your bait and tackle and head out for some fall fishing at WV state parks … WVU Press shines the spotlight on Appalachian stories … and a Ravenswood aluminum plant gets a major upgrade.

The Reconnect with Carmen LaBerge
Hats Off to the Amazing Octogenarians | Equipping Kids to Deal with Anxiety

The Reconnect with Carmen LaBerge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 40:54


Today’s Guests Peter Kapsner – 50 Shades of Truth 80 years old might mean some major milestones in your life! For several people they have: hiked the Appalachian trail, gotten a PhD and more; Moses, himself, literally walked with people in the wilderness. Ruth Goring – Author of “Isaiah and the Worry Pack” Worry is […] The post Hats Off to the Amazing Octogenarians | Equipping Kids to Deal with Anxiety appeared first on The Reconnect with Carmen | Engaging Culture from a Christian Worldview.

Stories-A History of Appalachia, One Story at a Time

A hundred years ago two men were captured near Harriman, Tennessee, after an intense manhunt.  They, along with two other men, were responsible for an attempted armed bank robbery, two kidnappings, and one murder during a crime spree through the Tennessee hills west of Knoxville in June, 1921. Today we tell that story. You can subscribe to the Stories podcast at Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Audible, Stitcher, IHeart Radio, Audacy, or on your favorite podcast app. Thanks for listening and for sharing our stories of Appalachian history with your friends!

Science Friday
Psychedelics Can Treat Depression, Climate Meeting, Dopesick Show. Nov 12 2021, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 47:21


Psilocybin Effective In Treating Serious Depression Depression is often treatable with medication, therapy, or a combination of the two. But some 30% of patients don't respond well to existing medications—and may try multiple antidepressant drugs with little or no improvement. This week, researchers reported that a new trial suggests psychedelics may be an effective therapy for treatment-resistant depression. A randomized, controlled, double-blind trial found that people with treatment-resistant depression who were given 25 milligrams of psilocybin, the psychedelic component of magic mushrooms, had a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. The treatment didn't work for everyone, however, and more research needs to be done before the finding can move to clinical use. Sabrina Imber, a science fellow at the New York Times, joins Ira to talk about the trial and other stories from the week in science—including a new timeline for the planned Artemis missions to the moon, screaming bees, and a very wayward eagle. Activists And Vulnerable Nations At COP26 Seek More Than Promises There's a big international climate summit wrapping up in Glasgow, Scotland this week. COP26 is the followup to 25 previous United Nations meetings about how the world must respond to the climate crisis—and its shortcomings in doing so. This year leaders had a big conversation to tackle: Countries needed to pledge to reduce emissions even further to prevent a global temperature rise of more than 1.5 degrees Celsius. To do so, they needed to finish hashing out the details of how they will enforce the 2015 Paris Agreement's provisions. Meanwhile, island nations and other vulnerable countries, who themselves don't emit much carbon, have continued to lobby for payment for what's called loss and damages. That's the harm they've already encountered as seas rise, threatening to obliterate their existence. The first week kicked off with bold pledges about methane emissions, coal phaseouts, and ending deforestation. This week, former President Obama spoke about the need for urgent action, and called out large greenhouse gas polluters like Russia and China for not attending. And a grim United Nations report was released, forecasting that despite all the bold pledges, the world was on track to warm a dangerous 2.4 degrees Celsius. The team of Threshold, a podcast that tells stories about our changing environment, has been reporting on these updates from Glasgow, talking to attendees and occasionally witnessing negotiations. In today's show, Ira talks to journalist Amy Martin, Threshold's executive producer and host, about her opinion on the outcome of COP26—and if transformative change can still come out of this year's meeting.   ”Dopesick” Takes On The Opioid Crisis The opioid epidemic has affected millions of people across the country—and more than 800,000 people are estimated to have died from an opioid overdose. At the root of this crisis is the painkiller Oxycontin, manufactured by Purdue Pharma. The company has made billions of dollars from the drug; but has also spent the better part of the last two decades fighting legal battles over its impacts, falsely arguing the drug is non-addictive and completely safe. Meanwhile, people from all walks of life, particularly in small towns across America, have been crippled by addiction to Oxycontin. The limited series “Dopesick” traces the story of the opioid epidemic, from the creation of the Oxycontin pill to a landmark legal battle where Purdue Pharma admitted it misbranded the drug as being less addictive than other prescription opioids. “Dopesick” follows a wide range of characters, from Purdue Pharma executives and federal prosecutors, to an Appalachian doctor and his pain-addled patients. Joining Ira to talk about bringing the show and its people to life is Danny Strong, creator and writer of “Dopesick,” joining from New York, New York.

Inside Appalachia
Building Cultural Bridges Through 'Mexilachian Music,' A Black Recreation Area Sees New Life, And Writer Marie Manilla On Being 'Urban Appalachian'

Inside Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021


This week on Inside Appalachia, we'll hear what happens when a family with roots in Mexico and Appalachia combines its cultural identities through music. We'll also learn about a park called Green Pastures, created in 1937 in a small Appalachian Virginia town as a U.S. Forest Service-run outdoor recreation area specifically for Black residents.

The Urban Exodus Podcast
A professional adventurer realizes his vision of a community homestead in the North Maine Woods | Daniel White @theblackalachian

The Urban Exodus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 75:22


I'm excited for you to hear my conversation with Daniel White - homesteader, explorer, and all-around trailblazer. Originally from Ashville, NC, Daniel grew up a city boy. Yet, deep down, he always had a desire to live closer to the natural world.Daniel dropped out of high school at 16 and in his mid 20s took a job as an electrician. He spent over half a decade working 60 plus hour work weeks. At 31, he boarded his first airplane and immediately got the travel bug. After a bad break up he decided to quit his job, cash out his 401k and savings, and hike the Appalachian trail. With no training, his first time sleeping in a tent was on the trail. Daniel documented his experience online for his friends and family and began to amass a following of supporters who helped him stay the course and hike all the way from Georgia to Maine. Originally, Daniel didn't think he would hike the whole trail and just planned to keep going until he couldn't afford to go any longer. He decided to document his experience on his social accounts and in a short period of time he amassed a number of supporters from all over the world that were able to keep him and his adventures going until he finished the trail in Maine. After that transformative 190 day journey, Daniel continued his adventures, biking the 2,000 mile underground railroad trail, hiking Scotland and Spain from coast to coast, and most recently the island nation Dominica.Perhaps Daniel's biggest adventure and challenge to date is realizing the dream he and his late father shared. Through contributions from his online community, Daniel was able to purchase 10 acres of land in northern Maine and is building his vision of a community homestead of tiny houses for like-minded folks who wish to enjoy a  lifestyle outside of the confines of the city. Daniel has zero pretense for the things he has conquered and achieved thus far. He is a person of action, a person who has realized that the people that succeed the most, often also fail the most and then are able to brush themselves off and try again. I think so many of us have these little voices in our heads that tell us we can't do this or can't do that, but I hope listening to Daniel's wisdom and story helps inspire you to step out of your comfort zone and work towards whatever you want to manifest or change in your own life. Fear of the unknown and fear of being uncomfortable is a powerful deterrent on a path to greater happiness and self-reliance. Daniel has had the courage to take control of his destiny and work towards his own vision of a life well lived. That hasn't been the easy route in any regard, but it is one that he is committed to and I know he will be successful in. In this modern day and age, each one of us has the power to share our stories and to connect with like-minded people - across the globe. I encourage you to follow Daniel's journey and consider contributing to the build out Zion North. Daniel's story is one of tenacity, self-reliance, courage, and the endless pursuit of adventure. I hope you enjoy it. To see photos from my visits to Zion North, links to Daniel's website, crowdfunding campaign and social accounts visit the Urban Exodus Blog. 

Transatlantic History Ramblings
Episode 100!!! The Killing Rock- The Legend and Facts of the Pound Gap Massacre with the Return of Dr. Sarah Beth Hopton!!!

Transatlantic History Ramblings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 140:55


INTERVIEW BEGINS AT: 35:20 On May 14th 1882 on Pound Gap near the border of Kentucky and Virginia, 5 people were "ambushed" and murdered on one of the strangest, and most notorious crimes in the history of Appalachia. Why were these people killed, who killed them, was it robbery? Revenge? Vendetta? Who benefited from the crime, and who was punished. Questions, conspiracies', legends and myths have surrounded this event for over 140 years, but what do we really know? Sarah Beth Hopton, PhD, show legend and honest to goodness Appalachian, has spent years studying this event. She has attended gatherings of living decedents on both sides of the incident, interviewing, them, being allowed access to documents, family stories, personal items, and their trust, allowing her a unique insight into the facts, and also the mysteries that surround the infamous Pound Gap Massacre!! So kick back, enjoy and please rate and share the show..let's keep the audience growing. Thank you all And hey, check out our Merch Store for Shirts. Hoodies, Coffee Mugs, Stickers, Magnets and a whole host of other items https://www.teepublic.com/user/tahistory All of our episodes are listed as explicit due to language and some topics, such as historical crime, that may not be suitable for all listeners.-Opening and closing theme is Random Sanity by British composer DeeZee

Grounds For Discussion
Episode 39 - Hillbilly Elegy

Grounds For Discussion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 53:11


What comes to mind when you hear the words, "Rust Belt"? We're talking about the book that inspired the movie, Hillbilly Elegy. If you need a refresh on Appalachian culture (or an intro) join us at the table! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/laura-archambault/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/laura-archambault/support

I Survived Theatre School
Molly Smith Metzler

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 62:10


Intro: Gina is co-hostless and doing her best. PLEASE SUBSCRIBE, RATE, and REVIEW you beautiful Survivors!Interview: SUNY Geneseo, Boston University, Tisch, Juilliard, Playwriting MFAs, competition in writing programs, Marsha Norman, Cry It Out, MAID on Netflix, Hollywood sea changes, female-centered shows, domestic violence, emotional abuse, Hulu, theatre is behind, denial, making mistakes, bad reviews.COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT (unedited):1 (10s):And I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school2 (12s):Together. We survived it.1 (14s):We didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all2 (21s):Survived theater school. And you will too. Are we famous yet?1 (34s):Hello? Hello. Hello survivors. This is Gina. This week. We are sons' cohost, just one host today. I'm missing my better half BAAs. His boss is actually attending to a friend who got terrible health news this week. And she is in her very boss like way being there for her friend and being the amazing person and friend that she is, which is why everybody loves buzz. Anyway, she'll be back next week if you're not. But today we have, honestly, you guys, this is the interview I have been waiting for.1 (1m 19s):Molly Smith. Metzler is a writer extraordinaire. You may have heard of her latest project made number three on Netflix entering its 28th day online, which has some very special meaning for Netflix that I hope to know more about one day and previous to me being the showrunner for maid, she also worked on shameless and several other successful television shows. And before that she was a playwright. And actually I got to know her work because I directed a play of hers called cry it out.1 (1m 59s):And it was a fantastic experience. And I started communicating with her over email when I was directing. And I was so impressed with the way that she responded to me. I mean, a that she responded to me at all that she was available to me at all. And not something you always get with a playwright and B that she really took her time with her responses and see that her responses ended up being pretty impactful for me, just not necessarily related to the play, but as a person. And I'm a little embarrassed that when I talked to her and I told her the way that she had impacted me, I just started seriously just crying, crying, crying.1 (2m 45s):And I was having this thought like, I, this is not a moment I want to be crying. And I'm generally in life. I, I welcomed here as, as a person who struggles to access their emotions. I do. I welcome a good cry, but it not want to be crying to Molly Smith Metzler in this great interview. But you know, it is what it is. If I'm going to be honest, I have to be honest. I can't be choicy about when I'm being myself. That's my, that's my mantra. Recently you have to be yourself in all the ways. Some of those ways are ugly and disgusting and you know, unsavory, and some of them are fine and some of them are be even beautiful.1 (3m 31s):So I'm working on embracing the, a mess that I am, but I really think you're going to enjoy this interview with Molly. She's fantastic. Even without the always wonderful presidents, presidents presence, maybe she should be president even without the always wonderful presence of BAAs. We still managed to have a great conversation and actually that whole experience of her at the last minute, not being able to do this and this being the first time we're doing this with one host, turns out to have been a good thing for us to go through, to learn that.1 (4m 14s):Yeah, sometimes we're not both going to be available and sometimes when I'm not available, she'll be doing an episode on her own. So, you know, whatever we're growing, changing learning, Hey, we're in 22 countries. Now, if you have a, not a subscribed to this podcast, please do. If you have not rated this podcast or given it a review, please, please, please, please, please, please do it seriously. Please do it, please. I'm begging you. Please do it, but okay. Anyway, here's Molly Smith message.0 (4m 53s):Well,1 (5m 0s):No problem whatsoever. Fortunately, my partner is Jen. Her very good friend just got diagnosed with cancer yesterday and she's with her right now helping. So she's not going to be able to join us. This is actually the first time we're doing an interview with just me. So we'll see how it goes.3 (5m 23s):Yeah,1 (5m 24s):It is. And she just, she has a lot of experience with, with cancer. So she's sort of like the first people, first person people call, which is like,3 (5m 38s):Yeah,1 (5m 38s):Exactly, exactly. But anyway, congratulations, Molly Smith. Metso you survived theater school and you're going to have to clarify for me because it looks like you went to four schools, but you didn't go to four theater schools. Did you?3 (5m 52s):I went to four schools. I did. They're not all theater schools, but I went to undergrad, SUNY Geneseo in Western New York and I was an English major. And then I went to Boston university and got a master's in creative writing with a concentration in playwriting. And then I went to Tisch and got an MFA in playwriting dramatic writing. And then I went to Juilliard, which is, you don't really get a degree there. It's called an artist diploma, but it's just finishing school basically.1 (6m 20s):Oh, okay. So the decision to, to do the MFA, were you thinking at that time that you, maybe you were going to be a teacher, I'm always curious about MFA's and writing because you know, if you learned what you needed to know and you know, why not just put yourself out there and be a writer?3 (6m 40s):I think it's very scary to take that jump. The thing about school that I got addicted to is that I'm actually way too social to be a writer. I like being around other writers and every, and every time you get a graduate program, you're with a bunch of writers and you have deadlines and you kind of, you know, it's a really public way to study writing versus alone in your apartment while way to say, you know, and I kept getting academic support to attend the programs. And so that was part of it. I'm not sure I would have gone deep into debt to get all those degrees, but I think giving me aid, I kept going. Yeah.1 (7m 16s):Okay, fantastic. And did you always know from day one that you, I mean, since you were in high school anyway, that you wanted to be a writer that you wanted to write dramatically?3 (7m 26s):I always loved writing. I had journals and I'm from a very young age. I love to write, but I had a sort of more academic feeling about it. I thought I was going to get a PhD in English and join the academy and be a professor. And I didn't know, I was creative in the sense of dramatic writing until my senior year of college. When I took a playwriting class, I didn't know I was a playwright. And I also didn't know. I was funny. Those two things emerged at the same time. Wow.1 (7m 54s):Oh, so you didn't have experience with theater before then?3 (7m 58s):Well, I grew up a ballerina, so I had a great sense of the stage and the relationship between an audience and someone onstage. I really like, I understood light and the power of an audience, but I, no, I didn't grow up a theater nerd at all. I grew up a nerd nerd, like an actual,1 (8m 18s):So that must've been like just a whole new, exciting world. Did you decide pretty much right away that you were going to be getting your MFA when you discovered that you liked to play with?3 (8m 27s):Yeah, I did. I took this introduction to play right in class and it was one of those things. People talk about this, like in a romantic relationship where you're just like, it changes your whole life. And I didn't have that in a romantic relationship, but I had that with playwriting. One-on-one where, you know, I just, I, it came, I don't want to say easily to me cause it was really easy to play it, but it came, it was like a big release in my life that I arrived at playwriting and loved doing it. And it's like a big jigsaw and you can stay up all night doing it. And I knew from the very first, basically from the first act of a play that I wrote that it's what I wanted to do. I'm very lucky. It was very clear.1 (9m 5s):Yeah. Yeah. That is really lucky. So we have talked to almost 60 people now, the majority of them have been actors. So we've really delved deep into like everything about being an actor, especially at the age of undergrad and what that's like to be growing up, you know, just growing up and then trying to figure out yourself well enough to be an actor and all the stuff that comes along with that, including, you know, the competitive best with your cohort. But I imagine that's what it, well, I don't want to imagine what it's like, what is it like with your cohort when you're all writers and you're presumably reading each other's work critiquing each other's work, does it get really competitive?3 (9m 55s):I suspect that it can, you know, I feel very lucky cause I have never experienced that directly in a graduate program situation. Part of it is I think I went to really great places where everyone had gotten in was incredibly talented and brought such a unique point of view and voice that none of us were trying to raise the same place. So it was really easy to just support each other. And also it's fun, you know, you're reading it aloud. So if something's in the south, you're trying an accent and it's super bad cause you're a playwright. So I found it, you know, I became close with the other writers and I mean, I'm married. One of them, I call him my husband, he and I were in the same graduate program at Tisch. And there is something beautiful about meeting someone in a writing workshop because you're just sort of naked.3 (10m 41s):It's all, you know, I imagine it's like, I understand my actors fall in love too. It's like, you're just so vulnerable and you know, each other in a deep way. But my experience has been that writers are pretty, pretty darn supportive of each other. And if you're not, you kind of don't fit in, like if you're a jerk, if you're competitive jerk, like you're not meant to be a playwright, playwrights need to love people. Cause that's what we do, you know? Yeah.1 (11m 1s):Yeah. That's a very good point. Actually, we talked to CISA Hutchinson yesterday and basically said, yeah, isn't she awesome?3 (11m 8s):She's in a beautiful inside and out like just, but yeah.1 (11m 12s):Yeah. She, and she echoed the same thing in what you're saying. So I guess we're going to stop asking this question about competition. It's just that it's so much of a part of like the act. And I think it's part of just how the program is structured. I mean, you're literally up for the same parts against each other and they PO posted on a wall and everybody shows up to3 (11m 35s):Absolutely. And you know, I was at Juilliard where they still cut people. You know, that system has changed a little bit, but I was at the, the version of Juilliard that was structured to drop 10% of the class out. And I feel like you don't get, I don't know. I learned a lot about that cause they cut playwrights as well. And I feel like that doesn't, that doesn't bring forth good creative work from anybody that pressure of, you know, is Sally going to get cut instead of me that's that's, that's not good skills. I don't think1 (12m 5s):It's true. And at the same time, like a lot of the people who were cut from our program went on to have better careers than the majority of us. So it's just like not a lot of rhyme or reason to it.3 (12m 15s):It's like SNL. Yeah. I mean, yes. It's not a predictor. You got it. Right.1 (12m 20s):Exactly. Okay. So you graduated or you've finally finished school with Julliard after doing it for, for a number of years then what happened next? You were, you were married or you're in a relationship and w how did, how do two writers figure out what their next steps are going to be when school's over?3 (12m 40s):Well, I don't know how to writers in general would do, but I can tell you how Colin and I did it, which is that we we've never been competitive because we write really different plays. Like I am talking to, you know, especially as a playwright, my, my work tends to, I mean, I've written Boulevard, comedy. It's like, I really like to laugh. My husband's play is everyone's on meth and they're an Appalachian. It's like, we are, we are really young and yang. And, but I think being, I really recommend being married to, or spending your life with another writer, if you are a writer because they get it and they get you in like a deep, deep way. So if you have to stay up to four o'clock in the morning, cause you're inspired and you have to finish the scene, you know, there's, there's just a, there's no jealousy about that.3 (13m 25s):There's an acceptance. And our, it really, I think I often say, I don't think I'd be a playwright. Certainly won't be any of the things that I am a mother, you know, like everything is because it's all. And I, I had someone who believed in me more than I believed in myself and at points that is everything because, you know, your play opens in New York, you get just the worst reviews in the world and you take, you know, you'd take to the bed and you don't think you're ever going to write again. And it's so important who you decided to spend your life with because, you know, con only saw me as a writer first and foremost. And you know, it's like at the same goes for him. So we, yeah, but just technically do we have money? You know, we lived in a apartment in Brooklyn that we got to kind of like a hookup.3 (14m 9s):My husband was, he managed the bar downstairs, so he knew the guy. And so we got this apartment that we could actually afford, but we both worked full time waiting tables and bartending. And then if I get into the O'Neil, for instance, he would do extra bartending support me being at the O'Neil. And you know, he went up to LA for a few months and did a bunch of meetings and screenwriting stuff. And I supported him with the Juilliard money. Like we just have always worked it out. And for the last handful of years, when we finally don't have to, we can both be working in. It's great.1 (14m 39s):Yeah. That's nice that, by the way, that makes so much sense about the difference in your writing because in watching made, you know, I remember getting to the end of the first episode that he wrote and not, not having known throughout the episode that he wrote it and being like, wow, this is really, really different than Molly's writing. And of course it, it was his, and I kind of tend towards that darker stuff too. So yeah. And by the way, the series is fantastic. It is so good. And how you were having such a moment, you're getting great reviews. People are loving. I saw even today, it's number three on Netflix. How are you doing with success? Because people assume that it's all great, but I'm guessing it's not.1 (15m 23s):And I'm guessing it's kind of scary too.3 (15m 27s):Oh, well this is all pretty, just great. You know, like I think there's probably two things that are tricky about it, which I'll tell you in a second, but the fact is, it's just, it's great. Especially because it's made, you know, made is the closest to play writing. I've done for the screen. I see the show as 10 individual plays and it's really just about cleaning and feelings. It's the most character driven thing I've seen on TV in a long time. There's no murder. There's no cool accents. We're not in Hawaii. It's just about one woman's cleaning and feelings. And every time we turned in an episode, I thought Netflix would call and be like, you know, this is too weird.3 (16m 9s):Like the couch can't eat her. That's just too weird, you know, but they let me make this like, you know, artistic, I think like they're beautiful thing. And I didn't really believe that they were going to air it. And then I didn't really believe that people were going, gonna watch it. And so the fact that the fact that it is exactly what I wanted it to be and people love it. It's very, I don't really, I think it's really exciting just as a writer, it's exciting. It's like, oh, maybe we can return to doing harder things on the screen and on the stage again, you know, I think audiences weren't deterred by the fact that it was difficult, you know, they leaned in. And so I feel like it's really, it's mostly just fantastic.3 (16m 49s):I am surprised that people love it this much, but no, I'm just, I'm so proud of it. So it feels great. That's all there is. Do it.1 (16m 57s):What were the, you said there you'll tell me about the two things that have been challenging.3 (17m 1s):Yes, it is challenging. I, and I know you'll relate to this, but coming up in the theater, there are so many of us that, that are just working hard and waiting tables and waiting for a break. And that was me as well. And you want to help every single one of those people and you want to help every single one of those people whose cousin is also in LA. So like, that's the part that's really hard for me is that I can't, I can't do for everyone. And I want to, and especially theater people, like if you, if someone sends me a cold email that the subject is like a MF playwright, like I read it and then I, you know, I, I can't help it.3 (17m 42s):So that's a little hard cause I want to be good to everyone. And, and can't so that's, that's hard for me. And the other thing that's just hard is, you know, I spend my life in sweatpants and now suddenly have to do a bunch of stuff where I look, I have to look very, you know, Like, you know, writers or writers were writers for a reason. And so, so suddenly I have to like I to buy lipstick. And so that part of it is a little being articulate. Like next to Margot, Robbie is very difficult for me, but1 (18m 14s):I didn't realize until just today that she was the producer. So she's, she's the person who optioned the book.3 (18m 20s):So she and John Wells got the book together. John Wells is a very famous producer. He did west wing ER, and shameless, which is how I know him. I worked in my last four seasons of shameless is a writer on the show. So when he and Margo got the book, LA had just done cry it out, it was cried out, was up like, like had just closed when they got the book and it's a play about moms. And I think they were like, oh, we know a person who writes about moms and they handed me the book. It was so kismet.1 (18m 49s):Wow. That's fantastic. And, but you had to, I mean, I read the book too. You had to create a whole narrative. That's not in the book. So how does that, I'm curious about that process and how it works. Is it that you kind of sit down as the show runner and hatch a basic idea that you, that you then have some writers help you with or do you have to outline all of the stories and everybody else just writes them? Or how does it work?3 (19m 20s):Well, it's a, it's a little bit different with every project. Oh, I'm with a story like made, you know, whenever the memoir I learned so much, like it was, it's really an educational tool and I didn't want to sacrifice any of that. On the other hand, when you go and sit down with your husband or wife and Saturday night to watch Netflix, you don't want to lecture and you don't want to like TV, shouldn't taste like TV, shouldn't taste like broccoli, right. It should taste like it should be a sneak attack. Kind of like my plate is like, I like to sneak people into learning something. So I knew kind of off the bat that that made was an incredible engine, the memoir, and that I wanted all the takeaway to be the same. But I also knew that we were going to have to create a lot of story to do that.3 (20m 1s):So to answer your question, when I first said I would do the book and when we were taking out and pitching it to Netflix, pitching it to HBO, you know, all the places I would have to say, this is what I'm going to do. You know, we're gonna, we're going to do 10 episodes. Her mom's going to be a huge character. Her dad's got a huge character. We're going to really build up. Sean. We're going to get to know some of the people in the houses we're going to get to know Regina, she's an invented character, but this is how she'll structure in the plot. And you really have to know the nuts and bolts of what you're going to do. And the tone of it, like it's kinda like giving a 45 minute presentation on what the show will be. And then hopefully someone like Netflix is like, okay, great. Here's, here's a green light and get your writer's room. So then you hire a handful.3 (20m 42s):If you're lucky, you know, I could, I didn't have any, no one told me what to do. I got to hire whoever I wanted. And I hired only four writers, three of whom are playwrights, three of whom. I'm sure. You know, cause it's Colin, Becca bronzer, Marcus Garley so really accomplished playwrights. And then Michelle, Denise Jackson, who is not a playwright, but should be like, she's an honorary playwright, you know? And so w and then the five of us sit down and we take what I've said, you know, about the show, the 45 minute presentation, and we flush it out. What are we doing in every episode? What does this look like? And that, that process in the writer's room is the closest, you'll get to a table read in the theater, you know, where you're just at the table, you're reading that play.3 (21m 24s):And then you talk about it for, you know, nine days. That's a writer's room is that every day. So it's very, very, very cool experience and everyone's sharing secrets and, and we disagree sometimes and we do puzzles and there's a lot of talk about lunch.1 (21m 43s):That's what everybody says.3 (21m 47s):But also what was cool that mean is that these five, these four writers and me, the five of us, we all really connected to different things in the memoir. And we also, all of us come from all of us can relate to the memoir in different ways. And so you get five different perspectives on something. And I think, you know, Becca brown center did so much of the writing of Regina, and I think she could really connect to Regina. And, you know, that character would not feel quite as beautifully drawn if Becca weren't in the writers room. Like, so, so much of it is it's a dinner party. And the result of that dinner party is character. You know? So it's really, it's the most important thing you do is those writers.1 (22m 26s):That is okay. So I also just learned that today that you didn't write that Regina monologue, because, and this is about my own projection that when I'm watching it, I'm going, oh my God, this is so similar to Claire, Claire. Is that the name of the character and cry it out. That lives up high, up on the hill.3 (22m 45s):Oh, Adrian. Adrian.1 (22m 47s):Yeah. Thank you. Sorry. I was thinking, I was thinking, it sounded like an Adrian, my likes. So that's fascinating that, that,3 (22m 53s):Well, let me explain one further thing, which is, so that's how the show gets written. And yes, Becca brown said, I wrote that monologue, but the other thing that the show runner does is it is my job to then go through all 10 episodes and make sure it sounds like one person wrote them. And, and so the showroom, so you kind of divide the writing in the room and then all funnels back to me and I rewrite it or fix things. Or sometimes, you know, sometimes you're doing a major rewrite sometimes you're just like with Regina monologue, it was so beautiful. You know, we, we had to cut a couple of things for production, but like, it's, it's back as work. And, but it's, that's what TV writing is. It's like, there'll be stuff that Becca wrote in episode seven that she didn't write, or, you know, like TV is very collaborative and then it all funnels through the showrunner who does a pass to make sure it's, it's up to the standard that I want.3 (23m 44s):It's totally what I want. You know, it is, it is a writing job as a group, and then it is ultimately one person's writing job it's book. Does that make sense?1 (23m 51s):Yeah, it does. And thank you so much for answering that question because I have always wondered. And also even on television shows that have, have a different director, every episode, I'm always thinking, how are they keeping true to the tone, but not now, now I understand it. Well, I have so many things to ask you. I want to talk to you about just one thing is that you have said that you love writing about class, which is a big part of made and your, and your place. But, so I want to talk a little bit about that, but I also kind of want to talk maybe first about the thing that you said you were surprised that people like to made, and I've heard a lot of female writers express, something like that.1 (24m 36s):I'm surprised. And maybe people just say it in a way as, as you know, not, not trying to try to be humble. Right. Okay. But I believe that you are surprised by it because it does seem like a kind of recent thing that the universe is allowing us to tell women's stories and having them at the forefront. I mean, it seems really pretty recent. And so are you, do you feel like this is you're part of a big sea change in terms of what's being represented on screen?3 (25m 7s):You know, absolutely. I was talking to Netflix yesterday and they said last year it was Bridgford, you know, these are a lot of things, but they were saying last year, people, the surprise was everyone loved Britain and love Queens gambit. And this year one loves squid game and loves made, which cracks me up. But, but they think to be in the same sentence as Queens gambit as the limited series. I mean, I think that's so exciting as a female writer, because she was an alcoholic kind of like piece of crap who was amazing at chess and went on this like beautiful arc that was not traditionally feminine. It was usually that's a man, like that's usually a male going through that and were riveted by his addiction and his dysfunction and made his, you know, I think we're continuing what Queens gambit did as well.3 (25m 50s):Like it's, you know, Alex has a lot of things, but she's not a woman. She is a character going through an arc and she makes a ton of mistakes and she, you know, is a product of where she comes from. And that is enough to carry a show. And I feel like that is it you're right. It's so recent. And I therefore assumed it would be treated like a, you know, like a niche, you know, maybe 500,000 people will watch it kind of like, cause we don't show up for those shows, but all of a sudden we really show up for those shows and we want to see a multidimensional and rich and layered woman at the story of her own dance story. It's really like exciting.3 (26m 31s):It's exciting.1 (26m 33s):That's what I think about stuff like this. I just imagine, you know, the people who are traditionally in charge of these things, I just mentioned it, but I imagine a bunch of guys sitting around being like, can you imagine people really want to hear about these dang? I mean, I feel like it must be a surprise to, to sort of the old guard that, you know, because of course everything does have to be motivated about what's going to be a return on your investment. And that, that that's understandable. It's I'm not saying anybody's bad for that, but it is curious to me that there was just this, there was an assumption that if you made a female centered show, nobody would want to watch it.1 (27m 16s):Except for every time they make a female centered, anything people want to watch it. Why is this keep being a surprise?3 (27m 24s):I think it's going to stopping a surprise pretty soon because this cracked me up. But my friend was doing a pitch yesterday at Hulu. And I guess like the conversation kind of organically came up with like, well, what's our main, you know, like what's the, you know, the producer was in it, but like, you know, people are starting to look for the, the queen scam, but you know, trying to look for the female, you know, the unconventional sort of what's the would be a surprising female story. We're starting to like, not only are we starting to have it at the table, that the market is the, market's starting to recognize that we're going to get eyes on the screen and it's, you know, I shouldn't be so surprised by made.1 (28m 5s):Right. Right. And it helps that we have people like Margot, Robbie and Reese Witherspoon and females who are having more of a say about what gets produced, you know, with what, what books get optioned and then what gets produced.3 (28m 17s):Absolutely. And, and more and more women are taking those jobs and taking those positions. And it's a good, it's a sea change. I also dare say, I think TV and film has ahead of it than theater. I have to say, I think1 (28m 29s):Girl, that's another thing I was going to say. Cause you had a quote in something I read theater is behind theater is so behind and this is, unfortunately it came as a surprise to me. Like when I woke up to the fact that theater is so behind, it was sad and it also doesn't make sense. It also, you know, it should be it's, it was 40 years ago. It was the most progressive part of art, I think.3 (28m 55s):Yeah. Well the theater doesn't treat women as, as minority voices and they have, and like that's, what's so crazy is we've, you know, I think we've carved out space for there's so much equality and, and like, it's exciting to see the programming in theaters change. And like it's not just white men anymore. That's all, that's very, very exciting. But heterosexual women stories that mother's stories about our struggles stories about, you know, me and my friends, there's no space for us on the New York stage. There's no space for my friends and I on the New York stage. And I feel like, and then, you know, you don't go up in New York, then you don't go all across the regions.3 (29m 36s):And I think a great example is actually cried out because that had a huge regional presence because I think people are starved for players like that, that are about women and just, you know, and not women on Mars and not, not necessarily, you know, like it just normal women, women having, you know, the Wendy Wasserstein plays of today are not produced in New York. And it's, it's a, it's a huge issue I think.1 (30m 0s):Yeah, yeah, it is. So, okay. So the other thing is that you love to write about class, which I find fascinating. I love to read about it in any case, what is your personal connection to your fascination with that issue?3 (30m 17s):Well, I think I grew a group of the Hudson valley, the daughter of two teachers. So, you know, I, I, I can't relate to made, for instance, in the sense of, I always had food and I always had a certain amount of like structure and S and security, but I, my parents were incredibly well educated and they kind of like my dad went to Cornell and it was sort of something we heard a lot about, even though we didn't kind of grow up in a moneyed area or money to house, there was a sense of, there was a sense of you could scholarship your way into the next strata. And I think that I find that fascinating because it's just not true. I, it's almost impossible.3 (30m 59s):It's almost impossible to change your class in America. And it's, it's, I feel like those walls are getting higher, not lower. And I watch people through everything they have at, at, at those chances to change, you know, change their stripes. And I just think the way we, we work in this country is we it's, we've made that harder and harder. There is no bootstrap narrative there. It does. There's no bootstraps it doesn't, it's not a thing in this country. So I find that fascinating because I felt very jipped. You know, I felt like I worked very, very hard and like I was always getting A's and being sophisticated and like, I couldn't graduate and get a, you know, a little studio in New York and intern at a publishing house.3 (31m 42s):You know, like a lot of my friends who came from money could, and there's just, it's so ingrained in our culture and it makes me mad and it's not, you know, it's not fair. Especially when I had a child and started thinking about cried out and just the way we treat that money directly affects maternity leave in this country too. And like, I can't compete with somebody who has a trust fund, you know, I had to put queer where I could afford her. And it's just bullshit that you can claw your way out of the class that you're born into. It's it's extremely rare. So I love that1 (32m 16s):It's bullshit and it's really dangerous cause it makes people feel so inadequate when they can't, you know, and that, that's also a great scene. I think it's in the first episode. Yeah. It's in the first episode when she goes and she's talking to the social worker and she's saying, so I can't get a job because I don't have a daycare and I can't get daycare cause I don't have a job. So I have to get a dog to prove that I didn't deserve daycare. I mean, it's, it's also3 (32m 40s):Backwards. Yeah. You're at a humongous disadvantage. If you are born into, you know, if you're born into poverty, you're at a humongous disadvantage in this country and it's like getting worse. That's the other thing is it's not, I mean, I have to leave. That's part of why made is, is touching so many people's sense of justice too. It's like, oh yeah, it's getting worse. Like, why aren't we talking about this? It's you know, Alex and I are, are not facing the same problems. And it's just by where I was born and where she was born and you know, you what family, your brand and who dictates so much of your struggle.1 (33m 17s):Yeah. And, and that, that the sort of historical narratives would have you believe that it's, it's the opposite of that and that, and that everybody left England to get away from that. But then yeah, just creative things I think here. So another thing that I heard or read that you said that really took my breath away is you said that when you became a mother, your, you didn't say your resolve for your career. You, the phrase that I that's sticking out to me, as you said, I went from being the secretary of my own company to the CEO. And it just, that just really like hit me in the center of my chest.1 (33m 58s):Can you just say a little bit more about it? What, what you meant by that?3 (34m 3s):Sure. I think that we'll probably like probably like many women when they become moms. I, I was frustrated that I had, I had this thing that I was good at, that I had studied for so many years that I've given so much time and love to my playwriting career and that it did not love me back in the sense that I could not afford to take core to a music class, you know? And it made me very, it made me very frustrated that, you know, I, I had devoted my, my self to this, this field that I had a passive relationship with. Like I was waiting for someone to call and tell me they were going to do a reading or, you know, or I was waiting for my career to start.3 (34m 50s):And I think what happened when I had, when I had Cora was I, I wanted to provide for her. And I also wanted to, I wanted to show her that you could be tough and you could be an active participant in your career like that. I didn't have to wait for it to happen. And so part of it was, I was, I just kind of said the things we all want to say out loud as a women, but I actually said them, which was like, Hey agents, what the F I am funny and talented. I want to work in TV. I want to take a music class with my daughter. What do I have to do to do that? And I you'd be shocked. I think how freeing and wonderful it is to just stand up for yourself and to make demands. And, you know, and I wanted to, I wanted to take an expensive music class with my daughter and I wanted to have a career.3 (35m 32s):And I was like, I'm not going to wait for it to happen because I know if someone gives me a chance I'm going to do, I'm going to go far in this field. Like, cause I don't know. Does that make sense? So I kind of like, wait, I said, waiting for the phone to ring and started making the calls.1 (35m 45s):Yeah. And also what I'm hearing is you stopped just blindly participating in the myth that everything can only work a certain way, which I feel like is something that we can all relate. I mean, it's something that boss and I talk a lot on this podcast about like just making so many assumptions about what, what we're definitely not entitled to have and what we're, you know, let's definitely for other people and not for us without ever once actually saying that out loud or asking for what we want. And actually yesterday chiefs have said the exact same thing. She said she, she was trying to be humble and say it's because she doesn't know how the system works. So she didn't know, she couldn't ask which you know. Okay. Maybe, but it's very inspiring to hear that.1 (36m 29s):Now you could just decide what you want to do with your life and your career. You could decide that you want to have a work-life balance and then have it.3 (36m 37s):Yeah. And you know, I think actors have this too. We are always waiting for the phone to ring. And at a certain point, I think that's a really tough way to be a mom because you can't count on anything and you're spread so thin. And I'm just kinda like, no, I'm going to generate, I'm going to generate this. And I can't really define the moment, but I will say for me it was emotional. I, I stopped, I stopped letting theater. Tell me how to feel about myself a little bit theater. I mean, it's a little bit like the terrible boyfriend that you just can't leave. Right. Like I would be like, I would be like, here's my new play. Do you love it? And they'd be like, maybe, you know, maybe we'll do a reading of it.3 (37m 19s):And I'd be like, let's my full heart. And I love you. And then, you know, and I finally like kind of broke up with that boyfriend in the sense that like, no, I'm really good at this. And like, I'm going to go where the love is. And I'm going to figure out how to pay my bills doing this and maybe you'll miss me and come back. You know, you know, it's hard as an artist, you can't let someone else tell you what your worth is. And theater is very conducive to that.1 (37m 40s):Yeah. Oh my God. That's so true. And that's, by the way, like a big part of the character of Alex, she does that too. I mean, she, with not that much to leverage did still find a way to just be very active about asking for what she wants. And I can see what you're saying about how, how having a kid makes that very clear. Whereas maybe you don't feel so I'm entitled to ask for what you want when it's just you, but when you know that it's somebody else who's depending on you, then it's that it doesn't feel like you're asking for yourself. It feels like you're asking for your family.3 (38m 15s):Yeah. And you see injustice with fresh eyes when you have a child, you know, because I don't know. I feel, I feel like certainly in my case, I w I would, I was so focused on being a good collaborator, being polite, being like, you know, you know, being grateful for the breadcrumbs that I got, you know, in my life. And I mean, honestly, it was a professional change, but it was primarily an emotional change. I was like, yeah, I don't want breadcrumbs anymore because my daughter deserves better than breadcrumbs. And so it just sort of filtered across all the fields, but yeah, another had does that.1 (38m 50s):Yeah, it does. It does well. So I don't know if I ever told you this, the reason I was looking through our emails earlier, as I wanted to see if I, I was sure I had said this thing to you, that I can not find in my email. So I'm going to say it to you now, which is that when I was directing your play, I wrote to you just about some things that I wondered if we could change. And you gave me the most thoughtful responses, which was, is to say you didn't invalidate that I was asking you, but you still stood up for what you, for the integrity of the play. I feel like I'm going to cry. I never saw anybody do that before.1 (39m 36s):And it was a really great, I wish I wasn't crying as I started to say this to you, but it was a great thing to, it was a, you were a great role model for me in that moment. And I always appreciate that. So thank you.3 (39m 52s):Oh, Tina, thank you. Well, you know what, thank you for wanting to have a conversation with me about it. Cause like I also think that's the sign of a fantastic director that you let me into your process and your thoughts about it. And I know you did a fantastic job with the play cause I had Scouts in that area who saw it and you know, so whatever you were, whatever you were working with, you artistically, you certainly landed that ship for you. You know, landed that plan beautifully.1 (40m 15s):Thank you. I had, and I had so much fun doing it. So tell me about some of your mentors. We had a nice discussion the other day about the power of mentors and some people go kind of through their whole training and never really feel like they connect with a mentor. Did you have mentors along the way?3 (40m 35s):Yes. I'm very lucky. Actually. I'm very lucky. I'm sure most people who go to Julliard and say this, but I, in my case, it's, it's really, really true that Marsha Norman was a wonderful mentor to me. I met her at Tisch and Tisha's a funny place because it's a larger program. You know, you don't have that. One-on-one with your professors that you do with Juilliard where there's just a handful of you, but, and I didn't stand out at Tisch. I sort of, my husband was, you know, my husband's sort of the star over player at, in class and I hadn't found my voice and I was sort of, I just wasn't like the star student and she was, she saw something in me and I don't think she saw like a Polish playwright yet, but she saw, I think there's just, she saw a way to help me find my voice.3 (41m 18s):And she hired me as her assistant coming out of that MFA program. And I always think like it was sort of charity work because she didn't need an assistant. She was so on top of her life. But I think she wanted to let me hang out with her and see how she conducted her business. So she was working on law and criminal intent. Yeah. Yeah. And so I was on set with her. I get to do research with her, for the scripts. She was doing the color purple and I got to go to rehearsal usually just to bring a coffee that I could watch. And it was, you know, she's also a mother and I don't know it was really, it, it was so generous of her because I got, I just got to see that you, what a woman in power looks like and, and a woman on her voice.3 (41m 59s):And she also says no a lot. And I grew to really respect that. Especially later when I became a mom, but you don't F with Marsha. I mean, she'll shut stuff down. She's really, I mean, she's such a generous person here. She did this thing for me, I'm a total stranger, but she's also like she knows her worth. So I was very grateful. It's been those years with her. And then, and then she invited me to Julliard. And then when I was ready really gave me, I mean, Juilliard is so much pressure. And the thing about Julia is you have to know what your voice is to go there. And so it's almost like she was helping me find my voice. And then when I found it gave me this incredible opportunity to go to Julliard. So sh honestly like very, very good to me in such a mentor in a very lucky.3 (42m 41s):And then on the west coast, I've had a wonderful mentor in John Wells because he, he's just one of the most terrific showrunners and producers, but it's funny cause I, everybody knows that that's not a secret in LA, but to work for him as a writer and to be in his writer's room. I learned so much from him about how to empower the people around you. How did it become like, you know, there's so many toxic writing rooms and toxic jobs with my friends, tell me, and it sounds terrible, but everyone at a John Wells show is thrilled to be there and very lucky to have that job. And they know it and like just that there's a way to do things gracefully. So he, and, and then he got this book and handed it to me and gave me my first chance to be a show runner.3 (43m 23s):So I had a, I've been very lucky to have him as a mentor on this coast1 (43m 28s):And the toxic. I've heard a lot of stories too, about toxic writers' rooms. And maybe that's also something that's going to get phased out because like so many of these things, you just, you just need more samples. You need, you know, you need more samples in your dataset so that, you know, I mean, if 99% of everything is run in one certain way, then there's little, there's little chance that it's going to change. But when, when the tide starts to shift, maybe there's a little, few more samples in your dataset that show, well, you can just be a regular nice person and still get the same, you know, get the same job done. That's that's nice to hear.3 (44m 9s):Yeah. Yeah.1 (44m 12s):So dah, dah, dah, oh, one, another favorite line from made is when Alex is talking to her dad about, I think this is, might be at the last episode or near then. And she says, she's trying to tell him that her or her, whatever boyfriend abused her and her, father's not taking it in. And she says, do you hear the words that are coming out of my mouth right now? That was another thing that really hit me because, you know, denial is really not a passive thing. Like you have to work pretty hard at defending your denial on something.1 (44m 56s):And I'm really familiar with saying something that feels, you know, that's a truth for me to people who, I mean, act as if you're, you know, like you're invisible and that turns out to be a really shaping force in a lot of people's lives. And you know, so anyway, I'm just curious about your own relationship and experience with denial.3 (45m 22s):Well, I love that you love that moment because I remember with that scene feeling like something was missing. And I remember, you know, I know a lot of it denial, but what I really know a lot about is gaslighting and denial is a form of gaslighting where you're just like, I'm, I'm not going to acknowledge a reality. And you know, I learned this tool a few years ago from a fantastic therapist that like, it's okay to just pause and be like, but you actually are hearing me, right? Like this is English. And you understand these words like, and I've, I've actually tried that tool in my life and steal at someone, not, not like, not be able to confirm that they're hearing the words.3 (46m 3s):And so it was when I, and then when I put it in the scene that it felt like, oh, that's what was missing is just this, like, how far are you going to take this denial? And he still can't write. I mean, I think Billy might nod, but he doesn't say anything. Like, I think gaslighting in denial and emotional abuse, I mean, I could write 40 Marsha was about this. I am fascinated by it. And the thing we don't talk about it as a form of abuse. And we should, it's like weirdly I think as well as violent, if not more violent than physical abuse, because you don't realize it's happening like Alex in the pilot, she doesn't know she's a victim of abuse and she is such an, a victim of abuse, which I hope we demonstrate in the show that you have to go on that ride with her, but you know, it's so corrosive and there's nothing worse than having someone tell you what what's real is not real day after day, year after year.3 (46m 56s):Like this is an area that I know a lot about I sent you do to1 (47m 1s):Yes. And actually my kind of where I put my energy in terms of recovery is with codependency and denial and codependency, or just, I mean, that's, that's the it's denial is the perfume of codependency. It's just, it's everywhere. And what I think really gets triggered for people who want to keep pretending, like they hear the words you're saying is because I find this in my family, like the way that denial really shows up in my family is if I acknowledge a truth, that's too true. I think what happens to other people is they feel that if they even just validate that that's my truth, that that somehow means that they have to acknowledge it for their own selves and their own lives.1 (47m 51s):And that's really like the forbidden thing that, you know, that people who don't want to go there can't do, they can't, it's like the Pandora's box. If I start to look at, you know, if I acknowledge that, what you're saying about this is true, then I can't help, but start to acknowledge all of the other things as well.3 (48m 9s):I think what you just said is, is brilliant because I think people think denial is just inactive, but it's aggressive. It's so aggressive. It's really violent, you know, intense denial that gaslighting of like, I will not even acknowledge. I hear the words you're saying it's, it's, it's so active. It's I mean, it's so aggressive. What you said was really, really smart really. Right. Yeah. And I love the people. I love the people are flipping out about Hank with me. Like how does he just sit there and let Sean treat her like that? And like, you know, and that's what I mean, I think she's mistreated throughout the show, but I think what Hank does to her in that moment with the denial is, is I think a lot of us recognize that.1 (48m 49s):Yeah. And I really appreciate the w the way you rolled out this whole concept of emotional abuse, because even I who feel like I've spent so much time working on this stuff, and I was a therapist, even I was found myself being like, oh, he didn't hit her. You know, she left, he didn't hit her. Hmm. I really had to check that in myself. And I was because one of the things that denial, I mean, in the absence of act, you know, saying you're wrong or whatever, and it's just, I don't hear you. You just assume that what you're saying, isn't valid, it's it becomes this thing that you do to yourself where you, you know, if somebody invalidates you enough, you start to invalidate yourself.1 (49m 38s):So I loved how you rolled that out in the series that are people talking to you a lot about that.3 (49m 45s):Yes they are. And how about in episode eight, where you are like, oh, Sean's changed and he's turned around and he's going to be a carpenter, you know? And like you it's in you, you find yourself. Or at least I did. And I assume it seems like audiences to just kind of like, oh, maybe this is a happy, love story. Like maybe he like, you know, and, and that, you know, that is all by calculated manipulative writing that I like my secret agenda with me. It was, you know, and I claimed 10 hours cause I wanted, I wanted the audience to go on the actual experience of that cycle and to get thrown off by it and caught up in it like, oh my gosh, I'm back, I'm back. And I'm in the pit, how did this happen?3 (50m 26s):And I wanted to show you how it happened. I also was like, I dare you to wash made and tell me that that's not domestic violence because it is emotional abuse is violent. It, what happens to her is violent. So that was like my secret mustache totally goal with the show.1 (50m 43s):Yeah, no, it, it hit, it totally played. And, and I think the other thing that's great about that is that when we have seen depictions of violence against women in film, I mean the best we could entail television, the best we could have hoped for is some woman who's abused who isn't a total idiot, because mostly what it is, how it's portrayed is some dumb person who doesn't, who's too dumb to know she's being abused. So therefore she goes back and also the various, the subtle, wow. I don't know if it's settled, but the, the subplot with the first roommate that she has when she goes to the, not roommate, but you know, the woman who lives in the shelter with her who introduces her to, you know, how, how to do life there.1 (51m 31s):I love I, that was heartbreaking her story of, because it is that you, you, you, yes, in the audience were saying, yeah, maybe sh maybe Sean is a good guy. Maybe, maybe all he really needed was to sober up and become the good person he was meant to team.3 (51m 50s):Yep. I mean, it's funny. I did an interview yesterday where this gentleman was like, is Sean okay? Like, does he end up okay. In life? And, and I, and I found myself sort of being like, I've never really thought of that cause he, you know, he's fictional, but I, I don't know. I'm not sure that that guy is ever going to make it out of that trailer, you know? And I'm not sure that he's going to get sober and be a great dad. I'm not. But I do feel like when he says at the end, I'm going to get sober and come see her all the time. I don't believe him. And, and I think that's his TV show, right? That's his cycle that he has to break. But my goal was to show that he's caught in his own cycle too.3 (52m 29s):Like, we are all kind of caught in our own cycles and it's so hard to break, you know, an Alex barely makes it out. And most women and men in her situation, the show ends in episode eight under the, in the pit. Most people don't get out of the pit and she is so smart and driven that she can, but she's the exception and not, she's a great exception. Yeah.1 (52m 53s):Yeah. Yeah. So we're, I want to be honoring your time. I told you we're only going to talk for an hour, but, but before we begin to wrap up, I just want to ask you, so since we've spent a lot of time talking about your success, let's hear about some of your failures. What have been some mistakes that you've made, maybe, maybe you maybe even like when you, when you made first, the transition from playwriting to writing and Hollywood, what were some of the mistakes that you made along the way?3 (53m 23s):Well, I, I think the, one of the great learning opportunities I've had as a human being, not just as a writer, was my first big production as a playwright in New York. And it was, you know, I was barely out of school and I felt I'm just so grateful for the opportunity. You know, it was a big production with stars in it and fancy director and everyone there was fancy except me and the process I have to say kind of went that way, like, like, huh, there's this element of it's actually, it's when I play close up space is about a dad and a daughter. It's about grief and pain and there's a lot of magical realism and I'm sure it's far from the perfect play, but it got obliterated by the press and squarely blamed on me the most inexperienced person in the production.3 (54m 11s):But what I learned from it is that I knew things about it were wrong. I knew immediately things about the production were wrong and I didn't use my voice. I didn't, you know, what happened with the play is my fault. I didn't, I didn't ring the bell. I didn't say, well, I didn't refuse the rewrites. Like I, you know, and everybody there had good intentions. Everybody wants to have a hit play, but people saw it a different way than I did. And, and it was wonderful people. There was no reason why I couldn't have said, Hey, yo, this isn't what I wrote. And I really, it was a crushing blow to have that play go so badly and to, to get such her, I mean, if you went for that and just Google it, it's the worst reviews. It's like, one of the, one of the reviews was like, is she sleeping with the director?3 (54m 53s):Like, why did she even get this product? You know, it's just straight on misogyny. I mean, it was, it was so mean, but what it taught me was I, since that moment I've really listened to my gut. And if my gut says this isn't right, I say it, and I don't worry about how it's going to come across. It sounds like I did that with you, but I have my sense of like, no, and, and it, and I learned the hard way in that moment that nothing is more important than your own gut. And so, and, you know, kind of re I had like a, kind of, a lot of momentum as a playwright really stop that momentum. It sent me into a deep depression. I mean, the, I lost so much because I didn't listen to my voice.3 (55m 36s):So that was my big theater lesson, which is applied to everything. But the big mistake I've made in TV to film, I've actually been really, really, really lucky and worked with fantastic people. But I think that stuff can go sideways here. It's a, it's a funny town, you know, and I've worked with wonderful people, but once in a while, you know, something's happening and then it just disappears. And so, you know, like that, you're gonna, you know, I, right before me and I came so close to having another job that I really wanted and was passionate about, it would have been my first time kosher running something, show running something, and, you know, we were all but celebrating.3 (56m 21s):And then the whole thing fell apart because the actress wanted her friend to write it and like bull, bull, crap. Like that happens all the time in LA. And so it's a hard time. It's a hard lesson the first time, you know, where I was like, oh, people don't, you know, like my agent sent me champagne. Like it was, it was happening. And then it very suddenly wasn't. And so I think it made me realize that don't pop the champagne until the contract is signed1 (56m 51s):And put that on a t-shirt.3 (56m 57s):That was a tough lesson to learn though, because I was like, wait, oh my God. Like, I went from like sky high to, and you know, nobody really, nobody apart, it was just very sobering. So,1 (57m 7s):And writing is so personal that it's really hard not to take both the criticisms to heart and then the, the opposite of the criticisms. And, you know, it's, it's hard not to make it. It's hard to stop making it about personal validation. You know, when, when somebody likes or doesn't like your stuff. Yeah. That's the journey I'm on right now. Not making it about, you know, like if somebody didn't like my play doesn't mean they don't, it doesn't have anything to do with whether or not they like me.3 (57m 40s):Yeah. You know, that's, I'm glad you're learning that because I also can tell you, I just staffed a writing room for the first time. And so that experience was really opening because I read unbelievably fantastic things and I didn't meet with them because, you know, you're designing a dinner party with five people and you kind of have to, and like you, the truth is, like I said, I passed on a lot of wonderful writers whose work I freaking loved. And like, can't wait to read for the next thing and have mentioned and recommended to other people. And that's part of it is like, you don't know how people are experiencing your work and the fans that you're building along the way. And I think we quickly assume the worst. Right? I know I do. But like, but the fact is like, you don't, you don't know how close you got it.3 (58m 24s):My guess is you're getting close to stuff and you don't know. And aren't able to know that1 (58m 29s):At the end of the day, the only thing you have control over is whether or not you go back to your computer later that day and just keep writing.3 (58m 36s):Yeah. You got to run, run your own race, which is so hard to do. I mean, listen, it really, really is. But yeah. The only thing you, the only thing you can control is your output true. Which is horrible. I mean, I, I, for the first time, in two years that don't have anyone calling me today to be like, where are the pages? You know? Like, I mean, part of it too is it's, it's helpful when you have deadlines and pressure. That's why I love to grad school because I'm the second Monday of October, I was reading my play out loud. And so I had to go right. You know, make sure I write it. So I also feel like that's, without that, it's also, that's a hard thing about feeling like you're not moving forward too, is that lack of deadlines.3 (59m 19s):But again, you don't, you don't, you don't know how far your work is going and how who's reading it and what it will lead to the next time. And I mean, I've gotten, I've gotten rejected on so many things that have led to a meeting later, you know, like so many things that, so many jobs I wanted that I didn't get, but then later someone's like, oh, we read her for that. We should meet her for this. And I didn't get that job either, but, but it's like, it's just funny. So yeah,1 (59m 48s):Like leaving a whole blanket of your career and you never know, you know, w where this, where the threads are going to end up.3 (59m 55s):Absolutely. And every time I get bummed out, which is a lot, because I'm a writer, all writers gets on debt. I, I try to think about and visualize the stack of things. I'm going to write in my life. And when I get terrible notes or when I get clobbered with notes and I feel depressed, I also think about the stack of work that I'm going to do in my life and how this piece that I'm writing right now is just one of them, you know? And that, that's my, that's my real tombstone like that pile, you know?1 (1h 0m 22s):Oh, I love that. What a great image and what a great note to end on.4 (1h 0m 37s):If you liked what you heard today, please give us a positive five star review and subscribe and tell your friends. I survived. Theater school is an undeniable Inc production. Jen Bosworth, Ramirez, and Gina plegia are the co-hosts. This episode was produced, edited, and sound mixed by Gina for more information about this podcast or other goings on of undeniable, Inc. Please visit our website@undeniablewriters.com. You can also follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Thank you.

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher
Ep 747 | Still Got Banged Up…

Chewing the Fat with Jeff Fisher

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 49:17


Is Colin buried yet? Missing cups and containers oh my… Weekend email stories… Kenyans win NYC marathon... Oldest hiker record on Appalachian trail… Action packed Sundays… Subscribe to the YouTube Channel… Email to Chewingthefat@theblaze.com Subscribe www.blazetv.com/jeffy / Promo code jeffy… #ShaveHeadSaveHuman Eaten by piranhas escaping bees… Eternals weekend… Tiger King has cancer… Most Prescribed Drugs… New weight loss plant / drug… Hacking issues… Military and China… Biden / DOJ / FBI / Family… Haitian Kidnapping.. Mandate freeze… Pfizermectin… Night of the Long Fart… Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Black in Appalachia
Black in Appalachia: Sepia Tones

Black in Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 53:37


Black in Appalachia Initiative Director William Isom shares Sepia Tones: Exploring Black Appalachian Music. This series chronicles the experience of freed and escaped African slaves and their descendants in the development of what we know today as Appalachian music. 

The Aliso Creek Church Podcast
Scripture for Today | John 11:32-44 (with Pastor Nick)

The Aliso Creek Church Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 10:25


Opening Song: Never Lost by Chris Brown Steven Furtick Tiffany Hudson Lyrics: Miracles when You move Such an easy thing for You to do Your hand is moving right now You are still showing up At the tomb of every Lazarus Your voice is calling me out   Right now I know You're able My God come through again   You can do all things You can do all things but fail 'Cause You've never lost a battle No You've never lost a battle And I know​ ​I know You never will   Everything's possible By the power of the Holy Ghost A new wind is blowing right now Breaking my heart of stone Taking over like it's Jericho My walls are all crashing down   You've never lost a battle You've never lost a battle You've never lost a battle You never will Never never   Yes I know​ ​I know You never will I know​ ​I know You never will Passage:  32 Now when Mary came to where Jesus was and saw him, she fell at his feet, saying to him, “Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.” 33 When Jesus saw her weeping, and the Jews who had come with her also weeping, he was deeply moved in his spirit and greatly troubled. 34 And he said, “Where have you laid him?” They said to him, “Lord, come and see.” 35 Jesus wept. 36 So the Jews said, “See how he loved him!” 37 But some of them said, “Could not he who opened the eyes of the blind man also have kept this man from dying?” Jesus Raises Lazarus 38 Then Jesus, deeply moved again, came to the tomb. It was a cave, and a stone lay against it. 39 Jesus said, “Take away the stone.” Martha, the sister of the dead man, said to him, “Lord, by this time there will be an odor, for dhe has been dead four days.” 40 Jesus said to her, “Did I not tell you that if you believed you would see the glory of God?” 41 So they took away the stone. And Jesus lifted up his eyes and said, “Father, I thank you that you have heard me. 42 I knew that you always hear me, but I said this on account of the people standing around, that they may believe that you sent me.” 43 When he had said these things, he cried out with a loud voice, “Lazarus, come out.” 44 The man who had died came out, his hands and feet bound with linen strips, and his face wrapped with a cloth. Jesus said to them, “Unbind him, and let him go.” Musical Reflection:  “Amazing Grace,” Appalachian folk tune Reflection Notes:  This beloved tune, formally known as NEW BRITAIN, originates from the folk music of Appalachia. The melody is simple and outlines triads, making it memorable; the ascending line creates a triumphant climax.  Prayer: Almighty God, you have taught us through your Son that love is the fulfilling of the law. Grant that we may love you with our whole heart and our neighbors as ourselves; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. The Leonine Sacramentary

PBS NewsHour - Brief But Spectacular
A Brief But Spectacular take on rebuilding and diversifying the Appalachian economy

PBS NewsHour - Brief But Spectacular

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 3:31


Brandon Dennison is a sixth generation West Virginian who is on a mission to revitalize Appalachia. His community based non-profit, Colefield Development, has trained over 1200 people facing barriers to employment, helping with education and personal development. Dennison gives his Brief But Spectacular take on rebuilding the Appalachian economy, and making it sustainable in the process. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
A Brief But Spectacular take on rebuilding and diversifying the Appalachian economy

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 3:31


Brandon Dennison is a sixth generation West Virginian who is on a mission to revitalize Appalachia. His community based non-profit, Colefield Development, has trained over 1200 people facing barriers to employment, helping with education and personal development. Dennison gives his Brief But Spectacular take on rebuilding the Appalachian economy, and making it sustainable in the process. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

West Virginia Morning
A Conversation With An 'Urban' Appalachian On This West Virginia Morning

West Virginia Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 15:06


On this West Virginia Morning, for a lot of writers and publishers, Appalachia means stories of the country and the coal mining or farming experience, but that's not true for all Appalachian writers. We hear from Huntington-based author Marie Manilla who identifies as an “urban Appalachian.”

Hound PodCast: Double U Hunting Supply
EP 85: Gone to the Dogs in West Virginia

Hound PodCast: Double U Hunting Supply

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 66:44


In this episode Steve visits with a fellow West Virginia coon hunter.  The conversation looks hard at an equally hard and unforgiving area of the country in which to hunt raccoons, the same type of area that Steve experienced growing up and in the years prior to his coonhound registry career.  Guest Josh Muncy lives in Kermit, on the West Virginia side of the Tug River that separates the Mountain State from Kentucky, a land famous for the nation's most-publicized feud and believed to harbor more raccoon hunters than raccoons.  Muncy is gaining a considerable following for his Muncy Outdoors YouTube channel where he and his sons record their hunts for the family archives and in the process are now garnering an impressive number of viewers.  Steve breaks down Muncy's background, his affinity for pleasure coon hunting despite the adversity presented by harsh terrain and sparse raccoon populations, and the boys talk about favorite hounds and hunts gone by in those Appalachian hills.  Steve opens the episode with a recap of his recent trip to the mountains and reveals many of the memories the trip invoked at each turn in the area's ever-winding roads.  This is a feel-good episode that exposes the cusp of Fielder's podcasting effort; taking up-close and personal looks at the personalities that form, in his mind, the true foundation of the sport.

Stay Out Of The Attic
Appalachian Folklore and Campfire Stories

Stay Out Of The Attic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 30:02


Happy Halloween everyone! Enjoy this spooky little folklore short about some different legends and campfire stories surrounding the history of the Appalachians mountains and trails. Read this story after you are done for a creepy little dessert : https://www.blueridgeoutdoors.com/go-outside/appalachian-trail-ghost-story/Want to join my Patreon? You can here: https://www.patreon.com/stayoutoftheatticAnd here are my sources: https://piddlin.com/library/smoky-mountains/spearfinger , https://www.themoonlitroad.com/appalachian-mountain-culture-ghost-stories/ , https://www.appalachiabare.com/something-beyond-reason-not-ordinary-appalachias-folklore-creatures-part-1/ , https://www.appalachiabare.com/a-strange-and-frightful-being-appalachias-folklore-creatures-part-3/ , https://www.appalachianhistory.net/2020/10/tommy-knockers-mine-ghosts.html , https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/haunted-forests-north-america-visit-halloween.amp , https://www.looper.com/436493/the-appalachian-horror-mystery-thats-heating-up-on-netflix/ Background music credit here: Music: https://www.chosic.com/free-music/all/ , https://soundcloud.com/mcfunkypants2018

SBB Radio
The Appalachian Sunday Morning with Danny Hensley 10 - 31 - 2021

SBB Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 117:09


A weekly broadcast featuring all Gospel music selections with your program & station host - Danny Hensley. www.sbbradio.org www.sbbradio.net 91.7 FM Community Radio Quick Listen Link: https://station.voscast.com/5c2bf0e47fbe8/ https://sbbradio.listen2myshow.com/

Ep 27: Orangutan in a Coupe

"Hey, Quick Question" Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 92:12


An Orangutan with a sword?! Only an idiot would pick that choice! Welcome back to another episode of the best pod east of the Appalachian mountains. This weeks the crew discusses the tragedy Halyna Hutchins and Alec Baldwins' accidental shooting, Which horror movie villain would be best to survive against all the others, what it means for someone to be "out of your league", and a really really stupid question to end the show. It has a fucking sword! Intro Song Producer: https://instagram.com/prodsalem?utm_medium=copy_link (https://instagram.com/prodsalem)/ Art:https://twitter.com/SanshPixel?s=20 ( https://twitter.com/SanshPixel?s=20) Social:https://www.instagram.com/hqqpod/ ( https://www.instagram.com/hqqpod/)  https://twitter.com/HQQpodcast (https://twitter.com/HQQpodcast) https://www.instagram.com/yourpalyeehaw/ (https://www.instagram.com/yourpalyeehaw/) https://twitter.com/YourPalYeehaw?s=20 (https://twitter.com/YourPalYeehaw?s=20) https://www.instagram.com/samarakay_/ (https://www.instagram.com/samarakay_/) https://twitter.com/samarakayy_?s=20 (https://twitter.com/samarakayy_?s=20) https://twitter.com/RadsDadsClub/

The Long Thread Podcast
Cassie Dickson, Coverlet Weaver & Sericulturist

The Long Thread Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 38:14


Whether it's growing and processing fiber or embroidering with handspun, hand-dyed linen thread, Cassie has always looked at traditional textiles and said, "I have to learn to do that." She's learned to split cane and weave baskets in the Cherokee style, ret flax in dew, and weave an overshot coverlet in two weeks. Having learned the old skills, she gladly teaches anyone who wants to know, just as fiber "grandmothers" did for her. The preservation of old textile skills runs deep in the Southeast and Appalachian communities where coverlets and silk-raising and natural dyeing took root. Cassie follows in the footsteps of Craft Revival movement, which led to the founding of folk and craft schools in the Southeast, and the Deerfield Society of Blue and White Needlework, which revived interest in colonial needlework of New England. Cassie Dickson is leading her part of a textile craft revival—and we're invited to join in.

Thaddeus Ellenburg's Casual Friday
Ginsengers vs. Mossers: Part Two

Thaddeus Ellenburg's Casual Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 29:58


Appalachian foragers vie for territory in the hills and hollows of North Carolina. Written and Read by Thaddeus Ellenburg. Produced by Thaddeus Ellenburg. Intro and Outro by Nicole Calasich. Series Artwork by Adrienne Lobl.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thaddeus Ellenburg's Casual Friday
Ginsengers vs. Mossers: Part One

Thaddeus Ellenburg's Casual Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:14


Appalachian foragers vie for territory in the hills and hollows of North Carolina. Written and Read by Thaddeus Ellenburg. Produced by Thaddeus Ellenburg. Intro and Outro by Nicole Calasich. Series Artwork by Adrienne Lobl.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Mythoholics
41: LEGEND: The Appalachian Tales

Mythoholics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 36:22


Follow us on social media @mythoholicspodcast  Like what you hear? Leave a review!  Now available on Amazon Music! 

Building Local Power
Reshaping Appalachia's Coal-Centric Economy with Bottom Up Solutions

Building Local Power

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 45:55


Host Jess Del Fiacco and ILSR's Brenda Platt are joined by Jacob Hannah, Conservation Director at Coalfield Development. Coalfield Development works across many sectors -- solar energy, agriculture, manufacturing, deconstruction, reuse, and more --  as it pursues its mission of rebuilding the Appalachian economy. … Read More

Tell Me Something True with Laura McKowen
Frank X. Walker on Poetry's Urgent Intimacy

Tell Me Something True with Laura McKowen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 59:35


When was the last time an artist took you by the hand and said, “Here, let me show you how the world looks through my eyes”? Frank X. Walker is Kentucky's former poet laureate and one of the co-founders of the Affrilachian Poets - a grassroots group of poets of color living in the Appalachian region. Thirty years after their founding, the Affrilachian Poets continue to dismantle the idea that Appalachia is a white region, devoid of literature and the arts. For decades, Frank's work has embodied a deeply personal approach and challenged us to see poetry as an urgent voice that can touch on our experience of living in a way other written works can't. Today, Frank is the Director of the MFA program of the University of Kentucky and he's mentored hundreds of artists along their path. He's the author and editor of a dozen books of poetry and, as you'll hear, Frank is a lovely, thoughtful, and really cool guy. You can find Frank here: http://frankxwalker.com/index.html Check out his books here: http://frankxwalker.com/books.html Spotify playlist for this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0djkPzw8PWwpv9qaixNZkX Tell Me Something True is a 100% independent podcast. There are no corporations or advertisers backing this community. We are 100% funded by the TMST community. Support TMST today so you can hear the uncut interviews, attend private events with Laura and help keep TMST ad-free: https://tmst.supercast.com/

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?
From the Field Series: Isabella Copeland

Why are We Talking about Rabbits?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 33:48


The From the Field Series is a conversation between First Things Foundation Field Workers and John as they explore the lesser talked about aspects of life. This is not a series devoted to what FTF does per se, but rather, a meaningful look at how experiences and decisions shape our lives.This week Isabella Copeland joins us from our Appalachian site to talk about her experience as a hospital chaplain and her intimate and life changing experience with death and those coming to terms with it.WAWTAR now has a Facebook group: Why Are We Talking About (More) Rabbits? Join us for more conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/797121200908155Interested in joining First Things Foundation? We are looking to send people to Sierra Leone and the Georgian Republic! Check out our Join FTF page: https://first-things.org/opportunities for more info, or email Daniel at danielpadrnos@first-things.orgGagimargos! Wait, what does that mean? Learn more about the Georgian Supra, why it's integral too our work, and its symbolic significance here: https://thesymbolicworld.com/articles/the-symbolism-of-the-supra/If you like this podcast, please consider leaving a review with your comments. Your support keeps this podcast alive and allows us to broaden our discussion. You can also check out First Things Foundation: https://first-things.org/ for more information on who we are and what we do.You can support our work around the world and this podcast by visiting https://first-things.org/donate - all recurring donors will also gain access to our weekly Podcourse: https://first-things.org/wawtar-podcourse where we further explore New World, Old World themes in an online class setting (capped off by a Supra dinner at the end of the semester).---CreditsMusic:Intro / Outro Provided by Edward Gares / Pond5.comSound effects and additional music:Sounds provided by https://www.zapsplat.comSupport the show (https://first-things.org/donate)

Mountain Mysteries: Tales from Appalachia
Appalachian Superstitions

Mountain Mysteries: Tales from Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 29:49


Join us for our Halloween Spooktacular!  Holly dives into some superstitions that originated right here in the Appalachian Mountains.  How many of these do you do? Follow us on all the things!Facebook: Mountain Mysteries: Tales from AppalachiaInstagram: Mountainmysteries.appalachiaGmail: mountainmysteries.appalachian@gmail.comPatreon: Patreon.com/mountainmysteriesSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/mountainmysteries )

Then Again with Ken and Glen
E90 The Role of Music in Appalachia

Then Again with Ken and Glen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 19:40


Episode Notes Dr. Esther Morgan-Ellis joins us to explore the ways in which music has played and continues to play an essential role in Appalachian culture and history. The origins of traditional Appalachian instruments, the varied forms of song and dance, and the popular tunes that have lasted through the years will be discussed in this episode. Find out more at http://www.thenagainpodcast.com

D2R Podcast Network
Think Tank Podcast - Missing Van Life: The Case of Gabby Petito and Brian ”Dirty” Laundrie

D2R Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 148:38


Dreem2Reality Entertainment presents the Think Tank Podcast.   On today's show: Ryan and Dave host! The guys spend the entire episode breaking down the timeline of the Gabby Petito and Brian Laundrie cross country road trip, the missing and then found dead body of Gabby, and the now currently missing Brian. The guys also discuss Dog the bounty hunter's involvement, the numerous hikers that have claimed to have seen Brian on the Appalachian trail, as well as how a forensic artist believes Brian will change his look to hide his identity. The guys watch an interview with John Walsh and his astounding, and for fans of Ryan - a familiar statement, that John directs towards Brian Laundrie. The guys round out the show with their own theories of what happened and what they believe will be the final outcome for "dirty" Laundrie. Enjoy.   Subscribe to the D2R Podcast Network on the Apple Podcast app and don't forget to rate and review while you're there. You can also find the D2R Podcast Network on any podcast streaming app. Just search: D2R PODCAST NETWORK and subscribe.   The guys would love to hear from you! Call the podcast hotline and have your voice heard. Dial 872-242-8311 (USA-CHAT-311) and leave a message!   If you enjoy listening to The D2R Podcast Network, then spread the word to everyone you know. Your word of mouth is our best advertising method and we appreciate your support. Thanks for listening and share!

The Green Tunnel
What Came Before

The Green Tunnel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 43:45


In this episode of The Green Tunnel we tell the story of the settler communities that existed along the route of the Appalachian Trail before the AT arrived. We've chosen three examples of those communities, each of which helps tell the story of life in the Appalachian mountains before Benton MacKaye dreamed up the AT in 1921. One community was home to people recently emancipated from enslavement, another was a thriving coal mining and railroad town until the mines played out, and the people of the third community had to rally their friends and neighbors to try to find a little boy who had wandered away from his schoolhouse in 1891. What was life like in the Appalachian mountains before the trail? Find show notes, including a full transcript, at https://greentunnel.rrchnm.org/episode-2-what-came-before/.

Dark Corners
Ep. 13: Wraiths of the Appalachian, "Night Flight"

Dark Corners

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 39:12


Wraiths of the Appalachian comes to a roaring conclusion as Eddie and the phantom wolfdog Snarly Yow follow their last directions from the mysterious Mr. D, which take them to South Mountain State Park in Maryland. But the adventure doesn't end there. You'll have to finish the rest of this terrifying wild ride to reach the terrifying climax of this final chapter of ghosts, cryptids, and other "ultra-terrestrials."

Appodlachia
#105: Appalachian TikTok Legend Danielle Kirk

Appodlachia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 45:50


Danielle Kirk is a native of Mingo County, WV currently lives in Eastern Kentucky who has made a name for herself for being a strong and positive voice for Appalachia on TikTok to her over 140,000 followers and counting.  We talk about where she grew up, her thoughts on Appalachian stereotypes, and why Charles Booker needs to do more to reach the people of Eastern Kentucky!Follow Danielle on TikTok!: www.tiktok.com/@daniellekirk731Transition Music: “Me and the Redbird River” by Carla Gover https://carlagover.com/ Ad-free episodes, bonus content, live events and more for as little as $5 a month - http://www.patreon.com/appodlachia

Apocrypals
96: The Goku of Judaism (Stories of the Baal Shem Tov)

Apocrypals

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 76:12


Happy Halloween, FIENDS and NeighBOOs! It's the spookiest time of year, and to get in the SPIRIT, we're reading about how the Master of The Good Name and founder of Hassidic Judaism fought a werewolf and then out-lawyered a ghost in front of God Himself. No, really. It's exactly as rad as it sounds. Topics of Discussion: AHH!BBA, a spooky film recommendation, the RAMBAM, the RADR, etc, the Appalachians of Dracula, Barovia, a very suspect ingredient, a ghost murderer who has a pretty good point actually.  Hymnal: “Werewolf Bar Mitzvah” by Tracy Morgan, “Monster Mash” by Bobby “Boris” Pickett  Offertory: As Enoch writes, "Whoever of you spends gold or silver for his brother's sake, he will receive ample treasure in the world to come." Support the show via http://ko-fi.com/apocrypals, or check out Official Apocrypals merchandise designed by Erica Henderson! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/apocrypals?ref_id=18246 Black Lives Matter. Trans Lives Matter. Heck 12. Isaiah 54:17

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review
Denis Villeneuve, Dune, The French Dispatch, The Harder They Fall and The Boss Baby 2: Family Business

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 139:41


Simon and Mark's guest is Denis Villeneuve, who talks about his film Dune, based on Frank Herbert's 1965 science fiction novel and starring Timothée Chalamet, Rebecca Ferguson and Zendaya. Plus we have reviews of The Boss Baby 2: Family Business, in which the grown Templeton brothers have become and drifted away from each other; The Harder They Fall, Jeymes Samuel's Western starring Regina King; Wes Anderson's The French Dispatch, set in an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional twentieth century French city, starring Léa Seydoux, Timothée Chalamet and Christoph Waltz; Dear Evan Hansen, the film adaptation of the Tony and Grammy Award-winning musical about Evan Hansen, a high school senior with Social Anxiety disorder and his journey of self-discovery and acceptance following the suicide of a fellow classmate; Bigfoot Hunters, in which a clickbait journalist is sent to the Appalachian foothills to cover a Bigfoot Convention and discovers there's more to this listicle than meets the eye; The Bacchus Lady, which deals with the issue of elderly prostitution in South Korea and Lucky Chan-sil, about a film producer who finds herself unemployed with the sudden death of her long-time collaborated director. Mark and Simon also talk you through the best and worst films on subscription-free TV next week, and recommend a home entertainment purchase in DVD of the Week. Send us your sub 20 second instant reaction to any film attached to an email to mayo@bbc.co.uk for our feature ‘Lobby Correspondents'. . Download our podcast from the Baby Sea Clowns app. We welcome your contributions: Email: mayo@bbc.co.uk Twitter: @wittertainment

Middle Tech
167. Boom Beans: Kyle Wilson on Promoting Entrepreneurship in Appalachian High Schools

Middle Tech

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 20:01


Kyle Wilson is the CEO and Founder of Boom Beans, an Appalachian-based organization working to help teach high school students about entrepreneurship through hands-on experience of starting their own businesses. We discuss Kyle's background prior to starting Boom Beans, the mission of the organization, and their progress to date. Learn more about Boom Beans at BoomBeans.org Visit us at MiddleTechPod.com Twitter Instagram Facebook LinkedIn Evan's Twitter Logan's Twitter

Ignorance Was Bliss
362 -- Neck Injuries Are Not Required -- with Kendall and Sarah from Appalachian Mysteria

Ignorance Was Bliss

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 70:29


When a conversation touches on podcasting, journalism, ethics, ethos, decapitation and cryptids, despite my unabashed fangirling? It's good stuff.Guests: Kendall and Sarah, Appalachian Mysteria (Jam Street Media)Book: The WVU Coed Murders: Who Killed Mared and Karen? -- https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B09G8Q9FNL/------------------------True Crime Podcast Reviews and Recommendations group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/201821154596270Promo: Crime of Your LifeDisclaimer: Melanie, Mask of SanityMusic: Jake Pierle -- https://jakepierle.bandcamp.com/------------------------Facebook group: The Asylum -- https://bit.ly/iwbasylumDiscord server: Ignorance Was Bliss Satellite Campus -- https://bit.ly/iwbdiscordMerch: https://bit.ly/iwbpodcastmerchPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/IWBpodcastTikTok (@iwbpodcast): Podcast ChecklistSponsor: Bath By Bex (code CBDkate for 15% off)

Afropop Worldwide
The Black History Of The Banjo

Afropop Worldwide

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 59:00


We trace the history of this most American of instruments from its ancestors in West Africa through the Caribbean and American South and into the present, as a new generation of Black women artists reclaim the banjo as their own. Rhiannon Giddens, Bassekou Kouyate, Bela Fleck and more talk claw-hammers, trad jazz, Appalachian folk, African ancestors and the on-going story of American music, which would be woefully incomplete without a Black history of the banjo. Produced by Ben Richmond