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Best podcasts about Adjunct professor

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Latest podcast episodes about Adjunct professor

The Roundtable
1/17/22 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 79:45


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

Great Women In Fraud
Episode 61 Kristy Grant Clark

Great Women In Fraud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:05


Kristy Grant-Hart, CEO of Spark Compliance Consulting, a London, Los Angeles, and Atlanta-based consultancy providing pragmatic, pro-business, proportionate compliance ethics solutions. She is the creator of Compliance Competitor, an facilitated online training game built on business simulation software.She's the author of the best-selling book, "How to Be a Wildly Effective Compliance Officer." In addition, Ms. Grant-Hart was an Adjunct Professor at Delaware Law School, Widener University, teaching Global Compliance and Ethics. She can be found at www.ComplianceKristy.com. She's a board member of the Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics and Health Care Compliance Association, as well as the AIDS Healthcare Foundation UK.Show Notes:https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristygranthart/https://www.sparkcompliance.com/   

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Investing and Life Lessons from Lou Simpson | Lumpy 15 Percent > Smooth 12 Percent

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 47:52


In this episode, co-hosts Phil Ordway, Elliot Turner, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) investing and life lessons learned from the late Lou Simpson; and (ii) Buffett's quote, “Charlie (Munger) and I would much rather earn a lumpy 15 percent over time than a smooth 12 percent.” Enjoy the conversation!   The primary purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. The views, information, or opinions expressed by hosts or guests are their own. Neither this show, nor any of its content should be construed as investment advice or as a recommendation to buy or sell any particular security. Security specific information shared on this podcast should not be relied upon as a basis for your own investment decisions -- be sure to do your own research. The podcast hosts and participants may have a position in the securities mentioned, personally, through sub accounts and/or through separate funds and may change their holdings at any time.   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.

America The BREW-tiful
Season 2: Episode 22 (1/14/2022) - Happy Anniversary Icarus!

America The BREW-tiful

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 58:52


Jason, founder of Icarus Brewing, joins us to talk about Icarus's upcoming 5th Anniversary on Saturday 1/15/22.  Big beers being sold for take home and big beers being poured for anyone who stops by to celebrate...yes we are looking at you!  The Adjunct Professor will be there so get yourself there and tick a couple beers with the Tick Monster himself.  Thank you to Jason for being a great guest and best of luck to him on his fifth year in business.  What a great achievement!

The Roundtable
1/14/22 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 78:05


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Former EPA Regional Administrator, Visiting Professor at Bennington College, and President of Beyond Plastics Judith Enck, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, and Albany County District Attorney David Soares.

Flow Research Collective Radio
Peak Performance Leadership Fundamentals From A Navy SEAL Commander

Flow Research Collective Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 57:38


TODAY´S EPISODE IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FLOW RESEARCH COLLECTIVE Are you an entrepreneur, a leader, or a knowledge worker, who wants to harness the power of flow so you can get more done in less time with greater ease and accomplish your boldest professional goals faster? If you´ve answered this question with “hell yes” then our peak-performance training Zero to Dangerous may be a good fit for you. If this sounds of interest to you all you need to do is go to getmoreflow.com right now, pop in your application and one of our team members will be in touch with you very soon.  --- "Vulnerability comes from the heart and this recognition that we are flawed." ~ Mark Divine ABOUT THE GUEST: Mark Divine is an expert in human performance as it is displayed in mental toughness, leadership and physical readiness. His work is based on an integral warrior-leader model that he developed and tested on over a thousand special operations candidates worldwide. The integrated training, which involves physical, mental, emotional, intuitional and spiritual training, has resulted in over a 90% success rate for the Spec Ops candidates. It is now taught to executives and corporate teams, tops sports teams, top athletes, professionals, first responders and warriors from all walks of life. Mark is the founder and leader of several highly successful enterprises including SEALFIT (Physical and mental training), Unbeatable Mind, LLC (Executive Mastery Development), NavySEALs.com and USCrossFit. He also co-founded the Coronado Brewing Company in Coronado, CA. SEALFIT developed out of the Navy's SEAL candidate Mentoring program, which took the pass rate for Navy SEAL candidates from 33% to over 80% on the Physical Screening Test at Navy Boot Camp. This program was instrumental in helping the Navy grow the size and quality of the SEAL force. Mark's other professional experience includes 20 years as a Navy SEAL officer, retiring as a Commander in 2011. Also 4 years as a CPA with the firm now known as PriceWaterhouseCoopers prior to his joining the Navy. As a reserve SEAL he led several prominent projects, including the Navy's internal study on whether to support the invitation of USMC into the Special Operations Command. Mark served as Adjunct Professor of Leadership at the University of San Diego and has authored four books: "The Way of the SEAL," published by Reader's Digest Publishing, "8 Weeks to SEALFIT" and "Kokoro Yoga" by St. Martin's Press, "Unbeatable Mind" and the "SEALFIT Training Guide," both self-published. --- If you order Steven's new book, The Art of Impossible, right now, you'll get $1,500 of free bonuses immediately dropped into your inbox.  They include secret chapters he has never released, masterclasses on key skills to help you jack up motivation, heighten creativity, and accelerate learning. You'll also get an entirely free training to help you fight distraction and spend more time in flow.  So click the link here, snag yourself a copy of The Art of Impossible, and let's get after it.

Financially Ever After
Navigating the Demands of Life and Starting 2022 in Balance

Financially Ever After

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 34:57


Dr. Randy Heller is a marriage and family therapist, collaborative mental health professional, and Adjunct Professor at Nova Southeastern University. She founded The Family Network, Inc., a comprehensive counseling center providing individual, couple, family, and group services to children, adolescents, and adults. In this episode, she talks with Stacy Francis about navigating the demands of life and starting the new year in balance and shares an action plan to make 2022 your best year. Thanksgiving to Christmas is typically a period of fear and uncertainty for families going through divorce. Many women experience fear of the unknown; they wonder if they will be alone forever and whether they can manage being on their own. You need to give yourself permission to be the best you can, rather than being perfect. If you allow yourself a day or two where you don't hold yourself to the ideal you, you can take that time to rest and recharge so you can resume meeting your personal expectations. When you find yourself in massive internal chaos, stop for a moment to just breathe. If you can breathe easily, then you can think about your next step. Like yoga, if you're not focused on what you're doing at the moment, you're going to fall. Worrying about all the ‘shoulds' will only prevent you from actually doing things. Instead, pay attention to the things you can manage today, and celebrate those accomplishments. The rest can be done tomorrow. Resources Dr. Randy Heller on LinkedIn FamilyNetworkFlorida.com Stacy Francis on LinkedIn | Twitter Email: stacy@francisfinancial.com FrancisFinancial.com Reach out to receive a complimentary consultation! Contact Francis Financial at +212-374-9008 or visit Francis Financial today!

Exposing Mold
Episode 50 - Dampness and Mold Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DMHS) Explained Dr. Tamara Tuuminen

Exposing Mold

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 61:46


Episode 50- Dampness and Mold Hypersensitivity Syndrome (DMHS) Explained  Dr. Tamara TuuminenDr. Tamara Tuuminen, MD, PhD, is a Clinical Microbiologist, Adjunct Professor, and Principal Investigator for ISLAB Mikkeli at the University of Helinski, Finland. After her experiences with falling ill from toxic mold in her workplace, her research shifted towards understanding more about the health effects of exposures to building dampness and mold. She has studied the subject extensively and is one of the rare physician scientists that understands  hypersensitization from exposures. In this episode Dr. Tuuminen provides our audience with an in depth presentation of her research findings and how DMHS differs from CFS, TILT, and CIRS diagnoses. She also provides recommendations on how to recover from exposures. Want to contribute to our efforts? Visit our GoFundMe page to donate today: gofund.me/daf1233e Transcript: https://bit.ly/3rlMzxh Click here to obtain this show's resources page: https://bit.ly/3F93LLeFind us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YoutubeNeed help navigating your mold injury without breaking the bank? Join our low cost education group:  bitly.com/exposingmoldeducationSponsors: Michael Rubino, The Mold Medic and  All American Restoration,  the first and only mold remediation company in the country specializing in remediating mold for people with underlying health conditions or mold sensitivities. They've quickly become the most recommended remediation company  from doctors and mold inspectors nationwide. Pick up your copy of Michael Rubino's book, “The Mold Medic: An Expert's Guide on Mold Remediation, " here: https://amzn.to/3t7wtaUMymycolab specializes in a precise form of mycotoxin testing by analyzing a patient's IgG and IgE antibodies in a blood serum sample, producing results you can trust. Visit mymycolab.com to order your test today.Support the show (https://www.gofund.me/daf1233e)

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

How to Understand and Treat Psychosis: An interview with Maggie Mullen, LCSW Curt and Katie interview Maggie Mullen, LCSW, a national trainer on culturally responsive, evidence-based care for psychotic spectrum disorders. We talk with Maggie about her anti-racist and disability justice framework of psychosis, understanding psychosis on a spectrum, what to do when psychosis enters the treatment picture, assessment of psychosis, and treatment using Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). We also talk about how society defines “normal” and pathology, exploring cultural differences in these definitions. Interview with Maggie Mullen, LCSW Maggie Mullen, LCSW (they/them) is a clinical social worker, national trainer, community activist, and author of The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Psychosis. Maggie specializes in culturally responsive, evidence-based care for psychotic spectrum disorders, trauma and PTSD, the LBGTQ+ community, and formerly incarcerated people. As a training director at Kaiser Permanente, they take great pride in mentoring, training, and supervising the next generation of social workers. You can find them online at www.maggiemullen.com In this podcast episode we talk about looking at psychosis differently We started the conversation on psychosis when we were looking at conspiracy theories. We know that folks who believe in conspiracy theories and those who have a diagnosis of psychosis are different, but knew that we needed a deeper dive into how to understand and treat psychosis. We dig deeply into this conversation in this week's podcast episode: Maggie Mullen's anti-racist and disability justice framework of psychosis “People with psychosis [are] being overly institutionalized… over medicated or highly focused on medication as the sole treatment. And particularly for our… black, indigenous, and folks of color experiencing psychosis, and people who are being shot and killed by police… when they're out responding to their symptoms in a public way, or being incarcerated and not receiving treatment.” Maggie came from a community organizing background Inequity and lack of resources for people who experience chronic psychosis The focus on medication rather than other forms of treatment for psychosis BIPOC individuals being shot by police when psychosis shows up in a public space “Psychotic spectrum” versus the segregation of psychosis as “other” “We are often the least prepared to deal with our most acute clients” The continued segregation of psychotic disorders Cultural considerations when determining what is psychosis or other types of experiences The lack of inclusion of psychosis in the research Psychosis is not “other” but is actually a spectrum of behaviors and are very common The symptoms of psychosis are not constant, they fluctuate for every individual The importance of following the model and voices of the disability justice movement Including education on the treatment for psychosis, rather than allowing therapists to opt out Folks with psychosis are often not included in the research, which needs to change What to do when psychosis comes into the treatment picture for our clients “The reality is there are wonderful outcomes, I think, for people with psychosis, when we look at it from a different perspective. Which is to say – what if some of the work might be on changing your symptoms themselves? But what if part of the work is actually on accepting your experiences so that you can just experience less stress with them?” We need more training on psychosis to feel confident Normalizing the experience of psychosis Helping to make peace with psychotic symptoms (i.e., making friends with the voices) to decrease distress Looking at treatments beyond medication How to identify psychosis and assess for impact and impairment The myth that all elements of psychosis are distressing and bad Why Maggie Mullen is using Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) to treat psychosis “People with psychosis deal with emotion dysregulation, actually more so than the average person…that's where we know DBT is really effective” We frequently underestimate the ability to help folks with psychosis Using DBT skills for emotion regulation concerns that frequently come up in psychosis Psychosis and PTSD oftentimes occur together and aren't always diagnosed Trauma can influence the onset of psychosis AND psychosis can be traumatic Maggie's pilot program with DBT for psychosis The concrete and straight forward nature of DBT skills make them very accessible Understanding psychosis differently, including the cultural differences of what is “normal” How to identify what is “real” and what is psychosis How do you define what is normal for someone? What do we decide what we pathologize? Breaking up the binary of normal or not normal – reframing as “experience” The importance of understanding what is negatively impacting the client and how to keep clients safe Take the lead of your client and trust that they know themselves best The tension between taking the lead of the client and mandates and requirements as a therapist The Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Psychosis by Maggie Mullen, LCSW Maggie wrote a book to democratize DBT skills Using DBT, but making the skills more concrete and accessible Our Generous Sponsor for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Buying Time LLC Buying Time is a full team of Virtual Assistants, with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support, customer service, and email management to marketing and bookkeeping. They've got you covered. Don't know where to start? Check out the systems inventory checklist which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated asap. You can find that checklist at http://buyingtimellc.com/systems-checklist/ Buying Time's VA's support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting, email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly. With a full team of VA's it gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available. Book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need - https://buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation/   Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Maggie's website Maggie on Instagram The DBT Skills Workbook for Psychosis by Maggie Mullen, LCSW   Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: Conspiracy Theories in Your Office Fixing Mental Healthcare in America: Serious Mental Illness and Homeless Fixing Mental Healthcare in America: Psychiatric Crises in the Emergency Room Fixing Mental Healthcare in America: Peer Support Specialists   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/ Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated): Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide is sponsored by Buying Time   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Buying Time has a full team of virtual assistants with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support customer service and email management to marketing and bookkeeping, they've got you covered. Don't know where to start, check out the system's inventory checklist, which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated ASAP. You can find that checklist at buying time. llc.com forward slash systems stash checklist.   Curt Widhalm  00:31 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Announcer  00:34 You're listening to the modern therapist survival guide where therapists live, breed and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:49 Welcome back modern therapist. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about all sorts of stuff and just my continued ability or inability to introduce episodes well here but   Katie Vernoy  01:06 yes, yes.   Curt Widhalm  01:07 Recently, we had an episode on conspiracy theories. We very, very briefly talked about the difference between people who are following conspiracy theories and psychosis. We did an almost barely adequate job of talking about it and decided that we needed to follow up with somebody could who could help us talk about psychosis a little bit more deeply. And so we have a guest today, Maggie Mullen LCSW w. And they are a fantastic resource when it comes to working with psychosis and very glad to have them with us here today. So thank you very much, Maggie, for joining us.   Maggie Mullen  01:49 Thanks so much for having me, Curt. And Katie.   Katie Vernoy  01:51 So glad to have you here. Like I told you before we got started, we needed somebody to talk about psychosis saw that you had sent in a little pitch to us. And we're like, oh my gosh, this is perfect. We're so excited. And I can't wait to kind of get to meet you here on the podcast. But let's, let's have everyone meet you and say what we always say to all our guests, who are you? And what are you putting out to the world.   Maggie Mullen  02:12 As Curt mentioned, Maggie Mullen, LCSW I use they them pronouns. And I am an author and trainer. And what I am working right now to put out into the world is an anti racist and disability justice approach to working with people experiencing psychosis that really focuses on centering their experiences and needs. And one of the ways that I'm really going about that right now is by offering DBT informed treatment to people who are struggling with psychotic spectrum disorders like schizophrenia, schizoaffective, disorder, bipolar disorder, etc.   Curt Widhalm  02:43 You get into this work, that a lot of therapists have their own stories that just what's your story as far as getting into working with psychosis, and really having this level of passion for it?   Maggie Mullen  02:59 So I come from a community organizing background, right, a lot of the work that I was doing before grad school was really centered around how do we bring communities together to fight for change. And I chose a path of social work, because I really wanted to have the opportunity to do both that macro kind of bigger level practice, but also help individuals because I was somebody who was able to connect with people pretty well and really enjoyed that part of the work. And as I was in grad school, learning more about mental health and kind of being in that part of the field, the thing I kept seeing over and over again, was the inequity and really lack of resources for people who are experiencing psychosis in a chronic way. And the way that, you know, that kind of shows up and at least at US, US society is, you know, seen people with psychosis being overly institutionalized, you know, really over medicated or highly focused on medication as the sole treatment. And particularly for our, you know, black indigenous and folks of color experiencing psychosis, and people who are being shot and killed by police, right when they're out of responding to their symptoms in a public way, or being incarcerated and not receiving treatment. And for me, that just felt like a call to action to say, I want to get involved in this area that really needs to be expanded. And I think one additional piece is if you look at almost any piece of literature in our field, right? So if you're like nerd like me, you want to go and do research about something. If you look into almost any psychotherapy treatment, you'll see that there's a rule out for participants who experienced psychosis. And that's really widespread across almost all therapies. And I find this odd because the same type of like what we used to call delusional beliefs we now call distressing beliefs or distorted beliefs, those same types of things happen in other diagnoses, right? We see this in eating disorders, right? People who have such distorted beliefs about their bodies to the point that they're willing to, you know, encounter significant health issues in order to engage in certain behaviors, right or even with depression, right, where we have distorted beliefs about your self worth to the point that you're willing to hurt yourself. but we don't exclude people so aggressively from treatment as we do with psychosis. And for me, that's really kind of a question that I kept coming on grad school, like, why this group? Why are we segregating them in this kind of way that's leading to, you know, high rates of suicide, high rates of incarceration, all those things that I mentioned before, that are just poor quality of life issues for these folks.   Curt Widhalm  05:20 So to ask maybe an obvious question here. Why, why what have you found out and asking this big question, what is our system have against psychosis? Is it fear from treatment professionals in the past? I'm sure that you've come up with some at least explanatory answers here.   Maggie Mullen  05:41 Yeah, there's not one right answer, I think is part of this, right. Like, if we went back really far in history, one of the things that we would see is that across cultures, right, there are really different approaches to psychosis, right? We see in a lot of indigenous cultures, the idea that people with psychosis are actually, you know, accessing other states of reality, and that scene is a strength, right? And something that's really valued, right, like people who are medicine are healers. And we don't see that particularly in white society in the US, right, where we're really have kind of more colon colonized mindset. But I think a lot of this comes from fear, right? Just the idea that I don't understand maybe what's happening to this person, they're behaving in a way that's, you know, erratic in my eyes, when it can't really get into their, you know, headspace and understand what they're experiencing. And I think that's part of how our field is responded, because if we look back at Dr. Aaron Beck, right, the creator of CBT, who just passed recently, he was doing trials of CBT, with people with psychosis back in 1950s. And for some reason, and I don't know all the reasons why his research kind of stopped around that point, right, kind of hit a dead end. And then we just kind of started offering these things to people with more like depression, anxiety, etc. I think part of this is just again, that fear that you mentioned, Curt, more than anything, unfortunately,   Katie Vernoy  05:45 when we look at this, there are folks who try to exclude psychosis from their practices, especially private practices. But we can't always exclude it. Right? Like there are times when it comes into our office, we've an established relationship with the client, and we can't always exclude and I'm not saying that we should always exclude it. I think that's part of the problem. But when we don't when we actually start working with psychosis, because it is so... I don't even know what the right word is...kind of fringe, maybe to our profession. I mean, I even think about I know you do DBT for psychosis, I've talked with DBT centers that say if they have psychosis, they shouldn't be doing DBT. I mean, like, there's, there seems like there's not really guidance, when whether you invite or exclude psychosis, when it shows up in your office, it seems like there's there's an opportunity for us to really do it wrong. And so I mean, typically, we asked what a therapist get wrong. So I guess I'm asking that question. But I, I'm trying to sort out kind of even how to get to the correct question, because it seems like part of what we get wrong as we exclude these folks from our practice. But if they show up, I imagine there's stuff that we're really getting wrong in the room and in the treatment planning.   Maggie Mullen  08:18 Yeah, I think part of this is that combination of we need clinicians to have more training across the board and treating psychosis. And again, I think with these newer wave therapies, like CBT, for psychosis, act for psychosis, more DBT skills kind of approach that are really emerging as very strong in the literature and really effective for people. And that are offered, but just not I think, in a very widespread way, again, at least in the US. And so I think part of it is we need clinicians with more training, so they feel more competent. And I think part of where we get things wrong, is that we think of psychosis as like these people over there, right? We kind of again, like you said, kind of put them in like a box segregated in some way. And the way that we really approach psychosis now in a kind of more modern or progressive sense, is that there's really a spectrum of psychosis. Right. On one end of the spectrum, we see people with less distressing less bothersome experiences of psychosis. And that for like, for me, for example, that looks like I'm on call for my work every once in a while, and I My phone has to be on 24/7 because I might be calling the emergency room to do an evaluation. And what will happen to me occasionally is I will think I hear my phone rang, and I will look down and I'll see no miss call, right? And I'll like say to my partner like hey, did you see Did you hear my phone ring? And they're like, No, that's an experience of an auditory hallucination, right. I've just had experience of psychosis. And on the other side of the spectrum, we have more of these distressing chronic life impairing experiences like psychosis that are more common for people who get diagnosed with schizoaffective sorta are psychotic spectrum disorder of some kind. And people who experienced those diagnoses fluctuate on the scale in the same way, right? That they are doing better at certain points, or their symptoms are not as distressing, etc. And part of the reason we frame it in this way now is to normalize the experience of psychosis that at some point, almost all of us will have some experience of psychosis. And I think when we look at it from that perspective, it feels less scary to approach psychosis. And I think also it can instill some hope that I think a lot of therapists don't have when they work with psychosis, right? We feel like, it feels hopeless, nothing's going to change, things are not going to get better. But we get training, I think and experience in that way. And the reality is there are wonderful outcomes, I think, for people with psychosis, when we look at it from a different perspective, which is to say, what if some of the work might be on changing your symptoms themselves? But what if part of the work is actually on acccepting your experiences so that you can just experience less stress with them? Right, so how do I make friends with my voices? So they don't bother me in the same way? Or how do I have to, like, do education with somebody's loved ones and families or societies to accommodate the fact that this person may need to, you know, do certain things to manage their psychotic symptoms, right. And that's just a normal part of their experience, rather than a pathologized experience. So I think these are ways as therapists that we have been getting things wrong historically. But we also know that there's plenty of ways that we can shift that with training with education, to make ourselves feel more confident doing this work   Curt Widhalm  11:37 The longer that we do this podcast more than I recognize that maybe my graduate training was not the greatest. And I'm trying to recall back to the way that we were educated on it. And it just seems to have been like one class in like the the psychopathology class that was just kind of, here's defining what it is. And if you ever end up working on it, then you'll get trained at your site. And it really kind of allowed for opting out of even having to learn about it. And my experience across time has been that it still shows up in my office that clients still present with this kind of stuff. Where do you see, you know, if my experience is really bad, where do you see graduate education needing to go as far as removing some of this fear or other ring of psychotic spectrum as a thing that needs to be feared?   Maggie Mullen  12:43 I think it starts with following the model and the experiences of the Disability Justice Movement, right, I think the thing that we can do first and foremost, is bring in the voices of people who experience psychosis themselves, right, have this lived experience, into our education or classroom settings. Because it's one way that we, I think, with any kind of stigma, right, that's out there is that through more dialogue and experience with people who are living with this, you know, whether we call it condition or experience or whatever, the more comfortable we get with it, the more normal it becomes to us. And so I think it's starting there and in the education and kind of classroom settings to reduce that kind of othering. And then, in addition to that piece, I think, again, it's the part of actively including, and teaching the treatments for folks with psychosis, and not acting like we can opt out of it. I think one thing I find, with therapists, not across the board, but oftentimes, is that we are often the least prepared to deal with our most acute clients, right? So we are often trained really well to work with people with, you know, garden variety, depression and anxiety adjustment issues, etc. The word Well, exactly right. And we don't get a lot of trained, I think that is very quality for people who are chronically struggling and dealing with things that are acute and very difficult for them very distressing. And I think that's part of where our education and our schools needs to change is to shift away from, you know, exclusive treatment of worried well, and really integrate the bigger spectrum of mental health and well being overall,   Curt Widhalm  14:20 to maybe even further add to this is not necessarily treating psychosis as something that just needs to be medicated away, which has been historically just kind of where well, you ship them to a psychiatrist, and that'll take care of the voices.   Maggie Mullen  14:38 Absolutely. Yeah, I hear that even for my colleagues, right, who work in my clinic have the idea that like psychosis is actually easy to work with because it's on the psychiatrist right to do that work. It's not really on us. We're just chasing them around getting them on medication. But as you've probably experienced in doing any of this work yourselves, many people with psychosis struggle with medications as an intervention, right? That can be life changing. For a lot of people, and for other folks, the side effects that come with them, you know, are so impairing that they're like, I don't want to do this right or, or I'm scared to do this or whatever it is because they can really change your life, your health outcomes, and even just the longevity of your life. So when we rely exclusively on that stuff, it really denies people the ability to build a life worth living, but isn't just, you know, kind of circled around medications as the only treatment   Katie Vernoy  15:26 Well, even in and how you're talking about psychosis, it just really puts a different flavor of it for me with this whole idea of a spectrum of psychosis. And to me, I mean, if we're really looking at auditory hallucinations, like hearing the phone ring, but it hasn't really wrong, or, or even, you know, kind of some of these really distorted thoughts that come up and these delusional beliefs that we have about ourselves that happen in, you know, even kind of garden variety, depression and anxiety, it seems like assessing psychosis would actually be much more complicated. If we're really looking at the full spectrum of the experience. What is your advice as far as identifying, you know, kind of what, what requires or what would be helped by this knowledge around psychosis?   Maggie Mullen  16:16 Can you answer a different way, Katie?   Katie Vernoy  16:19 Yeah, I guess I'm just asking, basically, how do you assess psychosis when it's not kind of this florid psychosis? How do you how do you actually assess psychosis with this idea of a spectrum of psychosis and psychotic experience?   Maggie Mullen  16:38 I think it's really dependent on the level of distress and impairment and causes in somebody's life. Right? Like with all things, when I think about if you're doing really good assessment for any mental health issue, and psychosis is no exception. It's like, how is this interfering with your goals? And the things you want to be doing with your values, your ability to do what you love? How is this in terms of the emotional side of it, right? Like, how much distress how much upset is this causing you, etc. And getting a really clear picture from clients around those pieces, I think can tell us whether we what level of intervention we need to kind of do. Because again, I think one thing that providers often do is we also kind of do the other extreme, which is to assume that if you have any experience of psychosis, it is distressing, and it's bad, right? Like we need to get rid of it. And I think a lot of people who have lived experience of psychosis will tell you, I actually find that there's some very comforting parts of my psychosis, right? Like, maybe I hear the voice of my mom talking to me who passed away or some other loved one, right, or, you know, something that can feel like it's just reassuring to them. And so when we need to when we're doing these assessments, we want to also be integrated in what's the problem and what's actually quite adaptive and works for your life instead,   Curt Widhalm  17:51 So why DBT for psychosis   Maggie Mullen  17:54 So in thinking back to the part about like, where researchers and mental health people got it wrong. So for a long time, providers assumed that people with psychosis didn't experience emotions in the same way as people who were maybe more neurotypical because they weren't expressing their emotions through their effect or their body language, right. And a lot of that has to do with negative symptoms, which are part of that spectrum of psychosis. And what we now know is that people with psychosis deal with emotion dysregulation, actually more so than the average person, right? So they're dealing with overwhelming emotions, that are sometimes triggered by their symptoms, right. So if you have a critical voice telling you, you're a bad person, that's going to cause emotion dysregulation, we're going to get emotional, sure, and kind of the cycle that can happen where then you might experience more psychosis, right? More symptoms, because of an increase in emotions, so kind of becomes a cycle. And what we know to be true is that people then cope with that emotion dysregulation the same way that somebody with, you know, BPD, who's in treatment for DBT, like do which is self harming suicide attempts, substance use, etc. And so that's where we know DBT is really effective, right, based on both the literature, the research, but people's lived experience around it. And so the idea with how we use DBT skills, and I say DBT skills, because we're taking an informed treatment approach, we're not necessarily doing a full DBT treatment program, although that is appropriate for some people with psychosis. We're thinking, let's break that cycle of again, emotions and symptoms kind of escalating each other by using something like distress tolerance skill, or an emotion regulation skill or mindfulness to help break things up and help reduce your distress.   Katie Vernoy  19:44 It seems to be completely logical that that would be the case like and my experience of working with some clients that had different different diagnoses on the spectrum of psychosis, and I also in my experience, if in any way was was aware of oftentimes trauma histories as well as is that? Is that relevant to this conversation?   Maggie Mullen  20:09 Absolutely. Yeah. Thanks for bringing it up. So one thing that I think is, or I don't think I know is very common amongst people with psychotic spectrum disorders is PTSD. So not just experiences of trauma, but experiences of trauma that are continuing to impact our life in a really significant way. And right now, we think about a third of people with schizophrenia have PTSD, which is a very high number. We actually think it's probably higher, though, because clinicians tend to not assess for PTSD very commonly. And clients don't tend to also report those symptoms very actively when they're not asked. So when we think about, again, what clinicians might be missing, it's important that we assess for that and, and part of how we think about trauma with psychosis is that it's really common for people with a psychotic spectrum disorder to have, you know, childhood trauma, so some kind of trauma from growing up. That might be one of the contributing stress factors in the development of psychosis over time. And we also know the experiences associated with experiencing psychosis are traumatic, right. So for example, we talked about the idea of like being incarcerated or being taken by the police in handcuffs to go to the hospital, right, that's a traumatizing experience for a lot of people, particularly for people of color. We also have, you know, being mistreated in hospitals kind of being warehoused there for long periods of time. And then certainly just the experience of psychosis itself, right, when you're just oriented and you're, you know, kind of separated from reality that can be really scary for people, right, we might do things that are out of character for ourselves. So trauma is a common experience, I think, for people with psychosis. And secondarily, there's really great treatment for people experiencing PTSD who also have a psychotic spectrum disorder. But it's really uncommon for providers to offer it because of fear, I think, again, to what we were talking about earlier. And we know, I think more so part of what we see the literature and research changing is that we are including more people with psychosis and studies now than we used to before. So for example, we see a lot of the new prolonged exposure, which is, you know, one of the gold standards for treatment of PTSD, that if somebody has relatively well controlled psychosis, so they might experience some active psychosis, but it may just not cause strong levels of distress. They're a great candidate for PTSD treatment. And same thing for cognitive processing therapy or CPT as well.   Curt Widhalm  22:31 Over the couple 100 episodes or so that we've done, we've had plenty of guests who come in and speak very well about their their target populations. But I don't think that we've had people like you who've actually piloted programs that back up that this is just beyond kind of the here's something that I've experienced a lot in my office and done well with, can you talk about what you saw as an opportunity with the program that you piloted?   Maggie Mullen  23:00 Sure, so I was trained as a DBT clinician, that's like my bread and butter as a therapist and working in a fully intensively trained DBT program. And I like live and breathe DBT, like, I am one of those DBT nerds that you hear about in grad school. And I think I felt like I was working, you know, as a DBT therapist, but also working a lot with people with psychosis in a in a kind of a treatment program. And there was this weird separation where we saw like, these two worlds being again, just very disparate, and not a lot offered between them necessarily, even though again, for people with borderline personality disorder who are really well treated by DBT. A lot of them actually experienced psychosis as part of their symptoms. And so what I did, essentially, with the encouragement of my colleagues was to say, why don't we just try to offer some of these skills to our clients and see how they do with them, see if they're practical enough, if they're concrete enough, which is, you know, important for people who might be experiencing chronic psychosis to be able to use them. And I really did this in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy for psychosis, right. CBT for psychosis has a really strong evidence base. And so I felt like, let's address this cognitive piece that CBT is really good at, but also integrated behavioral piece of DBT. And our clients loved it. Like it was actually kind of overwhelming the response that we received, as well as the outcome studies that we were doing around clients talking about how they were using those skills, and what that what that was shifting in their life, essentially, to feel like, not only do I know how to shift my thinking, but I can do something differently about it. And the thing about DBT skills that maybe no one will tell you is they're very straightforward, right? There are a lot of things people are already doing. Right? So self soothing, right? Many of us self soothe in many different ways, right? we distract ourselves, right? We use all of these skills, I think in many adaptive ways. And part of the work I think of integrating DBT skills is saying, Okay, do that intentionally now, right like don't just Do it as a background thing, but like think about what do I actually need right now that I'm feeling distressed? Because of the voices I'm hearing? You know, do we need to practice? You know, tip, right, which is a common skill in DBT when somebody is really distressed? Or do we want to practice opposite action here, because you're feeling some unjustified emotions, for example, and really just getting people to practice those in a more active way.   Katie Vernoy  25:20 I guess I keep going back to this notion that psychosis is not something that is separate, although I think there are programs where folks end up that are separate, like a day treatment program, those types of things, but oftentimes, even in those programs, it's folks that have had pretty intense emotions, intense suicidality, you know, there's, there's a reason that they're there, it's doesn't always mean that every single person in these day treatment programs have psychosis. But regardless, I think that the, the thing that I keep coming back to is this idea around looking at psychosis differently. And when we do that, it opens up all these other treatment options, because we look at as folks who have this element, and not "them", when you were talking about the way that other cultures look at psychosis, and the ways that folks who are having some of these experiences are, are seen as whether it's a medicine person, or someone that has insight in a different way. Or there's, there's different things where, you know, people are in touch with different parts of reality. I think about religion in the United States, and the similarities with that, and how people will hear God, they'll they'll, you know, they'll see signs, there's, there's a lot of things where there are pieces of things that are kind of acceptable, and culturally appropriate. And there are things that are seen as other and I'm just curious, because you talk about kind of your your background and the way that you're perceiving psychosis, and it seems like it would be very hard. And maybe this is what I was trying to get to earlier with the assessment question, but it seems like it's very hard to identify, in some cases, what is real? And what is psychosis? And so the question I have is, again, kind of like, how do we sort through that? How do we sort through? Is this a cultural experience? I mean, I think earlier, you said it was more around, you know, kind of distress. But sometimes having these things that are culturally appropriate are very distressing, you know, you get messages from God, or you get messages from other sources that are very distressing to you. And so how to how do you grapple with that when you're really trying to honor the experience of the person and sorting through whether it's psychosis or whether it's something else?   Maggie Mullen  27:48 I think one of the questions that you're kind of getting at is the question of like, how do you define what's normal for somebody?   Katie Vernoy  27:55 Yes.   Maggie Mullen  27:56 Yeah. And I, this is a question. I think that is when we like really backtrack as mental health professionals to the idea of like, what do we pathologize? And what do we consider normal? It's really hard to do our jobs to some extent, because the DSM is, right, kind of almost based on the idea that there are certain things that are not normal. But   Katie Vernoy  28:17 yeah,   Maggie Mullen  28:17 normal is really relative, right, based on culture based on history based on so many different parts of our experience. So it's, it's a little bit hard to answer that question, because it's a real philosophical one, in a way.   Katie Vernoy  28:28 Yeah.   Maggie Mullen  28:28 I think that is what informs our approaches, different providers is like, where do we come from? And our background of how we approach this type of stuff, again, of the idea of like, is there anything that's normal. And so I think when I see like this disability justice pushing around this piece, that's the part that really aims to sort of break up that binary of normal or not normal and say, like, this is all just experience. And again, the part that becomes how we assess things as clinicians is when somebody tells us this is a problem for me, or this isn't normal for me, right? Or this is scaring me, for example. And that's when we treat things with that kind of lens. It's complex. I think, in many ways, though, because for example, if I have somebody who is experiencing mania, they're not going to tell me something as a problem, oftentimes, right, you know, kind of, again, is a kind of generalization. When people experience mania, oftentimes, they feel amazing, right? They feel very on top of the world, not all the time, but for many folks. And they don't want an intervention at that point. And the thing that I'm always weighing right is the idea of, can you be safe at this point, right? Like art, what kinds of risks are you taking, for example? And what are ways that like, I need to intervene to help you just live your best life but take more of a harm reduction approach here, right like to keep you on track so that you're doing okay, the least amount of harm happens. But it's I think it's very tricky because so much of this stuff is relative and I honestly don't know if I have a great answer to Your question because of how murky things get around this piece. And so I think maybe my best advice around it is to say, take the lead of your client and know that they know themselves best and will inform you if something's an issue.   Katie Vernoy  30:12 Yeah, yeah, I think the the thought process that I've heard a number of different times and in my travels and learning about psychosis, is being able to inhabit the world where your client is, and then kind of slowly assess what is real and not real with the client from the clients perspective. And, and to me, I feel like that can be very, very challenging, because I think there's so much bias that comes into how we perceive the world that it's can be hard to truly take the lead of the client, do you have advice on how to how to do that when when it's not like, Oh, you have a different opinion for me, but it's like, Oh, your, your reality is different than mine.   Maggie Mullen  30:54 It's tough. It's really, it can be very challenging, because again, we have two different systems of training, right. So like, I have my beliefs around strengths based approach, following the lead of the client, like they are the expert on their own life that we get. And then there are things like being a mandated reporter, right, and like, needing to assess for risk and safety and things that my agency requires. And those are often at odds with each other, I think with a psychosis with the idea that I approach that really, by trying to be as transparent as possible with my clients coming into treatment around what their experience might be like, and maybe the way that I'm documenting things in my notes, right, and like trying to more educate them and say, Okay, so your doctor is going to talk about your delusions, your ideas of reference, etc. Here's what that means. Now, what's the language that you and I are going to use to describe that type of stuff that is affirming to you, and that is recognizing your experience as unique? And I try to take a bit of that perspective around all of this, because I think we can't necessarily fight the existing system. We have without I think, like working around it in that kind of way. So I don't know if that answers your question. Exactly, Katie,   Katie Vernoy  32:07 Yeah, no, that totally answers my question. Thank you.   Curt Widhalm  32:09 And I think your last couple of answers have really demonstrated why the DBT approach to psychosis fits so naturally, yeah. And I think is where your book probably just came very naturally in this whole process.   Maggie Mullen  32:27 It did it well. And I'll tell you, I didn't start out to write a book. Because I don't know, I didn't ever think of myself as somebody who's a writer, or even frankly, like training. But I got recruited to write a book because I was doing something it was a bit more innovative in this approach to working with psychosis. And the funny part is, one of the things that came up really frequently, just as kind of an aside is getting messages about people with psychosis don't read, right? There isn't a market for this. And it first of all, that's, that's very discriminatory. Yeah, for lack of a better term wrong. It's awful. And I think part of the reason people assume that A is because of stigma, and you know, wrong beliefs about people with psychosis, but also because there are literally aren't any other books written for people that are self help books for somebody with psychosis. And, you know, we have a wonderful books on the market for loved ones, or families or mental health providers working with psychosis, but almost nothing that is geared for the experience of somebody with a psychotic spectrum disorder to say, you take control of your own experience, right, you get to be educated and learn and be offered skills. And I think in particular, with psychosis, the other thing that we know is that most people with psychosis don't get mental health treatment, right, they don't either have access to it, they don't want it or they don't have providers who are, you know, competent in providing, as we talked about before. And so this book, obviously, is not a substitute for therapy. But it's a way to really, I think, democratize these skills to say, I want to get these out to you in a form of offering that's less than $20. And so I always encourage people to seek treatment as part of that book. But this is just one way to kind of get that message out there. So that's part of kind of the journey that led me to writing the book is just wanting to make sure people had access to these skills one way or the other, essentially,   Katie Vernoy  34:16 are there differences and how DBT skills are used when you are learned when you have psychosis as part of the the makeup.   Maggie Mullen  34:25 So the actual skills themselves are really identical to Marsha Linehan's work, right. And I really respect her work. And for me, I did not want to stray away from what the model is because the model is really effective. We're seeing more research now around full DBT treatment programs serving people with psychosis, but that's still kind of emerging literature. And Marsha Linehan, and her book actually even talks a bit about that. But to go back to your question, I think, part of what we do need to do when we're kind of, you know, adapting or kind of shifting. The way we teach DBT skills for these clients is to do a few things. One is to make them really concrete. so that there's just really straightforward information, there's not a lot of psychological jargon, right? Things that are just very straightforward. We also want to make sure that whatever we're offering is accessible. Because, you know, as we talked about a little bit before, you know, rates have been on, you know, for example, like SSI, so like being on a fixed income are really high amongst people with psychosis. So people don't have a lot of money. A lot of folks are marginally housed don't have stable housing or food access. And so we want to make things that are really accessible, right? You know, there's a DBT skill about going on a brief vacation, for example, we have to talk about, what does that actually practically look like in the life of somebody who has who's getting 700 ollars? a month, right? Like, what does that look like? So we want to adapt the examples to actually be a reflection of their personal experience as part of that as well. But otherwise, I think the skills really kind of match on well to the experience of psychosis.   Curt Widhalm  35:53 We've mentioned your book a couple of times, I think it's fair for us to actually name it. So dialectical behavior therapy skills, workbook for psychosis. We'll put a link to that in our show notes. But where else can people find out about you and the work that you're doing?   Maggie Mullen  36:12 So first is my website, which is Maggie mullen.com. I'm on Instagram. I'm working on building that following. It's Maggie Mullen, LCSW W there. And those are the main pieces you can contact me and reach me my direct contact information is there. I really am trying right now to put the work out again of this more progressive approach to treating psychosis into the world and doing a lot of consulting and training with agencies. So that's definitely something that I'm always excited about doing with new folks.   Curt Widhalm  36:40 And we will include links to Maggie's websites and Instagram handle over in our show notes. You can find those at MTS g podcast.com. And you can follow our social media come and let us know about your experiences and getting trained or poorly trained in working with psychosis. Come in and be a part of our Facebook community, the modern therapist group, and until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy And Maggie Mullen.   Katie Vernoy  37:10 Thanks again to our sponsor, Buying Time   Curt Widhalm  37:12 Buying Time's VAs support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly with a full team of VAs gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available.   Katie Vernoy  37:41 book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need. That's buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation once again, buying time llc.com forward slash book dash consultation.   Announcer  37:57 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Disparity of Large-Cap vs. Small-/Mid-Cap Valuations | Peter Bernstein on Bubbles and Survival

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 43:25


In this episode, co-hosts Elliot Turner, Phil Ordway, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) the historically high disparity between large-cap vs. small-/mid-cap valuation; and (ii) Peter Bernstein on survival and the avoidance of disaster, as well as managing through bubbles. Enjoy the conversation!   The primary purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. The views, information, or opinions expressed by hosts or guests are their own. Neither this show, nor any of its content should be construed as investment advice or as a recommendation to buy or sell any particular security. Security specific information shared on this podcast should not be relied upon as a basis for your own investment decisions -- be sure to do your own research. The podcast hosts and participants may have a position in the securities mentioned, personally, through sub accounts and/or through separate funds and may change their holdings at any time.   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.

Macro n Cheese
Sustainability: The New Economics with Stephen Williams and Phil Lawn

Macro n Cheese

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 55:42


Stephen Williams and Philip Lawn join Steve to discuss the forthcoming book, Sustainability and the New Economics: Synthesising Ecological Economics and Modern Monetary Theory, which Williams co-edited. The book brings together sustainability, ecological economics, and MMT. As you learn more and more about this thing called sustainability, you realize that it's really the economic system that is at the heart of the problem. It's the economic system you have to change. So when you start studying what we usually call heterodox economics, you soon start to learn about something called ecological economics, which Phil is an expert in. And then you start to hear about this other thing called Modern Monetary Theory. And it turns out these two things are completely complementary, and you need both of them.The volume is a collection of work by 15 authors or so, all with expertise in different areas, including the relationship between climate change and health impacts, planetary boundaries, sustainable development goals, and law. The book contains chapters by friends of this podcast -- Professor Steve Keen, who looks at the way mainstream economics has perverted the IPCC process, Steven Hail who wrote the chapter on MMT, and Phil Lawn, whose work ties the whole thing together by connecting ecological economics and MMT. In fact, according to Williams, he was the inspiration for the entire project. There is no other book with a focus on this connection. They explain the extent of the current mess, the post WWII Anthropocene, and examine how we got here, including the birth of neoliberalism, the fossil fuel industry, the publication of the “Limits to Growth” report, (which Steve Keen has talked about in a previous episode of this podcast), and more. Once they've laid out the past and the present, they look to the future: where do we go from here? How do we design a safe and prosperous future? That essentially means what new economic system could we bring in to replace the current failed economic system? Hey, there's nothing more dangerous than a bad idea. And mainstream economics is a terrible idea. https://realprogressives.org/macro-n-cheese-podcast/ (**For a full transcript and “extras” page of this and every episode, go to realprogressives.org/macro-n-cheese-podcast/**) Stephen Williams, from Australia, has a long background in newspaper journalism and a short background in law. His lifelong obsession is the issue of designing societies for maximum well-being and sustainability. This has led him to the study of heterodox economics as an essential suite of tools. He is the co-editor of the forthcoming collected volume, Sustainability and the New Economics: Synthesising Ecological Economics and Modern Monetary Theory(Springer International, 2022). Based in Adelaide, Philip Lawn is an evidence-based economist and Adjunct Professor at Torrens University, Philip is also research fellow with the Global Institute for Sustainable Prosperity and a member of the Wakefield Futures Group (South Australia). He is the author and editor of eight books on sustainable development, climate change, and the steady-state economy, and has 55 journal articles and more than 40 book chapters to his name. Philip makes speaking appearances at public events/debates and is regularly invited to deliver keynote and plenary presentations at academic conferences. #IPCC #MMT #ecological #climate #economics #sustainability #Anthropocene #GISP #Kelton #StevenHail #SteveKeen Support this podcast

The Digital Agency Show | Helping Agency Owners Transform Their Business Mindset to Increase Prices, Work Less, and Grow Prof

Sarah Moe started her career in Sleep Medicine in 2006 and is the Founder and CEO of Sleep Health Specialists, which provides sleep education to local businesses and corporations. She was also an Adjunct Professor in the Polysomnography (Sleep) Program at Minneapolis College. Sarah sat on the Board of Directors for the Minnesota Sleep Society and the Educational Products Committee for the American Association of Sleep Technologists. For her role in Sleep Education in our workforce, Sarah has been named to the Minnesota Business Magazine's "35 Under 35" 2016, "Most Likely to Succeed- Healthcare Division" finalist in 2017, "Women Who Lead" 2018, the Minneapolis St. Paul Business Journal's "Women In Business" 2019, and the TeamWomen's "WaveMaker Award- Uncharted Territory" finalist, 2019.

The Roundtable
1/6/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 50:06


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Cohoes City Director of Operations Theresa Bourgeois, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, and best-selling author and counter-terrorism expert Malcolm Nance.

Thinking Allowed
Food, Identity & Nation

Thinking Allowed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:08


FOOD, IDENTITY AND NATION - At a time when many of us are feeling overstuffed by festive eating, Laurie Taylor asks why food matters. He's joined by Paul Freedman, Chester D. Tripp Professor of History at Yale University, who explores food's relationship to our sense of self, as well as to inequality and the environment. Joy Fraser, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Folklore at Memorial University, Newfoundland, Canada, also joins the conversation. She asks why Scottishness has so often been signified, in a derogatory way, through food - from haggis to the deep-fried Mars bar. Does it say something about the relationship between England and Scotland? Producer: Jayne Egerton

Thinking Allowed
Food, Identity & Nation

Thinking Allowed

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 28:16


FOOD, IDENTITY AND NATION - At a time when many of us are feeling overstuffed by festive eating, Laurie Taylor asks why food matters. He’s joined by Paul Freedman, Chester D. Tripp Professor of History at Yale University, who explores food’s relationship to our sense of self, as well as to inequality and the environment. Joy Fraser, Adjunct Professor in the Department of Folklore at Memorial University, Newfoundland, Canada, also joins the conversation. She asks why Scottishness has so often been signified, in a derogatory way, through food - from haggis to the deep-fried Mars bar. Does it say something about the relationship between England and Scotland? Producer: Jayne Egerton

The Roundtable
1/3/22 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 78:30


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post, and former Associate Editor of the Times Union Mike Spain.

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
Which Theoretical Orientation Should You Choose?

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 32:27


Which Theoretical Orientation Should You Choose? Curt and Katie chat about how therapists typically select their clinical theoretical orientation for treatment. We look at the different elements of theoretical orientation (including case conceptualization, treatment interventions, and common factors), what impacts our choices, the importance of having a variety of clinical models to draw from, the types of practices that focus on only one clinical theory, and suggestions about how to approach choosing your theories for treatment, including some helpful assessments. In this podcast episode we talk about how therapists pick their theoretical orientation We received a couple of requests to talk about clinical theoretical orientation and how Curt and Katie chose their own. We tackle this question in depth: Choosing a clinical theoretical orientation The problem with the term “eclectic” when describing a clinical orientation How Curt and Katie each define their clinical orientations “Multi-modal” therapy The different elements of clinical orientations Case conceptualization Treatment interventions Common Factors and what actually makes therapy work What impacts which theoretical orientation we choose as therapists Clinical supervision Training Personal values and alignment with a theoretical orientation Common sense (what makes sense to you logically) Choosing interventions that you like The importance of having a variety of clinical theories that you can draw from “You need to know the theories well enough to know when not to use them”  – Curt Widhalm Comprehensive understanding is required to be able to apply and know when not to apply a clinical orientation Avoid fitting a client's presentation into your one clinical orientation Deliberate, intentional use of different orientations Why some therapy practices operate with a single clinical model Comprehensive Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) therapists run their practices and their lives with DBT principals Going deeply into a very specific theory (like DBT, EMDR, EFT, etc.) while you learn it Researchers are more likely to be singularly focused on one theory Suggestions on How to Approach Choosing Your Clinical Theoretical Orientation “Theoretical orientation actually can be very fluid over time” – Katie Vernoy Obtain a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical orientation Understand the theory behind the interventions Recognizing when to use a very specific theory or when you can be more “eclectic” in your approach Deciding how fluid you'd like to be with your theoretical orientation Find what gels with you and do more of that The ability to pretty dramatically shift your theoretical orientation later in your career Instruments for Choosing a Theoretical Orientation Theoretical Orientation Scale (Smith, 2010) Counselor Theoretical Position Scale Our Generous Sponsor for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Buying Time LLC Buying Time is a full team of Virtual Assistants, with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support, customer service, and email management to marketing and bookkeeping. They've got you covered. Don't know where to start? Check out the systems inventory checklist which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated asap. You can find that checklist at http://buyingtimellc.com/systems-checklist/ Buying Time's VA's support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting, email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly. With a full team of VA's it gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available. Book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need - https://buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation/ Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Institute for Creative Mindfulness Very Bad Therapy Podcast Petko, Kendrick and Young (2016): Selecting a Theory of Counseling: What influences a counseling student to choose? What is the Best Type of Therapy Elimination Game The Practice of Multimodal Therapy by Arnold A. Lazarus Poznanski and McClennan (2007): Measuring Counsellor Theoretical Orientation Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: Unlearning Very Bad Therapy Interview with Dr. Diane Gehart: An Incomplete List of Everything Wrong with Therapist Education   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/ Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated): Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of the modern therapist Survival Guide is sponsored by Buying Time.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Buying Time is a full team of virtual assistants with a wide variety of skill sets to support your business. From basic admin support customer service and email management to marketing and bookkeeping, they've got you covered. Don't know where to start, check out the system's inventory checklist, which helps business owners figure out what they don't want to do anymore and get those delegated ASAP. You can find that checklist at buyingtimellc.com/systems-checklist.   Curt Widhalm  00:31 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Announcer  00:35 You're listening to the modern therapist survival guide where therapists live, breed and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:51 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about how we are as therapists. And we have received a couple of requests for in episodes about how people select their theoretical orientations. And I think that this is a great opportunity for us to maybe gear an episode a little bit more towards early career therapists, some of the students who listened to our show, but also for those of you who are maybe a little bit later in your practice to consider how you came up with your theoretical orientation or orientations. And we're gonna dive into a little bit of our stories about this, but also what some of the research ends up saying about how a lot of therapists end up practicing in the way that they do. So, Katie, from the top of the show, what are your orientations? And how did you get to where you are?   Katie Vernoy  01:54 I think the the word that probably best describes my orientation is one that I was told not to use because it was bad, which was eclectic,   Curt Widhalm  02:06 eclectic   Katie Vernoy  02:07 ecelctic!   Curt Widhalm  02:08 lazy eclectics.   Katie Vernoy  02:11 And I think it's, it's not exactly true. But I really feel like I draw from a lot of orientations. A lot of models, maybe it's better than orientations, where there are a lot of really cool interventions that I like from CBT DBT narrative, even psychodynamic or Gestalt, or different things like that. There's a lot of really cool interventions that I've been able to kind of pick up in my my toolbox or tool tool belt over the years. And so to me, when we talk about orientation, and maybe this is a question to ask, I would say, I'm probably mostly existential, and certainly relational. And, and that's kind of where I sit. I think with orientation, though, there's how you conceptualize a case, how you treat a client's you know, so, orientation feels like a very broad thing, where case conceptualization seems more like okay, that's my that's how I'm orienting myself to a case specific interventions, I think tie to theoretical orientations. But I once had a supervisor say, pretty much all theories are the same. They just use different words, people want to make money. And orientations are different, but I feel like you can you can mix and match pretty well.   Curt Widhalm  03:33 And on that point, you're talking about Bruce Wampold's common factors that soar looking at therapeutic treatment where theoretical orientation affects treatment about 1%. Maybe some of the emphasis of where some of these questions are coming from is our therapists, education, emphasis on every class being about orientation, really not looking at the other 99% of what actually makes therapy work? Yes. Now, like you, maybe Unlike you, I look at myself not as a dirty eclectic therapist, but as a very intentional, multimodal therapist.   Katie Vernoy  04:19 Oh, my goodness, words, words.   Curt Widhalm  04:24 So, like you, I also end up using a lot of CBT. In my practice, I'm also drawn to existentialism, and very much utilize a lot of EMDR work which, for the EMDR people that I trained with over at the Institute of creative mindfulness, we really look at EMDR as being the greatest hits of a lot of other therapeutic styles that got it just naturally pulls from a number of different areas. But when we first got these cases, My first reaction was kind of, I wonder how much of how we practice is based in who our supervisors were and how they practiced at, you know, kind of a developmental stage of where we were at in becoming therapists. And if that's just stuff that because we were forced to practice in a way for a while, if that's why we continue to practice that once we're out on our own, and I'm wondering how much of that rings true for your story here.   Katie Vernoy  05:34 It certainly rings true for me, I think about some of the newer clinicians and certainly talking to like Carrie Wiita and Ben Fineman over it. Very bad therapy, it seems like they're more thoughtful than we are, or than I was anyway, when I was coming up. But I found myself trying to soak everything in and I had a psychodynamic supervisor and a CBT supervisor when I first started, and then I went into community mental health, it's very behavioral and, and CBT oriented, with some, you know, trauma informed, you know, different things that kind of layered in there. But I did find that the supervisor made a big difference if they had a strong orientation, because I that's how they framed everything. And that's why I think I, when I say the case, conceptualizations are oftentimes more along the lines of like psychodynamic or CBT. I think it's because that was how I was trained. The other piece that I was really lucky is that I also had a group supervision with several folks who are narrative, and they would talk about their cases from a narrative perspective, and would provide feedback on some of the cases that I was working on from a narrative perspective. And so I feel like there's some narrative that came in early enough that that was something that also I added to the pool. But it wasn't something I learned in school, I think it was newer, you know, I was getting ready to get licensed at that time. So to me, I feel like the people around us, primarily the supervisor, but also potentially even, you know, our colleagues in our group supervision can really impact how we see cases how we've, you know, kind of the types of interventions we try, and therefore our orientation.   Curt Widhalm  07:22 I don't know that I can tell you my supervisors orientation from my trainee years, maybe that speaks to the quality of supervision that was being given at the time, potentially, but I, I largely agree with you in the what did end up shaping up out at the time was the other people who were part of my supervision groups and kind of being pushed into recognizing that we were naturally drawn to some techniques, whether we knew it or not. Looking at a 2016 article from the universal Journal of Psychology, this is by Pepco, Kendrick and Jung, and aptly titled selecting a theory of counseling, what influences it counseling students to choose?   Katie Vernoy  08:13 Very good, very appropriate, Good, find, Curt!   Curt Widhalm  08:16 Good find Curt. They came up with three categories that probably worth exploring here a little bit for ourselves, the first topic on here does not necessarily fall into that I practice this way because my supervisor practices this way. And in fact, none of these three do. The first one is the counseling theory is similar to my personal value system. And   Katie Vernoy  08:43 that's where I remember because we did that orientation game. What was that called? With Carrie and Ben and Ben?   Curt Widhalm  08:51 Oh, the elimination game?   Katie Vernoy  08:53 Yeah, yeah. And I just I hear Ben talking about how amazing narrative is. And it seemed like it was so aligned with his values and stuff like that. I was like, I don't know that I was that thoughtful when I was in that stage of my my development.   Curt Widhalm  09:09 It's something where I really expect our audience to resonate with this one, just because we do talk about value systems as such an important factor of the work that we do, and that obviously should be reflected in the work that you do with your clients and make sense as far as how that would carry over as, as an extension of yourself and your personality to make the therapeutic alliance work. I think it's better done when it's intentional, maybe not in the way that you're describing of like looking for justification five years after a journal article is published to be like, Yeah, that's what I did. But to really be able to clarify, it's like you're giving credit to Ben for doing it. As far as saying, These are my values, this is a theory that ends up reflecting what those are. And I think that there are going to be certain theories that end up lending themselves to that more easily than others. Things like narrative therapy, where it really does have more of a social justice aspects to it. Yeah, as compared to something like behaviorism, which is going to be very much about pushing people to certain measurable outcomes, unless that's who you are as a person and why you don't get invited to dinner parties?   Katie Vernoy  10:38 Well, I think that there are things that I was trained as a therapist 20 years ago. And I think that there are, there are limitations on some of the research that was available 20 years ago, and so even if I were to come up now, I don't know that I would spend a lot of time on CBT, just based on, you know, kind of the limited transfer across different cultures and that kind of stuff, I think that there are great interventions, and I've kind of learned over the years, especially in working in a lot of different multicultural and cross cultural environments, how to make those adjustments and kind of what to hold to and what not to, but I think that there are, are definitely different pieces of information around orientation and kind of our personal value systems that I think, is a constant or a continual assessment. I don't know that, you know, I don't know that there's, you know, it kind of goes to that, like, what's what's been indoctrinated and what needs to be unlearned, and kind of the whole decolonizing therapy, but I think that there's, there's definitely things that feel inherently true to me, because of when I learned about them and and how they were just kind of organically fold it in. And I would have liked to have that assessment that personal values assessment around which theory fits best for me early enough on so I'm glad we're talking about it, hopefully, the students are going to do those assessments for themselves. But, um, but I don't know that I even thought to do it, because it was, you know, everything was kind of a truism. Like, this is what psychology is, you know, back in the olden days, when I was trained.   Curt Widhalm  12:20 And you what you're leading into, is this second on this list, which is people to series, because it's what makes sense logically, yeah, it's, oh, I can see how a leads to B leads to C. And this might lead to some more of those directive type therapies and CBT being an example of this, where but I think in, it's not just let me get to CBT. It's also being able to look at anything from a comprehensive way. And as much as I know, students, and really anybody else hates doing case conceptualizations it's an important factor to be able to see this is how people fit logically into this set of patterns as described by this theory. Historically, I have seen some pushback from educators and supervisors as far as this approach when it comes to trying to make clients fit into a theory, rather than hearing the client stories. And this is where I think most educators, most researchers when it comes to this, and we'll put some citations in the show notes. But people like Lazarus, Norcross and golden freed, all talk about the importance of learning a variety of theories. So that way you can shift to when clients don't fit a particular one that you're still able to practice in a way that makes sense for them. So having some theories that do make sense to you make sense. But don't, don't fall just into the logic trap of everything needs to follow into this set of patterns.   Katie Vernoy  14:05 Completely agree. And I want to just acknowledge that what makes sense to you may be what you were trained, which I think ties back into, it makes sense to me because that's what my supervisor taught me. And that's how the, the practice of doing therapy, this is what it is, and this is what makes sense to me. The follow on to that is the importance of either having a supervisor that has this kind of palette of different orientations and teaches to all of them and and has that as part of your supervision or having a number of different supervisors across your internship or trainee years or your associate years so that you can get your own perspective on something versus this is how it logically fits into the model I was trained by my one supervisor.   Curt Widhalm  15:02 And this is getting a comprehensive understanding, not just not just like, oh, we covered this in class last week, and I should try this out on clients. And here's parts of it that work. And because it worked, it made sense to me. But it does take a ability to get in to the depths. And I've always kind of naturally described this as you need to know the theories well enough to know when not to use them. And knowing that you should be able to shift to something else is the level of depth that you need to know. And rather than just forcing clients to do something, because the theory says that it should work means that you're maybe not quite there yet. And that's where having a more comprehensive understanding of switching between theories, or utilizing aspects of different theories, together with intention definitely helps out.   Katie Vernoy  16:04 Oh, for sure, I think to me, I see folks that are very immersed in a single theory, or a single orientation. And I think there are reasons to do that. I don't want to say anything negative about folks who do that. But to me, that wouldn't fit for me, because I would have to refer clients out who I could serve with a different theory. But specifically, I'm talking, the most frequent one that I see are, are people who are like doing comprehensive DBT. And that's their whole practice. And then there's also folks that end up doing a lot of EMDR, I feel like that's become less because there's so many people that have been trained in EMDR at this point or anything. But the DBT thing, it requires a lot to set up, you have to have a consultation team. You know, if you're doing comprehensive stuff, you have to have a group with CO leaders, there's a specific way you run your individual session. And it works really well for the folks that works for. And I think that the comprehensive DBT therapists who only do DBT would argue they know who it's not for, and they refer them out. For me, I don't think I'd be comfortable with that. But I think the level of knowledge to determine that, I think is is higher than I think some folks who initially come into a single theory, and maybe this is where the question came from is I need to have my orientation. And it's like, should I become an EMDR? therapist, or a DBT? therapist, or a CBT? therapist or a blank right? kind of therapist? And I think very few people end up with just one orientation, I believe. I think when someone's learning an orientation, you know, and I've seen this with like EFT folks, they go really deep into it. It's like they have, you know, at least a portion of their practices only EFT. I think that there is there is a and I'm talking about Emotionally Focused Therapy, not Emotional Freedom Techniques. Right? I understand there's two FTEs. But But I think that there's a necessity when you're digging deep into a very specific theory maybe to focus in on it. But I really like this idea of having that palette of orientations and intervention so that you can shift when it makes it makes sense. But what would you say for folks who are single theory that there is a different developmental stage? Or do you feel like it's folks that have a different style? Like, where does that fit? Do you think?   Curt Widhalm  18:41 You know, it's interesting that you talk about the DBT therapists, and when I talk with other therapists and in the community, and some of you are listeners of the show it sometimes I get accused of being a DBT therapist, I know I heard that recently. And I liked DBT, I've done some workshops towards, you know, learning DBT a lot of it, a lot of it makes sense. I'm not trained in DBT. But just the way that I understand where these comments are coming from is for a lot of DBT therapists, it's also ways that you run your life, and it's ways that fall into that first category of almost being value based. And with the bonus of things making sense. And also with the the third category here that we'll be leading into in just a moment, but it's a very comprehensive structured package that also immerses the clinician in needing to be in that lifestyle, too. I don't see this with other theories quite to the same extent. You know, I think they you bring up EMDR I think that there's a very big mindfulness component of it that the good EMDR clinicians that I know tends to exhibit as far as their practice. I don't necessarily see it when it comes to some of the more directive therapies that I don't see solution oriented therapists being like, standing in front of the the milk cartons in the grocery store being like, this one is an eight out of 10 solution, but this one over here is a nine out of 10 solution. Maybe they do, maybe it's just internal, I don't know. And, but the people that I really do see, stuck very much into single theories really aren't practitioners, it's researchers. And it's people whose research is based on needing to stay within a particular theory. And, you know, while I do have respect for the CBT therapists out there, it's those people who are like, well, everything's CBT, you know, that's just, you know, CBT with this or equine therapy is just CBT with more horsepower, or, but our third category is that people choose theories because they like techniques, or they like interventions that come from that theory. And it may not be the most comprehensive way of choosing a theory, it might be something that you find that a particular set of interventions works for certain situations. It's from just that description of it go further than that, like yes, yes, you know, you can't be in the middle of psychodynamic and being like, you know, what, we need some intermittent reinforcement right here. But it can be a place that starts you into getting more of that comprehensive look at a theory if what you find is that a certain technique ends up working, learn more about the theory. So that way, you can understand how it fits comprehensively in the explanation for why a client's pattern of behaviors or outlook on the world may be influenced or susceptible to being changed by that kind of an intervention.   Katie Vernoy  22:13 As you were talking, the thing that came to mind, for me, was the validity of this kind of construct. So I'm getting really far afield. So we'll see if this bears fruit. But there are some theoretical orientations that feel very rich, they feel like they have a lot to them, that you can really dig your teeth into them. They're a way of conceptualizing a case with potential suggested interventions or ways of being with the client in the room. And there are others that feel a little bit more stilted or really based on someone trying to put stuff together. So they can prove a point with their research or a slight change to something that's already present and all of that. So I guess I'm kind of pushing back on, needing to have a really in depth understanding of all of the orientations. And I know, you didn't say that, but like, there's some of this where I think about how I actually work. And I, it's almost kind of a post hoc description, saying that I'm existential, or I use narrative, or I've got psychodynamic or or CBT, or DBT, or whatever. Like, to me, it's something where and this is potentially more of a later career situation. And I'm sure you experienced this too. I have absorbed so much knowledge from so many different continuing education, things, different clinical consoles, and conversations. That to me, and this kind of talks about, I think what Diane was putting forward is that there's so many orientations at this point that it's gotten ridiculous. And so she's simplifying it doing something and we'll, we'll put Dr. Gehart's episode in our show notes, the link to it, but, but to me, I feel like there's so much I've absorbed so much that is similar. It's so much that goes together. And maybe this is about making sense and having techniques. And so it's not the strongest way to do it. But I don't know that I'm ever consciously thinking, Well, I'm going to approach this client with CBT to start and then we'll see if it goes into something else. Like I feel like I'm meeting the client. I'm hearing what they have to say I'm conceptualizing it probably from two or three or four different theories because they kind of all melded into one. And then I'm doing interventions based on my conceptualization, but it doesn't necessarily tie and maybe this just is lazy. eclectics eclecticism but it doesn't necessarily apply. Like I'm going to start with this orientation and move to this one then move to this one and that feels to in a box for me and how I actually practice.   Curt Widhalm  24:52 I think that with practice, it ends up becoming where, when you're versed in a couple of different theories, you see that certain things are going to be better approached in certain ways. If a client's coming to me, the intake phone call is to deal with trauma, I'm immediately going to go to my trauma modalities. First, as far as how I'm listening for the story developing, somebody is coming to me for something like obsessive compulsive disorder, I'm pretty much going to be going to what's an exposure and Response Prevention Plan. Part of these are where research shows some of the effectiveness part of this is really being able to look at how things make sense. And honestly, for me, part of it is how am I going to be most effective at utilizing something that I can be decently good at some theories that research shows, you know, 95% of people who get CBT by this are fixed by this. But if it doesn't fit with how and how I think about the approach, it's something where I may only be 75%, effective using CBT, with something where I might be 93% effective with something else. Yeah. And so part of that also does look at the influence of who I am. And one of the people that really led the way, as far as this kind of thing is one of those people who had a theory, and that was Milton Erickson, who was largely just kind of seen as it was his relationship with his clients. And yeah, he did a lot of strategic therapy work, but it ended up being him pulling from stuff that worked in the moment because that's what worked for him and the relationship that he had with his clients. So I   Katie Vernoy  26:49 guess the point that I wanted to make with that a new just kind of set it in a different way. But I want to make sure we're on the same page is it can be very fluid, it doesn't need to be I start with a conceptualization that is tied to one theory. And I make a treatment plan that's tied to that theory. And then if it needs to shift, I shift to a different theory. It's really to me it feels way more fluid than that. And like I said, I'm existentialist I'm, I'm a Yalom existentialist where it's really just about the relationship and being a real person in the room. So it gives me a lot of freedom to conceptualize things differently. But I think it's hard to describe it to someone that's just starting out when they're like, Okay, what do I do in therapy, and it's like, we'll be in the room, see what's happening with the client, and provide them what they need. I mean, like, that's kind of how I that's, that's my orientation.   Curt Widhalm  27:45 So I do want to point out that there are a handful of different instruments that are out there that you can look at, take it with a grain of salt. You might talk about the ways that you might view the importance of aspects that might steer you in the direction of looking at theories that might more naturally come to you. A couple that we've come across in preparation for this episode. One is the theoretical orientation scale, developed by Smith in 2010. It's 76 questions that you fill out Likert scale types, you score it, it points you to sub scales that might fall across a couple of different theories that you might want to look at. Another one is a 40 item scale called the counselor theoretical position scale. This was developed by Posnanski. And McClellan, either of these might be things where if you're looking for a questionnaire that is based on where you're kind of already existing, as a person might steer you into some directions to more easily find, I might want to research this more, you get into practicing that way, you might find that it continues to gel with you, you might find that parts of it gel with you. But if you're looking for a little bit more of a direction, if you're not quite familiar with a number of different theories, yet, these might be some starting places for you to look at as well.   Katie Vernoy  29:15 And I think the takeaway that I want folks to have or a takeaway that I want them to have is that theoretical orientation actually can be very fluid over over time, you can start with, I really want to dig into narrative and you do narrative therapy with a lot of your clients. you conceptualize it that way. Maybe you have a few other things that you're doing in the background and not just adhering to one theory. But over time, there may be something else that comes down the pike. You do a training on Emotionally Focused Therapy EFT I have a lot of people that they later in their career, start sending EFT and they're like I'm completely changing how I'm working. This is an awesome way to work with couples or even individually EFT or you Find DVT later and you start digging into that, and you really understand the conceptualization, those things. I think people get really freaked out. And part of it is, I think, the interview questions. I've even designed them, like, what is your theoretical orientation? Like, I think people get freaked out that they have to choose an orientation, and that sets them up for the rest of their career. And I don't think that's true. I think that they there there is certainly foundational work that may stick with you forever. And so you don't want to be mindless about what you choose to focus your attention on at the beginning of your career. But I think it is something where it does shift, you're going to be impacted by research that hasn't even been done or theories that haven't even been concocted yet. And so I think find things that gel with you I'll use your word there and and dig into them, but but don't fear that you're going to be locked into a particular orientation for the rest of your career you You most likely won't be,   Curt Widhalm  30:54 we'd love to hear how you came up with your theories or further questions that you might have the best place that you can do that is over in our Facebook group, the modern therapist group. You can follow us on our social media and we'll include links to those as well as the articles and measurements and citations in our show notes. You can find those at MTS g podcast.com. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy   Katie Vernoy  31:22 Thanks again to our sponsor Buying Time   Curt Widhalm  31:25 Buying Time's VAs support businesses by managing email communications, CRM or automation systems, website admin and hosting email marketing, social media, bookkeeping and much more. Their sole purpose is to create the opportunity for you to focus on supporting those you serve while ensuring that your back office runs smoothly. The full team of VAs gives the opportunity to hire for one role and get multiple areas of support. There's no reason to be overwhelmed with running your business with this solution available.   Katie Vernoy  31:54 book a consultation to see where and how you can get started getting the support you need. That's buyingtimellc.com/book-consultation once again, buyingtimellc.com /book-consultation.   Announcer  32:09 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Skincare Anarchy
Dr Alexiades, MD PhD (boss level), Founder of Macrene Actives

Skincare Anarchy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 42:28


Dr. Macrene Alexiades holds three Harvard degrees, a BA in Biology, an MD and a PhD in Genetics; 25+ year research background; and runs her own esteemed Park Avenue private practice in dermatology and laser surgery, a research clinic, and a lab focusing on anti-aging skin care, acne, skin cancer, and lasers. She is an artist and sculptor and uses injectables to achieve a natural look in her patients. M.D., Ph.D. received her three degrees from Harvard University: a B.A. from Harvard University, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and awarded the Fay Prize, the highest undergraduate honor; a M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and a Ph.D. in Geneticsfrom Harvard University. She is Associate Clinical Professor at Yale University and Adjunct Professor at Sigros Hospital, University of Athens. She was a Fulbright Scholar with a research award year in Europe. At Harvard, she excelled in portrait art and sculpture, but ultimately chose medicine and science, and was profiled in The New York Times and Vogue for her artistic skills in dermatology, injections and lasers. In medical school, she was honored with the Harvard Medical School Dean's Report and the Paul Dudley White Award. In graduate school, she received grants from the National Institutes of Health, National Eye Institute and Radcliffe College. As Chief Dermatology Resident at New York University School of Medicine, she was awarded the Husik Prize. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology and American Society for Laser Medicine (ASLMS) and Surgery and a Goldman Circle Member. She has achieved the rare status of Double Board-Certification in Dermatology in the European Union as well as the U.S. She is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor, New York Magazine Top Doctor and featured in numerous Who's Who awards. She serves on numerous medical boards, conducts FDA clinical trials for Allergan and research for Lancome among many other pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies. She recently was awarded the Richard E. Fitzpatrick Award, the top laser prize for her research at ASLMS. She is Assistant Editor for the journal Dermatologic Surgery and Senior Associate Editor for the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, and Editor & Reviewer for over 15 journals, including The New England Journal of Medicine, JAAD, JAMA Dermatology, Journal of Lasers in Medicine and Surgery, Journal of Cosmetic Surgery, British Journal of Dermatology and the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology. She has served as Chair of Research for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Guest Editor-in-Chief of the Annual Laser Issue for the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology, and has been extensively biographed in Who's Who and recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award and Industry Leaders Award.. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/skincareanarchy/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/skincareanarchy/support

Read The Fine Print!
The Life and Times Of An FBI Agent with Retired Agent Dan Reilly | Read The Fine Print, The Show! Ep. 2.10

Read The Fine Print!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 166:07


I ended the year with a bang! This episode is with Retired FBI agent, author, entrepreneur, and professor, Dan Reilly. We talked about forensics, the biggest jewel heist in DC history, his fallen peers, Wayne Perry, Alpo, and got into the fine print of what it takes to be (good, bad, and ugly) and thrive as an FBI agent and much more. Sit back and enjoy! Who is Dan Reilly? From 1980-2002, Mr. Reilly was regularly assigned to property crimes and violent crime investigations. He successfully investigated hundreds of burglary rings, and armed robbery rings. He also solved the largest armed robbery in the history of Washington, DC in 1984. subjects in two years. From 1989-2002 Mr. Reilly was regularly assigned to Violent Gang investigations. He is credited with starting the Safe Streets Program in Washington DC, which was used as the model for the nationwide Safe Streets effort. Mr. Reilly headed investigations that led to the first two successful RICO gang prosecutions in Washington, DC, the R Street Crew and the First Street Crew. He investigated, arrested, and prosecuted the notorious drug crew enforcer Wayne Anthony Perry. He developed and participated in the investigation of more than twenty other major violent gang cases in Washington D.C. including co-case agent responsibilities on the Southwest Crew case, which led to the closure of thirty homicides, and convictions of more than 70 subjects. He currently is an Adjunct Professor at George Mason University. He can be contacted here You can follow me @ IG: @dbethea.esq Twitter: @dbethea_esq And "DeTravius Bethea" on FB and Linkedin Please support: Cooper's Deli 594 Orange St. Newark NJ 07107 If you want to support the show, here are some ways... My Amazon Influencer Page: Amazon My favorite notetaking app: Evernote My Gumroad Page with ebooks and classes. My Youtube Page: youtube.com/user/dbethea315 You can also donate or become a supporter of the show below CashApp $dbethea2008 paypal.me/smrainmakers Venmo:DeTravius-Bethea https://anchor.fm/readthefineprint/support --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/readthefineprint/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/readthefineprint/support

Learning With Interesting People
Season 2, Ep.1: Season 1 Recap & Dr. Kristen Paul-Leadership Coach, Adjunct Professor, & Former Teacher & Principal

Learning With Interesting People

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 63:29


In this episode, Dr. Lang interviews Dr. Kristen Paul, a leadership coach for Humanex as well as an adjunct professor for Trinity International University.With over 18 years in education Dr. Paul knows the importance of being positive and growth-oriented.  She is an expert at understanding individual talents and how they can be utilize to maximize your personal leadership and growth.In this episode Dr. Paul discusses how to take a mission and put it into action as well as leaning on the strengths of teammates around you.Twitter: @MrsKristenPaulLinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-kristen-paul-7b366a27/Book referred to in episode by Dr. Lang, Carey Niewhof:  https://careynieuwhof.com/at-your-best/

The Roundtable
12/29/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 83:34


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, investigative journalist and UAlbany Adjunct Professor Rosemary Armao, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, and Dean of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity at the University at Albany Robert Griffin.

Beyond The Balance Sheet Podcast
Supporting Clients Through Life Transitions With Tom McCullough

Beyond The Balance Sheet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 25:58


Tom McCullough is Chairman and CEO of Northwood Family Office, a Toronto-based multi-family office serving the comprehensive needs of families of significant net worth. In this episode, Tom discusses how he supports families during financial and emotional transitions and reveals how he builds trust with families to disclose sensitive information. Tune in as we chat about preparing for the unexpected when it comes to family planning, the inspiration behind Tom's books, and the advice Tom would give a former version of himself.    IN THIS EPISODE:   [02:50] How Tom supports families during financial and emotional transitions. [06:20] Tom speaks about getting people to disclose sensitive information to him as an advisor.  [11:55] Ways to prepare for the unexpected when it comes to family planning.  [17:40] The inspiration behind Tom's book, The Top 50 Questions Wealthy Families Ask [22:15] The advice that Tom would give a former version of himself.    KEY TAKEAWAYS:   Advisors need to know what they are qualified and capable of dealing with. While on the other hand, they also need to know when it's time for a professional referral.  A family office should be objective; that way, it will bring clients into a zone of trust.  Be easier on yourself and others.  Practice more grace.    LINKS MENTIONED:   Website www.northwoodfamilyoffice.com   Books 'Wealth of Wisdom: The Top 50 Questions Wealthy Families Ask' and 'Family Wealth Management: 7 Imperatives for Successful Investing in the New World Order'   The Top 50 Questions Wealthy Families Ask www.wealthofwisdombook.com/podcast/ https://oconnorpg.com/podcasts/supporting-clients-through-life-transitions-with-tom-mccullough  BIO:   Tom McCullough is Chairman and CEO of Northwood Family Office, a Toronto-based multi-family office serving the comprehensive needs of families of significant net worth. He is also the co-author of 'Wealth of Wisdom: The Top 50 Questions Wealthy Families Ask' and 'Family Wealth Management: 7 Imperatives for Successful Investing in the New World Order'.  Tom has spent over 30 years in the wealth management/ family office field, initially in senior executive roles with RBC wealth management. The combination of this background, along with his own family's need for a truly comprehensive, customized and confidential service, led him to found one of Canada's first multi-family offices, dedicated to families looking for objective advice and boutique-style service. Northwood has quickly become one of the leaders in its field and has been consistently recognized as the top independent family office in Canada by Euromoney in its global private banking survey. Tom is a frequent speaker on wealth management and family issues. He is an Adjunct Professor of Finance at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management where he teaches ‘The Management of Private Wealth' in the MBA program. He is also an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Western University's Ivey School of Business. Tom is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Wealth Management and holds a certificate in Family Business Advising from the Family Firm Institute.

The Roundtable
12/27/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 80:10


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, UAlbany Lecturer in Africana Studies Jennifer Burns, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, and political consultant and lobbyist Libby Post.

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
The January 2022 Surprise of Good Faith Estimates Requirements

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 37:13


The January 2022 Surprise of Good Faith Estimates Requirements Curt and Katie chat about the No Surprises Act, specifically how to navigate the requirement for clinicians to provide Good Faith Estimates to clients. We talk about the impact of Good Faith Estimates on the intake process, potential complications when providing these estimates to your patients, and suggestions for how to simplify and systemize this requirement.      In this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide we talk about the No Surprises Act and the Good Faith Estimate Requirement When we heard about the planned implementation of these new requirements, we decided to dive into the legislation and articles from professional associations to understand what we actually need to do starting January 1, 2022. What is the No Surprises Act and the Good Faith Estimate (GFE) Requirement? “Some folks don't have a clear sense when they come into therapy, how long they're going to be there for.” – Katie Vernoy The goal of the No Surprises legislation is to avoid surprising patients with large medical bills There are benefits and challenges with the requirement to provide good faith estimates to our clients The Good Faith Estimate requirement is to provide the estimated cost of services (fee times number of sessions) at the beginning of treatment (if asked) and at least annually, if needed How will the Good Faith Estimate Requirement impact the Intake Process for Therapy? “These are not contracts; this is not guaranteeing the therapy is going to end after that many sessions.” – Curt Widhalm We are required to determine whether someone is hoping to get insurance reimbursement We must communicate the ability to obtain a written good faith estimate from providers We are required to estimate the number of sessions and total cost of treatment We talk about when you may need to provide a new good faith estimate (and explain changes) We provided a suggestion to start with a GFE for the intake session and then provide a second GFE after that initial session Potential Complications Curt and Katie see for Therapists Providing Good Faith Estimates The requirement for diagnosis very early in treatment The requirement for a diagnosis written on paper – both for folks who don't know or have not asked before, as well as for folks who do not want a written diagnosis Concerns related to putting forward the total cost of therapy for the year The elements of bureaucracy that could negatively impact the therapeutic relationship The No Surprises Act legislation isn't finalized and may have additional components or changes Our Suggestions to Systematize the Good Faith Estimate (GFE) Requirement for Therapists “There are certain aspects of this that I think - while onerous as far as communication with our clients - have the potential to make us actually talk with our clients about their treatment more frequently.” – Curt Widhalm Consider coordinating the timeline for updating GFEs, treatment plans, frequency of sessions, progress in treatment, and a reassessment of the sliding scale Think through how you talk about diagnosis and treatment planning ahead of time The idea to create some sort of mechanism for folks to either decline a GFE or to request an oral versus paper GFE Use recommended language to create your notice for your office as well as on your website Create your own template to simplify the process, including a boiler plate GFE for your intake Create a template for GFEs for on-going treatment Our Generous Sponsor for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Simplified SEO Consulting Simplified SEO Consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO Specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings. These days, word of mouth referrals just isn't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for a therapist and when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you!  That's where Simplified SEO Consulting comes in. Founded and run by a private practice owner, they understand the needs of a private practice. They can help you learn to optimize your own website OR can do the optimizing for you. Visit SIMPLIFIEDSEOCONSULTING.COM/MODERNTHERAPIST to learn more and if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO Courses using the code "MODERNTHERAPIST" Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! APA Article: New Billing Disclosure Requirements Take Effect in 2022 Suggested Notification Language for Good Faith Estimates Template for a Good Faith Estimate Good Faith Estimate Legislation Language from the No Surprises Act Federal Register: Requirements Related to Surprise Billing; Part II CMS.gov: Requirements Related to Surprise Billing; Part II, Interim Final Rule with comment period Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: Should Private Practice Therapists Take Insurance? Make your Paperwork Meaningful   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/ Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated): Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is brought to you by simplified SEO consulting.   Katie Vernoy  00:03 Simplified SEO consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings.   Curt Widhalm  00:21 Stay tuned at the end of the episode for a special discount.   Announcer  00:26 You're listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide, where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:41 Welcome back modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast where we talk about things that affect therapists, our practices, the ways that we practice the ways that we interact with clients and stay I'm going to start by talking about back when I was in high school, I had to take chemistry class, and studying the periodic table.   Katie Vernoy  01:08 Where are you going with this?   Curt Widhalm  01:10 My favorite element at the time was tungsten because will W on its butt over time, my new favorite element is the element of surprise.   Katie Vernoy  01:26 Surprise!   Curt Widhalm  01:27 I think actually, a lot of providers are surprised at the no surprises Act, which we're actually talking about today, going into effect January 1 of 2022. And many people have been over the last couple of weeks, speculating on what this means for their practices, what actions that they need to take. And it's seeming to get to be a little bit of a game of telephone out there in therapy land when seeing everybody talk on Facebook groups and this kind of stuff. So Katie, and I have done an adequate job of diving into this. And how to   Katie Vernoy  02:10 Adequate is the right word, I think.   Curt Widhalm  02:13 So we wanted to be able to talk about the big scary aspects of this, the not so scary aspects of this, and the parts of this that are TBD, because it's not even fully out there yet. And much like the Spanish Inquisition, nobody knows when it's coming. So. So we are going to include some helpful things in our show notes, you can find those over at MCSG podcast comm. I'm sure we'll be doing a follow up episode to this a little bit later, we will also include a whole bunch of very boring and dense government regulations in those show notes as well. So that way, you know that we at least can link to other things in our show notes.   Katie Vernoy  03:09 We've already started off great, very adequate Curt, very adequate.   Curt Widhalm  03:13 Yes. So probably the best resource out there, at least as far as condensing down a bunch of   Katie Vernoy  03:22 At the type of recording.   Curt Widhalm  03:24 Yes there is an article from the American Psychological Association originally created December 10 2021, that outlines what this means for psychologists. But if you are a healthcare provider of any other status, and you are operating within your license or your credential, this article pretty much applies to you too. So we're going to go through this, we're going to add little bits here in there and also make some suggestions that aren't included in this article. And continue to listen to the show and join our Facebook group for further updates on any of the stuff that we're talking about here today as we find important stuff to share. So now, actually, to the content of the show, if you haven't left yet, but the no surprises Act was part of a broad package that was signed into law during the Trump administration. This was a bipartisan bill. And this was really to be a very consumer friendly bill that prevents patients from getting surprise billing. Now, if anybody's ever been in kind of an emergency situation before, what you'll know is that you don't get a whole lot of time to be in the hospital and ask every single provider Hey, are you in my insurance network? Is this going to be covered that it's kind of just who you And not every person who's working on you is necessarily in network, not necessarily an employee of the hospital. And so what ends up happening is that all of your your treatment stuff gets submitted to insurance companies. And then, like Spanish Inquisition, surprise, there's bills that show up in the manual. And this is generally not seen as very consumer friendly, because people don't know what's coming. Yes. Having been on the receiving ends of those kinds of treatments myself in the past. Now, I kind of like where this bill is going, being a healthcare provider, in my own little practice, not liking where this is going. Because there is a lot of regulations that are being added into this that while intended very well, for kind of emergency situations are fields a little bit different.   Katie Vernoy  06:03 Yes. And I think that for private pay providers, there can be times when folks are surprised, not by Oh, the anesthesiologist wasn't in your network. And this extra special treatment that happened because of you were under sedation, cost $27,000. But it is something where some folks don't have a clear sense when they come into therapy, how long they're going to be there for. I think, as a profession, I think we're very good at making sure someone understands the fee before they come into the first session. They know what they're going to be charged when they sit down with us. I think the part that feels both, I guess positive, but also onerous is having to say like, Hey, this is how long your treatment is going to be. This is what it's going to cost and, and giving so much information. I mean, it's it's a lot of information that you're having to provide very early in treatment to a client. And they basically will hold you to it, and then they're given information that they can hold you to it if if it does shift, too, dramatically. So I see that I see the point. But I also see that it's going to be a lot of work. Especially I think just to set it up, I think that there's a way to systematize it. And we can talk about that when we have our kind of discussion around suggestions later. But to begin, it's going to take some work.   Curt Widhalm  07:32 And so the main crux of what you're talking about here is providing clients with a good faith estimate. Yes. Before we get into what the good faith estimate is, let's talk a little bit about the intake phone call with clients. Because I think certain aspects of this, many providers are doing in one way or another where in many jurisdictions were required to discuss our fees with clients before they come into our first session. Yes, it's, you know, no surprises. It's not that they're showing up in our office, it and then all of a sudden being like, wait, what that we yeah, do provide that, usually verbally in an intake phone call, what that good faith estimate now adds to our work is in that intake phone call, we need to start having language around, are you planning to submit a claim to your insurance company for the services that you're going to receive for me, those of you who are in network with insurance companies, that's all to be determined in the future. As far as how that works with insurance companies, we're really talking to those cash paying clients, those out of network therapists, those who provide super bills, if you have a hybrid practice, half, listen to this, turn off the insurance side of your brain. But in that initial phone call, you need to ask clients, are you planning to submit this for a claim? Now, the way that most of us are already doing this is around this language Trooper bills? Hey, do you want a super bill for our services?   Katie Vernoy  09:11 And I also do "Do you want me to do courtesy billing" and actually take the reins on, you know, kind of getting insurance information and that kind of stuff? So I think those of us who are that have a sizable portion of our practices that are private pay, navigate this, but there are some clients that come in never discuss insurance. And I think that the the shift that I'm going to make us I'm going to ask that directly versus kind of allowing it to organically happen in conversation because if somebody comes says, What's your fee? I say $200. They say okay, like, I don't necessarily take that extra step. All the time about that. I mean, sometimes they'll say, you know, do you have insurance benefits? And do you want me to do courtesy billing or would you like a super bill, but I've not been diligent about For folks that don't seem interested, so at this point, we have to ask the question, we have to know about that. I don't know what we do with that information, but we just have to ask, we have to know, that's probably more of the to be determined.   Curt Widhalm  10:12 Well, so from the APA article, what we do after asking if they intend to submit a claim to their insurance is inform them, that they can get a good faith estimate of the expected charges, and that we can provide it to them in a written document if they want. And that needs to include things like a CPT codes, the the billing code for those service sessions that you're intending to do, it needs to include information about the client on it, and the anticipated number of sessions. Yeah, and I think that this is a part where I'm seeing some of the chatter in the therapist community around. Some of the conversations are well, what if people hold us to, you know, you said, this was gonna take 20 sessions, and it took 40. These are not contracts, this is not guaranteeing the therapy is going to end after that many sessions. And I suggest being clear with clients about that, that, yes, as far as I can tell from this vantage point, if you follow treatment, if things go, Well, this should take X number of sessions.   Katie Vernoy  11:27 And then I think the other piece, if you truly think it's going to be 20 sessions, I think, put down 20 sessions, if you think it's going to be longer term treatment, I think you you know, you have to do this, it needs to be a good faith estimate for the next 12 months, I think you do it as an annual or to the end of the year. And maybe you do all your good faith estimates in January. But each new year of treatment for each client, you have to do a new good faith estimate. And each time you change the fee, or the cadence of treatment, the way I'm reading it is that you need to then do a new good faith estimate. So if somebody increases the number of sessions, like they go from once a week to twice a week, or they shift from twice a month to one month, you know, like you're gonna want to adjust down. It feels onerous. And I think that there's probably a way to make this pretty streamlined if you have a form and you just are changing that number and that number. But the part up front that I get worried about is that it's supposed to have the clients diagnosis. And we're talking about an intake call where people can request these good faith estimates. And so I'm assuming you put at that point to be assessed or to be diagnosed at the first session or something like to me, it seems like some of the information requested doesn't really hold up when you're just getting a good faith estimate from a potential client.   Curt Widhalm  12:51 Sure. So I'm gonna go back two points that you made and then come to where you're talking about here.   Katie Vernoy  12:57 Okay. Okay.   Curt Widhalm  12:59 Some of us have clients who are lifers, that   Katie Vernoy  13:02 yes, they are Yes, both you and I are in that category.   Curt Widhalm  13:05 So what I intend to do with those clients is, hey, you generally come 50 weeks out of the year, here's your fee for 2022.   Katie Vernoy  13:17 Done,   Curt Widhalm  13:17 Done, there you go.   Katie Vernoy  13:19 Yeah, I think it's supposed to be in a form. But we can argue if it can be verbal, or if it has to be that whole form.   Curt Widhalm  13:27 I'll give them a form. To your second point. I wonder if the implementation for a lot of therapists is very standard going to have the first session be, actually to Bill 90791 as an actual diagnostic interview for your first session, that would have your appropriate rates, go back to our CPT code episode and hear us talk about most therapists don't actually bill for that one. Yeah. But that, I think, actually, if I step back, this whole process might actually make us follow through on things that we're supposed to be doing a little bit better if we're not having formal diagnostic first sessions, if you're concerned about putting a good faith estimate out to a client that you've talked to for about five minutes on the phone, and four minutes of them are about what a good faith estimate is that you can actually create a space to say, here's a good faith estimate of what this first diagnostic session is going to costs. And you'll get a new good faith estimates for our sessions after that session based on what comes out in that diagnostic interview.   Katie Vernoy  14:49 So, private pay providers are now going to have to act a little bit like insurance providers and diagnose in the first session and predict how much treatment is going to be needed.   Curt Widhalm  15:01 yes.   Katie Vernoy  15:03 Welcome!   Curt Widhalm  15:05 well into your other points is, if you, misjudge or if services need to continue, it's not like your relationship with the client just has to stop, you do get to provide new and updated good faith estimates   Katie Vernoy  15:22 Yes   Curt Widhalm  15:22 as anything changes, like you said, if you're going to more sessions a week, if you change your fees mid year, if any number of different things changes, potentially even diagnostics, then you're going to want to provide good faith estimates that are updated. And I would recommend that you put language on those updated ones that this replaces the previous Good Faith Estimate from whatever the previous date is.   Katie Vernoy  15:52 And it does say in the language, and I don't know if this is in the APA article or the actual legislation, but it does say that when you provide a new Good Faith Estimate, you do need to identify what is different. And so if it's, hey, everything's rolling along, same fee, same number of sessions next year, I think it's saying, this is continuing. And it's you know, there's no changes in the fees, no changes in the predicted number of sessions this year, this is for this year. I think for folks where you're changing fees, or dramatically changing the cadence of sessions, I think that would be an important thing to put and definitely like your language of this replaces the previous Good Faith Estimate. One thing I'm thinking about with this is that if you've got a niche that that generally you know, or your lifers that generally have this is how many sessions you have per year. And so maybe it's 48, or 27, or whatever it is, you know, depending on the cadence of their treatment, shifting from every other week, to once a week back to every other week to once a month, like assuming you're kind of still in that number of sessions per year, I think you probably are fine. Changing fees, definitely a good faith estimate. But like if you've said, This is what you're what we were looking at this year. I think that could I think that could work. What do you think?   Curt Widhalm  17:15 I'm not a lawyer?   Katie Vernoy  17:18 Yes, nor am I.   Curt Widhalm  17:21 It's probable, and, you know, any challenges to this are still to be determined. This is all, you know, this is what regulations are going into effect. The HHS has not you know, had any opportunities to enforce any things yet. So we'll wait for somebody to get punished, and then we'll be able to tell you what they're doing. But realistically, it seems like a good faith estimate is exactly that. It's good faith that Yes. Hey, you know, you typically come to three out of four sessions a month, in case you come to more, you know, some months you do make a ball. So good faith, I'm going to put that you're gonna make all of the sessions over the next like five months. And we can evaluate at that point, you know, what's needing to be changed. There are certain aspects of this that I think well onerous, as far as communication with our clients have the potential to make us actually talk with our clients about their treatment more frequently? Yeah. And I think that that's part of what's scary to a lot of therapists is that clients are gonna see, I spend how much on therapy each   Katie Vernoy  18:40 year? I know, that's the part that I'm like, oh, yeah, that's gonna be rough. Most people don't want to think about it.   Curt Widhalm  18:49 I could buy several cars for this. Right? I think if you know, you're not wanting to sticker shock your clients on January 1 With, here's your good faith estimate of 50 sessions at $100 per session, or 200, or 300, whatever your fee is, yeah, that they can see some therapists breaking it down and say, Alright, here's only six months of anticipated treatment. And I'll just put out a new good faith estimate when that one runs out. But I think that that makes us be able to talk about clients progress, as far as what do you think that you need is continued services going forward and to actually review your treatment plans with them more frequently?   Katie Vernoy  19:37 Yeah, I think it's actually a good process to to align this with a treatment plan. I think process wise, I see it as being something like every January 1, I put out my good faith estimate. But I think there's an element to that where, you know, someone coming in in December and then giving a new one to them. January feels silly. So but I do think talking to folks at their treatment plan anniversary, or every six months or whatever your timeline is, and then talking about cadence talking about, you know, how they're feeling, you know, what they're thinking about. I think that's a good process. And I know when I was working in community mental health that was, you know, like, you talked about termination. From the beginning, you know, and I feel differently in private practice, like you might a lot of my clients are lifers, but I think it is, it's really easy to get complacent, when you're just kind of meeting every week, and you're not actually taking the time to look at what are we actually working on? What are you getting from this? You know, what is your financial situation compared to what we're talking about? I mean, for folks that do sliding scale, this could also be an opportunity to SPSS sliding scale and saying, okay, you know, my fee is going to be x January 1, and, you know, this is what you've been paying, you know, is that still appropriate? Are you able to increase towards the, you know, can you decrease the subsidy, so to speak, you know, like, you can have those conversations, it's just a money conversation that a lot of people don't like to have. And so I think this kind of thoughtful, you know, kind of transparent conversation about number of sessions length of treatment, Cadence. And money is important and needed, but pretty uncomfortable for a lot of folks   Curt Widhalm  21:27 being the optimist that I occasionally am, that I think that there are some providers out there, especially when it comes to things like sliding scales, who don't know how to bring the conversations back of, yeah, hey, you got a job. And now you can afford the fee that we had agreed upon before. This does provides those clinicians with an opportunity to have a better touch point, as far as renegotiating some of those sliding scale things.   Katie Vernoy  22:01 It's a natural benchmark. I think the other thing that is interesting on what's being required in these good faith estimates is the client diagnosis. We mentioned it kind of like, you know, do the diagnostic session separate and then a good faith estimate for ongoing treatment. But for some of my clients, they may never see their diagnosis unless I do this, right. And so for folks that don't do super bills, or don't talk about it, don't request their records. And so I think that's another thing for folks, you know, before they provide their first Good Faith Estimate, you may want to be ready to have that conversation because it does show up on the billing, or does show up on this form. And so being able to make sure that your clients understand how you diagnose why you've diagnosed, what you've diagnosed, and what it means how it's impacting treatment or not, it does mean that we need to diagnose our clients. And I think some folks are unlikely to do so when they're completely private pay.   Curt Widhalm  23:06 And I think for people who provide super bills, if this worries you, you're already doing this. It's just you're now with the potential of a more explicit conversation with your clients. And helping clients as Katie just mentioned, to understand what this process is. And, again, this is all very good spirited as far as being consumer friendly. And that's, you know, where it does put some of these onerous things on our behalf. But I think it has the potential because of all of these extra contact points in talking about treatment, and talking about monies impact on treatment, that clients are going to get better outcomes, which maybe I was gonna say if clients get better outcomes, that's good for you as the therapist.   Katie Vernoy  24:02 Sure, sure. I think there's, there's, there's an element of this that feels very paperwork and could take away from the relationship, you know, like, if you have to explain a tough diagnosis that that, you know, wasn't something that was in the regular conversation that can that can impact the relationship. If you have to really dig deeply into some of this. I think it's life. I think it's it's therapy, it's good therapy, but I don't know that it's necessarily I'm not going to just, you know, rainbows and sunshine about like, hey, you need to do this, because I don't know, I think that there are ways that you can make a benefit your client, I don't know that it's necessarily designed to benefit outcomes. The thing I was thinking about, which is an open question, there are folks who do not take insurance because they don't want a diagnosis and they don't want to have anything on record around diagnosis, whether it's based on their job, whatever some reason, they don't want to have a diagnosis. My assumption I'm not reading anything in here that you have to have a full DSM diagnosis, you could do a V code, you could do something that was subclinical. Is that how you're reading it? Or is this an open question where we have to determine like if people want to refuse a good faith estimate, written in good faith estimate? Are we allowed to do so?   Curt Widhalm  25:18 So for those people who are not in network, and if you know, the diagnosis question is a thing. If people, you still have the obligation to ask people, if they are planning on submitting their claims to their insurance company, sure, sure. If they are, you're still required to provide the proper diagnosis to them, you're not not just one that is reimbursable. And so if you are treating somebody for a Z code, if you are treating somebody for something that is traditionally not reimbursed, that is still the diagnostic code that you're supposed to put on there, that has not changed that is already in place. And if you're not doing that, that's insurance fraud. Spanish Inquisition is coming after you.   Katie Vernoy  26:07 Okay, so you didn't answer my question. But all of what I said, What you said was, I agree to if someone does not want to submit any claims to insurance, doesn't want a super bill barely wants a record? Can they decline one of these good faith estimates?   Curt Widhalm  26:24 Absolutely.   Katie Vernoy  26:25 So that they don't have any diagnosis on any paper anywhere?   Curt Widhalm  26:30 Absolutely.   Katie Vernoy  26:31 Okay.   Curt Widhalm  26:33 You as the clinician still need to chart your treatment plans and what it's based on and all that kind of stuff, whether your clients want a good faith estimate or not?   Katie Vernoy  26:42 Are we required to diagnose a client?   Curt Widhalm  26:44 you need to have a reason for treatment, and you need to have a treatment plan that is based on something other than a client just showing up? And you started a session with? Where do you want to start today and ending it with? You're where you need to be? That?   Katie Vernoy  27:03 That may be a whole other conversation. But   Curt Widhalm  27:05 I mean, that that is acting within the scope of your license that   Katie Vernoy  27:08 Sure, sure. So we can have a conversation about diagnosis, but from what you're reading, we could either put a non clinical DSM code and for this Good Faith Estimate, or someone could decline it if they don't want to have a piece of paper with their diagnosis on it.   Curt Widhalm  27:28 Sure, yeah.   Katie Vernoy  27:30 So we may also, at some point, need to put together a, I am declining a Good Faith Estimate form that people sign,   Curt Widhalm  27:38 you know, that's a great idea. You know, it's not like a subpoena where you have to, like, throw it at a client if they're running away from you. Anyway, there are   Katie Vernoy  27:50 Oe I would prefer for an oral, Good Faith Estimate versus a written faith, Good Faith Estimate. I think these are the things that are kind of the to be determined, we'll wait and see if anybody gets sued or or in trouble. But I think there are probably some some reasons why these would not be customer friendly, or consumer friendly, right, is all I'm saying. So we'll we'll table that for now.   Curt Widhalm  28:14 So there are some other requirements that I think are important for everyone to be aware of. You have to prominently post that clients can and are entitled to a good faith estimates. And this needs to be put on your website. It needs to be prominently displayed in your office. I'm I'm on Amazon right now, ordering one of those neon like scrolling things, just put it up behind me in session.   Katie Vernoy  28:46 Oh, that sounds awful.   Curt Widhalm  28:50 Or really just posting a paper a piece of paper that says you're entitled to a good faith estimates.   Katie Vernoy  28:57 And the APA article has both samples of the good faith estimate itself as well as notice the language for the notice. And it has instructions on it. Well, we'll link to those in the show notes. But I think it is big enough that it might be not quite a poster, but still a piece of paper on your wall. And then for your website. I think my suggestion What if you have a section on fees, this may be a reason to post your fees on your website. People have different feelings about it. And I think that would be the appropriate place to have it listed. is in that that section of your website.   Curt Widhalm  29:36 To be clear. You don't need to put on your website. Just a general I expect people's treatment to last 25 sessions   Katie Vernoy  29:46 No   Curt Widhalm  29:47 the language that you need to put out there is   Katie Vernoy  29:51 You can request a good faith estimate.   Curt Widhalm  29:52 Yes, exactly.   Katie Vernoy  29:54 And that's in that APA article. I think the other thing that I was starting to get to get in the weeds and I think this is is more kind of standing questions that will be to be seen. There are a difference between convening providers, which is the person providing the primary service and CO providers, from what I can read the convening provider is the person who has been asked for this good faith estimate. And maybe it's a primary provider, maybe it's just the person they thought to ask. And if there are co providers who are providing treatment with you for the identified patient. So for example, you've got a an eating disorder treatment group that, you know, you've got different folks either in your group practice, or that you do a lot of work with, you may end up having to put together kind of this full package of good faith estimates where everybody's services are on there. I think that's a little bit more detailed than we need to get for today's conversation, I think typically, you're just going to be doing your own services. But for folks who have group practices that maybe share an identified patient with another provider, or have a little complexity, you probably are going to want to reach out to your professional association or legal counsel to identify how best to take care of those good faith estimates is my opinion.   Curt Widhalm  31:10 Yes. If this sounds like a lot of extra steps, you're right. And some of the things that I'm seeing across the healthcare industry is that this does impact smaller businesses a lot more than group practices and agencies, because it is a lot of extra steps and does have time deadlines that oftentimes you're going to need to provide this in writing to clients who want it within one business day. And if you have a very, very busy schedule, this is something that you're going to deed to accommodate, you're going to have to get these systems in place. And you know, our friends over at simple practice that we've seen some chatter in the simple practice community requesting that some of this stuff be added to their platform, I hope that a lot of the EHR systems, we'll be addressing this so that way, it does help to streamline these things. But this is stuff that whether you like it or not, it's here. And, you know, we're trying to give you just a even if this is a, hey, I have to go and look at this stuff. And I need to make some changes now go and make those changes, because this is things that our world is changing, we have to adjust to as providers and our clients are going to be overall probably better for it even if that means that we're not.   Katie Vernoy  32:47 So I want to just before we close up, I want to talk through what I see as a potential path to try to make this as efficient as possible. And so I'm stealing one of your ideas, and then putting together the rest. So I think what   Curt Widhalm  33:00 your plan is everybody quits and go find retirement early on some cheaper cost of living base.   Katie Vernoy  33:09 No, everybody become coaches... Um, no, the plan is, I really like this idea of having a boilerplate, good faith estimate for your diagnostic session. So your 90791 I think the difficulty unless there is like some sort of a form created in your electronic health record, you may have to create this separately, but putting together that good faith estimate. So it is sent over with all of your intake paperwork. And it's part of the the process. So this is the fee, this is the service. I think that the nuance and you can have all of your information, the nuance is the clients name and those types of things. And so I'm going to look in simple practice myself to see if I can figure out a way to do it if if they don't fix that themselves, or don't put that together themselves. But I think even creating, you know, a form that you can upload and send to them where you can, you know, kind of do that that becomes with your intake paperwork, it goes out immediately you're in compliance. I think the next stage is having that good faith estimate that is for ongoing treatment, has all of your information already in place has all of the services and fees in place and then it goes into you know, there's a little bit that you have to fill out for each client that has their information, their diagnosis, and then the number the expected number of sessions, and that goes out after the first session.   Curt Widhalm  34:43 I think it's brilliant, until they change things and that's addressed. In some future episodes. We do know that there is language that is written into this no surprises act that even four out of network therapists might be needing to submit some of this paperwork directly to a client's health insurance company. That part of the law or the regulations has not yet been written. We just know that it's coming. It's reserved in there. And that's what some of the future languages for your member professional association, check out any guidance that they have, as those regulations continue to roll out, we will almost guaranteeing an episode in the future on what that means, especially for those of us who aren't used to talking with insurance companies and what kind of mean now, so we kind of want to hear you lamenting these kinds of things. I can share your thoughts with that in our Facebook group, the modern therapist group, and share it with us on our social media. We'll include links to all of that in our show notes. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy.   Katie Vernoy  36:02 Thanks again to our sponsors simplified SEO consulting.   Curt Widhalm  36:05 These days, word of mouth referrals just aren't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for therapists. And when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you. That's where Simplified SEO consulting comes in. It's founded and run by a private practice owner who understands the needs of a private practice, and they can help you learn to optimize your own website or they can do the optimizing for you.   Katie Vernoy  36:29 Visit SimplifiedSEOconsulting.com/moderntherapist to learn more. And if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO courses using the code MODERNTHERAPIST. Once again, visit simplified Seo consulting.com/moderntherapist and use the code modern therapist all caps.   Announcer  36:54 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.    

Black Entrepreneur Experience
BEE 282 Performs Around The World, Release 3 Remix EPS & Adjunct Professor, Amani Roberts ~ Bonus

Black Entrepreneur Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 38:36


DJ AmRo (Amani Roberts)  Amani started a online radio show called Mirth Nadir. The focus of the show was listener dedications and interviewing indie and mainstream artists such as Melanie Fiona, Raheem Devaughn,Charlene Lite and Donnell Jones. The successful creation of this show further cemented Amani's decision to DJ at a variety of events and venues throughout the world. Amani has successfully partnered with the international brand Clif Bar on numerous marathons and bicycle races across the west coast of United States.  DJ AmRo mixes classic Old School, Hip Hop and House with all of the latest top-40 hits and ensures that the crowd is moving at all times. His Jazz upbringing has proven invaluable as the historical knowledge allows him to find the right vibe for any party. A few of Amani's favorite artists include Stevie Wonder, Eric B & Rakim, Meshell Ndegeocello, Mariah Carey and Teena Marie. DJ AmRo is currently based in Los Angeles, California. Website: https://www.amaniexperience.com

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009
Weekly Space Hangout - How We Can Clean Up Earth's Space Debris with Dr. Jake Abbott

The 365 Days of Astronomy, the daily podcast of the International Year of Astronomy 2009

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 63:46


https://youtu.be/BX-SICfFvB8 Host: Fraser Cain ( @fcain )Special Guest: This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Jake Abbott, director of the Telerobotics Laboratory at the University of Utah to the WSH. The proliferation of Space Debris has become an increasingly alarming reality. In fact, as recently as December 3, 2021, "The International Space Station (ISS) had to swerve away from a fragment of a U.S. launch vehicle" (source:  https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/sci...). In a paper published in November 2021 in the science journal Nature , Jake and his research team have proposed a new method of dealing with the debris: using a series of spinning magnets to move these objects. You can read more about their proposed solution here https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/....   Jake Abbott is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah, and he is the director of the Telerobotics Laboratory. He joined the University of Utah in 2008. Before coming to Utah, he spent three years in Switzerland as a postdoctoral researcher working with Brad Nelson at the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich. Dr. Abbott received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 2005 working with Allison Okamura, his M.S. from the University of Utah in 2001, and his B.S. from Utah State University in 1999, all in Mechanical Engineering.   Jake Abbott's research has been funded by the NSF (including the CAREER Award), the NIH, NASA, the Air Force, and industry. He and his co-authors have won a number of Best Paper and Best Poster Awards at international conferences. He is currently an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Robotics Research, and was previously an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics.   In Jake's spare time, he's a movie buff, a foodie, and an all-around supporter of the arts and the community in Salt Lake City. Jake's wife is a flamenco dancer and instructor in Salt Lake City, and he plays guitar and sings as part of her group.   You can learn more about Jake and his research by visiting https://www.telerobotics.utah.edu/ind... and https://www.mech.utah.edu/directory/f.... Regular Guests: Dr. Nick Castle ( @PlanetaryGeoDoc ) C.C. Petersen ( http://thespacewriter.com/wp/ & @AstroUniverse & @SpaceWriter ) Pam Hoffman ( http://spacer.pamhoffman.com/ & http://everydayspacer.com/ & @EverydaySpacer ) This week's stories: - JWST & what it's going to be looking at. - A comet, 2 meteor showers, 2 contests & a citizen science project! - Crazy Pluto geology. - New information on the clouds of Venus. - Hyabusa samples.   We've added a new way to donate to 365 Days of Astronomy to support editing, hosting, and production costs.  Just visit: https://www.patreon.com/365DaysOfAstronomy and donate as much as you can! Share the podcast with your friends and send the Patreon link to them too!  Every bit helps! Thank you! ------------------------------------ Do go visit http://www.redbubble.com/people/CosmoQuestX/shop for cool Astronomy Cast and CosmoQuest t-shirts, coffee mugs and other awesomeness! http://cosmoquest.org/Donate This show is made possible through your donations.  Thank you! (Haven't donated? It's not too late! Just click!) ------------------------------------ The 365 Days of Astronomy Podcast is produced by the Planetary Science Institute. http://www.psi.edu Visit us on the web at 365DaysOfAstronomy.org or email us at info@365DaysOfAstronomy.org.

Computers, Coffee and Curriculum
CCC0049: Assessment Data and the Classroom Environment

Computers, Coffee and Curriculum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 33:43


Jim is joined by K-12 Social Studies Curriculum Supervisor Kim Cristal and West Irondequoit Director of STEAM and Adjunct Professor at University of Rochester Orlando Marerra 03:45  Great Ways People are Using Assessment Data Already 06:45 What Can Assessment Be? 12:50 Other Instructions Beyond the Traditional Model 16:55 Instruction Models of the Future 24:10 Hope for the Future for Data Gathered Contact us at feedback@k12ccc.com or 346-FAQ-HELP (346-327-4357)

Weekly Space Hangout
Weekly Space Hangout: 22-DEC-2021 - Cleaning Up Earth's Space Debris with Dr. Jake Abbott

Weekly Space Hangout

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 58:18


This week we are excited to welcome Dr. Jake Abbott, director of the Telerobotics Laboratory at the University of Utah to the WSH. The proliferation of Space Debris has become an increasingly alarming reality. In fact, as recently as December 3, 2021, "The International Space Station (ISS) had to swerve away from a fragment of a U.S. launch vehicle" (source: https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/science/international-space-station-swerves-dodge-space-junk-2021-12-03/). In a paper published in November 2021 in the science journal Nature , Jake and his research team have proposed a new method of dealing with the debris: using a series of spinning magnets to move these objects. You can read more about their proposed solution here https://attheu.utah.edu/facultystaff/waste-of-space/. Jake Abbott is a Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering and an Adjunct Professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah, and he is the director of the Telerobotics Laboratory. He joined the University of Utah in 2008. Before coming to Utah, he spent three years in Switzerland as a postdoctoral researcher working with Brad Nelson at the Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems at ETH Zurich. Dr. Abbott received his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University in 2005 working with Allison Okamura, his M.S. from the University of Utah in 2001, and his B.S. from Utah State University in 1999, all in Mechanical Engineering. Jake Abbott's research has been funded by the NSF (including the CAREER Award), the NIH, NASA, the Air Force, and industry. He and his co-authors have won a number of Best Paper and Best Poster Awards at international conferences. He is currently an Associate Editor for the International Journal of Robotics Research, and was previously an Associate Editor for IEEE Transactions on Robotics. In Jake's spare time, he's a movie buff, a foodie, and an all-around supporter of the arts and the community in Salt Lake City. Jake's wife is a flamenco dancer and instructor in Salt Lake City, and he plays guitar and sings as part of her group. You can learn more about Jake and his research by visiting https://www.telerobotics.utah.edu/index.php/People/JakeAbbott and https://www.mech.utah.edu/directory/faculty/jake-abbott/. **************************************** The Weekly Space Hangout is a production of CosmoQuest. Want to support CosmoQuest? Here are some specific ways you can help: ► Subscribe FREE to our YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/c/cosmoquest ► Subscribe to our podcasts Astronomy Cast and Daily Space where ever you get your podcasts! ► Watch our streams over on Twitch at https://www.twitch.tv/cosmoquestx – follow and subscribe! ► Become a Patreon of CosmoQuest https://www.patreon.com/cosmoquestx ► Become a Patreon of Astronomy Cast https://www.patreon.com/astronomycast ► Buy stuff from our Redbubble https://www.redbubble.com/people/cosmoquestx ► Join our Discord server for CosmoQuest - https://discord.gg/X8rw4vv ► Join the Weekly Space Hangout Crew! - http://www.wshcrew.space/ Don't forget to like and subscribe! Plus we love being shared out to new people, so tweet, comment, review us... all the free things you can do to help bring science into people's lives.

Beyond The Balance Sheet Podcast
Financial Literacy: Arming the Next Generation With Courtney Pullen

Beyond The Balance Sheet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 27:03


Courtney Pullen is the President of the Pullen Consulting Group with more than 25 years of experience in individual and family coaching. In this episode, Courtney joins us  to explain the importance of teaching financial literacy as early as possible to your children. He says that it would help if you were intentional when talking about wealth and finances with your family. Plus, Courtney explains how to pass on the proper values to your children around wealth. Tune in as we chat about grit, teachable money moments, and dealing with your own money issues.   IN THIS EPISODE:   [01:50] When are kids ready to hear about how much money is in your family?   [04:20] You need to be intentional when it comes to talking about money.  [09:30] How wealth can hinder the process of instilling values to your children.  [12:30] We need to not deprive our children of the opportunity to earn.  [21:20] An example of how Courtney promotes grit into his children.    KEY TAKEAWAYS:   You need to teach your kids financial literacy from a young age; the sooner, the better!  Let your kids make money mistakes; anything can be a great teachable moment. Define the purpose of your wealth; that way, you can pass on the proper values in your children.  Parents need to deal with their own money issues before teaching their children about money.      LINKS MENTIONED:   Website www.PullenConsulting.com   LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/courtney-pullen-54a1035/   https://oconnorpg.com/podcasts/financial-literacy-arming-the-next-generation-with-courtney-pullen   BIO:   Courtney Pullen M.A. is the President of the Pullen Consulting Group.  He has more than 25 years of experience in individual and family coaching, business and management consulting, leadership development, communication, and team building.   Courtney received his graduate degree in Psychology from the University of Northern Colorado in 1983.  He was a Clinical Associate at the School of Professional Psychology at the University of Denver and an Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado at Denver.  Courtney also spent 17 years as a Senior Consultant with Conversant Solutions, a Communication and Collaboration Consulting firm to Fortune 100 Companies.    Courtney has lectured frequently, conducted numerous workshops, and been published in the areas of individual and organizational change, behavioral finance, communication, and family wealth dynamics.  He is a former contributing editor to the Journal of Financial Planning and the Journal of Practical Estate Planning and is a faculty member of the Sudden Money Institute.  He also holds Fellow status in the Purposeful Planning Institute and is a graduate of the Newfield coaching program.    He has spoken at regional and national conference of the Financial Planning Association (FPA), National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA), Investment Management Consultants Association, (IMCA), and Young Presidents' Organization (YPO), as well as estate planning symposiums and family foundation conferences.   His primary focus is as a consultant to financial services firms and affluent families.  He is the author of Intentional Wealth: How Families Build Legacies of Stewardship and Financial Health.  He is also on CPWA faculty at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business.

Moments To Momentum
Episode 66: MIchael Leppert

Moments To Momentum

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 77:08


Michael Leppert is a lecturer at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University, as well as an Adjunct Professor at the O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs. Additionally, Michael is a published writer and featured columnist with regular pieces in the Indianapolis Business Journal.  Prior to his move to higher education, Michael was a seasoned Public Relations and Legislative Specialist, with 20-years as a private sector lobbyist, working with top government, community, and business leaders to achieve strategic priorities. He was also the former Director of Public Affairs, for Krieg Devault.  In this fun and insightful episode, Michael talks about his second book, and first novel, “Flipping the Circle”. He also explains what a lobbyist does, his love of show tunes, the value of understanding people from all walks of life, usefulness vs uselessness, and a “jolting” moment he experienced with his father when he was 18 that helped him understand empathy.  Check out Michael's website Connect with Michael on LinkedIn  Sponsors: Talevation Ninety.io Straticos Buy your copy of Level-UP To Professional: Second Edition  

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

How Can Therapists Actually Retire? - An interview with David Frank, financial planner for therapists Curt and Katie talk with David about managing finances, including student loan debt and retirement. We look at when to start saving, what to do when you're starting to save for retirement later in life, and how much is too much to save. David also shares his concept of a Money Date and how you should start looking at your financial picture. He also talks about financial planning and when to seek a professional for support. Interview with David Frank, Turning Point Financial Life Planning David Frank is on a mission to ensure every therapist has access to unbiased and fiduciary financial advice! Through the firm he founded, Turning Point Financial Life Planning, he helps therapists navigate every element of their financial lives: from understanding your practice P&L and building a personal budget to managing student loan debt and investing for retirement... and everything in between. Dave earned both his undergraduate and MBA degrees in finance and he also completed a certificate in personal financial planning. He's worked for over twenty years in investment banking, corporate finance and now personal finance. Don't let his love of the tax code and spreadsheets scare you off! You're just as likely to find him with his nose buried in one of Pema Chodron's books as reading up on the latest finance planning techniques. In this podcast episode we talk about: Managing Personal and Professional Finances How perfectionism can get in the way of saving The importance of “just getting started” in saving for retirement Saving money is a practice, not something you figure out once Why it is important to save money as soon as you can Navigating Student Loan Debt Student loan debt and how overwhelming it is to look at these debts The desire to pay off this debt as quickly as possible David's advice to save at least one time your annual income before aggressively paying off your student loan debt The comparison of interest rates on your debt versus returns on investing money Retirement and Investing in your Future “Starting to save and invest young is such great advice… and… it's advice for time travelers” For younger folks, the advice is to save as soon as possible What to do if you are closer to retirement age and you haven't started saving for retirement How to determine when you can retire “No one does this money thing perfectly, even if we start out of the gate pretty strong.” What to do when life happens and you have to start over David's own story of having to start over Societal fear due to 2008 and the Great Recession David Frank's Concept of “Money Dates” Reserve time each week to look at your money Start understanding how much you need to save Idea: go to the Social Security Administration Website to see what you're entitled to in social security How Much Money to Save The money mindset concerns that can get in the way of saving (or even looking at) your money How much money is too much money to save? Emergency funds and the feeling of safety and security The risks of saving too much money Quality of life questions when you are underspending Online tools to identify what you need in retirement, so you know when you've saved enough Actual numbers of what to save for retirement and what you can spend now Financial Planning – When and why to seek help with your money The complexity of the decisions related to paying debt versus investing The number of options available to each person when making decisions on our money Get feedback on how well you are doing on your practice financials and saving for retirement Risk planning, financial planning, estate and incapacity planning The importance of understanding your values when you look at how to spend your money Financial planning when you don't have a lot of money Choosing what you sacrifice when you decide to invest in shiny objects The problem of “shoulds” and getting financial advice from other therapists Our Generous Sponsor for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Simplified SEO Consulting Simplified SEO Consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO Specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings. These days, word of mouth referrals just isn't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for a therapist and when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you!  That's where Simplified SEO Consulting comes in. Founded and run by a private practice owner, they understand the needs of a private practice. They can help you learn to optimize your own website OR can do the optimizing for you. Visit SIMPLIFIEDSEOCONSULTING.COM/MODERNTHERAPIST to learn more and if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO Courses using the code "MODERNTHERAPIST"   Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! David's Website for Turning Point Financial Life Planning David's Finance Quickstart Guide David's Quickstart Intensive Coaching Session (use code MTSG for 20% off) David on LinkedIn Social Security Administration Website   Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: The 4-1-1- on your 401K Making Bank as a Therapist Overcoming Your Poverty Mindset Don't Take Tax Advice From Therapists   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/ Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated):   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is brought to you by Simplified SEO consulting.   Katie Vernoy  00:03 Simplified SEO consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings.   Curt Widhalm  00:21 Stay tuned at the end of the episode for a special discount.   Announcer  00:24 You're listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide, where therapists live, breathe, and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:40 Welcome back modern therapists, this is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for all things therapists. And that includes money and how we're setting ourselves up for running good practices, taking care of ourselves, both while we're working and towards retirement so that way, we don't have to do this forever. And we can potentially retire someday. And here to help us talk about this is David Frank. He is a financial planner and the founder of Turning Point financial, and he's here to help put the fun back in funds and take the ire out of retirement. So thank you very much for joining us today.   David Frank  01:29 Brilliant, thanks so much for that introduction. Kurt. I'm super excited to be here and to talk about, yeah, all things Money and Finance and even the dreaded R word of retirement.   Katie Vernoy  01:40 I'm so glad you're here, we had a lot of fun working together around the conference. And we definitely I feel like you're a friend of the show and a friend of mine. And so I'm so glad you're here talking about that.   David Frank  01:51 Thanks   Katie Vernoy  01:51 Because I think there's a lot that needs to be discussed. On a previous episode Curt and I had been talking about one of the retirement plans that therapists have is suicide, which is horrible. And, and part of that is just not planning not making enough money. And so to me, I feel like this is an important conversation for us to be having. And you're a great person to do it because you're a financial planner, who has chosen to work specifically with therapists. But before I get ahead of myself, the first question we ask everyone is who are you? And what are you putting out to the world?   David Frank  02:26 Yeah, so as Curt mentioned, my name is David Frank, and I am a financial planner, and the founder of turning point, financial fat is a financial planning firm that I began and it is focused exclusively on helping therapists or mental health professionals take care of their finances. So that's what I'm putting out into the world. That's what I'm doing. My kind of mission is to help people live better lives to help your listeners, your therapists out there live better lives, and also grow their impact in the world. Because when we get sort of some of this money stuff out of the way, we can be more present for every element of our lives. And I think it's less about the money and more about the actual feelings and feeling better about money and not being so stressed and overwhelmed about it.   Curt Widhalm  03:08 What's wrong with you if that you chose to work with therapists? How does somebody be like, You know what there there are people who are easy to work with with money, and I'm up for a challenge. Why? What brought you to the the mental health world as far as your client population here?   David Frank  03:31 Yeah, great question. Well, so within the financial planning community, much like within the therapist, community and mental health community, there's this like raging debate going on about whether niching down and really specifically defining your target audience or target market is a good idea or not. And when I started turning point, when I started my own business, the big thing I was worried about is like, is anyone actually going to show up and want to work with me, like actually pay me money for my services? And the other the secondary concern was like, will I be able to add enough value will I actually be able to, like, really understand what's going on for folks and really help them in a meaningful way. And I became super convinced that the solution to both of those anxieties was to define a niche of who I really wanted to work with. And it was a very, what's the right word, I was just very stressed about getting the right niche. And at that time, I was, I was seeing my own therapist, and I had been seeing this guy for several years, and he was awesome. I was working with kind of a life and business coach, and I was agonizing over this decision. And finally, my coach reflected back to me something that was obvious to him, but was invisible to me. And he just said, Why don't you work with therapists? And I was like, Oh, my it was just like a light went off. That's the wrong metaphor, but it just it felt so right. I love talking to therapists, like I sometimes I think like a therapist. I love learning about their business. And it just seemed like a population that I could help and like you say, like, maybe maybe I'm up for the challenge.   Katie Vernoy  05:01 What do you think therapists get wrong when they think about retirement or saving money or taking care of their finances?   David Frank  05:08 Yeah, I what I see is something that not just therapists get wrong, but just generally most people get wrong. And that's this idea of having to figure it all out or get something perfect, rather than just simply getting started. And when it comes to managing finances, both personal finances and professional finances, like your private practice finances, I think the key really is simply just to get started. And so if we think about saving for retirement, I mean, man, just even saying that makes me feel a little bit overwhelmed, right, like, there's so much there to navigate and figure out. But I think the key is to just sort of get started and meet yourself where you're at and just say, Okay, what you really need to do to save for retirement is just that to start saving. So understanding if you can put away even if it's just $5, every month, just get started, build that muscle, build the practice of saving some money and moving it, even if it's just moving it to a dedicated checking account where you're beginning to build up savings, then like down the road, you can come back and sort of figure out, okay, I should probably be investing this money rather than simply putting it into a checking account or something like that. And it is like it's a practice, this stuff is not a project that you sit down one day and get it all done. And then you're just good. It's kind of like a mindfulness practice is really the way I often think about it and encourage others to think about it is to carve out some time, every week to just spend with your money stuff, both your internal stuff, what comes up for you, when you're dealing with money and finances, and with the external stuff of the accounts that you have in the amounts of those accounts and how you navigate it. So I'm just a huge proponent of just sort of getting started and make taking those small, little steps. And I feel too often people get hung up that like, No, I have to make this big, monumental shift, that perfectionist tendency that so many of us have, can really hold us back.   Curt Widhalm  06:57 So I think in your own way, you've answered a couple of the questions that we would normally ask here, which is, when should people start saving? And how much should they start saving, which I'm hearing you say, early, and whatever you can. So that's kind of the first part of this, for maybe some of our listeners who are earlier on in their careers who are facing things like massive student debt, where it's like, well, I should be throwing money at, you know, getting the government off my back or blowing providers off my back. What do you say to somebody in that position where it's very earlier on where they might be kind of death, avoidant, as opposed to starting to think about investing in themselves?   David Frank  07:44 Well, yeah, a couple of things I want to say in response to that. And first, Curt, I think you hit the nail on the head, start saving as soon as you can, there's this this magic of compounding what we talked about in the financial world. And that just means the sooner that you get started saving, the longer you have, or the longer you give those investments to grow. So the amount that you need to save can are like the percentage of your income that you should be saving toward retirement, it can change dramatically depending on when you start. So if you're starting to save for retirement, say in your mid to late 20s, from mid to late 20s, all the way through retirement, that's like 40 years for most of us. And so if you start that early, you could save like 15% of your income and be absolutely fine. The longer you wait, the greater percentage of your earnings that you'll ideally need to set aside. Now I don't want anyone to hear those numbers and kind of like freak out and prevent them from from even getting started. Because anything is better than nothing in this sort of situation. So that's part of the answer. And we can probably talk more about that. But the the student loan issue, I think is a huge one. And yeah, I mean, I really feel like it's so it's so easy to want to avoid student loans and not even look at them. And what I would say is that, regardless of the type of debt, whether it's student loan debt, or a mortgage or auto loan, or really almost anything else, I don't encourage people to start aggressively paying off debt until they've saved, you know, roughly about one times their their annual income through a combination of emergency funds, retirement account savings, and even just, you know, ordinary savings and other other investments. The one exception to that might be really high interest rate credit card debt, which you might want to pay off. But student loans, especially, the only way that you can really get into trouble with student loans is to ignore them and not look at them. There are so many amazing options in terms of different income driven repayment plans out there. If you have federal student loan debts, I would encourage you to start saving and start looking at your student loans and considering what might the right path be for you because there are so many good options out there. Unfortunately, because there are many options. It's a little confusing and overwhelming to navigate. But there are definitely great resources out there. So super long answer To your question, allow you guys to jump in.   Curt Widhalm  10:03 And if I can provide, you know, maybe a little bit of a perspective on this, you know, if you're looking at student loans, if your rates are like 5 6 7 percent in interest, even that can feel scary. But when you look at like stock market returns over the last couple of years, money that you could be saving 5% on by putting into your loan, you could have been getting returns of 1015, or more percent, depending on how that kind of stuff is invested, where you're using that same money to make your retirement come sooner. This is where having some of the ability to kind of sit and look at some of this stuff. And sitting with somebody like David would, I'm sure walk you through some of these kinds of comparisons of here's how you can make even very little money work for you.   David Frank  10:49 Yeah, I think that's that's an excellent point, Curt. And like that's, that's right. Like, it's always great to be investing the money and seeing really great returns from the stock market, like we have seen over the last couple years, really over the last 10 years, it's been an insane period, where there's been really healthy returns. And you're right, like you could have not pay down your student loans whatsoever. Because yeah, they're probably in the neighborhood of 5 6 7 8% interest each year, something like that. And that's just it's so complicated. Like there's so many factors to think through that I think yes, the more you spend some time just sort of looking and learning yourself, the more comfortable you'll start to be with it. And that way you can kind of avoid making more rash, emotional decisions, which is sometimes when folks get themselves in trouble. And yeah, you know, I'm having a conversation with financial person, who you who you trust, and who can help you make the right decision for you. Because there there is no one right decision really ever when it comes to all these things. It really is personal and helping a client or helping the person sitting across from me determine what is the right move for them, given their life's their their life, rather, their goal, their anxieties around money, their worries, how do we manage all those different things?   Katie Vernoy  11:59 I like that you're talking about it as individual decisions. I think there are some things we're kind of the cold hard numbers with some therapists are great at math, many therapists are not great at math, that's kind of a trope that I don't actually like, I think it's this thing of, of being able to actually look at the cold, hard numbers of what do I save by paying the minimum payment on my debt? Versus what do I earn from even putting something in a very risk free I mean, the stock market isn't necessarily risk free, you could make 10%, or you could lose 20%. You know, there's, there's so much there. And I think some people can hold that risk and are used to that, and some folks can't. And so I think looking at what, what makes sense for you with the emotional makeup of how you're looking at your money, the amount of bass that you have and can play around with as well as what your debt looks like. It seems like understanding that is really important. I think when we're looking at folks who are first starting out, which is kind of Kurt's question, which is like they have student loan debt, most likely, they are not earning a lot. And so you're saying kind of look at the numbers identify what's going to make the most sense, save a year's worth of salary before you really aggressively attack your student loan debt, I would recommend probably paying minimum payments. So you don't start? Well, yes, fee is as well. But like, I think there are folks that want they want to be debt free. And I think there's also a lot of folks who know that most people are never completely debt free because of mortgages or, or car loans or other types of debt that can be accrued. But when you look at folks who are a little further on, and whether it's age wise, or career wise, they're further along, and maybe they haven't saved for retirement, what would you say to them, because I think for folks who are early on and they can save the $5 a month or whatever, that's awesome. And I think that there is that compounding that you were talking about. But there are folks that I've talked to even that are like, I am in my 50s I'm in my 60s, I haven't done anything. And I just don't want to have to work forever. And so what would you recommend for folks who are further on in their life who are maybe further on in their career? What should you say, you know, how do you determine what you should save? How do you determine how and when you can retire? I mean, for folks who are later on I think there's there's sometimes a bigger question mark than folks for starting out. I mean, the message when you're first starting out when you're younger, and you're newer in your career, like just save, start it, you've got a lot of time it'll grow, we promise. But for folks that don't have that time, it's especially people who have recently seen their parents, colleagues and friends go through, you know, 2008 or, or different times when retirement just dropped out completely. I mean, there's some fear there's some societal fear around investing. Potentially you have to look at too.   David Frank  14:47 Yeah. No, I like the way you teed up that question too, because I Yes, starting to save and invest young is such great advice. And I also like to describe it as I'm like, It's advice for time travelers, right? Because it's like yeah, that is a lovely thing, but like who actually does that? I mean, some people do for sure.   Katie Vernoy  15:05 Curt and I both did because of the backgrounds that we have. So we both are very fortunate. But not everyone has that.   David Frank  15:12 No, well, just like as an aside, like, I also have like that similar background, like I have an undergraduate degree in finance, I have an MBA in finance. And so like, right out of the gate, in my early 20s, I was like, I gotta be saving, I got to be putting all this money in a 401k. And I did that from like, 22, or whatever to like, 32. And I was doing great. Like I was killing it. And then you know, life happened. And like, I went through a really rough period in my life, I ended up unemployed for like, three years. And guess what, like, I burned through all those savings. So I thought I had done all the right things. And I had, but like, life just happens. And so the story that I told myself at the age of 35, when I was like, essentially broke and starting over was, like, there were a lot of nevers like this is I'm never gonna have the same amount of money, I'm never gonna have the security, I'm never gonna feel comfortable. It's just like, it's kind of like it's over for me. And the truth is that life had all kinds of twists and turns in store for me, and that most of what I was telling myself then wasn't true. So why do I even tell that story? I think the point is, is like a no one does this money stuff perfectly, even if we start out of the game strong, so just be kind and forgiving to yourself, number one. And number two, you really don't know what the future holds like there can be tremendous improvements made in a really short amount of time. So with that, as background, I would say, again, I have this concept I call money dates, which is just set aside 30 minutes, every day, every week rather, or so every week or so 30 minutes or so put it on your calendar and just treat it as if it were, you know, a client appointment and be like, I'm going to sit with my money stuff, and just look at it every week, and just see what's happening. So that I think, especially if you're find yourself later in life, and you use the specter, you have worry or fear about retirement, just start that practice, start getting familiar with what's happening, start understanding maybe how much you might need to save. Yeah, and also try to bring someone else into it with you. Maybe that's a significant other, maybe that's someone in your personal life, who you feel comfortable having this conversation with, just to sort of make it seem less private and scary. That could also be someone like me, like a financial professional, that you have reason to believe would be trustworthy, and would give you good advice. Because there are always options, there's always hope. There's so many things, different levers, you can pull. And the last point I'll make on this is that if you're really worried First, I would go to the Social Security Administration website and just log in, create an account, see what your you'll be entitled to in terms of social security benefits, it might actually be a little bit more than you're suspecting. And that's just like so that that can provide a really solid base. It's not like you have to pay for everything yourself in return in retirement, we do have a bit of a backstop. So start there, and then begin to think, okay, beyond that monthly payment that I'll likely get, what more might I need? And how might I start to get there,   Curt Widhalm  18:05 I'm imagining these money dates of just sitting around with your financial statements and staring them in the eyes and doing the 36 questions to make you fall in love. Alright. Sounds great. But I don't know also, that it's that far off, when it's actually being able to look at this stuff intently as you're describing, and kind of shifting this from maybe more of the personal finance section to you also work with people as far as their finances towards their practices as well. How did how did those conversations look?   David Frank  18:39 Yeah, I mean, they they really run the gamut, you know, you know, what, what most people want to know, is just like, Am I doing okay? Like, is this okay? And I think the answer is, it's kind of this, I'll give like someone like something I read on the cover of a Buddhist magazine, which is like, your perfect just as you are. And you could use some improvement. I feel like that's always kind of like where I kind of began with this. Yeah. It's, it's, it's just like, that's just the truth, you know, and like, so everyone, like, it's a similar practice of just being like, okay, let's, let's look at your practice financials. When's the last time you looked at your profit and loss statement or your p&l? And for a lot of people, it's like, well, the last time I had to, which is when I had to prepare my taxes last year, and like, from there, like I'm not really sure. And so it's like, okay, let's no big deal, a very common experience. And we can and we can do better. So we can just sort of look at it and just sort of spend time with those numbers and just be like, I don't know what any of this means. Right? Like it's they're confusing. These financial statements are confusing. And every therapist that I've ever met, whether they're self described good at math or terrible at math, can understand them. Because this is just simple math. I think it's more about creating room and space for the uncomfortable feelings that come up. When when folks start to, to work with their practice finances, and it's Working to sort of sweep out of the way limiting beliefs around Oh, I'm just no good at this, I'll never figure this out. Because I guarantee like you can figure it out. And sometimes sure you need some support from a professional like me or a peer or whomever. But it's just spending time. And yeah, asking those 36 questions to fall in love with your practice, P&L, I think is, it's not a bad place to begin.   Katie Vernoy  20:23 That's funny, I think there's, there's so much emotion around money and security. And, and I think everybody, you know, there's a lot of different episodes, we've done with different folks on, you know, kind of money mindset and stuff. And we can link to those in the show notes as well. But I think that there's this idea, you know, we've got the folks that haven't saved anything and just, you know, they're living in a way or practicing in a way where they're barely making enough money to survive, or they're just not thinking about it, or whatever, you know. And then there's folks I've interacted with on the other side, where they don't pay themselves a lot, they save a lot of money in a, like an emergency fund, or they're investing a lot. And one of the questions that you had suggested we talk about is can you save too much? And so, so I wanted to ask about that. Because I think that there are folks who feel very safe, when they have a lot of money saved or set aside. And then and then they don't touch it at all. And to me, I feel like there there's some benefit to that. But I think to a point, and then there's also I think some potential things that can get in the way if you need a gigantic emergency fund.   David Frank  21:41 Yeah, I mean, well said exactly. And I kind of like talking about this too, because having money saved wherever it is, whether it's an a retirement account, or an investment account. It for a lot of people, it feels like safety and security. And I think on some level, but you know, money touches pretty much everything. I might argue everything in life, like every moment of your day, is impacted by money, even if you're just like carving out enough time to not be working or thinking about money. That's that's time, I guess, theoretically, you could be making money, or something like that. So it's so intertwined. And we get so many messages from society around money and why it's important what we should be doing with it. That yeah, that at that end of the spectrum, where it's just like, I want to squirrel away and save, because it creates safety and security, I think, yeah, I think I think there is a risk of saving too much. And it's the question I always ask is sort of, you know, what, what is important? Like, if you find yourself saving a lot of money, ask yourself what is important about having so much money in this account, or what is important about having a big emergency fund, you know, what comes up that there's, there's certainly something going on, and I think it isn't necessarily bad. And yet, I would say if you are constantly finding yourself having to live from a place of restriction or scarcity in that, like, oh, I can't take that vacation. Because I I'd rather be saving money. I can't even maybe take a professional training because even though I feel really passionate about doing that, I need to be saving money. If you find you're constantly saying no to things that would nourish you that would make your quality of life better, then I think there's something there's something you need to look at. And again, it's it's it's likely an emotional issue. And I think that's that's another good opportunity to, you know, work with a professional or also there's like so many, like pretty good tools online these days to help you assess where, where am I really in terms of saving for retirement? How much? Like, how safe do I do I need to be? This is like a personal story about saving so much for retirement, I had a friend who lived in New York, he worked for, I can't remember who he worked for. But he had, he had like a pension, like a really generous pension. And he was putting a ton of money into his 401k. And he was like three years away from retirement. And like, by any measure, he had all the safety and security at least financially that anyone could ever hope for. And he was so looking for forward to retirement, and then the pandemic hit. And he he died of a heart attack, just a sudden heart attack. Totally unexpected. I mean, the reason I share that is like It was tragic. It was horrible. And, and it's life, right? Like we're never we're not promised anything. So I think it's got to be a balance. Yes, save and plan for the future. And just know that there is no such thing as complete safety and security because our life's journeys can end really at any point. And I think we just need to acknowledge both of those facts that yes, we want to be living in the moment and making our current life as good as reasonably possible. And also be planning prudently for the future and then balancing those two and it's tricky.   Curt Widhalm  24:50 Besides just like squirreling money away and the places to put that money and how to spend that money. Are there other considerations of how therapy should be taking care of themselves and their assets. You know, like with your friend example here, I'm sure that part of the extension of this is looking at things like wills and power of attorney type things.   David Frank  25:14 Yeah. Yeah. All that fun stuff. That's yeah, like, I think of it as like, risk risk planning, and then estate and incapacity planning. And as a comprehensive financial planner, those are things that I that I help folks look at as well. And they're things that many of us don't want to want to look at. But yeah, you know, you know, I think when it comes to like, sort of estate in an incapacity planning, and that's the type of work that I will help clients think through, and you almost certainly need to work with a professional attorney licensed in your state of residence to put a plan like that in place. So many folks think, oh, estate planning, that's something for rich people. And yeah, that's true. And it's also pretty much for all of us. So like, putting in place like a professional will, which really just ensures that your your clients are cared for in the event, you can't continue to show up for them the way you do today in your practice, and also having like personal incapacity and estate planning documents in place, powers of attorney, you know, wills, maybe maybe a trust to depending on what state you live in, these are uncomfortable things to think about. It's not comfortable to think about our own potential, passing our inevitable passing, or our potential incapacity. And I think it's really important. It's really, I think, I view this stuff as like an extension of loving kindness to, to your future self, to your clients, to your family members and loved ones. And having having a thought partner to think through what are the right pieces of that plan to have in place for you, I think is is really important.   Katie Vernoy  26:46 The balance between living now and saving for the future, I think is a really tough one. I think along the lines of we could die at any moment. But we also could live longer than we expect.   David Frank  26:57 Yeah,   Katie Vernoy  26:57 I think the retirement age of 65, which, you know, came into place when people lived to be 70 or 75. You know, I think people living into their hundreds, I think that there is there is a lot longer that people theoretically could be retired. We also know there's a lot of therapists who practice well beyond that, because it's it can be a good quote unquote, retirement career. But to me, it seems like there's there's a lot to consider both in how do I live well, today, but also, how do I save enough to really live a long, long life, you know, like, the hope is that you're going to live and be in retirement for 3040 years. Right. You know, I think that that seems that's what I want. And so, if we're looking at identifying, I don't even know if there's a there's an answer here. And it probably is, you know, appropriately and it depends answer. But is there a percentage of our income that we should say, versus a percentage that we should and reinvest into our businesses? Or a percentage that we should use to enjoy our lives? Like, like, Are there standard typical percentages that people can kind of keep in mind when they're trying to make some of these decisions? If they are currently doing that on their own or with a, a non professional thinking partner?   David Frank  28:27 Yeah, that's a great question. And I think you're right, that my answer is going to be prefaced by It depends.   Katie Vernoy  28:33 Of course,   David Frank  28:34 and yeah, you know, and obviously, nothing we've covered here today, including what I'm about to say is advice for anyone listening, right? Like, I don't know, you personally, listener, whoever you are. So I can't give advice that's, that's tailored to your particular situation. But in general, going back to the theme of it, it also depends when you've started saving. So if you're starting to save for retirement, and you're somewhere in your mid to late 20s, targeting saving 15% of your, of your pre tax income. So a quick aside, like it's difficult to know, like, especially if you're self employed, you have your own private practice, how much money am I even making, the best place I think to go and look for that is on the first page of your federal income tax return. I know that's like a scary place like no one wants to go to unless they're absolutely forced to. But there's so many good numbers on it. And there, you will find your total income on the very first page, I think it's like line 16 or something, and that'll tell you your total income. So I would say find that number. And then say if you're in your 20s, multiply that by 15% or 15% of that, that's ideally how much you should be saving every year. If you're in your late 30s, I would say that number should be closer to 25% of your total income. And then if you're around 50, late 40s 50s, then that number starts to get closer to even 50% which is like a scary number. So that's that's kind of aspirational, like who can really do like that's, that's really, really tough, which is why I don't want those numbers like they're not carved in stone. They're rough guidelines. And if you find yourself for not meeting them, that would be a typical human experience, right? Like most people aren't going to consistently meet those. That's okay, just continue doing the best the best you can. And then like, once, if and when you can hit those numbers, then it's like the rest of your money, you need to figure out like, what, what is the right balance for you, and then it totally depends like is, if you can hit your savings targets of let's like, roughly, for most people, it's gonna be like 15, in the range of 15 to 25%. Like, that's mostly realistic. And that's like a pretty solid number that we can really begin to work with that opens up options for yourself for your future self, then they spend the rest of the money in the way that feels best to you, like, yeah, reinvest some of that. reinvest in your practice, like do do what feels what gives you energy, like kind of like, like, you know, what gives you joy? Like that's, that's really how I think it's important to think about   Curt Widhalm  30:53 when you're working with clients, I'm imagining that some of the depends that you're talking about here and getting to know them probably comes very much like therapy, and what do you value would you are hitting some of these financial goals and how you should spend it that for some clients, it might be, alright, you need to start spending this money, let's talk about buying a second house. Whereas for somebody else that might be, you know, what's you know, and see what kinds of, you know, charitable contributions that you can make? Do you ever find yourself in those very, very positive positions, but also on the flip side of that, like, hey, maybe you shouldn't get that doctorate, because it doesn't fit within your financial plans, or any kinds of other like, hold up like, this doesn't seem to fit with the lifestyle and values that you've talked about?   David Frank  31:46 Yeah, I mean, what I like to say, and this is not an original phrase that borrowed it from someone else in the personal finance industry, but I like to say like, you can have basically anything you want, you just can't have everything. So if you really want to do something, for whatever reason, I always encourage a little bit of self reflection, just sort of asking what what is it about, for example, getting a doctorate that feels so important and vital to you? And then if you answer that question to your satisfaction, like that's not it's not my life, it's not up to me what the best use of your money is, if it's really something that's vital and important to you, then the question is, well, what are the right trade offs? So let's, let's just look with some clarity and say, This is how much this is going to cost. In the case of a doctorate, there's student loans and options like that, and just be as clear eyed as we can about the future and say, Okay, here's why you want to do this, here's the why it's important, or here are the elements about it that are important for you. And here's the numbers associated with that, let's just figure out how to make it work well. And sometimes when when, when folks see the other the sacrifices and other areas of their life that they might have to make, suddenly they realize, actually, maybe this isn't what I want, because there are competing employer priorities that are actually more important. And I just, I sort of forgot. So sometimes what I do is just remind people just reflect back to them, what they've told me, or what they've demonstrated to me is important to them. Because as human beings we do with like, we see like a shiny object, and we want to chase after it. And sometimes that shiny object is like really something you should be pursuing. And other times, it's something that's just a distraction, and we just need to be reminded of what's more important.   Katie Vernoy  33:23 I love that I think it's really important, I guess that's the right word, I can think of here to understand yourself your values, and put put an individual plan together, I see a lot of shoulds you should be making this much money, you should be doing this, you should be doing that. And I think being able to really talk through with a knowledgeable person, you know, what, what actually are my values around this? What are my life goals? And how do I actually plan for those life goals versus someone else's, and and even really looking at individual circumstances, I've had folks that have told me that they don't want to take insurance because they get $5 less than their full fee. And I'm like, you're listening to advice from people in California where they get half of their full fee, you know, and so, like, you know, all of these shoulds and the kind of impromptu financial advice from other therapists and Facebook groups I think is something that we really need to fight against so that people can look at their own numbers, their own situation and make their own plan and so I love everything that you've said. And I appreciate your your thoughtfulness and your understanding of the emotional aspects of it that really make it hard for some folks to do this in a clear eyed way.   David Frank  34:43 Yeah, well thank you that's very kind and and yeah, I just think that word should I hate that it's just like stop shooting all over yourself like there is no once i Mister like they're just there is no right answer really for any of this and Yeah, like advice. I just like, I get so triggered Maybe is there I don't know what the right word is. But like when people give advice, I heard this in a webinar I attended the other month. And the speaker said, All advice is autobiographical. And I'm like, what does that mean? And what he meant was that anytime someone is giving you advice, they're speaking from their own experience. So they're really giving advice to themselves, like, oh, I should have done this in the past, or I should be doing this right now. But I'm actually not, or, or whatever it is. And so advice can be good. But whether it's coming from a professional, like a financial advisor, or a colleague that you know, somewhere, or someone you don't know, but in a Facebook group, just ask them to explain. They're like, Oh, okay, interesting point. Why do you why do you say that? Like, what, what is the thinking behind that? And you may discover that, oh, that, that that piece of advice applies for them, because it's autobiographical, but it's sure doesn't apply to me. Um, or you might find it does apply to you, and great if it does, but it is also individual,   Curt Widhalm  36:01 where can people find out more about you and turning point financial, if they want to reach out to you and work with you?   David Frank  36:10 Yeah, so the best thing for people to do is to navigate to my website, and access my finance quickstart guide for therapists. And that'll give you a sense of what you should be thinking about in your fancy financial life. And it also gives you a good sense of what it might be like to work with me. And my website is turning point hq.com. So that's like turning point, a bridge, the abbreviation for headquarters. And yeah, there's a ton of good resources on there. And I think I will even by the time this airs, we'll have a little simple worksheet that folks can work through to help them determine how much they might, they ought to be I don't, I'm gonna use the word should how much they might want to consider saving for retirement so so they can navigate to the website and find all that good stuff.   Curt Widhalm  36:51 And you've got an offer for our listeners as well.   David Frank  36:56 I do for just a special offer. For the listeners of this great podcast, I'm offering 20% off my QuickStart coaching intensive. So navigate to my website, under the Services description, you'll find more information about that. And when they're scheduling that meeting, if they just enter the code, MTSG, or something like that, I will offer them 20% off when it comes to pay me.   Katie Vernoy  37:18 Yay. That's awesome. Thank you.   Curt Widhalm  37:20 And we'll include links to all of that in our show notes. You can find those over at MTSGpodcast.com. And make sure to join our Facebook groups, modern therapist group, and follow us on our social media for updates on everything that we're doing and connecting you with some of the other wonderful people in our community, much like David. So, thank you very much for joining us today. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy and David Frank.   Katie Vernoy  37:48 Thanks again to our sponsor, simplified SEO consulting.   Curt Widhalm  37:52 These days, word of mouth referrals just aren't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for a therapist. And when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you. That's where simplified SEO consulting comes in. It's founded and run by a private practice owner who understands the needs of a private practice, and they can help you learn to optimize your own website or they can do the optimizing for you.   Katie Vernoy  38:16 Visit simplifiedSEOconsulting.com/moderntherapist to learn more. And if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO courses using the code MODERN THERAPIST. Once again, visit simplified Seo consulting.com forward slash modern therapist and use the code modern therapist all caps.   Announcer  38:40 Thank you for listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTSGpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Superforecasting and the Good Judgment Open | Biggest Lessons of the Year 2021

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 53:32


In this episode, co-hosts Phil Ordway, Elliot Turner, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) superforecasting and the Good Judgment Open; and (ii) the biggest lessons of the year 2021. Enjoy the conversation!   The primary purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. The views, information, or opinions expressed by hosts or guests are their own. Neither this show, nor any of its content should be construed as investment advice or as a recommendation to buy or sell any particular security. Security specific information shared on this podcast should not be relied upon as a basis for your own investment decisions -- be sure to do your own research. The podcast hosts and participants may have a position in the securities mentioned, personally, through sub accounts and/or through separate funds and may change their holdings at any time.   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.

The Seth Leibsohn Show
December 17, 2021 - Hour 2

The Seth Leibsohn Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 37:05


Ken Masugi, Senior Fellow of the Claremont Institute and Adjunct Professor at Johns Hopkins University, on his piece in American Greatness, "The War We Must Fight." See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Telltail Dog
Episode 33: "Love Has No Age Limit": Managing Older Rescue Pups and Children with Karen B. London, PhD

Telltail Dog

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 65:19


Karen B. London, Ph.D., is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist and Certified Professional Dog Trainer. She specializes in working with dogs with serious behavioral issues, including aggression. Karen writes the animal column for the Arizona Daily Sun and is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University. She joined Elizabeth Silverstein of Telltail Dog Training to discuss her 2011 book, Love Has No Age Limit, her more recently published Treat Everyone Like a Dog, her training journey, and how she manages and advises kids and dogs and their families, especially with older rescue pups. Follow Karen London, PhD Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/karen.london.dog.behavior/ The Wildest: https://www.thewildest.com/dog-behavior/does-your-dog-have-greeting-disorder The Bark: https://thebark.com/category/author/karen-b-london Follow Telltail Dog Instagram: instagram.com/telltaildog/ Facebook: facebook.com/telltaildog/ Twitter: twitter.com/telltaildog Website: https://telltaildogtraining.com/

Climate One
This Year in Climate

Climate One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 59:38


A recent poll shows that in 2021, for the first time, a majority of Americans personally felt the effects of climate change. But has that growing awareness translated into action?  This week, Climate One hosts Greg Dalton and Ariana Brocious review the top climate stories of the year – from Joe Biden's climate agenda to the extreme weather events so many experienced, to the recent international climate summit in Glasgow, to the passage and signing of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal. This special episode features excerpts from some of Climate One's most profound interviews of 2021, including conversations with such luminaries as Jay Inslee, Mark Carney, and Katharine Hayhoe. For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Kathy Baughman-McLeod, Senior Vice President and Director, Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center Jay Inslee, Governor, State of Washington Carla Frisch, Principal Deputy Director, Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Energy Sasha Mackler, Executive Director, The Energy Project, Bipartisan Policy Center Beth Osborne, Director, Transportation for America Rich Thau, Moderator, The Swing Voter Project Jiang Lin, Adjunct Professor, University of California Berkeley Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance Amanda Machado, Writer and Social Justice Facilitator Mark Carney, UN Special Envoy on Climate Action and Finance Katharine Hayhoe, Climate Scientist Sister True Dedication, Thich Nhat Hanh student Support our work: climateone.org/donate Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
CLIMATE ONE: This Year in Climate

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 59:38


A recent poll shows that in 2021, for the first time, a majority of Americans personally felt the effects of climate change. But has that growing awareness translated into action?  This week, Climate One hosts Greg Dalton and Ariana Brocious review the top climate stories of the year – from Joe Biden's climate agenda to the extreme weather events so many experienced, to the recent international climate summit in Glasgow, to the passage and signing of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal. This special episode features excerpts from some of Climate One's most profound interviews of 2021, including conversations with such luminaries as Jay Inslee, Mark Carney, and Katharine Hayhoe. For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Kathy Baughman-McLeod, Senior Vice President and Director, Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center Jay Inslee, Governor, State of Washington Carla Frisch, Principal Deputy Director, Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Energy Sasha Mackler, Executive Director, The Energy Project, Bipartisan Policy Center Beth Osborne, Director, Transportation for America Rich Thau, Moderator, The Swing Voter Project Jiang Lin, Adjunct Professor, University of California Berkeley Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance Amanda Machado, Writer and Social Justice Facilitator Mark Carney, UN Special Envoy on Climate Action and Finance Katharine Hayhoe, Climate Scientist Sister True Dedication, Thich Nhat Hanh student Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
CLIMATE ONE: This Year in Climate

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 59:38


A recent poll shows that in 2021, for the first time, a majority of Americans personally felt the effects of climate change. But has that growing awareness translated into action?  This week, Climate One hosts Greg Dalton and Ariana Brocious review the top climate stories of the year – from Joe Biden's climate agenda to the extreme weather events so many experienced, to the recent international climate summit in Glasgow, to the passage and signing of the Bipartisan Infrastructure Deal. This special episode features excerpts from some of Climate One's most profound interviews of 2021, including conversations with such luminaries as Jay Inslee, Mark Carney, and Katharine Hayhoe. For transcripts and other information, visit: https://www.climateone.org/watch-and-listen/podcasts  Guests: Kathy Baughman-McLeod, Senior Vice President and Director, Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht-Rockefeller Foundation Resilience Center Jay Inslee, Governor, State of Washington Carla Frisch, Principal Deputy Director, Office of Policy, U.S. Department of Energy Sasha Mackler, Executive Director, The Energy Project, Bipartisan Policy Center Beth Osborne, Director, Transportation for America Rich Thau, Moderator, The Swing Voter Project Jiang Lin, Adjunct Professor, University of California Berkeley Albert Cheung, Head of Global Analysis, Bloomberg New Energy Finance Amanda Machado, Writer and Social Justice Facilitator Mark Carney, UN Special Envoy on Climate Action and Finance Katharine Hayhoe, Climate Scientist Sister True Dedication, Thich Nhat Hanh student Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Getting Your Real Estate Life Together
EPISODE THIRTY-SEVEN : Getting Your Real Estate Life Together with Kama Burton

Getting Your Real Estate Life Together

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 45:38


Kama Burton is a Speaker and Trainer, with an emphasis on Leadership, Motivation, Fair Housing Practices and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Her passion for teaching has opened an opportunity and she has been teaching as an Adjunct Professor at Moreno Valley Community College teaching a pre-licensed Real Estate Course since 2018. Kama believes in leadership and serves on her local Board since 2015 and is excited to be the 2021 President-Elect Inland Valley Association REALTORS®. At the State(C.A.R) level, she is currently a Director serving on the Executive, Federal, and Legislative Committees, and at the National Level(NAR), she is a member of the Fair Housing Committee Giving back to the community is a priority in her life. Since 2015, she has mentored over 400 girls to help them discover their full potential through Self love, Self worth and self esteem through her weekly Girls Club and yearly Girls Conferences. Kama is also  the author of her 1st published book, I fell in love with His promises. In this episode, Kama shares with us about how she started her business during the pandemic, the importance of teaching and volunteering to the community, and doing things she's passionate about (like writing her own book) outside of real estate. She also talks about organizing a non-profit that helps girls learn to themselves. Make sure to tune in until the end because Kama sure gave us a lot of inspiration to start giving back. Listen in! FOR SHOW NOTES CLICK HERE Tweetable Quotes: “ I believe, as realtors, we because we sell the community we have to give back to the community.” - Kama Burton  “Just do it. Do it afraid. Just do it afraid.” - Kama Burton  “You find what you love, and you just do it from your heart.” - Kama Burton  Connect with Kama on Instagram!  You can connect with me, Tracey Hicks, on LinkedIn and Facebook. Check out our website, https://allthingsrealestatestore.com, so you can stay up to date on our latest promos and find the best real estate products you'll need to get your real estate life together! Feel free to email me at hello@allthingsrealestate.com, I'd love to hear from you. This podcast is in part brought to you by our team over at Streamlined Podcasts! Streamlined makes it super affordable and convenient for us to edit and distribute our podcast episodes each and every week. Check them out at www.streamlinedpodcasts.com for more information on how you can start scaling your message with podcasting today. Enter code: ATRE for a 10% discount off your first month of editing services! PLEASE LEAVE A REVIEW + Share with your Realtor® friends who want to step up their real estate marketing skills!

HER | Mind Body Life
A Plant-Based Diet Can Knock Out Hot Flashes Without Drugs

HER | Mind Body Life

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


Hormones control so much more in our bodies than we give them credit for.Hormones control so much more in our bodies than we give them credit for. Thyroid hormones give us energy, insulin regulates our blood sugar, and of course, there are our sex hormones. And the food we eat can affect these in huge ways!Early menopause can occur in women as young as in their twenties, resulting in hot flashes and other uncomfortable side effects. A new study to be published by the North American Menopause Society in the October issue of the journal Menopause finds that a plant-based diet rich in soy can significantly reduce hot flashes.Neal Barnard, MD joins us this episode to talk more about this study. He is president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, founder of the Barnard Medical Center, an Adjunct Professor of Medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine, and a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology. His federally funded diabetes research revolutionized the nutritional approaches to type 2 diabetes, and he now aims to empower readers with life-changing information on hormones and health.The study is already online and can be read here.

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.
Ep68: Amory Lovins 'The Einstein of Energy Efficiency'

Cleaning Up. Leadership in an age of climate change.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 63:35


Amory Lovins is Cofounder and Chairman Emeritus of the Rocky Mountain Institute. Apart from co-founding the Institute in 1982 he served as its Chief Scientist between 2007 and 2019. Amory is a an author of 31 books and more than 700 papers, he has advised major firms and governments on energy in over 70 countries for more than 45 years.He has taught at ten universities, most recently the Naval Postgraduate School (Professor of Practice 2011–17) and Stanford University, where he's currently Adjunct Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a Scholar of the Precourt Institute for Energy—but only teaching topics he's never formally studied, so as to retain beginner's mind. He served in 2011–18 on the National Petroleum Council and has advised the US Departments of Energy and Defense.He has received the Blue Planet, Volvo, Zayed, Onassis, Nissan, Shingo, and Mitchell Prizes, the MacArthur and Ashoka Fellowships, the Happold, Benjamin Franklin, and Spencer Hutchens Medals, 12 honorary doctorates, and the Heinz, Lindbergh, Right Livelihood (“alternative Nobel”), National Design, and World Technology Awards. In 2016, the President of Germany awarded him the Officer's Cross of the Order of Merit (Bundesverdienstkreuz 1. Klasse).Further reading:IEA Energy Efficiency 2021 report:https://www.iea.org/reports/energy-efficiency-2021Official bio:https://rmi.org/people/amory-lovins/How Big Is the Energy Efficiency Resource?    (a half-hour summary talk is at https://energy.stanford.edu/events/special-energy-seminar-amory-lovins-holmes-hummel)https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/aad965Recalibrating Climate Prospectshttps://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab55abCan a Virus and Viral Ideas Speed the World's Journey Beyond Fossil Fuels? (with Kingsmill Bond)https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/abc3f2SAE: Reframing Automotive Fuel Efficiencyhttps://doi.org/10.4271/13-01-01-0004

Doggy Dojo
Methods Matter: The Case Against Aversive with Dr Karen London

Doggy Dojo

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 48:07


This is possibly the most important topic in Dog Training today. Do Methods Matter? YES! We break down why using aversive techniques is damaging to your relationship with your dog and to their very welfare. I'm joined by Dr Karen London, who breaks it down for us! Karen B. London, PhD is a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist, Certified Professional Dog Trainer, and an award-winning author of six books about canine training and behavior, including her most recent, Treat Everyone Like a Dog: How a Dog Trainer's World View Can Improve Your Life. She blogs for TheBark.com and TheWildest.com, writes the animal column (The London Zoo) for the Arizona Daily Sun, and is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences at Northern Arizona University. Dr London has a new book: Treat Everyone Like a Dog Instagram: @Karen.London.Dog.Behavior Facebook: Karen London Some references we mentioned in the episode: Scientific Paper: Does Training Method Matter? Evidence for the negative impact of aversive-based methods on companion dog welfare AVSAB Position Statement on Humane Dog Training Shock Collars are banned in Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, Slovenia, Austria, Parts of Australia and Quebec, Canada. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Leading Equity
LE 220: Trauma and Postsecondary Success with Dr. Plashan McCune

Leading Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 44:11


About Plashan McCune, Ed.D. Dr. Plashan McCune, brings over 30 years of experience in operationalizing mental health practices into educational settings. Her accomplishments are combining mental health and education for better life outcomes for professionals and students. Her experiences include: Serving as an administrator for elementary thru high school in Chicago, Denver and Oakland. Adjunct Professor at Univ. of San Francisco, Leading Criminal Justice Reform and Mediation as a trainer with Northwestern Law School. Founder of a global leadership program for African American Young Ladies (AAYLS.)  She is also the author of Trauma and Postsecondary Success A Framework for Systemic Change and presents and trains on this topic globally. Her career has been informed by her passion for social justice and systems reform to ensure opportunity and success for underserved populations. Dr. McCune specializes in infusing Trauma-Informed/Sensitive Practices focused on Culturally Responsiveness within organizations and educational institutions. Show Highlights African American Young Ladies Summit Trauma and postsecondary success Supporting students with trauma Creating rules, consequences, and expectations MTSS Investigating your current practices Connect with Plashan Email: higherlearningu@gmail.com Website: Higher Learning U Additional Resources Trauma and Postsecondary Success: A Framework for Systemic Change Free Course on Implicit Bias 20 Diversity Equity and Inclusion Activities Equity Leaders Accelerator 2.0 Annihilating Racial Injustice in School Course FREE AUDIO COURSE: Race, Advocacy, and Social Justice Studies Learn more about the Advocacy Room

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
Should Private Practice Therapists Take Insurance?

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 36:41


Should Private Practice Therapists Take Insurance? Curt and Katie chat about the latest data from SimplePractice on private practice clinicians billing insurance. We explore the most common set up for clinicians (a hybrid insurance/private pay practice) as well as how therapists bill insurance, the disparity between private pay fees and insurance rates (and how different these disparities are across the United States), how strategies for growing private practices are affected by who is paying, and how to set yourself up for a successful hybrid insurance practice. It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. In this episode we talk about: Demystifying the most Common CPT Codes E-Book from SimplePractice Looking at the most common make up of therapists' private practices (hybrid: insurance and private pay) The theories about whether to take insurance of not The process of starting a practice (credentialing timeline, marketing, etc.) The benefits of being on an insurance panel (e.g., nearly 100% close rate) The income differences for clinicians at different stages of practice development The average number of appointments per week by type of practice (insurance, hybrid, or private pay) and what that means for your income How well insurance reimburses in different states (and comparing these rates to typical private pay fees) Financial considerations when looking at the insurance rates you will get in your area How to set up your practice if you choose to take insurance The most frequently billed CPT code (as well as others to consider) The controversy around 90837 and how to make sure you get paid Different strategies to build a sustainable business with an insurance or hybrid private practice Our Generous Sponsor: Simplified SEO Consulting Simplified SEO Consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO Specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings. These days, word of mouth referrals just aren't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for a therapist and when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you!  That's where Simplified SEO Consulting comes in. Founded and run by a private practice owner, they understand the needs of a private practice. They can help you learn to optimize your own website OR can do the optimizing for you. Visit SIMPLIFIEDSEOCONSULTING.COM/MODERNTHERAPIST to learn more and if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO Courses using the code "MODERNTHERAPIST" Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Demystifying the Most Commonly Used CPT® Codes for Mental Health   Relevant Episodes: Busting Insurance Myths Make Your Paperwork Meaningful Noteworthy Documentation Negotiating Sliding Scale Special Interview: Open Path Psychotherapy Collective   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated) Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is brought to you by simplified SEO consulting.   Katie Vernoy  00:03 Simplified SEO consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings.   Curt Widhalm  00:21 Stay tuned at the end of the episode for a special discount.   Announcer  00:24 You're listening to the modern therapist Survival Guide, where therapists live, breed and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:40 Welcome back Modern therapists. This is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast where we talk about oh things, therapy, running our practices, that all things therapy, we don't really talk a lot about what we do with clients, but talking   Katie Vernoy  00:58 sometimes we do   Curt Widhalm  00:59 sometimes. But today, we are talking about an ebook that was sent over to us by our friends over at simplepractice. And this is called demystifying the most commonly used CPT codes. And Katie and I come from very different places, when it comes to insurance, and Katie's got a hybrid practice, I have a cash pay practice where we do super bills, and I understand some of this stuff. And Katie understands a lot of this stuff a lot more. And we wanted to be able to give our take on things and help you make some decisions on whether or not insurance is right for your practice.   Katie Vernoy  01:47 Yeah, I think it's something where I am actually in the majority Curt and I don't know that that's well seen the hybrid practices 51% At least have simple practice users and 61% of simple practice users billed insurance this year, and have an insurance portion of their practice, but only 10% are just insurance. So to me, I think when someone comes on to a Facebook group or in a networking situation and says, Hey, should I accept insurance? I feel like a lot of people are like, no, don't take insurance private pays the best. But I think a lot of us in the background are quietly accepting insurance, at least for a portion of our practice. So there's a lot of detail in this report that talks about kind of regular rates, you know, how many sessions are being billed and that kind of stuff. And so I would recommend looking at it, we'll link to it in the show notes, as well as a link to an interview that we had with one of the authors, Barbara Griswold, that when we talked about kind of insurance myths, I think, I think we're coming back around to insurance myths that that episode is quite some time ago. So I think we're going to have some new things to talk about here. But to me, I think the hope in this conversation is that there are folks who will, maybe are considering insurance and shouldn't be. And there are folks who are feeling like they shouldn't accept insurance, but that might actually be better alignment for them. Because I think there's a lot of things that are stated as facts by people who are either like you solely in self pay or private pay practice, or folks who are in very different states. And there's there's a lot of misinformation that I think it's shared or inaccurate information for someone's individual situation. So what are your thoughts? What do you know, as a private pay practice, about taking insurance? And why would you tell people not to take insurance? Maybe let's start there.   Curt Widhalm  03:55 The more of these conversations we have the less that I'm finding myself telling people what they should do. And I will speak broadly to the   Katie Vernoy  04:05 Fair enough.   Curt Widhalm  04:07 Why I see people making some of the decisions that they do. And I know and this is stated in the eBook. Our friend Dr. Ben Caldwell is quoted as saying many clinicians want the stability of income and to not have to market themselves and paneling with insurance allows them to focus on clinical care rather than spending time on marketing. And I think that this is true. There are a number of people who are in our profession who just want to see clients and do work and not have to deal with the stressors of where my next clients coming from. They don't want to deal with a lot of marketing aspects going out to networking sort of things. And for those of you who that's your jam have that be your jam. I am not one of those people, myself, I am. I love the networking and the marketing aspects. It takes a while to be able to build up a reputation in the community with referral sources. Not everybody can afford to take the time to build the practice that way you need the income sooner. And I think one of the themes that you'll probably hear from me a lot throughout today's discussion is just kind of you have to do what's right for you. And there's no one size fits all approach on this. But I also in kind of setting up my practice when I was initially considering applying to be on some of the insurance panels, and was talking with some people in my community, who were panels and hearing how long it takes to actually get panels. Hmm, I found that I was getting clients who were cash pay clients in the meantime, of what that paperwork length of time was going to be anyway. So my practice started to develop cash pay, even while I would have been waiting to get paneled in the first place. So maybe it was just that I was kind of eagerly out there going out and seeking clients and marketing anyway, that at the time was just kind of where, oh, if I'm getting them anyway, why do I need to accept a lower rates of insurance, to see the same people that I'm already getting into my practice?   Katie Vernoy  06:35 That's a really good point for myself, I actually started my private practice while I was working in community mental health, so I didn't have time to market or network or do any of those things. And I, you know, I put my shingle out in an area that didn't have many clinicians. And so I did get some private pay clients while I was credentialing, but I was credentialing without having any clients at all. And without even trying to get clients it was like that was my escape plan, I was going to credential on the side, you know, kind of send those things in. And as I started getting insurance panels, then I was kind of adding clients to my practice. So I think there are different ways that people go about starting a practice. And I think you know, whether you credential or you have someone help you credential, that that is a time gap. I think for some people, it's been up to six months, I don't know what the current timeline is right now. But it can take a long time to get panels, which can be ideal for someone that needs to stay in a community mental health job or a group practice job before they can really go out on their own. I think at this point, once you are paneled, for some panels, you can almost fill up your caseload in a couple of weeks. And so it becomes a an a way to have some solid income. And that stability, because I honestly can say with my insurance based portion of my practice, which is very tight, tiny at this point that I'm going to be private pay very soon. But what I was in the height of my hybrid practice, someone would call, I had a similar specialty or was close enough, and I took their insurance. And it was almost 100%. Close, right. Whereas with the private pay, you know if your marketing well, and your networking well, and all of those things, they may come in already knowing your fee, they may come in already knowing your specialty, and it could be a pretty high close rate. But I've heard more like 10 to 30% close rate sometimes for private pay clients, especially at the beginning.   Curt Widhalm  08:36 Oh, and speaking of the beginning, I also hear in our larger therapist discussions within the therapist community that some panels require people to be licensed for two years, before they can even get on the panel in the first place. And for those, you know, very energetic, freshly licensed people, if that's another limitation, as it was, you know, when I first started my private practice, it was shortly after I got licensed that if it's not even an option to you, and you're looking at developing some of these other marketing and referral network streams. I can say from my vantage point that if my fee is twice as much, and I'm closing only a third of the clients, if that still balances out as far as the number of sessions that I'm seeing, I'm actually potentially even working less than I am if I am panels and seeing fewer clients.   Katie Vernoy  09:36 Well, that's assuming that you're getting the same number of calls, which you don't.   Curt Widhalm  09:41 That is very true, I'll grant you that   Katie Vernoy  09:43  So 100% of 10 versus a third of three is is actually 10% of the clients so so just a little a little math, I think it it does take a while to build a private pay practice it is much more cost efficient as far as your time, and that actually is not necessarily totally true, we should talk about fees in a second. But I think it's something where overall income is very different in the beginning. And then again, very different, when you get to your kind of stable number I think for at the beginning and insurance practice, you can immediately get up to that 50 or 60,000 a year, probably, with a private pay practice, that's going to take a little while, but then you're going to get up to a much higher number, you know, and these are just made up numbers. But like that 100,000 A year or 75,000, a year or 120,000, a year, I think is more likely in a private pay practice than it is in a an insurance practice, or a hybrid.   Curt Widhalm  10:47 And looking at the data from simple practice here, kind of reflecting what Katie is talking about, they have a nice little graph that shows the average number of appointments per billing type in the last 30 days. And those who are doing self pay only, the average number of appointments for the median, I guess, is 28. self pay only over 30 days, that's   Katie Vernoy  11:17 pretty low   Curt Widhalm  11:18 the upper 75th percentiles 55 sessions over a 30 day period. But you compare that to the insurance only. And it's 20 and 46, which are below what those self pay therapists are in   Katie Vernoy  11:36 that. Yeah. And the insurance when the way that that's talked about is those insurance only practice, folks are typically like new group practice, associates kind of that are billing, just insurance, the practices only they're using associates or other folks in the practice for insurance only. So I think the the thing to look at is the hybrid, and the hybrid actually has a lot of appointments. You're looking at it. So what are the numbers for the hybrid practice   Curt Widhalm  12:06 So medians at 55 sessions? That's compared to 28 for the self pay, and the upper 75th percentile is 80 versus 55.   Katie Vernoy  12:17 Yeah, so it's, it's, it's a, it's a fuller practice. Now, whether or not you want a fuller practice, they don't actually say overall income for folks, which I think is interesting, and might be interesting data for them to look at. But I think it's so variable, I think it's hard to say. But I think determining whether you take insurance at the beginning, obviously, if you're not licensed long enough, that's going to be a factor. But I started paneling. I was five years licensed, I was ready to be out of community mental health, or I wanted at least an escape route from Community Mental Health. I got paneled pretty easily. It took a while, but I was still working. And then I was able to start adding clients afterwards. I think if you are able to kind of do the pace of building a private pay practice, that may be the right move for you, depending on where you live. And I think that so the the initial one is, can you have your income ramp up, you know, slowly? Or do you need to have it ramp up quickly? Once you get, you know, panels, I think that's that's the first thing to think about. They didn't say kind of how long insurance clients stay versus private pay. I've got a mix. In my practice, I found that I think more private pay clients are going to finish sooner than insurance clients. But But what is your experience of that? Because you've had private pay for a long time? I mean, do you have a churn rate that's pretty high, where you're having to constantly get new clients? Or do you have clients that stay for long term I mean, I'm a long term therapist, I've got clients for years. So it's, it's a different model.   Curt Widhalm  13:54 I have mostly clients who have stuck with me for quite a while. And while I do have some churn in my practice, I would say as far as my particular caseload goes, that's probably somewhere around 10% of my my caseload. Now, it doesn't mean that I have the same, you know, 90% of the clients forever, but I do tend to have my repeat people coming back after a couple of years off. And so I see relatively few new clients in my practice. So most of my people are lifers. And yeah, you know, I imagined that, you know, if I preview that I'm going to retire in like 30 years that that might create some panic for some of my clients now just knowing that things are going to end so I may not   Katie Vernoy  14:49 We are both long term therapists.   Curt Widhalm  14:51 Yeah   Katie Vernoy  14:52 You may not be the best to say that. And maybe that's another thing potentially if you are a clinician that already has has more of a short term model, if you're already going to have churn with your clients might as well get the best bang for the buck and do private pay or have a huge referral source and get insurance. And so I think it's, it's something where there's a lot of factors in what is going to be the right mechanism for you. The other thing is, is there are very different rates that people charge across the country. And simple practice has that in there, as you know, kind of their private pay full fee. There's also very different insurance rates. And so I don't know if you looked at this chart, but it's, it's crazy, because as California being one of the most expensive places to live, we actually are our middle the middle of the pack or lower part of the pack on what the median insurance reimbursement rate is.   Curt Widhalm  15:51 And looking at this, I have to imagine that a big piece of this is supply and demand, because some of the states with the highest reimbursement rates are South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota. And while there is the Twin Cities in Minnesota, there's a lot of rural area out there. And so I have to imagine that some of the higher rates are being either commanded by therapists were like, look, there's nobody else in town to take your insurance, and they're doing a good job of advocating for themselves for higher reimbursements. Or the insurance companies are trying to draw more practitioners to work in these areas. And, you know, in California, like the building that my office is in, I think that there is and don't quote me on this, I think that there is roughly 8 million therapists that work in my building. And so a, and obviously, not all of us are handled with insurance companies. But I have to imagine that the insurance companies could panel every single therapist and be like we have so many people that we only need to pay you $8 per session.   Katie Vernoy  17:09 Well, I think the problem is that's there's I mean, we could have whole conversations about ghost panels and people being fall and stuff like that, because I certainly still get calls from folks. And they they basically are searching for weeks trying to find someone who accepts their insurance. So I also think that there is a an issue in California with insurance because the the average fee, or the median fee for California I think, is $100. For insurance reimbursement, and 150 is the private pay fee, although the the one in 2018, apparently was 130. So there's, there's a big difference. And you and I are both double insurance rates or more. So it's, it's a huge difference. And if you've designed your fee, and they have some information in this about how you can set your full fee, but if you design your fee based on what you need to make, and the insurance reimbursement rate is half of that, that's a huge difference and needs to be a consideration you I would have to see double the insurance clients to make the same amount of money that I make with my private pay clients there, when we look at places like Oregon, their regular full fee is 165. They're one of the five most expensive places to live, but insurance reimburses them at 130. So that's only a $35 difference, you know, and it's still per session, blah, blah, blah. But it is much closer, it's not half of what the fee is, or, you know, two thirds what the fee is. And, and it's a lot more approachable. Texas is another one that they reported on the average private pay fee, or the medium private pay fee is 125. Insurance is only 88. But it's still only a $37 difference. And so and it's also costs a lot less to live in Texas and live than it does to live in California. And some of these fees. You know, Oregon was the highest one they reported at 130. But if you've got a private pay fee, that's typically around 130 to 150. And insurance is paying you 130 It's not functionally different. And if you've got an almost 100% close rate, and can be choosy. And insurance practice may be awesome. Because you don't have to do the marketing. There's consistency insurance is going to consistently refer to you most when I was taking mostly insurance I had to put outgoing messages saying I'm not currently taking new clients. So people would stop begging me to call them back. And so it's it's this thing of there are places in the country in the United States where taking insurance makes a lot of sense.   Curt Widhalm  19:57 And especially when it does save you some of that time to go out and markets and to pay for SEO and fancy websites and all of that kind of stuff. And this is really where you're looking at your cost basis. And, you know, that's having to look at your finances. And that also includes how you value your time in putting that stuff together. So if it is functionally the same, and it does save you a bunch of other time, makes sense.   Katie Vernoy  20:30 I think the big caveat is the number of clients you're seeing, or need to see to make the money, the total money that you want to make. And then also the amount of time that you'll spend on insurance billing, there are some panels that are great, not a lot of, you know, denied claims, not a lot of work on that part that you know, you get paid easily, you know, I have one panel that I'm still on and I'm getting ready to go off of, but I, if they could just pay me a little bit more, I'd stay on it because I get a direct deposit, almost, you know, a few days after the session. And I've got clients paying 10 or $20, to see me like it's, it's amazing, it's really cool. However, there's other ones where I will charge something, they'll pay me once, they won't pay me another time. And then I have to chase it down. And so when you get into more of that, there is a bigger amount of time that's spent on kind of managing the billing and tracking the billing and doing all those things. A lot of that became really easy when I did it through simple practice. So I will, I will acknowledge them for that, that I at this point, I push a button, it goes through, it tells me if it's been denied, and then I can chase it down. But most of the time, I don't even need to worry about it because I don't have to chase it down.   Curt Widhalm  21:51 Now, one of the other things that I hear from you and some of my other friends who are panels is also that you take the copay, but then you might be waiting several months for the rest of the payments to even find out if it's been approved or not. And one of the considerations of having that cash pay practice is my clients give me the money, and then all of the money is mine. Yeah, right up front. And so yeah, there's, you know, anywhere that gets into, alright, you're getting paid, but when and how and are you able to tie those things back to the specific sessions that, you know, might move you into a, this is gonna be a big part of our discussion here, move you into a different CPT code.   Katie Vernoy  22:43 I think there are definitely situations where people don't get paid right away. And I think sometimes it is due to shifting from an individual contract to a group contract. Or if there's like, I had a situation where I wasn't paid because I had left the panel. And I billed for three sessions for a couple of clients right before I was off the panel. And they said I was off the panel, even though I submitted the claims before the final date, you know, like and so I had to go in and fight them for that. But otherwise, most of the time I get paid right away, like within days, and it goes directly into my bank account. So okay, so I think that there, there is a wide array of experiences here. I think if you have a panel where you're not getting paid, or if you get clawbacks meaning they think they say, Hey, we thought it was covered, but it's not give us the money back. I've never had a clawback. Maybe I should knock on wood here. But like, that sounds awful and horrible. And I think that there are things where we can just say there are times when insurance companies are evil and and are they unnecessary evil? Some people say yes, some people say no, but But yeah, I think there is typically a financial stability when you take insurance. However, if you're not getting paid that financial stability doesn't actually exist. And so you want to be pay attention to it. But let's go to the what you were talking about the kind of the CPT codes as well as number of clients. Sure. So the vast majority of clinicians that bill through simple practice, and this is like over 100,000 users, not all of them are mental health therapists. Some of them have other types of practices. But the vast majority, like 10 times the number of sessions were billed as 90837, which is the 60 minute session or 60 Plus minute session versus 90834, which is 38 to 52 minutes, which fits into that 15 minute hour, right? And insurance companies assume that therapists are going to build that 15 minute hour. And they say that most of our colleagues are billing the 15 minute hour but we know thank you simple practice that most of us are billing 90837 which means it's 53 minutes or more. And it means you actually have to be working clinically with a client for 53 minutes or more. And I think some people may fudge that it can't be you waiting, it can't be the documentation. It can't be the scheduling time that you spend in the in the session. It's actual clinical time. That being said, some folks are getting pushed back and they're having to prove medical necessity for the longer session, which is the 90837. I think that is BS. I think it's it's something where insurance companies, I mean, and the rates for 90837 are way higher. So you do a 52 minute session. And it's like $40, less than or $30, less than a 53 minutes session. It's ridiculous. It's, you know, and so insurance trying to get people to bill last are saying do these shorter sessions? Well, Ben's idea is that we'll just do these 90834, you can do a session, as short as what was it? 38 minutes, you could do a 40 minute session. And then if you can see more clients that way. And that might be a way to make more money in less time, because you do a certain number, there's this is in the thing, but like a certain number of 40 minute sessions, versus a certain number of 60 minute sessions. You know, it's about the same and you're spending less time. And I don't agree, sorry, Ben, I just don't agree. Because it's not just the session time, it's also all the paperwork. But then there's also the clinical case management. If you've got 20 people in crisis versus 30 people in crisis. It's a very different workload.   Curt Widhalm  26:41 Yeah, I, I see where Ben is coming from on this from just a nuts and bolts number thing, and I will always remind people that Ben has not been a practicing therapist for several years.   Katie Vernoy  26:59 And love you, Ben, we love you.   Curt Widhalm  27:03 And, honestly, you know, we do have a lot of love and respect for bed and all of the work that he does, and, you know, simple practice, and practice learning and everything that he's got going on. But I think it's easy to forget the Practice Management sides of things. Yeah. And a lot of the managing caseload sides of things that I'm sure that he will very much acknowledge that he's a little bit out of touch on. It's just not practical. I mean, it's just, it's, it's somebody saying, like, well, if people want more money, why don't they just work more? And?   Katie Vernoy  27:46 Well, I think the argument isn't actually the, to work more, it's, Hey, do shorter sessions, so that you, you have less time in the chair. But it's like, but there's, you know, like, even the task switching of seeing one client versus the next client. I mean, that's not even to mention what we just talked about with billing and, and case management. So I get it. And I actually think that that the other message I want, I want to add to Ben's message and say, Why not allow for some of these shorter sessions, because you could see your client twice a week for 40 minutes. And, and have more of that flexibility of billing code. I mean, there's also information in here, and I'm sure this came from Barbara, which was about, you know, kind of using some of these other codes, like, you know, 90846 is the client is family therapy without the clients you can talk to parents and have it paid for, you know, there's there's crisis codes, there's a lot of stuff there that I think is pretty interesting. But, but you can use insurance a little bit more flexibly, you know, and Bill for everything, it's just then you're taking the time to build for everything. I think the other thing is, I think there was a statement like to avoid burnout See, five to seven clients, five days a week. And 25 doesn't sound bad, but 35 sounds awful. And so I think that there's, there's a need to assess your for yourself. If you have 35 clients and they're mostly insurance, I would recommend having a biller so you're not chasing down, you know, fees, you're not dealing with benefits, checks, that kind of stuff. But if if you can see 35 clients a week, then you're different than me. I can't do it. I don't know that I can do 25. So I think it's something where it's it's sorting out what that looks like. And you can you can do some simple math and I think you had started it. You can make a good living seeing mostly insurance clients. It just is really important that you all have your systems are very clean. Probably you have a biller, at least someone to check benefits and chase down things you know, because insurance on simple practice is literally pushing a button once it's all set up. But it's sorting out how many clients you actually want to see. And do you want to do some of these other things? I mean, to your point earlier, I would rather go out and do some networking, then see another client, right at times, you know, like, I would rather write a little blog post or do a podcast episode with you then see another client, like, when I've gotten through the number of clients that's comfortable for me in the week, I could make more money seeing more clients. But I choose to do that in other ways, and to charge more for those times.   Curt Widhalm  30:33 And it's not that we don't like seeing clients. It's that for   Katie Vernoy  30:38 other things, too. Yeah, exactly.   Curt Widhalm  30:42 So, you know, I do hear and read in some of the therapist forums about, you know, some of these clawbacks things that are happening, some of the rejections of that 90837. Is there anything that can really be done about that?   Katie Vernoy  31:00 There's some specific things in the e book. And I think that the most important thing is to make sure that you're writing actual start and stop times, you know, simple practice defaults to either an hour or 15 minutes, and it starts on the hour, or the whatever the time is that you set the appointment, making sure you actually have the time in there to the minute, if you see somebody for less than 53 minutes that you down, code it to 90834. And I think you want to make sure that you know, we've got different episodes on documentation, I can put in the in the links in the show notes. But it's something where being able to document medical necessity for a longer session, that kind of stuff. I think it's important. I think I got something from one of the insurance panels I was on that basically said, You need to make sure that your notes show that you spent that much time and so anyone that's been in committed mental health knows like, you have to have enough interventions. In your note for that for that long of a session. You know, if you're going to go a full hour, or 53 minutes, plus, you need to make sure your documentation shows that you're not processing one thing. And that's all that you've put down in your note. So those are the things that you can do. It's just Ben's idea of doing shorter sessions and seeing more clients may keep you under the radar radar of insurance companies, they don't see you as overusing 90837. I just don't think it's worth it. I think just do the documentation, make sure that you're you're staying true to the start and stop times and hope for the best.   Curt Widhalm  32:36 Overall reading through this, I can say that my reaction is insurance companies aren't paying as badly as I had thought that they were. Yes. And I don't know how to convey to our listeners how much it actually pains me to say that, that. But there are a lot of individual factors that you have to decide for yourself that if you're wanting to see clients, you're wanting the marketing and the phone calls to be kind of funneled to you being on a panel makes sense. If you're somebody who needs to get out of the office a little bit more, you want to put in a little bit more of that work, and you want to operate partially or fully outside of the insurance systems. There's pathways for you there to both have their advantages and disadvantages. But I was really surprised to see that out of the 1000s of users that simple practice has those rates are a lot closer than I would have expected them to be.   Katie Vernoy  33:49 Yeah, well, and I think a big point there is that if you're wanting to have an accessible practice, and you're wanting to do that, for a lot of clients, insurance is potentially a better way to do it, because clients will pay, I think the median copay was about $15. Whereas if you slide down to $30, or 50 $60, or $70, or $80, you're going to make less than insurance. Now, if you're doing it for a couple of spots, you're doing it through open path or you're doing those kinds of things as a small give back, I think that's very much appropriate. But if you're doing it for your whole caseload, where your whole caseload is sitting around the median insurance fee, you will make the same amount potentially more because you will not have to market it yourself. Your clients will pay less than they're paying you now. You just have to get through the the insurance paperwork and that kind of stuff. So I think I think there's going to be different factors for everyone. But if you're sliding your fee, down to 100 or below $100 typically anyway You may make more on insurance than you are right now.   Curt Widhalm  35:04 We would love to hear your feedback and what you're doing with your practice. And the best way to do that is join our Facebook community, the modern therapist group, you can also let us know on our social media. And we'll include links to all of that and the stuff from simple practice and what Katie mentioned in our show notes, you'll find those over at MTS G podcast calm. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy.   Katie Vernoy  35:30 Thanks again to our sponsors simplified SEO consulting.   Curt Widhalm  35:33 These days, word of mouth referrals just aren't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for a therapist. And when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you. That's where simplified SEO consulting comes in. It's founded and run by a private practice owner who understands the needs of a private practice, and they can help you learn to optimize your own website, or they can do the optimizing for you.   Katie Vernoy  35:57 Visit simplified Seo consulting.com forward slash modern therapist to learn more. And if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO courses using the code modern therapist. Once again, visit simplified Seo consulting.com forward slash modern therapist and use the code modern therapist all caps.   Announcer  36:22 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.  

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Michael Mauboussin‘s Expectations Investing | The Right Amount of Lying

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 55:34


In this episode, co-hosts Elliot Turner, Phil Ordway, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) the new edition of Michael Mauboussin's book, Expectations Investing; and (ii) the "right" amount of lying -- prompted by Rohit Krishnan's essay, "How Much Should You Lie?" Enjoy the conversation!   The primary purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. The views, information, or opinions expressed by hosts or guests are their own. Neither this show, nor any of its content should be construed as investment advice or as a recommendation to buy or sell any particular security. Security specific information shared on this podcast should not be relied upon as a basis for your own investment decisions -- be sure to do your own research. The podcast hosts and participants may have a position in the securities mentioned, personally, through sub accounts and/or through separate funds and may change their holdings at any time.   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.

Serious Privacy
Rise Up! Privacy Tech is Here to Stay (Lourdes Turrecha)

Serious Privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 36:37


This week on Serious Privacy, Paul Breitbarth and K Royal speak with Lourdes Turrecha. Where a year of five ago many companies could still run their data protection and privacy compliance programs with email, spreadsheets and word files, today's reality is completely different. Accountability, documentation and reporting requirements are much more detailed and widespread than they were before. Privacy technology is on the rise, and we sure know something about that at TrustArc! But privacy tech is not just about privacy management - it is also about privacy enhancing technologies, smarter processing technology and improved data security. Our guest this week knows all about this. Lourdes is the Founder & CEO of PIX LLC, an innovative privacy firm in Silicon Valley, and the Founder and Chief Privacy Tech Evangelist of The Rise of Privacy Tech (TROPT), a movement that brings together privacy innovators, investors, experts, and evangelists to further privacy innovation. She is also Privacy Tech & Law Fellow and Adjunct Professor of Privacy Law at Santa Clara University School of Law.As always, if you have any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at seriousprivacy@trustarc.com. In addition, if you like our podcast, please do rate and comment on our program in your favorite podcast app. We also have a LinkedIn page for Serious Privacy, so please follow for more in-depth discussion.ResourcesThe 2021 Defining the Privacy Tech Landscape white paper Privacy Tech Startup Deal Flow (for startups that are fundraising)TROPT Innovators membership (to get plugged into the privacy tech space and build relationships with other privacy tech founders, investors, and experts)TROPT Data Privacy Week 2022

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
The Democratization of Clinical Trials

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 66:09


Clinical trials represent the primary means to test new drugs before they become approved by the FDA for sale and marketing as a standard of care. The purpose of these trials is to test the safety and efficacy of new drugs and their combinations. Clinical trials must be performed with the highest ethical standards and must include geographically, genetically and socio-economically diverse populations. Trials provide completely free care for all participants, ensuring that any patient can participate. However, the vast majority of cutting-edge trials are performed in elite academic tertiary care centers, requiring patients not living in the immediate vicinity to undergo burdensome travel and long stays away from home. The Guardian Research Network was developed to address these issues by bringing novel trials to community health systems where most patients are treated, effectively democratizing clinical trial access. A new digital approach was developed to consenting patients, and collecting and reporting clinical data, and a network was formed using centralized approaches to save time and expense. Real-world data is used to submit comparator control arms to the FDA to support rapid drug approvals. Timothy J. Yeatman, M.D. is an adjunct professor of surgery at the University of Utah, where he has an active National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded laboratory, and he is a member of the Cell Response and Regulation Program of the Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI). He has spent the past two and a half years directing the development of an integrated cancer program for Intermountain Healthcare and its 24 hospitals, and coordinating collaborations with the University of Utah and HCI. He recently joined Phenome Health as its chief clinical officer in charge of identifying and accruing 1million participants in the Beyond the Human Genome Project (BHG). MLF ORGANIZER Robert Lee Kilpatrick NOTES MLF: Health & Medicine SPEAKERS Dr. Timothy J. Yeatman M.D., Adjunct Professor of Surgery, University of Utah; Chief Clinical Officer, Phenome Health; Dr. Robert Lee Kilpatrick Ph.D., Chair, Health & Medicine Member-Led Forum—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on December 7th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Roundtable
12/9/21 RT Panel

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 75:56


The Roundtable Panel: a daily open discussion of issues in the news and beyond. Today's panelists are WAMC's Alan Chartock, Siena College Professor of Comparative Politics Vera Eccarius-Kelly, Lecturer and Adjunct Professor in Communications for SUNY New Paltz and RPI Terry Gipson, and Tetherless World Professor of Computer, Web, and Cognitive Sciences at RPI and Director of the RPI-IBM Artificial Intelligence research collaboration Jim Hendler.

Pacey Performance Podcast
Deciphering, understanding and optimising athlete movement efficiency with Matt Jordan

Pacey Performance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 63:35


This week's Pacey Performance Podcast guest is Matt Jordan. Throughout his career, Matt has consulted with more than 30 Olympic and World Championship medallists, and he frequently provides his expertise to high-performance sport organisations. Matt has been a strength and conditioning coach and applied sport scientist working with international athletes for over six Olympic Winter Games. In addition to being the Director of Sport Science at the Canadian Sport Institute Calgary, Matt is an Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Kinesiology at the University of Calgary. On the podcast, Matt discusses a topic he wrote about in High Performance Training for Sports (2nd Edition) – efficiency of movement. Not only does Matt define what efficiency of movement is, but he also explains how experts apply it to training programmes. He also dives into the strength training framework for mechanical efficiency, and how isometric training should be adapted to apply to specific sports. Continuing the technical side of things, Matt also talks about loading for technical efficiency. Matt also talks about some of the psychological aspects of sport science, such as why coaches need to remember that they are ‘servants of performance' and not become transfixed on their own particular way of doing things. In a similar vein, Matt speaks about how coaches can detach from irrelevant information and see a problem for what it is, and avoid the pitfalls of following the same model again and again. To hear all this insight and much more, hit the play button now. This week's topics: What is efficiency of movement? Applying efficiency of movement to training programmes The strength training framework for mechanical efficiency Isometric training, and how specific exercises need to be for certain sports Why coaches need to remember that they are ‘servants of performance' How to detach from irrelevant information and see a problem for what it is Loading for technical efficiency How to avoid the pitfalls of being transfixed on a specific model

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

When Clients Have to Manage Their Therapists Curt and Katie chat about the work (or mental load) therapists often give to clients that is really ours. We talk about requiring our clients to do things that are not helpful to treatment like: manage our time, do excessive paperwork, negotiate through our money stuff, be guinea pigs, or teach us about their culture or other differences. We also look at the impact of these abdications of responsibility on the therapeutic relationship and the clinical work.     It's time to reimagine therapy and what it means to be a therapist. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy talk about how to approach the role of therapist in the modern age. In this episode we talk about: When we give more work to clients (that isn't really good therapy) The mental load or emotional labor that therapists can unwittingly add for clients Time management and the impact of poor practices on clients Being late, managing the shape of the session, scheduling The difference between being authentic and being irresponsible The care you show when managing rescheduling and the impact on the relationship What can come up, especially related to attachment wounds The problem when you consistently forget to get back to your clients Paperwork as a burden on clients, especially when clinicians don't read the paperwork The message you give when you don't follow up on a client's homework When outcome measures feel like paperwork that is solely for the benefit of the therapist, rather than something that feels relevant to the client Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) poorly implemented Delayed billing, not providing superbills timely Allowing a balance to accrue The power dynamic and power imbalance when clients owe therapists a sizable amount The labor we're giving to our clients when don't have structure on payment (sliding scale fees and payment plans) How our own money stuff might come into these conversations Adding new theories or trying new interventions on clients without a strong clinical rationale The danger to the client's trust in the process if we throw new interventions in each week The mental load of asking our clients to teach about their own experience or navigating therapist bias Identifying a lack of fit or when treatment is over (rather than forcing our clients to do so) Own our humanness and set ourselves up for success Why this work sometimes gets handed to clients (rigidity, therapy culture) Our Generous Sponsor: Simplified SEO Consulting Simplified SEO Consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO Specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings. These days, word of mouth referrals just aren't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for a therapist and when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you!  That's where Simplified SEO Consulting comes in. Founded and run by a private practice owner, they understand the needs of a private practice. They can help you learn to optimize your own website OR can do the optimizing for you. Visit SIMPLIFIEDSEOCONSULTING.COM/MODERNTHERAPIST to learn more and if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO Courses using the code "MODERNTHERAPIST" Resources mentioned: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Very Bad Therapy: A Clinical on Unprofessionalism   Relevant Episodes: Work Harder Than Your Clients Clinical Versus Business Decisions How to Fire Your Clients Ethically How to Fire Your Clients Ethically Part 1.5 Diversity and Cultural Competence Special Populations   Connect with us! Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group  Our consultation services: The Fifty-Minute Hour Who we are: Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch: www.mtsgpodcast.com www.therapyreimagined.com Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapist's Group https://www.facebook.com/therapyreimagined/ https://twitter.com/therapymovement https://www.instagram.com/therapyreimagined/   Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano http://www.crystalmangano.com/   Transcript (Autogenerated) Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode is brought to you by Simplified SEO consulting.   Katie Vernoy  00:03 Simplified SEO consulting is an SEO business specifically for therapists and other mental health providers. Their team of SEO specialists know how to get your website to the top of search engines so you get more calls from your ideal clients. They offer full SEO services and DIY trainings.   Curt Widhalm  00:21 Stay tuned at the end of the episode for a special discount.   Announcer  00:26 You're listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide, where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings to support you as a whole person and a therapist. Here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  00:41 Welcome back, modern therapist, this is the modern therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about therapy about our practices, things that we do to have more successful practices and leave our clients in better places promote healing in the worlds. And today's episode is inspired by a client's comments about the work that therapists make clients do outside of the work that therapists make clients do. And this is the ways that we make our clients do some of the practice stuff for us, or that our bad practice habits end up giving people bad therapy experiences. So this is not necessarily about the clinical work, but things that we do that potentially start to affect the clinical work. And going through kind of some brainstorming on this. And we posted this question the night before recording this out on our Twitter feed, we got exactly zero responses from anybody. So this is a list of things to   Katie Vernoy  01:55 Maybe we should have put it in our Facebook group, where we get responses. Next time guys next time.   Curt Widhalm  02:01 But we came up with a list of things, this is probably a non exhaustive list. And you can go to our effort mentioned Twitter or Facebook group and continue to add meaningfully to this list. But things that clients have identified are also the importance of being on the other side of the couch things that we've identified, the end up just being bad therapy experiences. So Katie, what first comes to your mind on this.   Katie Vernoy  02:33 I think the the thing that comes first to my mind is probably the way that we manage time. Because for me, I worked in a clinic mental health clinic, a mental health clinic where time seemed very dynamic and fluid and things just never started on time. And it was something that bothered me, I equally participated in it. But it's something that I found is important for me, I want to make sure I'm on time that if I tell my client that we're going to reschedule that I have a time available for them and, and that I manage time properly within my session. But I have heard from clients that that is not always the case. In fact, I'll link to this in the show notes, there was an episode that I supported very bad therapy on where a client who reported on their story was given tons of paperwork after their therapist was 30 minutes late to the intake session. And just the types of things with that are just hugely problematic. But like if we're not respecting your client's time, if we're not rescheduling and like managing the rescheduling process, if we're going over which I have to admit, sometimes I go on that one where we don't manage time properly. In this session, we're forcing our clients to kind of work around us or manage the time for us. I know as a therapist, I'm always tempted to manage the time for my therapist, she actually is good with it. But like I still am like, oh, well, I know we need to finish. You know, like, I feel like when that's happening there is there's work that the client must do that doesn't seem fair.   Curt Widhalm  04:21 And the way that this plays out is I've had people describe this to me as we understand that therapists have their own lives, have their own reactions have their own shit that just comes up and a lot of things that we encourage therapists to be out about, you know, hey, I'm going to a conference that's gonna affect our sessions that we need to reschedule things. But I've heard statements around this as far as like, Oh, I'm going to a conference. I need to reschedule. I'm needing to move a couple of people around I'll get back to you in a couple of days with what your options for rescheduling for next week might be. And then not following up with the clients that ends up putting the clients in positions of do I need to call back is my therapist actually going to follow through. So these are really kind of small afterthought things that can have a great deal of impact on our clients as far as pushing some of the scheduling responsibility back over to them. Now, parts of the ways of getting around this is if you have a good, you know, scheduling system that allows for clients to be able to put themselves on your schedule, hey, you know, I'm going to this conference next week, we could spend a few minutes right now doing this or set a reminder for, you know, tomorrow to check back and I'll have my availability up there, and you'll be able to book an appointment for what's available. And that can be one way of helping to alleviate this problem.   Katie Vernoy  06:08 Yes. And I think that the message that we send, if we don't immediately take care of it, or, or have a solution for it, I think is one of I don't care about your session. I mean, to me, it's respectful to take the time to to do the rescheduling, especially if you've got a couple of minutes that aren't going to take away from clinical time. And I think the the message of I've got a few things to move around, and then I will get back to you and not getting back to kind of put somebody in a in a hierarchy of how important they are to you. And to me, it just feels, I think it hurts the relationship when you disregard them. And you don't get them scheduled immediately. Or you don't show the importance of getting them scheduled and taking care of their time immediately. In my opinion.   Curt Widhalm  07:00 You know for some of the clients that I've seen that have described this, it's their people who seem really high functioning in many areas of their lives.   Katie Vernoy  07:11 Sure.   Curt Widhalm  07:11 But this does bring out a lot of attachment wounds, especially if there's been relational traumas in their lives. And it might not be something that is at the forefront of your mind as a practitioner, when you're managing your practice of looking at just how deeply impactful those between session contacts or absence of contacts can end up happening with clients from all walks of life, but particularly from these clients.   Katie Vernoy  07:41 And I want to cover another element of this because there was a period of time, not lately because of the pandemic. But when I was traveling a lot, or I was doing a lot of things, I did reschedule a lot. And some people would say that de facto is disrespectful to clients, and you set your weekly time and you keep it and that kind of stuff. And for me, and maybe that's why I've gotten very comfortable with rescheduling. But if the communication is open, and there's a clear value that you hold for them and their session time, I think you can reschedule maybe not as much as you want. But I think that you can still do it. But I think if you forget to call them back, and you make them be the ones that reach out, I think that's when it gets problematic. I think folks can live their lives travel all they want, do what they want. I think it's just take care of your clients in the process. Hold those times make sure that you make it available for them, and help them to reschedule don't make them do it.   Curt Widhalm  08:36 So is kind of shifting gears here a little bit. But also speaking on responsiveness. You brought up paperwork. So first of all, there's just the sheer amount of paperwork. Yes, and depending on the kind of practice that you have, sometimes agencies are going to have mountains and mountains of paperwork. And from a bureaucratic standpoint, it might be because there's multiple people within the agency who are interacting with a client if there's a medical component of the agency justifying paperwork, and I don't want to do that. But for, you know, more private practice II type places that there can be a lot of good intentions with paperwork, but a complaint that I hear from some of my students, some of my clients about other therapists experiences is does that paperwork ever actually end up getting used for anything or is it just filling stuff out for filling it out sake?   Katie Vernoy  09:42 Yes, yes. I think that's the piece that I that really bothers me. I know. Like when I go to a doctor's office, you know, whether it's an intake or an annual appointment or whatever, so much paperwork, and they clearly don't have time to read it and then they asked Be the Same questions right afterwards. And I know that that happens with therapists as well. I personally probably have a couple too many pieces of paperwork that I feel like I need to have. And they are really just kind of forms that people sign. But all of the assessment stuff I do read, and I am, it's clear when I see my clients that I read it, but I think there are a lot of folks that feel like they have to have all of this information. But there's arguments about having it at intake before intake after intake, you know, like people can argue clinically when they want to ask for all this information, but having so much paperwork to get through to walk in the door, and then have it clear that my clinician has not read it drives me bonkers.   Curt Widhalm  10:46 I was at a presentation several years ago at this point that the speaker was a psychiatrist who was talking about the last days of one of their parents being in a hospital, end of life sort of things. But every doctor that was making their rounds, they learned after a couple of days that they just needed to ask the doctor before saying anything like have you read the chart that. So this is this is not just particular to therapists experiences that overall in healthcare we can get, especially when we're busy really into that habit of just kind of making our clients catch us up on things rather than going back through notes, you know that that P part of SOAP Notes of even just going back and following up on what I also hear from a lot of clients, which is following up on homework, that we assign clients to do things. But if we don't bring it back up in session, we're giving them a pass to not do it. But yeah, it also backs up the quality of our work, or the emphasis on the suggestions that we make when we do ask and follow up on referrals on homework tasks on different ways of doing things that if clients are like, alright, I don't need to do this, or if they're the ones like I did the homework, do you want to talk about it? But the answer, probably Yeah.   Katie Vernoy  12:19 Yes, yes. And I know I've had that happen, where I either failed to write down the specific homework assignment in the progress section of my note, or the plan section of the notes, sorry, or I was kind of waiting to see if it was relevant. And I think in truth, that means that the client may feel responsible to bring it up and feel like they have to manage it, and or they just start start disregarding it. So I think that's a really good one. And I think being able to manage our own documentation properly, so that we can have that continuity of care from session to session, I think is really important. And if we're not managing the continuity of care, you know, I think we joked and a few probably in a few different presentations and conversations about self care, just like, Oh, what was most you know, what was most, you know, resonant with you last week, you know, when you don't remember what you talked about like that that's really making the client, it puts them in the driver's seat? I think there are clinical reasons to do that. But I think if you're structured enough that you're actually asking for homework, follow up.   Curt Widhalm  13:33 And you don't want to be that therapist, it's kind of doing the, you know, the psychic out in front of the audience, like I'm sensing, sensing an H over here. Was there something in your last week that that starts to age? Hey, speaking of things that we can overload clients with your this is from your list, lots of outcome measures without either buy in about it, or showing what you're doing with those outcome measures.   Katie Vernoy  14:06 Yes, yes. Yeah, I think the thing for me is on my therapist for a while was doing feedback, informed treatment. And I was like meh and and she did drop it. So that's good. Maybe I shouldn't say that outloud   Curt Widhalm  14:21 maybe they weren't doing feedback, informed treatment. It was just feedback informed treatment flavored therapy.   Katie Vernoy  14:28 Maybe No, I we did talk about it a little bit. But I was also anyway, that's a whole other conversation that I can have with my therapist. But I think when I'm thinking about that, that was my experience of like, I don't want to do feedback informed treatment. I'll tell you if I need something different. Stop asking me questions. Stop spending time in my session on this paperwork that you want me to fill out is kind of how it felt to me. So I'm, and I knew what it was like I didn't need her to explain it to me. So I also was having my own experience of it. But back in Community Mental Health, there were tons of outcome measures that were put together to, for funding streams, like we had to show progress, we had to do this stuff. And, you know, we had to do them quarterly or different things like that. And theoretically, if you actually use those, clinically, I could see the benefit. But most of the clinicians didn't, they just had to get it done. And so it had that piece of like, here, fill out these 27 different scales. And then we'll be done. And we can get back to the business of therapy versus actually using them clinically. And so to me, first off having 27 different scales, and I exaggerate a little, I think is is overkill, and I think not using them clinically is is just bureaucracy at its worst.   Curt Widhalm  15:48 And don't just blame this on agencies. There are people who, if you are some of my fit people out there, you know what I'm talking about, but it's for the people who think that they're doing fit that aren't, that are just kind of taking up session time, they're not explaining how they're using this information with clients that really just ends up Compounding this problem. Yeah. Now, on the opposite end of too much paperwork is maybe not giving enough paperwork, and not necessarily just assessments, but this is following through on things like super bills. And yeah, letting you know, months and months stack up before clients are reaching out to you and saying, Hey, I'm thinking that, you know, my insurance company isn't going to reimburse me for things that happened last year, that you're getting that far behind. Yeah, you know, the this is things that now start to impact potentially the the contracts that you got clients into your practice with, as far as, you know, if part of clients decision making processes, I'm coming to you because at least I'm getting a few dollars back on my therapy sessions, because of a super bill. This is something that starts to have a financial impact on clients.   Katie Vernoy  17:20 Yeah, I definitely have had clients that I forgot I was doing a super bill for and they reminded me fortunately, it was not too far out. And we were still able to get it done. But I think that's, that's hard. I mean, that's part of the process that we say we're going to do. And if we don't do it, and they and they have to remind us, I mean, granted, this is them getting their money back. But if we've said, Hey, I will provide you with a super bill, we need to live up to that into the bargain. I think there's also courtesy billing and different things. We talked about some of this stuff in work harder than your clients on ways that you can show up better and and maybe even in some of the other conversations we've had on kind of the highest level of customer service, I'll look back and see what we've actually done episodes on, then put those in the show notes. But I think, to me, I think if we're not billing timely, and like with insurance, billing, if we're not billing timely, and we don't get paid, I think we just hold that. Like, if we didn't do it, we don't get paid. But if we're billing really late, and we're also not collecting payments until we know what the copay is going to be, or until we know how much has been covered. We can end up with big balances that clients have. And we know there's there's a lot of guidance around that. But I think that can start to happen. Even if you don't bill or don't charge them a reasonable copay. Like, except like once a month. That means for some clients, that's fine, and you can figure out the cadence with them. But I think if we're not doing things timely, and all of a sudden a client owes like 1000s of dollars or hundreds of dollars for some clients, it's it's overwhelming, and it creates a little bit of a rupture within the therapy relationship.   Curt Widhalm  19:02 It really does heighten the power imbalance that not only are the traditional therapist client power balances there, but then it's also this is somebody that I'm indebted to, and especially if it's multiple sessions that for whatever reason, that therapist hasn't built the client, then clients might not actually be bringing that up. And, you know, not everybody's great at budgeting their money. So if they get hit with multiple sessions of Yeah. You're then putting yourself into, at best trying to work out a payment plan with them. versus, you know, potentially, it being the end of the therapeutic relationship and somebody that owes you money just as potentially gone.   Katie Vernoy  19:56 Yeah, I mean, I think that is loss of money for clinicians, and I think we should be pretty motivated to not do that. But I think about like setting up payment plans or even like a sliding scale when there's not any structure to it's like kind of pay what you can. There is a clinical element to this, I think. But I think there's also some emotional labor that we're giving to our clients to try to figure out what they can say they can afford that feels acceptable to you, or what their timeline is for the payment plan, or whatever it is, and all of a sudden, this relationship has become very different. And I feel like the more structure that the therapist can give, the less we're putting our money stuff on our clients, because I think sometimes sliding scales and pay payment plans and stuff like that are very needed. And sometimes they're because clinicians aren't willing to turn folks away or refer folks to appropriate resources. And so then it becomes this weird push pull of, well, if you can get high enough, then maybe I can see you. And, you know, it's it really becomes this weird dynamic. And maybe that's overstating it, but it feels really strange to me, I feel like it's been a lot, it's a lot easier when someone has a specific copay, or I say, This is my fee, and they say yes or no.   Curt Widhalm  21:13 Why longer that I practice, because of some of these points, the more that I look at things from a practice management, and that it simplifies things. And I look at it from a legal and ethical end to that, it's acknowledging that as the providers, we have the responsibilities to set boundaries, especially around kind of more taboo sort of things in polite society that we don't talk about money in this way. It puts us in the position of even if we're very equal, driven in the way that we approach the work that we do with our clients that this is just kind of handing off all of that responsibility as you described.   Katie Vernoy  22:02 Yeah. I mean, I feel like there's probably a mechanism to have a Pay What You can practice, and I am thinking of someone in particular, and I have a sense that she's probably doing it very well. And so maybe I'm gonna reach out to her so you know who you are, I'm reaching out to you. But I feel like it has to be handled very, very well. And there needs to not be kind of this ulterior motive around it, because then it's like, I'm putting my stuff on you versus really opening up my practice to exactly what you can pay. If you can pay $2, or you can pay $250, you're in the door is a very different thing, then, what can you pay? Can you pay this? Can you pay that? Well, I can only do this, can you do that? Like it just this the bargaining, I feel like just creates a completely different relationship. And maybe maybe I'm too in my own money stuff and need to solve it. But I feel like that's putting our stuff onto the clients.   Curt Widhalm  22:58 So switching gears here, some, a lot of us love to add new skills to our practice, add new tips, add new interventions, add new theories, and you're encouraged to practice them. Yes. But clients who know that they're the ones who are being practiced on, it should be done in a way that they are buying into, it's not just, I came from this workshop this weekend, and this is the first time that I am using all of these interventions, that that is doing therapy that is not practicing therapy, and that is doing therapy poorly. And   Katie Vernoy  23:40 yeah,   Curt Widhalm  23:41 go ahead.   Katie Vernoy  23:41 I was just gonna say, I know that I've been guilty. Sometimes I'm like, this is such a cool intervention. And I was thinking about you the whole time. And I think it would be great. And then we try it. And sometimes it's cool. And sometimes it's like, Oh, I was way more excited about that than I really thought about it. So I know I'm guilty of this.   Curt Widhalm  24:01 And I think it's natural, especially earlier in our careers to want to try out and especially as you're trying to find what your theory is that part of getting a theory is just trying things out and being able to see what works for you. But I've had clients respond back or heads supervisees clients that this ends up becoming discussions and supervision of, well, that's nice, but what's your success rate with this that makes them even just question the effectiveness, whether they're, whether the clinician is good at it or not. That just kind of devalues the belief that it's actually going to work from the clients end.   Katie Vernoy  24:47 Yeah. Yeah, I think the longer I work with a client, the more we're able to kind of play around with new things, see what's happening, but like if it's especially a newer client, where it feels like I'm coming in each week with a completely new theory. Without a lot of understanding, yeah, it feels like I'm just grasping at straws. And so I think it is important, regardless of how excited you are of an orientation, or a new new intervention that you really, how does that flow into the work that's already happening? Is it relevant? Or is it just does it just sound like fun? I think some of the folks who read us putting a mental load on our clients will probably think this is what we were going to talk about. So I want to make sure we do talk about it. This is what we talked about all of the podcasts, I didn't want to miss it. What I put together my little list, which is us, not having knowledge, especially cultural or specific demographic kind of information, and asking our clients to teach us, I think this across all of our clinical episodes is basically what every clinician who's talking about a population of folks that we didn't necessarily learn about in grad school, says is that what they get wrong, is that they make clients teach them. And they also make bad assumptions and all of that. And so then the clients, if they stay has to do the work of teaching us they have to do the work of navigating our bias, they have to determine if it's if we're the right therapist for them. And so I think, I don't know that we have to go deeply into this topic, because like, probably three quarters of the episodes of our podcast, maybe that's an exaggeration, half of the episodes of our podcast on this very thing. But I think what we're requiring our clients to teach us about that, all that makes them them from the ground up versus coming from a place of I have some knowledge, and how does that impact your life? And tell me a little bit more about your particular perspective? I think that is an emotional load that I think is extremely harmful for us to put on the clients.   Curt Widhalm  26:56 And I think if you approach that as more likely to be harmful than not from that approach. Yeah, it's not to say that it doesn't work. And you know, despite all of the experience that I have in my career, that sometimes it's even just owning my side of the street of here's my experience with this particular presentation, this particular culture, even sharing with them from session to session. Here's what I've been reading about since last time, as it pertains to this area that demonstrates a better way of handling this, as opposed to, hey, why don't you teach me about your fill in the blank difference of culture from mine, that assumes kind of that dominant thing. So if that dead horse is not already beaten.   Katie Vernoy  27:54 But we'll, we'll, a link to a section of our podcast episodes that has a lot of those types of beginning beginner information that you can start with if you've got a client that has some differences that you don't know much about.   Curt Widhalm  28:09 And I think that that goes into the next thing on your list here, which is identifying a lack of fit overall, yeah. With and this doesn't have to be just immediately before the first session, but even in the first session or so appropriately, being able to say, I don't think that I can help you. Or there's somebody who is better at helping you or my skills, don't line up with what you need out of therapy at this point. And then providing a warm handoff to somebody who can, that, you know, it's hard enough for many clients to, especially first time therapy seekers find a therapist that meets many of their requirements, costs, location, specialty, this kind of stuff. And then to just kind of throw those clients back to the beginning of the process is a very difficult aspect of just where our healthcare system is. But this is part of why we build the networks that we do to say, Hey, I know somebody who might be a better fit for you on this than I am. And being able to own that in a non shaming way.   Katie Vernoy  29:27 We've talked about this a few times, and we have a couple of episodes on how to fire our clients ethically, if you've started down the path and recognize that you're not the right therapist for them. And so being able to, you know, whether it's identifying that you're not a fit anymore, or they might need somebody else at this point, I think that's our responsibility and not our clients kind of fading away. And to that point, we need to be the ones that identify the end of treatment, when it's clinically relevant. If it's like, Hey, I've got what I need. I'm going to come back later, or those types of things that can be either collaborative, or the clients choice, the client can always choose to end treatment. But if you're recognizing it's time to end treatment, and you don't say it, because you don't want to lose a client, then the client has to say it later. And that's not fair to them.   Curt Widhalm  30:19 So all of these are extra considerations for helping your clients having good experience with your management of your practice of being able to come to therapy for the reasons that they think that they're coming to therapy for. And, you know, I think that we've probably got a upcoming episode here to be recorded, but helping to talk with clients about what realistic expectations of therapy are, yeah, that if we're really honest about it, it's, you know, realistic expectations. If your honest list is, I'm going to be late on emailing you things, or I'm going to be chaotic and scheduling you. But we encourage you to own your stuff. If you wouldn't feel comfortable owning that to potential clients. These are ways of being able to consider the impacts and really being able to look at your own therapeutic relationships with your therapists of what goes beyond just what's happening in the therapy room.   Katie Vernoy  31:31 And I think there are many of these things that probably each of us, you know, I'm talking about you and me, as well as, as all of our listeners, we there's many of these things that we've all done at some point. And I think part of it is being human, we get excited about a treatment and we try it before we really think through the whole clinical plan, or we're late or we forget to get back to our client or whatever it is like I think all of us have at least a few if not all of these somewhere in our history. I've been a therapist for 20 years. So of course these things have come up. But I think if we can own our humaneness and set ourself up for success, we minimize these things. Yes. And I think if we don't get overwhelmed, we don't, you know or don't aren't consistently in a state of overwhelm, I think we can manage these things a lot better. I think the reasons that I came up with it, sometimes these things happen that I think are worth investigation, and maybe in another conversation about clinical orientation, or how we view ourselves in the profession. But I do feel like there is a rigidity that sometimes happen. And I've seen this in in some different kinds of topics. And we talked about it a little bit in some recent episodes. But when we feel like our clients need to take on this emotional load, because it's their responsibility, or it's part of the clinical element of things, you know, clients must do this, because it's their thing. I just, I feel like I need to remind folks like, therapy is a weird beast, we do things in a particular way. And is there's a culture that we've created around what therapy is what the relationship looks like, all of these things that our clients may not know. And so the fact that they should remember their appointment time, or they should do, they should always be the one managing their scheduling, or whatever it is, you know, like, if there's something that they should do that if they don't do it, then it's clinically indicated. And I create sometimes there's clinical communication that can happen there. But when we when we put our filter of what a good therapy client does over someone who maybe has never had therapy or has never had therapy with you, you're putting stuff on them that I don't think is necessarily accurate.   Curt Widhalm  33:54 So, we'd love to hear your thoughts on all of this stuff you can let us know on our social media or come join our Facebook group, the modern therapist group. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy.   Katie Vernoy  34:08 Thanks again to our sponsor Simplified SEO Consulting.   Curt Widhalm  34:12 These days, word of mouth referrals just aren't enough to fill your caseload. Instead, most people go to Google when they're looking for a therapist. And when they start searching, you want to make sure they find you. That's where simplified SEO consulting comes in. It's founded and run by a private practice owner who understands the needs of a private practice, and they can help you learn to optimize your own website or they can do the optimizing for you.   Katie Vernoy  34:35 Visit simplified Seo consulting.com forward slash modern therapist to learn more. And if you do decide to try your hand at optimizing your own website, you can get 20% off any of their DIY SEO courses using the code modern therapist. Once again, visit simplifiedSeoconsulting.com/moderntherapist and use the code modern therapist all caps.   Announcer  35:00 Thank you for listening to the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at mtsgpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

Law To Fact
Entertainment and IP Law with Tony Iliakostas

Law To Fact

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 37:29


In this episode: I speak with Tony Iliakostas about Entertainment and IP Law.  Tony discusses his entree into the entertainment law practice and shares fascinating details about posthumous personality rights.Some Key Takeways:1. There are ways to distinguish yourself to employers besides grades. You can start a blog, write about topics of interest, etc. 2. When trying to find a job, network, network, network3. Recognize the value that your work as a lawyer contributes to the overall business or social good to which you are contributing.About our guest:Tony Iliakostas, also known as “Prof. T” by his students, is the Manager of ABC News Rights and Clearances and an Adjunct Professor at New York Law School, teaching Entertainment Law and Intellectual Property. In his role at ABC News, Tony handles complex copyright licensing for various ABC News programs, including “Good Morning America,” “20/20,” “Nightline,” and other related ABC News branded programs.  Tony also works closely with the news division's business affairs and legal departments on various risk assessment matters when licensing photos and videos for the broadcasts as well as mitigating any legal claims in the event there is a copyright infringement claim.  Tony also has experience in personality rights licensing, having handled the licensing of various dead celebrities including Albert Einstein, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and other iconic celebrities in his role as Business Affairs Manager at Greenlight. Tony most recently started an Instagram account called @TheIPProfessor as way to encourage, educate, and entertain people about the wonderful world of intellectual property. Tony is a graduate of Fordham University, Class of 2011, and New York Law School, Class of 2014. As always, if you have any suggestions for an episode topic, please let us know!You can email leslie@lawtofact.com or tweet @lawtofact.-Find us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook!Review us on iTunes, your opinion matters!-Want to stay updated on all things Law to Fact?Join our mailing list by visiting www.LawToFact.com.