Podcasts about Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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War memorial in Washington, DC, United States

  • 69PODCASTS
  • 111EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 28, 2022LATEST
Vietnam Veterans Memorial

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Best podcasts about Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Latest podcast episodes about Vietnam Veterans Memorial

AM Quincy on QATV
Mayor Thomas Koch - June 28, 2022

AM Quincy on QATV

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 14:33


Quincy Mayor Thomas Koch discusses plans to renovate the Furnace Brook Golf Course, clubhouse, and adjacent Forbes Hill Park. Koch also talks about a ceremony to add a name to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial at Marina Bay, and the upcoming Independence Day festivities.

Eyewitness History
The Creator Of The Vietnam Memorial Wall Tells Us How He Received His Army Commendation Medal

Eyewitness History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 47:07


Mr. Scruggs is a United States Army veteran who served in the Vietnam War and later founded the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, which built the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., in the United States. Scruggs was the President of the foundation until 2015 when he retired.Scruggs continues to monitor the societal, spiritual, and other impacts of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC. He is Chairman of the Selective Service National Appeals Board and a Member of the District of Columbia Bar Association. He recently launched an updated website and is planning several events this year to mark this historic event anniversary. The next event will take place in November, the official 40th anniversary of the dedication of the memorial. "In Vietnam, I was wounded in combat at 19 years old. I could not have imagined ten years later at the age of 29, I would come up with the idea to build a memorial to my fellow Vietnam Veterans. It would include every name of every soldier who gave their life for my country, America." - Jan C. ScruggsTo find out more, go to Jan Scruggs' website: https://www.founderofthewall.com/

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Growing Up Gold Star

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 38:16


Tony Cordero talks about growing up without his father, realizing in early adulthood that there must be many thousands of other kids who lost their fathers in Vietnam, and creating an all-volunteer non-profit organization, Sons and Daughters in Touch, to connect them with each other.

Echoes of the Vietnam War
You Are Not Alone

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 43:28


June is National PTSD Awareness month. Vietnam veterans often have a hard time getting help for this condition, and having someone in their corner can make all the difference in the world. Cyndy Hollender-Stancliff married two Vietnam veterans, both of whom suffered from PTSD. She shares her story of love and support, loss and healing.

Wilson County News
Floresville veteran's heart soars on Honor Flight

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 5:47


The Navy Memorial. Arlington National Cemetery. The Marine Corps War Memorial. The Air Force Memorial. The FDR Memorial. The World War II Memorial. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The Korean War Memorial. The Smithsonian Aeronautical Museum. The Mall. These were most, but not all, of the places Elizandro De Los Santos, 76, and 19 other war veterans visited during their May 19- 21 Honor Flight to Washington, D.C. There were also parades, ceremonies, and receptions. “Once you got up in the morning, it was nonstop,” Elizandro said. Honor Flights are designed to provide U.S. military veterans of America's wars with a...Article Link

Hi Line Ministries
More Than a Name Upon a Wall

Hi Line Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 13:27


A woman was at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, she had flowers in her hand and a pen and paper to trace the name of the loved one she had lost in the war.  As she began to trace the name she began to talk to the Lord; she told the Lord...........

C-SPAN Radio - C-SPAN's The Weekly
Memorial Day 1993: President Clinton is booed at Vietnam Veterans Memorial

C-SPAN Radio - C-SPAN's The Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 10:52


Presidents are no strangers to getting booed. But what about getting booed by war veterans when making a speech at a war memorial on Memorial Day? In this episode of C-SPAN's podcast "The Weekly" -- themed for Memorial Day -- we remember the rough reaction President Bill Clinton faced when he spoke at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in 1993. Clinton was the first president to visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on Memorial Day. But was met with boos and catcalls from war veterans who weren't forgiving his avoiding the draft and anti-war positions as a student. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Nobody's Perfect

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 35:10


In wartime, casualty and injury records are often created (or not created) in moments of absolute, unimaginable chaos. Sometimes the dots just don't get connected. David Kies is the living embodiment of that phenomenon. He is alive... and his name is on The Wall. In this episode, he tells us what it's like to do a rubbing of your own name at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

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Echoes of the Vietnam War
Hamburger Hill

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 43:08


Hill 937 was the center of a brutal and legendary battle that began 53 years ago this week. After eleven days of vicious fighting and heavy losses on both sides, it would become known by another name: Hamburger Hill. Hear a personal account from a soldier who survived it.

Good Mornings Podcast Edition
Thursday, May 5, 2022

Good Mornings Podcast Edition

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 59:15


The Wall That Heals - a replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial - will be on display in Findlay this week... We have details on the exhibit and commemorations planned through the weekend (at 16:40) --- Could the leak of that Supreme Court draft ostensibly overturning Roe v. Wade be as consequential as the ruling itself? (at 26:32) --- What's Happening: Details on events for the month of May at the Hancock Historical Museum (at 37:52) --- Stumped on a gift for Mother's Day? We have ideas that mom is sure to love (at 53:44)

Midnight Train Podcast
Unexplained Mass Disappearances. Where'd They Go?

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 105:45


Ep. 154 Unexplained Mass Disappearances   Today we're talking about unsolved stuff…but in a different way. We're talking about unexplained mass disappearances. How can large numbers of people just disappear without a trace? Where'd they go? Why'd they go? Did somebody make them leave? Bigfoot again? Aliens? Supernatural? Chainsaw? We may never know….but that won't stop us from discussing, speculating, and inevitably making really bad jokes on today's episode. So all aboard bitches let's roll!   Let us begin back…back…waaaaay back in 1918. We're talking about the USS Cyclops. Aside from having a great name, it fits the bill on mass disappearances. USS Cyclops (AC-4) was the second of four Proteus-class colliers built for the United States Navy several years before World War I. A collier is a fancy name for a big ass coal cargo ship. The USS Langley, the first aircraft carrier in the US Navy, was a converted collier. This was actually the second ship to bear the name Cyclops. She had been swimming around hauling coal and helping refugees between the Baltic sea, the Bahamas, and Mexico since 1910. In 1917 she was covered to help haul troops and coal all over the world during WW1.  In March 1918, the ship was given a new cargo: tons and tons of dense manganese ore, used in steelmaking. She left Brazil loaded up with the brittle metal, then voyaged to Barbados to resupply for the long journey home to Baltimore. That's where things get interesting. On the journey home something went wrong and the ship was never heard from again. Not even an sos. The last known transmission from the Cyclops was "weather fair, all well" at the beginning of the trip home. When the ship did not reach Baltimore a massive search was undertaken. Every naval ship from Cuba to Puerto Rico was sent out to search for debris. At the time, given it was during the war, the general consensus was that she was sunk by the Germans. But during the search, ships could not find any debris field that would be evident if it was torpedoed. In fact no one found anything…anything at all. It seemed the ship just disappeared. 306 people were just… gone. It remains to this day, the single largest loss of life in the history of the United States Navy that did not directly involve combat! Wow that's pretty crazy. So what exactly happened? Well there are theories abound my friends!    First there is a mini conspiracy theory that the captain sabotaged the ship or even took it all the way to Germany! Why, you ask? Well let us tell you. It is said that the crew was unhappy with the captain. You see, Captain Worley was hated by his staff and officers and was accused of being pro German. It was discovered later that Worley was actually German born and had changed his name at some point. It's not known why he changed his name. On top of that, the US Consulate General of Rio, named Gottschalk, boarded the ship with 73 other local sailors. Gottschalk was very popular with the German community in Brazil. Couple this with the fact that upon leaving Brazil, the ship was said to have been overloaded and people began to speculate. They say that Worley and Gottschalk purposely sabotaged the ship in some way to favor the Germans back home. Either that or the thought is that they essentially stole the crew and cargo and headed back to Germany. Seems plausible, until you try and figure how a few men could have forced 300 men to go back to Germany.  There are several theories of the ship being struck by a rogue wave or breaking up at sea. One sailor reported when they reached Rio, that on the way, the deck of the ship would sway when the ship was struck with large waves. He says the ship was showing signs of structural failure. Could that have been the issue? If so…where was the debris? Another theory was that the ship was overloaded and ran into a storm in which the unstable ship overturned and sank to the bottom of the ocean. Again…why no debris though?   For a BBC Radio 4 documentary, Tom Mangold had an expert from Lloyds investigate the loss of the Cyclops. The expert noted that manganese ore, being much denser than coal, had room to move within the holds even when fully laden, the hatch covers were canvas, and that when wet, the ore can become a slurry. As such, the load could shift and cause the ship to list. Listing is caused by the off-centerline distribution of weight aboard due to uneven loading or to flooding. By contrast, roll is the dynamic movement from side to side caused by waves. If a listing ship goes beyond the point where a righting moment will keep it afloat, it will capsize and potentially sink. Combined with a possible loss of power from its one engine, it could fill with water and go down in bad weather.   Then there's our personal favorite…the Bermuda triangle just straight fucked it up and aliens took it. That's right passengers…this happened in the infamous Bermuda triangle!!! So of course there are numerous theories involving the Bermuda triangle and supernatural goings on.  Most of these Bermuda triangle theories involve either aliens coming down and abducting the ship and crew, or aliens under the ocean coming up and claiming the ship for themselves. We here at the train, well at least Moody, think that this is the most plausible explanation of course.    So what do you guys think? Aliens?.... Yea it was aliens…   Ok so up next we're heading up to the great white north. For those of you who don't know…that's Canada.. You know America's hat. Anyway.. we're looking at the lake Anjikuni incident. The telling of this mystery was taken from mysterioustrip.com.  Anjikuni Lake is located deep in the Kivallig area of rural Nunavut in Canada. Placed near the Kazan River, the lake is perfect for fishing and trout. Anjikuni fastly became a home for the Inuit tribe; it developed soon into a colony and became popular almost instantly on a cold November day in 1930. Joe Labelle, a Canadian fur trapper, was more than an efficient individual who spent a lot of time doing outdoor activities. He was very familiar with the area; he knew that the people established a community. Joe was acquainted with the Inuit stories of wood ghosts that were reportedly harmful, and this remote part was soaked in the tales of the Wendigo. Labelle generally didn't have any fear or anxiety; however, this specific night at the lake became different. The full moon was casting a spooky luminosity all over the village, and no one was moving. The Huskies that were usually loud with the influx of travelers were quiet as well. The only sound he could hear was of his own steps made on the snow and the concave reverb of his greeting. He quickly understood something was not normal, and he started investigating as soon as he entered the village. The village was in complete silence, and he could see no one. No noise of conversation or laughter was detected. What's worse was the complete lack of smoke originating from chimneys that denoted the presence of living beings.   Joe noticed a fire at a distance and went towards it to inspect; the fire seemed to be burning for a significant amount of time. Upon further investigation, he found that someone started their supper preparations; however, they didn't finish making it. LaBelle continued towards the village, ready to bump into someone who could tell her what was really happening here. Joe, stepping out of his uncontrollable feelings, began an investigation into the Inuit's homes to search for any clues related to the silence and made a sudden and quick decision to leave the village.   He found that several homes were well-stocked with food and weapons; he further found a burnt meal in another house. In one spot, he found a repair of a junior sealskin that was yet to be finished. Sadly, he couldn't conclude anything.   As there wasn't any conclusive answer concerning what took place, it must certainly have been an unexpected event that spread widely and involved all 30 men, women & children in the village. Food, clothing, and weapons were left behind. But Why? There was no answer   More investigation directed him to a pair of findings that was enough to give him goosebumps. To the extent that he was able to tell, whatever happened, had happened recently.   He examined the entire village and found no new traces in the snow apart from his own. The most ghastly discovery he made was of the dogs. Seven of them had starved to death. This evidence was enough to persuade him to head to the nearest telegraph office located farther away. That would mean that Joe had to overlook basic requirements such as shelter and food; however, he was in a hurry to leave the place and seek assistance. As beaten and frostbitten as Labelle was, he finally stumbled into the telegraph office. In a few minutes, he sent an emergency message to the nearest RCMP (Royal Canadian Mounted Police) camp. By the time the Mounties reached, many hours later, Labelle had calmed himself enough to talk about his distressing stories.   According to 1984's article – The world's most significant UFO mysteries, written by Roger Boar and Nigel Blundell– the Mounties, when on their way to the Angikuni Lake mystery, took a bit of time to rest at a shack alongside a trapper and his two sons. They explained to the trapper and his sons that they are heading towards Anjikuni Lake to solve a ‘problem.' The Mounties asked the trapper if he had seen anything strange these past few days. Upon asking this question, the trapper was compelled to admit that he and his two sons had noticed an eerie luminous object flying all over the sky a few days ago. He further stated that he had seen giant, gleaming ‘flying objects' changing shape right before their eyes. And this object was flying towards the village at Anjikuni lake.   So did this event even happen? Or was LaBelle making it up. According to skeptoid.com( see we look at both sides equally) here are a number of things about the Joe Labelle story that raise red flags. For one thing, it happened in November, when average temperatures are 13°C degrees below freezing. Angikuni Lake is a sheet of ice; kayaks pulled up on the beach would not be "battered by wave action". The very presence of kayaks so far inland is suspect, though not impossible. Migratory Inuit would often park their kayaks to hunt caribou. These eastern Iglulik kayaks were made of sealskin stretched over willow branches. But the small Angikuni Lake is landlocked so far inland on the Barrens that neither willow nor sealskin were available, and this would be, by far, the farthest inland that the historical use of Iglulik kayaks would have ever been documented. Not impossible, but highly suspect.   Labelle described a permanent settlement, a "friendly little Eskimo village" of "about thirty inhabitants" that he'd known "for many years". A statement from the Mounted Police says "A village with such a large population would not have existed in such a remote area of the Northwest Territories." They had left sealskin garments behind, in a region where there was caribou hide rather than sealskin; and as a trapper Labelle should have been able to identify it properly. So there was either a series of quite improbable circumstances, or Labelle was wrong.    Today, no physical evidence exists of a village at Angikuni Lake, and nobody has ever published an account of going up there and clearing away any remnants. So we have to rely on documentary evidence to find the true history of the vanishing village.   So with all the contradictory evidence what is real and what isn't. Was there a group of Inuits that completely disappeared or was it a tall tale? Could it be a combination of both and the truth is somewhere in the middle? Who knows…either way…crazy story! Next up we head to Brazil and the village of Hoer Verde! We got the following info mostly from coolinterestingstuff.com. The Mysterious legend of Hoer Verde, the town with 600 inhabitants that vanished, is certainly confusing and troubling.   The case will cause you to ask questions, questions like “how can anything like that ever happen with absolutely no evidence to suggest anything unusual had happened?”   Like so many legends from the area, information on Hoer Verde is difficult to track down. But what information is accessible is not only disturbing, but incredibly perplexing.   As visitors to the village entered the small town they were immediately struck by how dead everything was. Unlike other villages of six hundred no one was walking through the streets.   Hanging signs waved in the gentle wind creaking noisily juxtaposed with the uneasy footsteps and subdued whispers of those passing through. As they passed by local houses and looked in the windows it was evident immediately that something wasn't right. No one was anywhere to be seen.   The police were called, and investigators descended on the town to look through the village. As they came to the town's school they found a gun, which they took to be forensically examined. And then the investigators looked to the blackboard on which the words, “There is no salvation” were written. After a cursory examination, they realized that it had been fired the day before, but by whom they were unsure.   A manhunt ensued for the 600 villagers in the small town. Despite this, no trace of any of the locals was ever unearthed.   As newspaper reports of the town's disappearance reached the west it was considered a curiosity, but with the shifting political climate of Brazil in 1923 it was considered possible that the town had evacuated to avoid conflict with guerrillas.   Another mysterious element is the original language of the phrase “There is no salvation.” Though the phrase has been largely translated into English, the phrase holds little significance in English or Portuguese. However, if the words had been “Illic est haud salus.” in Latin or some variation of it, this could have been related to the phrase “Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus” which is a Catholic phrase meaning “Outside the Church there is no salvation.” If this was the case in a largely Catholic area, the lesson could have been a religious lesson which was interrupted by some unknown force, but with no specific significance itself.    So what happened…we don't know…but you know there are some crazy theories!!   Let's start with the most bizarre theory that is floating around. This theory states the 600 residents of Hoer Verde were swallowed by a black hole taking them all to a fourth dimension. yes…that's a theory. Along those lines there's the inevitable alien abduction talk. Could aliens have really come down and abducted 600 people? We like to think so but who knows.    The next  theory people point to is the political landscape in Brazil leading to soldiers or revolutionaries forcing all the villagers to evacuate. The only thing is the villagers disappeared in 1923. There was no civil war going on at the time, as is sometimes referred to with the legend. Also the revolution didn't occur until 1930 and another occurred in 1932. In neither case was a village of 600 reported to be wiped out or relocated.    And then there's the issues of the names of the towns, one town is completely nameless in the legend while Hoer Verde is a rather strange name for a village or town in Brazil, for one Verde translates to green from Portuguese to English but Hoer is not a word in Portuguese. It seems to be a Dutch word that is a derogatory word for sex workers.   Second, the legend states the town has been forgotten to time but one source we found says they were able to find multiple lists of towns and villages dating back to the 16th century for Brazil. No name comes close to Hoer Verde except for Ouro Preto, which translates to black gold and the history for it goes back to 1698.   So this story is pretty crazy huh. Well turns out it may also be completely made up. There's been a research dive that traces the origins of this story to a fairly recent article in a sketchy Russian newspaper written by a man named Mikhaylov Andrei. To put this guy into perspective, in the same article he blames the disappearance at the colony of Roanoke on protoplasm coming from the ocean and devouring the people off the colony…yea…he claims it happens every few millennia. So while the myth of Hoer Verde lives on…it may just be that…a myth!   Next up we are gonna look at the Moche civilization. Information for this tale we got from an article on Fodors.com. The Moche culture remains one of the most mysterious unknowns of Peruvian history, and with the more prominent Incas filling up most of the pages in the history books, the Moches do not receive as much attention. The Moche believed in gory human sacrifice and produced famously beautiful pottery, built huge, bizarre brick pyramids and had a complex and efficient irrigation system. Some of the aqueducts are still in use today.   All researchers can glean from the Moche civilization is through a collection of artistic masterpieces from archaeological digs, writings from Spanish invaders (the Moche did not use a predominant written language), and other fragments left behind in Peru's northern coastal regions. The Moche civilization lived and flourished along the northern coast of Peru from the 1st to the 8th century A.D., with their highest concentration of residents in the popular Trujillo region and Chicama valley. Due to the riches of this land, which included access to sturdy clay and precious metals, the Moche civilization accumulated significant wealth and power during this pre-Incan period. At the foot of the Cerra Blanca Mountain, Moche's capital city covered 300 hectares, or 3 million square meters of an opulent environment that offered residents a tight community of people, storehouses, open plazas, and ramps for easy entry to multiple-level structures. The upper elite also planned fields surrounding the city (indicating a class-based society). Building this capital took the Moches 600 years to complete and involved no fewer than six construction phases.          In addition, the capital included two now-famous pyramids often open to tourists today: the Huaca Del Sol (Temple of the Sun), a structure standing more than 50 meters in height and encompassing an area of 340 by 160 meters, and the Huaca De La Luna (Temple of the Moon), built using millions of adobe bricks. Which, if you know anything about photoshop, is quite a feat. Researchers believed both were used as prodigious religious tombs.     Although monuments and temples remain for archeologists to research today, most of the tangible objects left behind by the Moches were artistic, creative artifacts full of intricate designs and pops of bold colors. Considered skillful metalworkers and adept potters, the Moches produced sophisticated headdresses made of real gold for their goddesses, jewelry of valuable metals, chest plates to show prestige, textiles for ornamentation and wardrobe, utensils for eating, and tools for working in the fields.           In 700 A.D., the Moches moved their capital city to Pampa Grande in the Lambayeque Valley, approximately 40 miles from the Pacific Ocean. They constructed this city to include large pyramids and temples made of dirt using a method called chamber and fill, which allowed loose dirt to clump into cribbed walls. No one knows exactly why the Moche civilization eventually disappeared. Many researchers believe El Niňo caused substantial damage to the fields and irrigation systems, as they found confirmation of flooding at every single ceremonial site. (The chamber and fill approach appeared to hurt them significantly.) Archeologists also think the Moches abandoned Pampa Grande quickly and as they left, set their city on fire—but why?   The El Nino mentioned above is a prevailing theory. It is said that it was…wait for it… A SUPER EL NINO!!!!! So basically the easiest way to describe it is that the Moche faced 30 years of flood condition weather and rain followed by 30 years of drought conditions. Harsh. Some say this led to an issue with fertile soil so the citizens couldn't really dig, plant and grow crops. Also, because of the El nino theory, Dramatic changes in the ocean's environment could also be one of the reasons why the Moche, an early pre-Columbian civilization in Peru, fell apart over 1000 years ago.    No one is 100 percent sure what happened to the Moche. The Moche are not the only civilization to have disappeared without a discernible reason. They are scattered throughout history and the world from the Aztalan civilization in the American West to the inhabitants of great Zimbabwe. The disappearances of civilizations is definitely an interesting topic overall.   Changing the tone a bit, we're next going to look at an airliner that disappeared with 95 military personnel on board. Flying Tiger Line Flight 739, a Lockheed Super Constellation airliner, was scheduled to transport 96 military personnel from the US to Vietnam and disappeared on March 16, 1962.    According to the military, the men were under orders to relieve soldiers in Saigon tasked with training Vietnamese troops to fight the Viet Cong guerillas. As such, the flight was operated by the Military Air Transport Service (MATS). A few stopovers were made along the route—one in Honolulu, one in Wake Island, and a final one in Guam. With nine and half hours of fuel remaining, their final stretch was estimated to take around six hours. Sadly, however, they were never seen again.   Guam Centre grew concerned when the flight failed to make its scheduled position report at 15:30. They attempted to contact the aircraft without luck. When the flight also failed to make its destination, a distress status was initiated, and one of the largest search and rescue operations to date commenced. The search was conducted by the U.S. Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard and Marines and covered more than 200,000 square miles. It came up empty, and nearly 60 years later, not a trace of the flight has been found.    Strangely, another MATS-operated Super Connie in the Flying Tiger Line, this one carrying secret military cargo, also met with tragedy that day. Departing from the same airport at roughly the same time as Flight 739, Flight 7816 (N6911C) crashed during an attempted instrument approach to Adak Island, Alaska. Of the seven people on board, six crew members suffered minor injuries, and one died after becoming trapped in the fire. The timing of the incident with Flight 739's disappearance raised many red flags.   The only potential clue to Flight 739's fate came from onboard a Liberian tanker, the SS T L Linzen, where witnesses noticed vapor trails moving west and disappearing into a layer of cumulus clouds. A few seconds later, they observed a large, two-pulse explosion, followed by two fireballs falling from the sky at different speeds. The ship's radar flagged a target approximately 17 miles from its current position, or roughly 500 miles off the coast of Guam. The location fell in line with the approximate flight path of 739, so search and rescue operations gave focus to the area. It is in the remote Pacific Ocean, so it's a wonder that anyone witnessed the event at all.    The idea of a Super Connie exploding mid-flight was too improbable for aircraft experts to believe, leading many to the conclusion of sabotage. For one, L-1049Hs were not known to have any fuel problems or electrical issues near fuel tanks. Additionally, nothing on board would have been powerful enough to blow apart. So, if the plane did explode, the theory goes, it would likely have been caused by impact with an external force, such as a meteor or, more sinisterly, a missile. With the United States in the throes of the Vietnam and Cold Wars, proponents of the shoot-down theory have pointed toward the Soviet Union as a possible villain in this scenario.    Assuming the explosion was unrelated, another possibility is that the flight was hijacked and those onboard taken hostage. However, the kidnappers would have likely made demands for the men's release at some point, and such demands never came—or were at least not made public knowledge. Kidnapping theories are common with disappearances of aircraft, including Malaysia Flight 370.    For surviving families, the most popular theory has always been that the men were part of a secret military operation gone awry. This is supported by claims that they left behind important items, such as their IDs and wedding bands, and gave long, drawn-out goodbyes—as if they knew they were never coming back. Still desperate for answers, some family members recently attempted to submit their DNA to the military database used to identify bodies found abroad. The government denied those requests, citing legal reasons. It has also denied decades of pleading to have the servicemen's names added to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial wall, remaining adamant that they were never part of any war mission.   Maintenance problems had already been addressed while the plane was in Guam, but it's rare for a mechanical issue to cause an explosion, though it can't be completely ruled out—likewise with sabotage. While neither option can be dismissed entirely, there's no evidence that they happened.    The missile theory is also speculative. If an enemy had chosen to shoot down this flight, who would that have been? The Soviet Union, which was a Cold War adversary, was the only other nation capable of downing a high-flying plane mid-ocean. But why would the Soviets have done it? And why in such a remote expanse of the Pacific? There's no clear motive and no evidence to support such a claim. A more likely explanation is the explosion of ordinance, accidentally or as an act of sabotage by some unknown actor, aboard the secret military flight.    In late 2020, surviving family members constructed a monument in South Portland, Maine, honoring the servicemen of Flight 739. We got most of this indoor from a cool article on planeandpilotmag.com   How about some of your favorite quick hitters!   SS WARATAH   In July 1909, the SS Waratah was heading for Cape Town, South Africa, on its way back from Melbourne, Australia, making a scheduled stop in Durban on the way. It was carrying over 200 people, both passengers and crew, but as it left port to complete its journey, one passenger elected to remain behind.    Engineer Claude Sawyer had made many journeys by sea, and he was so concerned by the behavior of this brand new ship that he disembarked in Durban and sent a message to his wife describing the ship as "top heavy." The Waratah left port at 8 a.m. on July 26, and headed into rough seas for its journey to Cape Town. At 6 a.m. the following day it overtook another ship, the Clan McIntyre, and exchanged signals, before the Waratah disappeared into the distance, never to be seen or heard from again.    According to the Master of a vessel called the Clan McIntyre, when the Waratah passed him, his ship was sailing into nine meter waves and a violent storm. Two ships later claimed to have seen bodies and debris in the water, however nothing was ever actually recovered.    An expedition sponsored by author Clive Cussler claimed to have found the ship in the 1980s. However, when the searchers eventually reached the wreck, they actually discovered a World War II transport vessel instead. The mystery of the SS Waratah's fate remains.   AZTALAN INDIANS   Just outside the small town of Lake Mills in south central Wisconsin, on the banks of the Crawfish River, lie the remains of a Native American city called Aztalan. The Wisconsin settlers who discovered it in 1836 named it "Aztalan" due to a misplaced assumption that the Native Americans who lived there had a connection to the Aztecs.   The ancient city contained stepped pyramids, conical mounds, evidence of housing, fishing, and farming, and even a substantial defensive stockade wall containing up to 30 watchtowers. And according to local legend, they even built large stone pyramids in the bottom of what's now called Rock Lake in Lake Mills. But the valley was later flooded, meaning that evidence to prove this legend true is hard to come by.    At its peak, Aztalan would been occupied by around 500 people between 700 to a thousand years ago. But at some point after 1300 AD, the site was mysteriously abandoned, and no one really knows why.    According to an article published by Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine, evidence points to a few different theories about their fate: a lack of resources, drought, and violence from other nearby Native American settlements.    Despite a very obvious intention of these early Wisconsinites to remain — nothing says "I'm staying!" like a large defensive wall — they're now nothing more than local history and legend.   ROMAN 9TH LEGION   The Ninth Legion was a Roman military formation of around 5,000 soldiers stationed in York in Northern England during Rome's occupation of Britain. This unit maintained control of the wild inhabitants of what would later become northern England and Scotland. In 108 AD, an inscription in the City of York places the legion in the city. However, 50 years later, when a new record of the legions was completed, no mention of the ninth appeared   What could've happened to erase the existence of 5,000 soldiers? No one really knows.   According to a Roman writer, many Roman soldiers were killed in Britain at the beginning of the second century, necessitating several reinforcements. This included the arrival of a new Legion, the Sixth, in 122 AD, which took up residence in the now presumably empty York.    No records describe the Ninth Legion's fate. Some theories suggest the Legion was simply sent elsewhere, though there's little evidence to support this. Meanwhile, Emperor Hadrian visited the British Isles at the beginning of the second century. To take control of the Briton-on-Roman violence, he ordered the construction of a 73 mile long, 15 foot high, fortified wall across the island to keep the invaders out of Roman territory. And you don't go doing that unless you've got a good reason — like say losing an entire legion.    Hadrian's wall still stands today. However, there's still no sign of the ultimate fate of the Ninth legion — and there probably never will be.   SS POET   The SS Poet was a former World War II troop transport that was mothballed for 20 years after the war, before being bought and converted to carry cargo. Considered "old but sturdy" in October 1980, the ship had an experienced crew of 34 men — including the captain who'd been at sea for 41 years — when it mysteriously disappeared.   On the morning of October 24, 1980, the SS Poet sailed from Philadelphia with a load of corn bound for Egypt, where it was due to arrive on November 9. As it passed Cape Henlopen later the same morning, the Poet sent its last message before heading out into the Atlantic, and into history.   The following day a storm blew up in the North Atlantic with 30 foot waves and 60 mph winds. But for a ship like the Poet that shouldn't have mattered. When the storm finally passed it left behind no trace of the Poet, no debris, and no distress signal was ever heard.   A popular explanation for the loss proposes an undiscovered hull leak that would have caused the ship to become unstable and founder in the bad weather. However with no evidence to back that up, fingers were soon pointed at the owner who had failed to report the ship missing for several days after losing contact, and at the coast guard who didn't begin a search for another four days after that. Well-built ships with experienced crews don't just vanish without cause, but that doesn't mean we'll ever know what it was.   we got these quick hitters from an article on grunge.com.

Echoes of the Vietnam War
John Woods Is a Ghost

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 39:11


October 27th, 1967, outside of Bù Đốp, near the Vietnam-Cambodia border. The helicopter John is piloting has just been shot down by an enemy RPG while attempting to evacuate two wounded Special Forces soldiers from the jungle. In this episode, John shares the story of his service in Vietnam, including his helicopter crash, his dramatic rescue, and his long, strange journey home.

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories
Jan Scruggs: Founder of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 43:53


Jan Scruggs went to Vietnam in 1969 to serve as a rifleman in the U.S. Army. By the end of his service, he had received the Purple Heart, the Combat Infantry Badge, and an award for gallantry. After the war, he researched post-traumatic stress, which led to him testify before congress in support of establishing the nationwide Vet Center Program.  In 1979, Scruggs decided he wanted to create a memorial to all the Americans who died in the Vietnam War in order to help the country heal. Three years later, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was completed in Washington D.C. 

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Brothers and Sisters in Arms

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 52:13


April 10, 2022 was National Siblings Day. In this episode, we bring you the inspiring stories of two separate sets of siblings — both from families with long legacies of service — whose lives were forever changed by the war in Vietnam.

A Better Peace: The War Room Podcast
TO HELP HEAL THE PEOPLE: JAN SCRUGGS

A Better Peace: The War Room Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 31:44


CAUTION: This episode contains a first-person account of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and attempted suicide. These are incredibly important topics that need to be discussed, but we want our listeners to be aware that the conversation can be very frank at times. If you or someone you know is in crisis, there are options available to help you cope. Contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Last week on March 29th the nation observed National Vietnam War Veterans Day. This week we'd like to share a conversation with Jan Scruggs, the man who conceived of and eventually built the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C. A combat veteran of the Vietnam War himself, Jan tells the incredible story of his motivations, obstructions, collaborations and finally success in creating a striking symbol of the conflict and its cost that is visited by over 3 million people each year. He joins podcast editor Ron Granieri in the virtual studio to discuss his experience in Vietnam and the post traumatic stress he suffered upon his return. Jan tells the story of his mission to recognize the sacrifices and losses of his generation and to help heal the people that are sent out to fight their nation's wars.

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Building The Wall

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 33:11


Jan Scruggs, a decorated veteran of two tours in Vietnam, had the idea for a memorial in March of 1979. Three and a half years later, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was a reality. In this episode, Jan recounts his incredible journey from grunt to visionary to target… and, ultimately, to victor.

Merrimack Valley Newsmakers
Wall That Heals, Vietnam Veterans Memorial Replica, and In Memory Honor Roll Comes to VA Bedford

Merrimack Valley Newsmakers

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 16:45


The Wall That Heals, three-quarter scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, is coming to Massachusetts in September with local Vietnam veterans who died eligible to be honored as part of the In Memory Honor Roll in the mobile Education Center. The Wall That Heals will be open Thursday through Sunday, Sept. 22-25, at the Veterans Administration Edith Norse Rogers Hospital in Bedford, part of the VA Healthcare System. Kat Bailey, VA Public affairs officer, was a recent guest on WHAV's morning program.“So it's really, really cool. The Wall that Heals is transported from community to community. So, Methuen is a sister community that's going to have the wall, in September as well. It comes in a 53-foot trailer and when it's parked, it's open to the exhibits built into its sides that tells the story of the Vietnam War and wall and divisive era in American history,” she explained.Bailey said thousands of visitors are expected every day during the time The Wall is in Bedford. She added one of the most interesting parts of having The Wall is the segment that goes with it known as the In Memory Program.“It honors the Vietnam veterans who died after returning home, and all veterans from Massachusetts are honored in the In Memory program. It will have their photo and their name on display as part of the mobile education center when the Wall That Heals is here. And, to honor a veteran is free and it's a really simple application process and all that information is up on our website.”The web address is va.gov/bedford-health-care. Bailey said the VA Hospital in Bedford is the only federal location that will be hosting The Wall that Heals this year, and sponsors and volunteers are needed. Those interested may email VHABedTheWalThatHeals@va.gov.Support the show (https://whav.net/become-a-whav-member/)

Echoes of the Vietnam War
8 Days in March

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 36:21


The panels that make up the Vietnam Veterans Memorial each represent a moment in time. Some moments are measured in years but for one of those panels, its beginning to end lasted only eight days. It could have been any eight days in the Vietnam War, but this panel tells the story of a secret mission in Laos, rising tensions back home, and the incredible story of a Medal of Honor recipient.

The Rick Jensen Show
Enormous Replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Coming to William Penn High School

The Rick Jensen Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022 10:30


The Wall That Heals exhibit includes a three-quarter scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial along with a mobile Education Center. The 53-foot trailer that carries The Wall That Heals transforms to become a mobile Education Center. Additional exhibits give visitors a better understanding of the legacy of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the collection of items left at The Wall.

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Items Left at The Wall

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 28:01


More than 400,000 items have been left at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in remembrance, in longing, and in tribute. Learn how those items became a museum collection of the National Park Service, and hear from its first curator — a Vietnam veteran who would perform that labor of love for the better part of three decades.

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Vietnam Love Stories

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2022 44:20


War interrupts everything normal in life… except for love. In this episode you'll hear stories of people falling in love, people keeping love alive, and love keeping people alive.

Echoes of the Vietnam War
The Tet Offensive

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2022 36:12


On January 30, 1968, North Vietnamese and Viet Cong troops launched an offensive that is widely considered a pivotal moment in the war. Vietnam War specialist Dr. Erik Villard sheds a historian's light on the Tet Offensive.

Echoes of the Vietnam War
Remembering Khe Sanh

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 37:34


The siege at Khe Sanh began on January 21, 1968. For 77 days, 6,000 Americans — mostly Marines — held their positions against an all-out assault by more than 30,000 enemy troops. Hear personal stories from two men who survived the siege and then returned, decades later, to Khe Sanh.

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast
Episode 103:The Healing Wall l The Controversy And Triumph of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial

The 18th Airborne Corps Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 34:55


The Vietnam War Memorial is a national landmark in Washington, DC that attracts millions of Americans every year. The reflective black granite wall engraved with more than 58,000 names is such a big part of our communal processing of that war. It's hard to imagine now, but during its inception the wall was a source of explosive controversy among Vietnam veterans. This episode is the story of that wall. It's the story of Jan Scruggs, the wounded Vietnam veteran who fought for a national memorial to honor those Americans killed in that war. It's the story of Maya Lin, the Yale architecture student who designed the wall as a symbol that would not let the country off the hook for what it did to our Vietnam veterans. It's the story of the men who returned from Vietnam and organized a national movement to fund the memorial on the National Mall. The story of the Vietnam War Memorial is a part of the story of the American experience in Vietnam. Like everything associated with that war, it was divisive within the United States, the subject of protests and outrage. It's now a source of comfort, of closure, of healing for so many Vietnam veterans and so many Families bereaved by that war. As Vietnam veteran, poet, and veterans' advocate John Musgrave said: "When I saw that wall, I knew it would save lives." The wall, which displays no rank, no date of birth, no unit affiliation, and no hometown, bonds each of our Fallen in perpetuity. This may be among the most important, insightful episodes we've ever produced, so we hope you'll listen and pass it on.

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com
Christmas Miracle Needed

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 20:50


She needs your help.Back in 1992 I met Janna Hoene.  She lives in Maui and and was deeply impacted by a visit to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington.  She saw a name and make another visit. That was just the beginning.Despite years of work there were thousands of photos of the fallen from the Vietnam War still missing.  In 2011 I visited her in Maui.  She decided that to find a way to get the photographs..Thanks to Janna there are now only TWENTY FIVE Photographs needed to have a photo of every Veteran on The Wall....  She started a movement.Here is her story.....Can You Assist??Persistent, inspiring Janna finds the 42 | News, Sports, Jobshttps://www.lahainanews.com › columns › 2012/05/03May 3, 2012 — LAHAINA - Some 50 years ago, 42 members of the armed forces from Maui lost their lives in the jungles of Vietnam.

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com

Unlike watching the movies,  not all stories have happy endings.This is the story of a decorated Viet Vet who wanted to take his life.  Yet  an unexpected romance began when he attended the dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in November 1982.

C-SPAN Radio - C-SPAN's The Weekly
Veterans Day: Politicians Speaking At War Memorials

C-SPAN Radio - C-SPAN's The Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 13:40


 Memorable moments from politicians speaking at America's national war memorials. President Ronald Reagan at Arlington National Cemetery, Sen. John Warner at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, President Bill Clinton at the Korean War Veterans Memorial, Sen. Bob Dole at the National World War II Memorial, and President Joe Biden at the National World War I Memorial Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Echoes of the Vietnam War
The Battle of the Ia Drang Valley

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 37:40


November 14, 1965 marked a pivotal moment in U.S. involvement in Vietnam. Elements of the Army's 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) entered the first major land battle of the war at landing zones X-Ray and Albany, which would turn out to be proving grounds for a whole new kind of warfare. Hear three personal perspectives from men who survived.

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
TW// An Escape From Hell On The Last Boat Out Of Saigon On April 30th 1975 | Zoonie Nguyen S7 E9

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 76:42


Join The Community!TRIGGER WARNING: Suicide is mentioned in this episode.​This episode's guest has an incredible story to share with A Vietnam Podcast. Zoonie Nguyen grew up on Nguyễn Thông street in Sài gòn and left on the last day possible - on April 30th 1975. At only 8 years old, her family escaped and went through an exodus from hell on the last boat with 4000 people. This was a traumatic journey, but by a 'miracle' and they made it to a refugee camp and after many months the family started a new chapter of their life in Canada. In 1995 Zoonie decided to go back to visit Sài gòn, a trip that completely transformed and turned her life around.She is now known as a public speaker, coach & mentor for women entrepreneurs launching and growing their business. She is currently making a documentary called ‘How She Dares'.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
TW// An Escape From Hell On The Last Boat Out Of Saigon On April 30th 1975 | Zoonie Nguyen TEASER S7 E9

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 3:01


Join The Community!TRIGGER WARNING: Suicide is mentioned in this episode.​This episode's guest has an incredible story to share with A Vietnam Podcast. Zoonie Nguyen grew up on Nguyễn Thông street in Sài gòn and left on the last day possible - on April 30th 1975. At only 8 years old with her family they escaped and went through an exodus from hell on the last boat with 4000 people. Their boat was sinking but a 'miracle' happened and after many months in a refugee camp, she started a new chapter of her life in Canada. In 1995 she decided to go back to visit Sài gòn, a trip that completely transformed and turned her life around...She is now known as a speaker, coach & mentor for women entrepreneurs launching and growing their business. She is currently making a documentary called How She Dares.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne
Episode 2177 – The Wall that Heals coming to Texas

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 12:34


Episode 2177 of the Vietnam Veteran News Podcast will feature a story about the upcoming appearance of The Wall that Heals in Sulfur Springs, Texas. The featured story appeared on KETK – Fox51 and is titled: Vietnam Veterans Memorial coming … Continue reading → The post Episode 2177 – The Wall that Heals coming to Texas appeared first on .

Waco History Podcast
Waco's Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Waco History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 79:02


Dr. Sloan talks with Major John Householder about Waco's Vietnam Memorial. They discuss its past and future.

VOICES FROM THE VERNACULAR MUSIC CENTER
Researching War w/ Guest Dr. Ron Milam

VOICES FROM THE VERNACULAR MUSIC CENTER

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 59:58


Intro - 0:00Tune called Planxty Sir Festus Burke | Randal Bays/fiddle, Chris Smith/tenor banjo, Roger Landes/bouzouki | composition by Turlough O'Carolan, from the album “Coyote Banjo” by Chris SmithPart I, Meet Dr. Ron Milam  - 01:13Part II, Vernacular Perspective of the Vietnam War - 05:18Part III,  Researching Both Sides of the War - 13:06Part IV, Academic Conferences - 21:32Part V, Institute for Peace & Conflict (IPAC) - 26:10Part VI, Music and the War - 28:20'How many kids did you kill today?'Part VII, Social Identities within the War - 51:44Outro - 58:36Planxty Sir Festus Burke Ron Milam is an Associate Professor of History, a Fulbright Scholar to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, and the founding Faculty advisor to the Veterans' Association at Texas Tech. He teaches both halves of the U.S. Survey, the Vietnam War, and graduate and undergraduate courses in Military History. His latest teaching interest is terrorism and insurgency, an interest that developed from his having been named an Academic Fellow for the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies. He also serves as the Academic Advisor for the semi-annual Vietnam Center sponsored student trips to Vietnam and Cambodia. He has also taught at the Diplomatic Academy of Vietnam under a Ford Foundation grant.Dr. Milam is the author of Not a Gentleman's War: an Inside View of Junior Officers in the Vietnam War, published by the University of North Carolina Press, and the editor of The Vietnam War in Popular Culture: The Influence of America's Most Controversial War on Everyday Life (2 volumes), published by ABC-CLIO/Praeger. He is currently working on “The Siege of Phu Nhon: Montagnards and Americans as Allies in Battle,” which deals with one of the most significant battles in the late days of the Vietnam War.Dr. Milam is a member of the Texas Tech Teaching Academy, recipient of the President's Excellence in Teaching Award, the Chancellor's Council Excellence in Teaching Award, the President's Excellence in Teaching Professorship and is an Integrated Scholar. Dr. Milam is the Executive Director of the Institute for Peace & Conflict (IPAC), which includes the world renowned Vietnam Center and Sam Johnson Vietnam Archive, and is a member of the Board of Directors of the David Westphall Veterans Foundation, which operates the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire, New Mexico. He was recently named by Secretary of Veteran's Affairs Robert Wilke to the Veteran's Advisory Committee on Rehabilitation (VACOR).Dr. Milam is a combat veteran of the Vietnam War, and in 2015 was inducted into the Officer Candidate School (OCS) Hall of Fame at the National Infantry Museum at Fort Benning, Georgia. He rides and collects motorcycles.For more information, please see his Texas Tech University Bio. Full Playlist for EP 22VVMC Book ClubVVMC: Friends & Voices, a Collaborative PlaylistVoices from the Vernacular Music Center

The Loop
Afternoon Report: Friday, July 23, 2021

The Loop

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 6:37


The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in the Fenway Rose Garden is vandalized. A Berklee alum performs at the Summer Olympics opening ceremony. Boston Acting Mayor Kim Janey clarifies her announcement about masks in schools. 5 minutes of news that will keep you in The Loop.

Camp Iron Mountain
009 | Creating the Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Camp Iron Mountain

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 26:03


What You'll Get From Today's Show You'll hear the story of the challenges and triumphs in building the most visited monument in Washington D.C.   Resources Related to the Topics Discussed in Today's Episode Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (VVMF). Since the dedication of The Wall, VVMF has pursued a mission of preserving the legacy of The Wall, promoting healing and educating about the impact of the Vietnam War. They run an incredible website that serves as a launching pad for their various education initiatives.   The Wall USA. The 4/9 Infantry Manchu (Vietnam) Association started a website that provides a number of detailed facts and statistics about the names that are found on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. This site is no longer updated but the association says they will keep the website live.    National Park Service - Vietnam Veterans Memorial. Visitors can find the information on the memorial if you look to visit it in person, including a database of all of the names currently included on the wall.   Offerings at the Wall: Artifacts from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Collection (Thomas B. Allen). This book, published in 1995, is a powerful book, primarily told through photographs, showcasing a small number of the over 400,000 items left at the Vietnam War Memorial. When available, the author shares pieces of the stories behind the artifacts and how they relate to those killed on the wall.  If You Want to Support The Podcast You can help others find the podcast by leaving a positive review on whatever podcast player you're listening to it on. Please share a link to the podcast with a friend or family member who you think would enjoy listening to it. https://www.campironmountain.com. 

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com
Englishman Finds Peace. His Journey Began At The Wall.

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2021 22:51


Mark Byford had a long and successful career with BBC.  He began his career there after graduating from law school at Leeds England in 1979.  He ended his 30 year career at BBC and moved on to other pursuits.While visiting Washington DC he went to see the Vietnam Veterans Memorial one morning.   As the sun was shining brightly  he saw a name glistening of Larry Byford.      This was his father's name, who fought in World War II and became a decorated policeman in England.  He wrote a fantastic book- A Name On The Wall, Two Men, Two Wars, Two Destinies which took him to Texas where Larry Byford's Family was still grieving. Larry died  in 1967 trying to rescue a wounded West Point Army Officer in a battle with Viet Cong.  His next book  -The Annunciation: A Pilgrims Quest-   looks at the spiritual meaning of Luke's biblical story.  He interviewed over 300 theologians and clerics.  Mark is a Lay Cannon at the famed Winchester Cathedral.  He is involved with many charitable pursuits including Lifeboats, a group whose volunteers include lifeguards and boats to rescue people stranded at sea in the waters of the United Kingdom.

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com
Memories Of The Fallen- Items Left at The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2021 9:41


   Since 1982 hundreds of thousands of items have been left at what veterans call "The Wall".  This National Memorial has the names of those American troops who gave their lives fighting in Vietnam and is visited by 5 million people annually.   Jan Craig Scruggs, Esq.Founder, Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington DCChairman, Selective Service National Appeals Board    www.janscruggs.com

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com
Jimmy Buffett Helps Save Dying Vietnam Vet With Music!!

JanscruggsVietnamWarstories@buzzsprout.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2021 9:19


Jan Scruggs, a  Vietnam veteran,  is the person who started the popular Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington DC  - dedicated in 1982.  This sacred place gets over 5 Million visitors annually and has had a deep impact on many veterans and families of those who served.Jan met Jimmy Buffett while on a trip to California in 2009.   Jimmy was helpful to Jan when he had a 2012 ceremony at which the Secretaries of Defense and Interior spoke as well as then Second Lady Jill Biden.   Jimmy entertained the audience with God Bless America at the  event which also had family members of Fallen US Troops from Iraq and elsewhere.In November 2017 Jan was in a Coma expected to die.   Burial arrangements were being made at Arlington National Cemetery.   Jimmy sent a song to a film producer in Maryland who got the song to Jan's wife,  Becky.  She made contact since it was widely known that the life of Jan Scruggs would soon come to an end.   This song ended with a line that encourages Jan to " Hang In There, Jan".   The Buffett song was played for Jan over and over - day after day.  To the shock of everyone Jan awoke from the Coma in December!    Within a few weeks he was walking.  Last year he had his heart valves replaced at the Cleveland Clinic.   He is active at Skiing,  Golf and exercises daily.   Jan feels that the song helped him get out of the coma.  Maybe you will agree when you hear the voice of Jimmy Buffett.   www.janscruggs.com.          Thank You, Jimmy !!