Podcasts about lyndon johnson

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36th president of the United States from 1963 to 1969

  • 512PODCASTS
  • 771EPISODES
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  • Jun 20, 2022LATEST
lyndon johnson

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Best podcasts about lyndon johnson

Latest podcast episodes about lyndon johnson

Power Station
The teachers are often overlooked and deserve so much credit for what they do

Power Station

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 38:54


Launched as part of President Lyndon Johnson's 1964 War on Poverty, Head Start provides low-income children, from 3 months to 5 years old, with the educational and emotional preparation required to thrive in kindergarten and beyond. This includes the children of farmworkers who face significant hurdles to attending school at all. Head Start centers serve 14,000 migrant and seasonal children in 24 states, educating the children of farmworkers who travel from state to state to cultivate the crops that grace our tables. In this episode of Power Station, we speak to Alma Hernandez and Gisela Gaspar, children of farmworkers who have graduated from Head Start to college and now, internships with the National Migrant and Seasonal Head Start Association. Children in agriculture are the least protected compared to other sectors and Alma and Gisela have first-hand experience with exposure to pesticides, worsening conditions due to climate change and low wages for grueling and skilled work. They are an inspiration to their siblings, an advocate for the Head Start teachers who helped them launch and a powerful voice for their parents and communities here, on Capitol Hill and everywhere.          

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
James Kirchick: The Hidden History of Gay Washington

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 65:36


For decades, the specter of homosexuality haunted Washington. The mere suggestion that a person might be gay destroyed reputations, ended careers and ruined lives. At the height of the Cold War, fear of homosexuality became intertwined with the growing threat of international communism, leading to a purge of gay men and lesbians from the federal government. In the fevered atmosphere of political Washington, the secret “too loathsome to mention” held enormous, terrifying power. Utilizing thousands of pages of declassified documents, interviews with more than 100 people, and material unearthed from presidential libraries and archives around the country, James Kirchick's Secret City is a chronicle of American politics like no other. Beginning with the tragic story of Sumner Welles, Franklin Delano Roosevelt's brilliant diplomatic advisor and the man at the center of “the greatest national scandal since the existence of the United States,” Kirchick illuminates how homosexuality shaped each successive presidential administration through the end of the 20th century. Cultural and political anxiety over gay people sparked a decades-long witch hunt, impacting everything from the rivalry between the CIA and the FBI to the ascent of Joseph McCarthy, the struggle for Black civil rights, and the rise of the conservative movement. Among other revelations, Kirchick tells of the World War II–era gay spymaster who pioneered seduction as a tool of American espionage, the devoted aide whom Lyndon Johnson treated as a son yet abandoned once his homosexuality was discovered, and how allegations of a “homosexual ring” controlling Ronald Reagan nearly derailed his 1980 election victory. Join us for a talk with author James Kirchick and the story that could transform our understanding of American history. About the Speaker James Kirchick has written about human rights, politics and culture from around the world. A columnist for Tablet magazine, a contributing writer to Air Mail, and a nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, he is the author of The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age. Kirchick's work has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, The New York Review of Books, and the Times Literary Supplement. A graduate of Yale with degrees in history and political science, he resides in Washington, D.C. NOTES See more  Michelle Meow Show programs at The Commonwealth Club of California. SPEAKERS James Kirchick Journalist; Author, Secret City: The Hidden History of Gay Washington; Twitter @jkirchick Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Co-host John Zipperer Producer and Host, Week to Week Political Roundtable; Vice President of Media & Editorial, The Commonwealth Club of California—Co-host In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on June 13th, 2022 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Radiandofe Show
MEMORIAL DAY SPECIAL

Radiandofe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 8:07


Carolina del Norte, Raleigh- El 5 de mayo de 1866, el Congreso y el presidente Lyndon Johnson declararon a Waterloo, N.Y. el lugar de origen del Memorial Day. Conocido también como Día de los Caídos o Día de la Recordación, es una fecha conmemorativa en la cual se honra a los soldados estadounidenses caídos en las guerras. Originalmente rindió homenaje a los fallecidos durante la Guerra Civil estadounidense.Antes de que el Memorial Day fuera una ceremonia de conmemoración oficial en los Estados Unidos, en varios lugares se acostumbraban hacer homenajes similares los que actualmente se conocen; se adornaban con flores y banderas las tumbas de aquellos soldados que cayeron durante la guerra.La decoración de las tumbas en los campos santos es la razón por la cual actualmente al Día de los Caídos también se le conoce como Decoration Day o Día de la Decoración. Estas ceremonias eran eventos informales y no eran accesibles para toda la comunidad, por lo que no fueron oficiales. El Departamento de Asuntos de Veteranos de los Estados Unidos reconoce aproximadamente 25 lugares nombrados en relación con el origen del Día de los Caídos. Muchos de esos sitios están en el Sur de los Estados Unidos, eso se debe a que la mayoría de los muertos de la guerra civil están enterrados en esa parte del país. enlacelatinonc.org

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library
A Conversation With AFI Founder George Stevens, Jr. on growing up in the Golden Age of Hollywood

With the Bark Off: Conversations from the LBJ Presidential Library

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 48:32


On today's episode, we go slightly beyond the presidency as we talk to George Steven's Jr. about his new memoir, My Place in the Sun: Life in the Golden Age of Hollywood and Washington.The son of famed film director George Stevens, George Stevens Jr. grew up in the highest reaches of Hollywood, on the sets of classic films like Giant, Shane, The Diary of Anne Frank, and A Place in the Sun. But yearning for his own place in the sun, he ventured to Washington to work with legendary journalist Edward R. Murrow at the United States Information Agency, producing films for John Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, before going on to work for other presidents in other capacities.The founding director of the American Film Institute and the creator of the Kennedy Center Honors, Stevens describes his remarkable life and unimaginable brushes with history.

Never Had It So Good Sports Radio
NHISG Where Are They Now? David Riley & Tim Moore - Guest Coach Lyndon Johnson

Never Had It So Good Sports Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 38:00


NHISG Where Are They Now? David Riley & Tim Moore - Guest Coach Lyndon Johnson

BlackFacts.com: Learn/Teach/Create Black History
June 1 - BlackFacts.com Black History Minute

BlackFacts.com: Learn/Teach/Create Black History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 1:50


BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for June 1st.White House Conference on Civil RightsThe aim of the conference was built on the momentum of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 in addressing discrimination against African Americans.  The four areas of discussion were housing, economic security, education, and the administration of justice.President Lyndon Johnson had promised this conference in his commencement address at Howard University the year before.Like that address, the conference was named "To Fulfill These Rights." The title was a play on "To Secure These Rights," a report issued by Truman's civil rights commission in 1947.There were over 2,400 participants, representing all the major civil rights groups. Out of the conference came a hundred-page report.Learn black history, teach black history at blackfacts.com. 

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

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The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast
AND THEREFORE WHAT?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 47:16


In this episode, Dinesh takes up Lyndon Johnson's famous saying at the end of every meeting, "And therefore what?" to answer that question about the documentary. Dinesh examines the faulty rebuttal from several quarters that claims that legal ballots illegally cast somehow amount to legal votes. Actor Scott Baio joins Dinesh to talk about the politics of Hollywood. Dinesh joins Dante in the circle of Jupiter. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Joe and Raanan Talk Movies
Episode 63 - Random Things

Joe and Raanan Talk Movies

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 59:24


Joe and Raanan are back. We're not talking anything specific on this one but that's what made it so fun. We touch on a bunch of movies including Philadelphia, House of the Devil, Locke, more Philadelphia and more. We also take gay marriage, Lyndon Johnson, gender norms, Joe's new special and much more. It's a wild one. Raanan is loopy on drugs and Joe is tired of podcasting. We think you'll love it. Enjoy and subscribe! #Comedy #Movies #JoeList More from Joe List: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZPJ...

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values
106 – Reappraising Herbert Hoover with George Nash

Saving Elephants | Millennials defending & expressing conservative values

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 98:27


Historian George Nash returns to the show to discuss the life and legacy of Herbert Hoover.   Few American presidents are as decried by voices on both the Left and Right as Herbert Hoover.  His name has become synonymous with economic suffering and callous Federal response.  But Dr. Nash contends that the popular narrative linking Hoover to the catastrophes of the Great Depression do a great injustice to the actual historical account and reduce one of America's most remarkable men to that of a callous buffoon.  Hoover, in Dr. Nash's telling, was responsible for saving the lives of more people than anyone else who ever lived.  And that's just the start of it.  He accomplished so much in his long life of public and private service that, even if he had never been president, he would be well worth studying today.  A greater appreciation for the complexities of the man and the times in which he lived provides the student of conservatism a greater appreciation for the challenges we face today.   About George Nash George H. Nash is the epitome of a gentleman and a scholar.  A graduate from Amherst College who received his Ph.D. in History from Harvard University, Dr. Nash is an authority on the histories of American conservatism and the life of President Herbert Hoover.  Dr. Nash is an independent scholar, historian, and lecturer.  He speaks and writes frequently about the history and present direction of American conservatism, the life of Herbert Hoover, the legacy of Ronald Reagan, the education of the Founding Fathers, and other subjects.  His writings have appeared in the American Spectator, Claremont Review of Books, Intercollegiate Review, Modern Age, National Review, New York Times Book Review, Policy Review, University Bookman, Wall Street Journal, and many other publications.  He has lectured at the Library of Congress; the National Archives; the Herbert Hoover, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon Johnson presidential libraries; the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum; the Hoover Institution; the Heritage Foundation; the McConnell Center; and at various universities and conferences in the United States and Europe.  Several of his lectures have been featured on C-SPAN.  He has also been interviewed by C-SPAN, National Public Radio, numerous radio stations, and the print media. Dr. Nash lives in Massachusetts.

The Takeaway
Deep Dive: Fair Housing

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 64:45


After the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Voting Rights Act and even Loving v. Virginia, one major issue around the racial justice movement remained unaddressed: fair housing. On April 11, 1968 President Lyndon Johnson signed the National Fair Housing Act into law.  Because of this, April is National Fair Housing Month. All month, advocates, organizers, and communities commemorate this landmark piece of Civil Rights legislation which outlawed discrimination in housing. On this episode of The Takeaway, Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren take a Deep Dive into the history and current state of fair housing in America, 54 years after the passage of the National Fair Housing Act.  Guests: Lisa Rice, President and CEO of the National Fair Housing Alliance Jim McCarthy, President/CEO of Miami Valley Fair Housing Center Michael Allen, Attorney and Partner at Relman Colfax Ava Deakin, lead plaintiff in Deakin v. Old Town Triangle Association Senator Tim Kaine from Virginia

The Takeaway
Deep Dive: Fair Housing

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 64:45


After the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the 1965 Voting Rights Act and even Loving v. Virginia, one major issue around the racial justice movement remained unaddressed: fair housing. On April 11, 1968 President Lyndon Johnson signed the National Fair Housing Act into law.  Because of this, April is National Fair Housing Month. All month, advocates, organizers, and communities commemorate this landmark piece of Civil Rights legislation which outlawed discrimination in housing. On this episode of The Takeaway, Melissa Harris-Perry and Dorian Warren take a Deep Dive into the history and current state of fair housing in America, 54 years after the passage of the National Fair Housing Act.  Guests: Lisa Rice, President and CEO of the National Fair Housing Alliance Jim McCarthy, President/CEO of Miami Valley Fair Housing Center Michael Allen, Attorney and Partner at Relman Colfax Ava Deakin, lead plaintiff in Deakin v. Old Town Triangle Association Senator Tim Kaine from Virginia

Black Op Radio
#1091 – Jim DiEugenio, Jeremy Kuzmarov Tom Gram

Black Op Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 136:17


  At Kennedys and King Article: Walker, Oswald, and the Dog That Didn't Bark by Benjamin Cole Video: Paul Bleau's presentation at Dealey Plaza UK Paul Bleau's upcoming articles about the Jim Garrison papers Researchers like Peter Dale Scott, Anthony Summers, Paul Hoch dumped on Garrison after he lost the Shaw trial Book: Let Justice Be Done by Bill Davy: Paperback, Kindle CNN's four-part documentary on Lyndon Johnson: LBJ: Triumph and Tragedy This series is based on the book The Triumph & Tragedy of Lyndon Johnson by Joseph A. Califano Jr. This series whitewashes what really happened under the Johnson administration Articles: CNN's Apologia for LBJ by Jim DiEugenio: Part 1, Part 2 LBJ's Operation Rolling Thunder in Indochina Nixon dropped more bomb tonnage than LBJ in Indochina Kennedy's policy in Vietnam FREE Borrowable Ebook: Lessons in Disaster by Gordon Goldstein NSAM 288 The Gulf of Tonkin resolution was written 3 months before the incident occured !! OPLAN 34A and the DESOTO (DeHaven Special Operations off TsingtaO) patrols Kennedy never sent American combat troops to Vietnam “I always thought it was foolish for you to make any statements about withdrawing. I thought it was bad psychologically. But you and the president thought otherwise, and I just sat silent.” - LBJ to Mcnamara Stream/buy JFK: Destiny Betrayed: Amazon Prime, iTunes, Vudu LBJ's April 1964 meeting with the executive staff of The Washington Post at the White House Katharine Graham of The Washington Post was present at the meeting Johnson asked them for support of his upcoming war against the North Vietnam FREE Borrowable Ebook: In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam by Robert S. McNamara Article: Marilyn, Tony Summers, and his Paper Tiger by Donald McGovern Article: Cleaning up after My Debate with Buzzanco by Jim DiEugenio Jim DiEugenio debates Robert Buzzanco (Aaron Good's American Exception podcast) Buzzanco had Noam Chomsky on his podcast to thrash Oliver Stone and Kennedy Video: JFK Pushed Med4all 57 Years Ago! (The Jimmy Dore Show) Len Osanic's interview of Igor Lopatonok (episode 1088) asked to be taken down Listen to this amazing 2-hour episode featuring Doug Horne about the Pearl Harbor attack Books: Deception, Intrigue, and the Road to War by Horne: Vol.1, Vol.2 Doug Horne's new book The McCollum Memorandum Black Op Radio had to switch to a new hosting service So please consider making a donation to Black Op Radio Donate via Paypal to osanic@prouty.org Getting transcript for Malcolm Blunt discussing Fletcher Prouty Video Here Get autographed copies Jim DiEugenio's two books for just $25 !! Jim's address: P.O. Box 4354, Burbank, CA 91503 Listener questions answered Video: Why Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. Believes the CIA Was Behind the JFK and RFK Assassinations Videos: Megyn Kelly interviews Robert F. Kennedy, Jr.: Part 1, Part 2 George H.W. Bush and the CIA William Colby was fired as he was too forthcoming with the Church Committee George H.W. Bush, Gerald Ford and a few CIA guys who ended up shutting down the Church Committee Article: The CIA and the Media by Carl Bernstein "I forgot what I was supposed to say" - Marina Oswald Jim is currently working on the book of the film JFK: Revisited Part B: Jeremy Kuzmarov; beginning at 1:04:15 Jeremy Kuzmarov is Managing Editor of CovertAction Magazine He's also the author of four books on US foreign policy Book: Obama's Unending Wars by Jeremy Kuzmarov: Paperback, Kindle Book: The Russians are Coming, Again by Jeremy Kuzmarov: Paperback, Kindle Oklahoma City Bombing: Was Timothy McVeigh a Patsy in a Sinister Black Flag Operation? by Jeremy Kuzmarov "One day you will find out your government was behind this" - Timothy McVeigh Part C: Tom Gram; beginning at 1:15:10 How Tom Gram got interested in the JFK case

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 414 With Doris Kearns Goodwin From Abraham Lincoln The 16th President

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 5:13


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 414 with Doris Kearns Goodwin from Lincoln on the History channel. Goodwin's career as a presidential historian and author was inspired when as a 24-year-old graduate student at Harvard, she was selected to join the White House Fellows, one of America's most prestigious programs for leadership and public service that still exists today. Goodwin was chosen to work directly with President Johnson in the White House and later assisted him in the writing of his memoirs. Her first book, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream, was published and republished to rave reviews. In Spring 2019 it was rereleased with a new foreword by Goodwin, highlighting LBJ's accomplishments in domestic affairs that have stood the test of time.

With No Due Respect
With No Due Respect S04E07 (James Webb Renamed?)

With No Due Respect

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022


 "It takes many good deeds to build a good reputation and only one bad one to lose it" Was ol' Benji Franklin right?  This week we space out on the James Webb telescope and then discuss it's namesake.  Some are out to realign the name from it's human origin, but why?  Then on DHOTW:  Megan Rapinoe hits Rock Bottom.With No Due Respect S04E07 (James Webb Renamed?)SHOW NOTES:"The Three-Body Problem" by Cixin LiuHubble Space TelescopeJames Webb TelescopeTasco TelescopeTrappist-1Bib & Tucker Tennessee WhiskyJames Edwin WebbNASA 1950's logoApollo MissionsLavender Scarehttps://www.thelavenderscare.com/Senator Everett DirksenLyndon Johnson"Trumbo"Abraham LincolnFord's TheaterJohn Wilkes BoothAdidas Commercialhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fujboh-W7SkWernher Von BraunMegan RapinoeDwayne JohnsonTogethxr LogoXFL LogoCedric McMillanCedric McMillian 2017 Arnold Classic Speechhttps://youtu.be/9mC8HWfytj0Gilbert GottfriedGilbert Gottfried - The Aristocratshttps://youtu.be/aGA0dIz9-Wk

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 414 With Doris Kearns Goodwin From Abraham Lincoln The 16th President

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 5:13


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 414 with Doris Kearns Goodwin from Lincoln on the History channel. Goodwin's career as a presidential historian and author was inspired when as a 24-year-old graduate student at Harvard, she was selected to join the White House Fellows, one of America's most prestigious programs for leadership and public service that still exists today. Goodwin was chosen to work directly with President Johnson in the White House and later assisted him in the writing of his memoirs. Her first book, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream, was published and republished to rave reviews. In Spring 2019 it was rereleased with a new foreword by Goodwin, highlighting LBJ's accomplishments in domestic affairs that have stood the test of time.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 414 With Doris Kearns Goodwin From Abraham Lincoln The 16th President

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 5:13


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 414 with Doris Kearns Goodwin from Lincoln on the History channel. Goodwin's career as a presidential historian and author was inspired when as a 24-year-old graduate student at Harvard, she was selected to join the White House Fellows, one of America's most prestigious programs for leadership and public service that still exists today. Goodwin was chosen to work directly with President Johnson in the White House and later assisted him in the writing of his memoirs. Her first book, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream, was published and republished to rave reviews. In Spring 2019 it was rereleased with a new foreword by Goodwin, highlighting LBJ's accomplishments in domestic affairs that have stood the test of time.

Arroe Collins
Play It Forward Episode 414 With Doris Kearns Goodwin From Abraham Lincoln The 16th President

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 5:13


This is Play It Forward. Real people. Real stories. The struggle to Play It Forward Episode 414 with Doris Kearns Goodwin from Lincoln on the History channel. Goodwin's career as a presidential historian and author was inspired when as a 24-year-old graduate student at Harvard, she was selected to join the White House Fellows, one of America's most prestigious programs for leadership and public service that still exists today. Goodwin was chosen to work directly with President Johnson in the White House and later assisted him in the writing of his memoirs. Her first book, Lyndon Johnson and the American Dream, was published and republished to rave reviews. In Spring 2019 it was rereleased with a new foreword by Goodwin, highlighting LBJ's accomplishments in domestic affairs that have stood the test of time.

Betrouwbare Bronnen
263 - De Amerikaanse Burgeroorlog (3): de overwinning van Abraham Lincoln en Ulysses Grant

Betrouwbare Bronnen

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 78:57


Veel wat er in de 21e eeuw in de Verenigde Staten gebeurt, begrijp je pas echt als je je verdiept in de grote gebeurtenissen die daar in de 19e eeuw plaatsgrepen. Met Amerika-expert Pirmin Olde Weghuis duiken Jaap Jansen en PG Kroeger opnieuw in de dramatische historie van de Burgeroorlog en de bloedige nasleep daarvan. In Betrouwbare Bronnen aflevering 185 (23 april 2021) en 228 (11 november 2021) ging het over de aanloop naar de scheuring van 'the Union', het debat over de slavernij en over de gruwelen van die oorlog en het unieke leiderschap van president Abraham Lincoln.In deze derde en laatste aflevering van deze serie beleven we de dramatische gebeurtenissen van de jaren 1864 en 1865. In april capituleren de legers van het Zuiden onder generaal Robert E. Lee en wordt Lincoln vermoord in een theater waar hij zit te genieten van een malle komedie. De sleutelfiguur in deze jaren is Ulysses S. Grant. Hij was de militair aan wie Lincoln het tovertrouwde de legers van de Unie aan te voeren naar de overwinning. En in zeer turbulente omstandigheden werd hij vervolgens in 1868 zelf president.Grant krijgt de voorbije 20 jaar steeds meer waardering van historici voor de wijze waarop hij zijn ambt uitoefende, bij alle besef van de vele kwetsbaarheden van zijn bewind. Wat maar weinig staatslieden lukt, kreeg Grant voor elkaar. Hij slaagde erin de terreurbeweging Ku Klux Klan te vernietigen en de zwarte bevolking in het Zuiden een begin van gelijkberechtiging en democratisch burgerschap te schenken. Wat op papier al was geregeld, ging Grant concreet realiseren.Na zijn presidentschap werden Grants verdiensten stukje bij beetje teruggedraaid. PG en Pirmin analyseren hoe Lincolns opvolger Andrew Johnson al begon met het afbladderen van de erfenis van zijn grote voorganger. Ook Grant moest meemaken hoe zijn eigen partij die verworvenheden in compromissen met de planterselite van het Zuiden verkwanselde. Ging in zijn jaren nog 70% van de zwarte bevolking naar de stembus, rond 1900 kon nog maar 2% zijn stem uitbrengen.Het was pas die andere vicepresident Lyndon Johnson die na de moord op een president de burgerrechten zou herstellen. LBJ's Voting Rights Act wordt nu onder Joe Biden herzien om de rechten van minderheden te versterken. De strijd hierover is dan ook uitermate actueel, controversieel en geworteld in de duisterste periode van de Amerikaanse geschiedenis.***Deze aflevering is mede mogelijk gemaakt door donaties van luisteraars via Vriend van de Show. Sponsoring of adverteren is ook mogelijk. Stuur hiervoor een mailtje naar adverteren@dagennacht.nl***Hieronder nog meer informatie. Op Apple kun je soms niet alles lezen. De complete tekst vind je altijd hier***Verder lezenRon Chernow - Grant (biografie)***Verder kijkenGone with the wind (official trailer, 1939)John Lewis: Full speech in Selma (2015)***Verder luisteren185 - De Amerikaanse Burgeroorlog (1): Black Lives Matter en George Floyd, hoe de burgeroorlog op de VS nog altijd zijn stempel drukt228 - De Amerikaanse Burgeroorlog (2): hoe Abraham Lincoln onvoorbereid de strijd in gingTennessee Ernie Ford - Marching Through Georgia (liedje uit de Burgeroorlog)President Lincoln: Second Inaugural Adress***Tijdlijn00:00:00 – Deel 100:40:11 – Deel 201:18:57 – Einde Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966
#182 Eartha and LBJ

To The Batpoles! Batman 1966

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 90:44


On January 18, 1968 — just two weeks after her final appearance on Batman was broadcast — Eartha Kitt attended a White House ladies' luncheon held by Lady Bird Johnson. After a brief, unsatisfying conversation with Lyndon Johnson, Kitt, annoyed, stood up and denounced the Vietnam War. This prompted an apparent effort by the President to kill her career in the US. We discuss a recent video from the New Yorker that explores this incident, with clever tie-ins to her Batman appearances. Also, we dust off our Batman '66 comics collections and take a look at issue 8, featuring the story King Tut Barges In. PLUS: A Japanese surf band tackles that Batman theme, we complete our listen to the “Featurette” interview of Adam and Burt from the Batman: The Movie DVD, and read your mail on … various past episodes! New Yorker documentary: When the Government Tried -- and Failed -- to Silence Catwoman The Washington Post looks back 50 years later Eartha Kitt vs. LBJ: Newly Found Audio Next script: "Hizzoner the Penguin" Treatment First draft Final Discuss the scripts on the '66 Message Board

Black Information Network Daily
BIN - Our Daily Story. Monday April 11, 2022

Black Information Network Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 16:07


Today marks the 54th anniversary of the 1968 Fair Housing Act. Signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson, the Fair Housing Act prohibited discrimination in the sale, rental and financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin or sex. To discuss the impact of this historic law and upcoming events tied to its anniversary, host Ramses Ja is joined by Muriel M. Nolen, Interim Executive Director of the Tennessee Human Rights Commission. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Coast Community Radio
An Adventure in History April 10, 2022

Coast Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 29:00


Mac & Alana chat about the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.  Plus, Mac insults Idi Amin and overshares about President Lyndon Johnson.  

New Books in the American South
Kate Clifford Larson, "Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 47:07


She was born the 20th child in a family that had lived in the Mississippi Delta for generations, first as enslaved people and then as sharecroppers. She left school at 12 to pick cotton, as those before her had done, in a world in which white supremacy was an unassailable citadel. She was subjected without her consent to an operation that deprived her of children. And she was denied the most basic of all rights in America--the right to cast a ballot--in a state in which Blacks constituted nearly half the population. And so Fannie Lou Hamer lifted up her voice. Starting in the early 1960s and until her death in 1977, she was an irresistible force, not merely joining the swelling wave of change brought by civil rights but keeping it in motion. Working with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which recruited her to help with voter-registration drives, Hamer became a community organizer, women's rights activist, and co-founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She summoned and used what she had against the citadel--her anger, her courage, her faith in the Bible, and her conviction that hearts could be won over and injustice overcome. She used her brutal beating at the hands of Mississippi police, an ordeal from which she never fully recovered, as the basis of a televised speech at the 1964 Democratic Convention, a speech that the mainstream party--including its standard-bearer, President Lyndon Johnson--tried to contain. But Fannie Lou Hamer would not be held back. For those whose lives she touched and transformed, for those who heard and followed her voice, she was the embodiment of protest, perseverance, and, most of all, the potential for revolutionary change. Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer (Oxford UP, 2021) is the most complete biography of Hamer ever written, drawing on recently declassified sources on both Hamer and the civil rights movement, including unredacted FBI and Department of Justice files. It also makes full use of interviews with Civil Rights activists conducted by the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress, and Democratic National Committee archives, in addition to extensive conversations with Hamer's family and with those with whom she worked most closely. Stirring, immersive, and authoritative, Walk with Me does justice to Fannie Lou Hamer's life, capturing in full the spirit, and the voice, that led the fight for freedom and equality in America at its critical moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

New Books in African American Studies
Kate Clifford Larson, "Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 47:07


She was born the 20th child in a family that had lived in the Mississippi Delta for generations, first as enslaved people and then as sharecroppers. She left school at 12 to pick cotton, as those before her had done, in a world in which white supremacy was an unassailable citadel. She was subjected without her consent to an operation that deprived her of children. And she was denied the most basic of all rights in America--the right to cast a ballot--in a state in which Blacks constituted nearly half the population. And so Fannie Lou Hamer lifted up her voice. Starting in the early 1960s and until her death in 1977, she was an irresistible force, not merely joining the swelling wave of change brought by civil rights but keeping it in motion. Working with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which recruited her to help with voter-registration drives, Hamer became a community organizer, women's rights activist, and co-founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She summoned and used what she had against the citadel--her anger, her courage, her faith in the Bible, and her conviction that hearts could be won over and injustice overcome. She used her brutal beating at the hands of Mississippi police, an ordeal from which she never fully recovered, as the basis of a televised speech at the 1964 Democratic Convention, a speech that the mainstream party--including its standard-bearer, President Lyndon Johnson--tried to contain. But Fannie Lou Hamer would not be held back. For those whose lives she touched and transformed, for those who heard and followed her voice, she was the embodiment of protest, perseverance, and, most of all, the potential for revolutionary change. Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer (Oxford UP, 2021) is the most complete biography of Hamer ever written, drawing on recently declassified sources on both Hamer and the civil rights movement, including unredacted FBI and Department of Justice files. It also makes full use of interviews with Civil Rights activists conducted by the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress, and Democratic National Committee archives, in addition to extensive conversations with Hamer's family and with those with whom she worked most closely. Stirring, immersive, and authoritative, Walk with Me does justice to Fannie Lou Hamer's life, capturing in full the spirit, and the voice, that led the fight for freedom and equality in America at its critical moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in History
Kate Clifford Larson, "Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 47:07


She was born the 20th child in a family that had lived in the Mississippi Delta for generations, first as enslaved people and then as sharecroppers. She left school at 12 to pick cotton, as those before her had done, in a world in which white supremacy was an unassailable citadel. She was subjected without her consent to an operation that deprived her of children. And she was denied the most basic of all rights in America--the right to cast a ballot--in a state in which Blacks constituted nearly half the population. And so Fannie Lou Hamer lifted up her voice. Starting in the early 1960s and until her death in 1977, she was an irresistible force, not merely joining the swelling wave of change brought by civil rights but keeping it in motion. Working with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which recruited her to help with voter-registration drives, Hamer became a community organizer, women's rights activist, and co-founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She summoned and used what she had against the citadel--her anger, her courage, her faith in the Bible, and her conviction that hearts could be won over and injustice overcome. She used her brutal beating at the hands of Mississippi police, an ordeal from which she never fully recovered, as the basis of a televised speech at the 1964 Democratic Convention, a speech that the mainstream party--including its standard-bearer, President Lyndon Johnson--tried to contain. But Fannie Lou Hamer would not be held back. For those whose lives she touched and transformed, for those who heard and followed her voice, she was the embodiment of protest, perseverance, and, most of all, the potential for revolutionary change. Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer (Oxford UP, 2021) is the most complete biography of Hamer ever written, drawing on recently declassified sources on both Hamer and the civil rights movement, including unredacted FBI and Department of Justice files. It also makes full use of interviews with Civil Rights activists conducted by the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress, and Democratic National Committee archives, in addition to extensive conversations with Hamer's family and with those with whom she worked most closely. Stirring, immersive, and authoritative, Walk with Me does justice to Fannie Lou Hamer's life, capturing in full the spirit, and the voice, that led the fight for freedom and equality in America at its critical moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in African American Studies
Kate Clifford Larson, "Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 47:07


She was born the 20th child in a family that had lived in the Mississippi Delta for generations, first as enslaved people and then as sharecroppers. She left school at 12 to pick cotton, as those before her had done, in a world in which white supremacy was an unassailable citadel. She was subjected without her consent to an operation that deprived her of children. And she was denied the most basic of all rights in America--the right to cast a ballot--in a state in which Blacks constituted nearly half the population. And so Fannie Lou Hamer lifted up her voice. Starting in the early 1960s and until her death in 1977, she was an irresistible force, not merely joining the swelling wave of change brought by civil rights but keeping it in motion. Working with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which recruited her to help with voter-registration drives, Hamer became a community organizer, women's rights activist, and co-founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She summoned and used what she had against the citadel--her anger, her courage, her faith in the Bible, and her conviction that hearts could be won over and injustice overcome. She used her brutal beating at the hands of Mississippi police, an ordeal from which she never fully recovered, as the basis of a televised speech at the 1964 Democratic Convention, a speech that the mainstream party--including its standard-bearer, President Lyndon Johnson--tried to contain. But Fannie Lou Hamer would not be held back. For those whose lives she touched and transformed, for those who heard and followed her voice, she was the embodiment of protest, perseverance, and, most of all, the potential for revolutionary change. Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer (Oxford UP, 2021) is the most complete biography of Hamer ever written, drawing on recently declassified sources on both Hamer and the civil rights movement, including unredacted FBI and Department of Justice files. It also makes full use of interviews with Civil Rights activists conducted by the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress, and Democratic National Committee archives, in addition to extensive conversations with Hamer's family and with those with whom she worked most closely. Stirring, immersive, and authoritative, Walk with Me does justice to Fannie Lou Hamer's life, capturing in full the spirit, and the voice, that led the fight for freedom and equality in America at its critical moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books in Biography
Kate Clifford Larson, "Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer" (Oxford UP, 2021)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 47:07


She was born the 20th child in a family that had lived in the Mississippi Delta for generations, first as enslaved people and then as sharecroppers. She left school at 12 to pick cotton, as those before her had done, in a world in which white supremacy was an unassailable citadel. She was subjected without her consent to an operation that deprived her of children. And she was denied the most basic of all rights in America--the right to cast a ballot--in a state in which Blacks constituted nearly half the population. And so Fannie Lou Hamer lifted up her voice. Starting in the early 1960s and until her death in 1977, she was an irresistible force, not merely joining the swelling wave of change brought by civil rights but keeping it in motion. Working with the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), which recruited her to help with voter-registration drives, Hamer became a community organizer, women's rights activist, and co-founder of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. She summoned and used what she had against the citadel--her anger, her courage, her faith in the Bible, and her conviction that hearts could be won over and injustice overcome. She used her brutal beating at the hands of Mississippi police, an ordeal from which she never fully recovered, as the basis of a televised speech at the 1964 Democratic Convention, a speech that the mainstream party--including its standard-bearer, President Lyndon Johnson--tried to contain. But Fannie Lou Hamer would not be held back. For those whose lives she touched and transformed, for those who heard and followed her voice, she was the embodiment of protest, perseverance, and, most of all, the potential for revolutionary change. Walk with Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer (Oxford UP, 2021) is the most complete biography of Hamer ever written, drawing on recently declassified sources on both Hamer and the civil rights movement, including unredacted FBI and Department of Justice files. It also makes full use of interviews with Civil Rights activists conducted by the Smithsonian and the Library of Congress, and Democratic National Committee archives, in addition to extensive conversations with Hamer's family and with those with whom she worked most closely. Stirring, immersive, and authoritative, Walk with Me does justice to Fannie Lou Hamer's life, capturing in full the spirit, and the voice, that led the fight for freedom and equality in America at its critical moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

Global Tennessee
Special Town Hall | Russia, Ukraine, Europe and America | Dr. Roger Kangas

Global Tennessee

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 71:47


Dr. Roger Kangas, Ph.D. Academic Dean and Professor Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, National Defense University TNWAC Global Town Hall at Belmont University, March 31, 2022 @ 6:00 p.m. CT with Moderator, Dr. Thomas A Schwartz, Ph.D., Distinguished Professor of History of U.S. Foreign Relations, Vanderbilt University Transcript available at TNWAC.org | Support the Tennessee World Affairs Council by becoming a member and making a contribution | Sign up for the newsletter | All on TNWAC.org Dr. Roger Kangas – Academic Dean and a Professor of Central Asian Studies at the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies. Previously Dr. Kangas served as a Professor of Central Asian Studies at the George C. Marshall Center for European Security in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany; Deputy Director of the Central Asian Institute at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in Washington, DC; Central Asian Course Coordinator at the Foreign Service Institute for the U.S. Department of State; Research Analyst on Central Asian Affairs for the Open Media Research Institute (OMRI) in Prague, Czech Republic; and as an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Mississippi. Dr. Kangas has been an advisor to the Combatant Commands, NATO/ISAF, the US Air Force Special Operations School, National Democratic Institute, International Research and Exchanges Board, American Councils, Academy for Educational Development, USIA, USAID, and other US government agencies on issues relating to Central and South Asia, Russia, and the South Caucasus. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University. Dr. Kangas holds a B.S.F.S. in Comparative Politics from the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Indiana University. Dr. Thomas A. Schwartz Thomas Alan Schwartz is a historian of the foreign relations of the United States, with related interests in American politics, the history of international relations, Modern European history, and biography. His most recent book is Henry Kissinger and American Power: A Political Biography (Hill and Wang, 2020). The book has received considerable notice and acclaim. Harvard's University's Charles Maier has written: “Thomas Schwartz's superbly researched political biography reveals the brilliance, self-serving ego, and vulnerability of America's most remarkable diplomat in the twentieth century, even as it provides a history of U.S. engagement in global politics as it moved beyond bipolarity.” Earlier in his career, Schwartz was the author of America's Germany: John J. McCloy and the Federal Republic of Germany (Harvard, 1991), which was translated into German, Die Atlantik Brücke (Ullstein, 1992). This book received the Stuart Bernath Book Prize of the Society of American Foreign Relations, and the Harry S. Truman Book Award, given by the Truman Presidential Library. He is also the author of Lyndon Johnson and Europe: In the Shadow of Vietnam (Harvard, 2003), which examined the Johnson Administration's policy toward Europe and assessed the impact of the war in Vietnam on its other foreign policy objectives. He is the co-editor with Matthias Schulz of The Strained Alliance: U.S.-European Relations from Nixon to Carter, (Cambridge University Press, 2009).

Brennan's Podcast
[16] Adam Towers

Brennan's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 139:44


Robert Caro's "The Years of Lyndon Johnson":- all in one (hardcover): https://amzn.to/3x1zCga- volume 1: https://amzn.to/3DtfoNK- volume 2: https://amzn.to/3iTHhVG- volume 3: https://amzn.to/3Dro86W- volume 4: https://amzn.to/3iQOwh0

Echoes of the Vietnam War
8 Days in March

Echoes of the Vietnam War

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 36:21


The panels that make up the Vietnam Veterans Memorial each represent a moment in time. Some moments are measured in years but for one of those panels, its beginning to end lasted only eight days. It could have been any eight days in the Vietnam War, but this panel tells the story of a secret mission in Laos, rising tensions back home, and the incredible story of a Medal of Honor recipient.

Plausibly Live! - The Official Podcast of The Dave Bowman Show

Now and again, I get distracted by another topic that pulls at my interests. Yesterday, the MILSURPWRITER and I got into yet another discussion about Veterans. Specifically whether or not Veterans who make certain claims about their service while running for public office are… well… being totally honest or just playing to the publics appetite for heroes? There is a long history of service in this nation, and the total number of people who use that service in a nekulturny* manner are few overall, but they also tend to be the loudest. I personally have always held a deep suspicion for anybody who feels the need to tell me their CV more than once. But these politicians feel the need to tell you every day what they say they've done. The big question is why anybody would care?

Björn in the USA
Leiderschap in turbulente tijden. Is Joe Biden een nieuwe Roosevelt of Johnson?

Björn in the USA

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2022 62:27


Joe Biden werd al vroeg in zijn presidentschap vergeleken met Franklin Roosevelt en met Lyndon Johnson, grote Amerikaanse hervormers die het aanschijn van de Verenigde Staten voor altijd veranderden. Biden zou dan de postmoderne versie zijn van z'n voorgangers, met een geloof dat gelijk liep: dat de overheid ook levens béter kan maken. Biden sputtert intussen nogal en heeft niet de comfortabele parlementaire meerderheden van zijn illustere voorgangers. Lijkt Biden op Roosevelt of Johnson?

Cool Weird Awesome with Brady Carlson
Presidents Week: Lyndon Johnson Had A Not So Great Leap Day

Cool Weird Awesome with Brady Carlson

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 24, 2022 3:47


This week we're replaying some of our favorite episodes about presidents. In this show from February 2020, we recall the time Lyndon Johnson visited the Pentagon on Leap Day 1968 - and became the first President of the United States to get stuck in an elevator. Plus: Graceland hosts the third annual Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Weekend. LBJ Stuck In An Elevator (Atlas Obscura) Ultimate Elvis Tribute Artist Weekend at Graceland (Memphis Travel) Take care of business as a Cool Weird Awesome backer on Patreon! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/coolweirdawesome/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/coolweirdawesome/support

New Books in History
Gregg Cantrell, "The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 78:54


Pundits, politicians, and scholars often use words like "liberalism" and "populism" uncritically. Dr. Gregg Cantrell, professor of history at Texas Christian University, argues that not only do these terms have specifically, historically contingent meanings, but also that one can draw a direct link from one to the other. In The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism (Yale UP, 2020), Cantrell explains how the populists weren't simply racist rural men, but instead had complicated ideologies and policy views, and an expansive worldview that serves as a forbearer to 20th and early 21st century liberalism. The Texas Revolt is driven by people - Lyndon Johnson's grandfather Sam Johnson, Black activist and avowed populist JB Rayner, the Texas judge and gubernatorial candidate Tom Nugent - and Cantrell uses their stories to paint a complicated, and remarkably modern, picture of the populists and the Texas People's Party at the end of the nineteenth century. Although their political party fell apart after the 1896 election, their ideas lingered in American politics, eventually becoming the core of the mid-twentieth century Democratic Party platform. The People's Revolt convincingly shows that the populist are not what you think, and that while it's easy to kill a political party, quashing ideas is much more difficult. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Political Science
Gregg Cantrell, "The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 78:54


Pundits, politicians, and scholars often use words like "liberalism" and "populism" uncritically. Dr. Gregg Cantrell, professor of history at Texas Christian University, argues that not only do these terms have specifically, historically contingent meanings, but also that one can draw a direct link from one to the other. In The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism (Yale UP, 2020), Cantrell explains how the populists weren't simply racist rural men, but instead had complicated ideologies and policy views, and an expansive worldview that serves as a forbearer to 20th and early 21st century liberalism. The Texas Revolt is driven by people - Lyndon Johnson's grandfather Sam Johnson, Black activist and avowed populist JB Rayner, the Texas judge and gubernatorial candidate Tom Nugent - and Cantrell uses their stories to paint a complicated, and remarkably modern, picture of the populists and the Texas People's Party at the end of the nineteenth century. Although their political party fell apart after the 1896 election, their ideas lingered in American politics, eventually becoming the core of the mid-twentieth century Democratic Party platform. The People's Revolt convincingly shows that the populist are not what you think, and that while it's easy to kill a political party, quashing ideas is much more difficult. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books Network
Gregg Cantrell, "The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 78:54


Pundits, politicians, and scholars often use words like "liberalism" and "populism" uncritically. Dr. Gregg Cantrell, professor of history at Texas Christian University, argues that not only do these terms have specifically, historically contingent meanings, but also that one can draw a direct link from one to the other. In The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism (Yale UP, 2020), Cantrell explains how the populists weren't simply racist rural men, but instead had complicated ideologies and policy views, and an expansive worldview that serves as a forbearer to 20th and early 21st century liberalism. The Texas Revolt is driven by people - Lyndon Johnson's grandfather Sam Johnson, Black activist and avowed populist JB Rayner, the Texas judge and gubernatorial candidate Tom Nugent - and Cantrell uses their stories to paint a complicated, and remarkably modern, picture of the populists and the Texas People's Party at the end of the nineteenth century. Although their political party fell apart after the 1896 election, their ideas lingered in American politics, eventually becoming the core of the mid-twentieth century Democratic Party platform. The People's Revolt convincingly shows that the populist are not what you think, and that while it's easy to kill a political party, quashing ideas is much more difficult. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in the American South
Gregg Cantrell, "The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in the American South

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 78:54


Pundits, politicians, and scholars often use words like "liberalism" and "populism" uncritically. Dr. Gregg Cantrell, professor of history at Texas Christian University, argues that not only do these terms have specifically, historically contingent meanings, but also that one can draw a direct link from one to the other. In The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism (Yale UP, 2020), Cantrell explains how the populists weren't simply racist rural men, but instead had complicated ideologies and policy views, and an expansive worldview that serves as a forbearer to 20th and early 21st century liberalism. The Texas Revolt is driven by people - Lyndon Johnson's grandfather Sam Johnson, Black activist and avowed populist JB Rayner, the Texas judge and gubernatorial candidate Tom Nugent - and Cantrell uses their stories to paint a complicated, and remarkably modern, picture of the populists and the Texas People's Party at the end of the nineteenth century. Although their political party fell apart after the 1896 election, their ideas lingered in American politics, eventually becoming the core of the mid-twentieth century Democratic Party platform. The People's Revolt convincingly shows that the populist are not what you think, and that while it's easy to kill a political party, quashing ideas is much more difficult. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-south

New Books in American Studies
Gregg Cantrell, "The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 78:54


Pundits, politicians, and scholars often use words like "liberalism" and "populism" uncritically. Dr. Gregg Cantrell, professor of history at Texas Christian University, argues that not only do these terms have specifically, historically contingent meanings, but also that one can draw a direct link from one to the other. In The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism (Yale UP, 2020), Cantrell explains how the populists weren't simply racist rural men, but instead had complicated ideologies and policy views, and an expansive worldview that serves as a forbearer to 20th and early 21st century liberalism. The Texas Revolt is driven by people - Lyndon Johnson's grandfather Sam Johnson, Black activist and avowed populist JB Rayner, the Texas judge and gubernatorial candidate Tom Nugent - and Cantrell uses their stories to paint a complicated, and remarkably modern, picture of the populists and the Texas People's Party at the end of the nineteenth century. Although their political party fell apart after the 1896 election, their ideas lingered in American politics, eventually becoming the core of the mid-twentieth century Democratic Party platform. The People's Revolt convincingly shows that the populist are not what you think, and that while it's easy to kill a political party, quashing ideas is much more difficult. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in the American West
Gregg Cantrell, "The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism" (Yale UP, 2020)

New Books in the American West

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022 78:54


Pundits, politicians, and scholars often use words like "liberalism" and "populism" uncritically. Dr. Gregg Cantrell, professor of history at Texas Christian University, argues that not only do these terms have specifically, historically contingent meanings, but also that one can draw a direct link from one to the other. In The People's Revolt: Texas Populists and the Roots of American Liberalism (Yale UP, 2020), Cantrell explains how the populists weren't simply racist rural men, but instead had complicated ideologies and policy views, and an expansive worldview that serves as a forbearer to 20th and early 21st century liberalism. The Texas Revolt is driven by people - Lyndon Johnson's grandfather Sam Johnson, Black activist and avowed populist JB Rayner, the Texas judge and gubernatorial candidate Tom Nugent - and Cantrell uses their stories to paint a complicated, and remarkably modern, picture of the populists and the Texas People's Party at the end of the nineteenth century. Although their political party fell apart after the 1896 election, their ideas lingered in American politics, eventually becoming the core of the mid-twentieth century Democratic Party platform. The People's Revolt convincingly shows that the populist are not what you think, and that while it's easy to kill a political party, quashing ideas is much more difficult. Dr. Stephen R. Hausmann is an assistant professor of history at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-west