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Best podcasts about civil war battle

Latest podcast episodes about civil war battle

El vuelo del Fénix
El Vuelo del Fénix - Peticiones del oyente 122 - 30/05/22

El vuelo del Fénix

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 59:07


Hoy escuchamos: Civil War- Battle of life, Sonata Arctica- Still loving you, Rainbow- Kill the King, Lost Horizon- Pure, Red Wine- Dioses sin voz, Rust n´Rage- Don´t save my soul, Segismundo Toxicómano- Hoy como ayer, Rammstein- Radio, Tengger Cavalry- War horse, Before the Dawn- Final storm, Crooked Royals- Rumination, In Mourning- At the behest of night. Escuchar audio

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

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El vuelo del Fénix
El Vuelo del Fénix - Estreno Shaman - 16/05/22

El vuelo del Fénix

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 58:39


Hoy escuchamos: Shaman- The spirit, Shaman- The I inside, Civil War- Battle of life, Visions of Atlantis- Master of hurricane, Visions of Atlantis- Legion of the seas, Everlust- The tale of the noble knight, Volturian- Empty world, Ñu- Yo estoy vivo, Orianthi- Contagious, Cabin Boy Jumped Ship- Golden, Kreator- Midnight sun, Amorphis- Seven roads come together. Escuchar audio

Métal Décadence
Metal Decadence - 12 mai 2022

Métal Décadence

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 184:28


Emission du jeudi 12 mai 2022 [TRACKLIST][Classiques]01 Lamb of God - 11th Hour 02 AC/DC - Thunderstruck 03 Cavalera Conspiracy - Inflikted 04 Nailbomb - Wasting Away [Nouveautés]05 Lord Of The Lost - Not My Enemy 06 Walter Trout - Ghosts 07 Porn Queen - Future Past 08 Sideburn - Feel The Heat 09 The 69 Eyes - Drive 10 Papa Roach - Kill The Noise 11 Die Apokalyptischen Reiter - Der Eisenhans 12 Lions at the Gate, Jinjer - Find My Way (feat. Tatiana Shmayluk) 13 Crisix - The Many Licit Paths 14 Soulfly - Superstition 15 Suicide Silence - Thinking in Tongues 16 Decapitated - Cancer Culture 17 Bolverk - Uaar 18 Unaligned - Void Wraith 19 Nastergal - Solitude 20 Xaoc - I, Pilate 21 Spiteful Visions - Spiteful Visions 22 Dischordia - The Whip 23 Optical Delusion - Raigeki 24 Wake - Swallow the Light 25 Cabal - Magno Interitus (feat. Joe Bad) 26 The Troops of Doom - Dethroned Messiah 27 Behemoth - Ov My Herculean Exile [3ème HEURE]28 My Sleeping Karma - Prema 29 Michael Schenker Group - A King Has Gone (feat. Michael Kiske, Bobby Rondinelli, Bob Daisley & Tony Carey) 30 Visions of Atlantis - Master the Hurricane 31 Coldrain - Calling 32 Civil War - Battle of Life 33 Malevolence - Still Waters Run Deep 34 Misery Index - Complete Control 35 Baalzagoth - Suffering 36 Organectomy - Concrete 37 Abated Mass of Flesh - Maze Of Detestable Afflictions

Ten Minute Tuesdays
Ten Minute Tuesdays March 15, 2022

Ten Minute Tuesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2022 7:59


Headlines this week include:  The 160th Anniversary of the Civil War Battle will be in May of this year; the new use tax is producing money for the city; the Carthage Board of Education will meet to discuss the Bond issue for the new Performing Arts Center at the high school; Carthage 2022 Seniors awarded the platinum level national career readiness certificate; the highly pathogenic avian influenza has been found in Missouri wild birds; and Missouri statewide gas prices are nearing record highs as increases continue nationwide. You can find these stories under the Podcast Headlines section on our home page as well as view local obituaries on our website 24/7 at carthagenewsonline.com. Plus, Jacqueline shares weather, David brings you Carthage Tiger sports and Wendi has events coming to Carthage. Subscribe to catch Carthage, Mo., news each week on your favorite podcast platform.American Family Insurance, Jeffry Hodkin Support the show (https://www.paypal.com/donate?hosted_button_id=CZBLKDGQFUZL2)

Untold Civil War
Season 3 Premiere: Civil War Whiskey Tasting with Kings County Distillery

Untold Civil War

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 49:32


Join myself and the folks behind Kings County Distillery as we discuss their wonderful brand and the history of whiskey distilling in NYC! Remember to always drink responsibly! See myself and good friend of the show Tony taste Kings County Empire Rye and other whiskies on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMMWxeF5zojtN8_NeWtyULw?view_as=subscriberMore on Kings Country Distillery here: https://www.kingscountydistillery.com/Music is graciously provided by Craig Duncan.This show is made possible by the support of our sponsors. Please check them out below.The Badge Maker, proudly carrying affordable, USA made products for reenactors, living history interpreters, and lovers of history. https://www.civilwarcorpsbadges.com/Civil War Trails is the world's largest 'Open Air Museum' offering over 1,350 sites across six states. Paddle to Frederick Douglass's birthplace, follow the Gettysburg Campaign turn-by-turn in your car, or hike to mountain tops where long forgotten earthworks and artillery positions await you. Follow Civil War Trails and create some history of your own. www.civilwartrails.org Military Images is America's only magazine dedicated solely to the study of portrait photographs of Civil War soldiers. In each quarterly issue of MI, readers find a mix of analysis, case studies, examinations of material culture and personal stories that offer a unique perspective on the human aspect of the Civil War. http://militaryimagesmagazine.com/Support the show:(The podcast receives monetary compensation from these options.)Make a one time donation of any amount here: https://www.paypal.me/supportuntoldCWMake a monthly payment through Patreon and get the most up to date news on the podcast! Also, if you choose the 2,3, or 4 tier, you'll be able to ask the experts questions ahead of time!https://www.patreon.com/user?u=51151470&fan_landing=trueCheck out Gentleman's Box! Get all the tools you need as a gentleman delivered to your door! From cuff links, to cologne, to fitness gear, they have it all!http://imp.i121497.net/KaPv7You can also support us by using Instacart! Hauling groceries can be a thing of the past! Have all your groceries delivered to your doorstep. Use the link below to start an account and you will be supporting this show at no extra cost to you!https://instacart.oloiyb.net/PPVYzCheck us out on Facebook and Instagram:https://www.facebook.com/untoldcivilwar/ https://www.instagram.com/untold_civil_war/ Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=51151470&fan_landing=true)

HISTORY This Week
How Lincoln Almost Lost it All

HISTORY This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 32:56


December 11, 1862. Union Army engineers are urgently constructing a bridge, one that will carry soldiers into the town of Fredericksburg, Virginia, a Confederate stronghold. Union leaders are banking on the element of surprise and are desperate for a victory. But, by the time it's over, more than a thousand Union soldiers will perish in one of the worst defeats of the Civil War. How does the failed Battle of Fredericksburg threaten the future of the Emancipation Proclamation and Abraham Lincoln's very presidency? And how does Lincoln manage to save both?Special thanks to our guest Professor John Matteson, author of "A Worse Place Than Hell: How the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg Changed a Nation." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Cincinnati Edition
New Book Explores Ohio's Role In A Pivotal Civil War Battle

Cincinnati Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 17:42


The Battle of Antietam in 1862 was America's deadliest single day on the battlefield. In his new book, Daniel Welch explores Ohio's role in the pivotal clash.

History Unplugged Podcast
The Civil War Battle That Resembled Dante's Inferno

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 48:56


In the spring of 1864, President Lincoln feared that he might not be able to save the Union. The Army of the Potomac had performed poorly over the previous two years, and many Northerners were understandably critical of the war effort. Lincoln assumed he'd lose the November election, and he firmly believed a Democratic successor would seek peace immediately, spelling an end to the Union. A Fire in the Wilderness tells the story of that perilous time when the future of the United States depended on the Union Army's success in a desolate forest roughly sixty-five miles from the nation's capital. To discuss this battle is John Reeves, author of “A Fire in the Wilderness.” At the outset of the Battle of the Wilderness, General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia remained capable of defeating the Army of the Potomac. But two days of relentless fighting in dense Virginia woods, Robert E. Lee was never again able to launch offensive operations against Grant's army. Lee, who faced tremendous difficulties replacing fallen soldiers, lost 11,125 men—or 17% of his entire force. On the opposing side, the Union suffered 17,666 casualties. The alarming casualties do not begin to convey the horror of this battle, one of the most gruesome in American history. The impenetrable forest and gunfire smoke made it impossible to view the enemy. Officers couldn't even see their own men during the fighting. The incessant gunfire caused the woods to catch fire, resulting in hundreds of men burning to death. “It was as though Christian men had turned to fiends, and hell itself had usurped the place of the earth,” wrote one officer. When the fighting finally subsided during the late evening of the second day, the usually stoical Grant threw himself down on his cot and wept. What did it show about Grant and Lee?

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show – Freedom on Trial: The First Post-Civil War Battle Over Civil Rights and Voter Suppression by Scott Farris

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2021 35:42


Freedom on Trial: The First Post-Civil War Battle Over Civil Rights and Voter Suppression by Scott Farris The Confederacy lost the Civil War but quickly began to win the peace when a mysterious organization arose called the Ku Klux Klan. The Ku Klux, as it was then called, sought to restore white supremacy by terrorizing the formerly enslaved to prevent them from voting or owning firearms. To support Black resistance to the KKK’s campaign of murder and mayhem, President Ulysses S. Grant suspended the writ of habeas corpus in large portions of South Carolina and sent the famed 7th Cavalry to make mass arrests. Grant’s new attorney general, the first former Confederate to serve in a presidential Cabinet and an ardent advocate for Black equality, Amos T. Akerman, aggressively prosecuted the Ku Klux in a series of sensational trials that shocked the nation and forced a reckoning regarding just how much the Civil War and the recently enacted Fourteenth and Fifteenth amendments to the Constitution had changed America and its notions of citizenship. Highlighting forgotten Black and white civil rights pioneers and weaving in the story of the author’s own great-grandfather’s crimes as a member of the Ku Klux Klan, Freedom on Trial tells a gripping story of a moment pregnant with promise when race relations in the United States might have taken a dramatically different turn. It is a story that also offers a sober lesson for those engaged in the ongoing work of fulfilling the American promise of equality for all.

Civil War Talk Radio
1725-John Matteson-A Worse Place Than Hell: How the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg Changed a Nation

Civil War Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2021


John Matteson, author of "A Worse Place Than Hell: How the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg Changed a Nation"

All the Books!
E297: New Releases and More for February 9, 2021

All the Books!

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 9, 2021 47:03


This week, Liberty and Vanessa discuss The Gilded Ones, Kink, The Witch’s Heart, and more great books. Pick up an All the Books! 200th episode commemorative item here. Subscribe to All the Books! using RSS, iTunes, or Spotify and never miss a beat book. Sign up for the weekly New Books! newsletter for even more new book news. BOOKS DISCUSSED ON THE SHOW: The Gilded Ones (Deathless #1) by Namina Forna  A Tip for the Hangman: A Novel of Christopher Marlowe by Allison Epstein Zorrie by Laird Hunt   Kink: Stories edited by Garth Greenwell and R.O. Kwon The Witch’s Heart by Genevieve Gornichec The Three Mothers: How the Mothers of Martin Luther King Jr, Malcolm X and James Baldwin Shaped a Nation by Anna Malaika Tubbs We Run the Tides by Vendela Vida And Now You Can Go by Vendela Vida Voice Lessons: How a Couple of Ninja Turtles, Pinky, and an Animaniac Saved My Life by Rob Paulsen A Lady’s Formula for Love (The Secret Scientists of London, #1) by Elizabeth Everett WHAT WE’RE READING: Act Your Age, Eve Brown by Talia Hibbert The Ones Who Don’t Say They Love You: Stories by Maurice Carlos Ruffin MORE BOOKS OUT THIS WEEK: Prey: Immigration, Islam, and the Erosion of Women’s Rights by Ayaan Hirsi Ali The Panic Years: Dates, Doubts, and the Mother of All Decisions by Nell Frizzell Loner by Georgina Young  Rafael (Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter Book 28) by Laurell K. Hamilton  A Song with Teeth: A Los Nefilim Novel by T. Frohock  The Good Girls: An Ordinary Killing by Sonia Faleiro  The Paris Library by Janet Skeslien Charles  Thirsty Mermaids by Kat Leyh FEM by Magda Carneci, Sean Cotter (translator) Fragments of an Infinite Memory: My Life with the Internet by Mael Renouard and Peter Behrman de Sinety Bookish Broads: Women Who Wrote Themselves into History by Lauren Marino and Alexandra Kilburn Dreyer’s English (Adapted for Young Readers): Good Advice for Good Writing by Benjamin Dreyer Unfinished: A Memoir by Priyanka Chopra Jonas Ian Fleming’s War: The Inspiration for 007 by Mark Simmons The Rope: A True Story of Murder, Heroism, and the Dawn of the NAACP by Alex Tresniowski A Year with Swollen Appendices by Brian Eno  Eleven Sooty Dreams by Manuela Draeger, J. T. Mahany (translator) The Burning Girls by C. J. Tudor Ellis Island by Georges Perec, Harry Mathews (translator) The Velocity of Revolution by Marshall Ryan Maresca  The Power Wish: Japan’s Leading Astrologer Reveals the Moon’s Secrets for Finding Success, Happiness, and the Favor of the Universe by Keiko, Rieko Yamanaka (translator) Summer Brother by Jaap Robben, David Doherty (translator) Come On Up by Jordi Nopca, Mara Faye Lethem (translator) We Are Not Like Them by Christine Pride and Jo Piazza Ladies of the House: A Modern Retelling of Sense and Sensibility by Lauren Edmondson Between Two Kingdoms: A Memoir of a Life Interrupted by Suleika Jaouad  The Love Proof by Madeleine Henry  Daughters of Chivalry: The Forgotten Children of King Edward Longshanks by Kelcey Wilson-Lee Tell No Tales: Pirates of the Southern Seas by Sam Maggs and Kendra Wells Reckless, Glorious, Girl by Ellen Hagan City of the Uncommon Thief by Lynne Bertrand Slough House by Mick Herron A Stranger in Town: A Rockton Novel by Kelley Armstrong    Super Host by Kate Russo  A Worse Place Than Hell: How the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg Changed a Nation by John Matteson  Memory Craft: Improve Your Memory with the Most Powerful Methods in History by Lynne Kelly The Vineyard at Painted Moon by Susan Mallery The Absolute Book by Elizabeth Knox  Black Widows by Cate Quinn  In the Shadow of the Moon: America, Russia, and the Hidden History of the Space Race by Amy Cherrix American Serial Killers: The Epidemic Years 1950-2000 by Peter Vronsky Game Changer by Neal Shusterman Silent Night by Nell Pattison In Memory of Memory by Maria Stepanova, Sasha Dugdale (translator) The Power Couple by Alex Berenson We Play Ourselves by Jen Silverman The Rain Heron by Robbie Arnott  The Address Book: What Street Addresses Reveal About Identity, Race, Wealth, and Power by Deirdre Mask Nobody Knows What They’re Doing: The 10 Secrets All Artists Should Know by Lee Crutchley  The Love Square by Laura Jane Williams Possession by Katie Lowe Engines of Oblivion by Karen Osborne Sorrow and Bliss by Meg Mason The Weak Spot by Lucie Elven As Far As You’ll Take Me by Phil Stamper This Is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyber Weapons Arms Race by Nicole Perlroth The Bride Bet (Girl Meets Duke) by Tessa Dare Love and Other Lies by Ben McPherson The Delivery by Peter Mendelsund Rabbit Island by Elvira Navarro, Christina MacSweeney (translator) Bug by Giacomo Sartori, Frederika Randall (translator) Fireheart Tiger by Aliette de Bodard  Tangled Up in Blue: Policing the American City by Rosa Brooks Wild Rain: Women Who Dare by Beverly Jenkins The Bona Fide Legend of Cool Papa Bell: Speed, Grace, and the Negro Leagues by Lonnie Wheeler Nuestra América: My Family in the Vertigo of Translation by Claudio Lomnitz The Iron Raven by Julie Kagawa Gay Bar: Why We Went Out by Jeremy Atherton Lin A Pho Love Story by Loan Le The Invisible Woman by Erika Robuck  Love and Other Poems by Alex Dimitrov The Girl From Shadow Springs by Ellie Cypher Rain Is Not My Indian Name by Cynthia L. Smith Hot British Boyfriend by Kristy Boyce  Amid the Crowd of Stars by Stephen W. Leigh Crossing the Line: A Fearless Team of Brothers and the Sport That Changed Their Lives Forever by Kareem Rosser Girlhood: Teens around the World in Their Own Voices by Masuma Ahuja Probable Impossibilities: Musings on Beginnings and Endings by Alan Lightman Doomed Romance: Broken Hearts, Lost Souls, and Sexual Tumult in Nineteenth-Century America by Christine Leigh Heyrman  We Are the Ashes, We Are the Fire by Joy McCullough The Electric Kingdom by David Arnold Rebel Daughter by Lori Banov Kaufmann Curse of the Divine by Kim Smejkal Sparring with Smokin’ Joe: Joe Frazier’s Epic Battles and Rivalry with Ali by Glenn Lewis See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing
NTEB PROPHECY NEWS PODCAST: The Gloves Are Off As The Great Civil War Battle We Warned You Was Coming Has Now Begun In Earnest

NTEB BIBLE RADIO: Rightly Dividing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2020 88:12


On this episode of the NTEB Prophecy News Podcast, we are connecting all the dots, on all the various levels, to show you the new civil war that has engulfed America. The election is now about 17 days away, and what hangs in the balance is nothing less than the future of our Republic. Never at any time over the past 244 years, have so many powerful forces within America conspired together to take down America. Once they succeeded in ending democracy and turning Germany into a one-party dictatorship, the Nazis orchestrated a massive propaganda campaign to win the loyalty and cooperation of Germans. The Nazi Propaganda Ministry, directed by Dr. Joseph Goebbels, took control of all forms of communication in Germany: newspapers, magazines, books, public meetings, and rallies, art, music, movies, and radio. Viewpoints in any way threatening to Nazi beliefs or to the regime were censored or eliminated from all media. Are we seeing that now happening here in America by the radical Left?

Radio Free Flint with Arthur Busch
Flint's Civil War Battle Flags #20050

Radio Free Flint with Arthur Busch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2020 40:57


Save The Flags Which is a State of Michigan project to preserve, research and display 240 battle flags carried by Michigan soldiers in the Civil War, the Spanish American War and World War I. It now has an “adoption” program to conserve these flags.  Individuals, organizations, schools, families and communities can help with the preservation, research and display of the flags by “adopting” flags in the collection. To date, almost 150 flags — mostly from the Civil War — have been adopted, providing the project with much-needed funds. Flint resident David Norris' great-grandfather, Talmon C. Owen, fought with the 10th Michigan Infantry in the Civil War. The 10th Michigan Infantry was organized at Flint, Michigan, and mustered into Federal service for a three-year enlistment on February 10, 1862.  This Michigan unit fought their way in support of and on the front-lines, all the way with Sherman to the Sea. They were part of the attack and taking of Atlanta.  Regiment lost during service 7 Officers and 95 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 2 Officers and 223 Enlisted men died by disease. Total 327 Michigan State Capitol construction initiated in 1872, just seven years after the end of the Civil War. The building was built in large part to serve as a memorial to the sacrifices made by the Great Lakes State in the war and through the years this connection has continued. Before leaving for the field of battle the men of these regiments were presented with beautiful silken flags. The regiments received a stand of colors consisting of two flags: a national flag and a regimental flag. The national flag was the traditional American red, white, and blue Stars and Stripes. The regimental flag typically had a solid blue field emblazoned with the Federal or Michigan coat of arms. The flags quite often were presented to the regiments by the ladies of their communities in grand ceremonies. Music provided in this episode is courtesy of songwriter David O. Norris, who wrote the Song "Peach Tree Creek".  Folk singer Neil Woodward performs the song written in honor of Flint's 10th Infantry who fought valiantly in the Civil War battle at Peach Tree Creek. That critical battle that led to the fall of Atlanta.  David Norris' great grandfather, Talmon Owens, fought on the side of the Union Army in this battle.   Folk singer Neil Woodward Neil Woodward is recipient of 2018 State of Michigan Heritage Award "in recognition of his outstanding contribution to Michigan's cultural heritage."  In 2003 the Legislature of the State of Michigan officially named Neil Woodward Michigan’s Troubadour in recognition of his life long commitment to preservation of Great Lakes folk music and culture.  You can listen to more of Neil Woodward's music at https://www.neilwoodward.com Special thanks to our guests David O. Norris, Neil Woodward and Mattew J. VanAker, Director, Tour, Education and Information Service, Michigan State Capitol and Save The Flags, Curator. For more information on how you can help Save the Flags visit: http://capitol.michigan.gov/SaveTheFlags  #SaveTheFlags  #CivilWarHistory  #Flint #NeilWoodward #MichiganCivilWarHistory --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/radiofreeflint/message

Battles and Banter: A Relaxed Military History Podcast

On this episode of Battles & Banter, Avery is joined by Rich Condon of "Civil War Pittisburgh" and Patrick McGuire of "The History Things Podcast" to discuss the Civil War Battle of Franklin, Tennessee (November 30, 1864). This will be the first battle from the Western theater of the American Civil War that the BnB squad has talked about. The guys will discuss the importance of John Bell Hood's Tennessee Campaign of late 1864 and how the Battle of Franklin was the battle that broke the Confederate Army of Tennessee's back. Enjoy!

LISTEN: This Day In History
July 3rd This Day in History

LISTEN: This Day In History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2020 5:16


Today in history:  Brian Jones dies. Jim Morrison dies. Richard Branson and Per Lindstrand became the first hot-air balloon travelers to cross the Atlantic. Algeria recognized as independent. Civil War Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania ended.  

Just Talkin'
June 22nd | Colby Lewis Dealt With A lot of Comebackers & The Last Civil War Battle

Just Talkin'

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2020 39:46


Song: Sleep on the Floor by Lumineers. Town: Brownsville, Texas. Player: Colby Lewis. Book: Sure Signs by Ted Kooser

Little House on the Prairie Podcast: Walnut GroveCast
Walnut GroveCast - Soldier's Return

Little House on the Prairie Podcast: Walnut GroveCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2020 103:52


This episode was recorded way back in December - it was the first night of Chanukah and Kim Layer joined me to discuss the emotional episode Soldier's Return.  This episode deals with PTSD in a time when little was understood and not much more than medicating the problem existed. This episode also deals with opiate addiction and the struggles associated with it.  Soldier's Return was originally released on March 24, 1976 "Coming home after 12 years of performing with a busy Philadelphia orchestra, Mrs. Whipple's troubled son, Granville, hopes that the peace of Walnut Grove will help him shake the nightmares and the morphine addiction that resulted from an incident during the Civil War Battle of Shiloh." If you would like to hear more from Kim head over to her podcast, Unsolved Mysteries Rewind https://vhsrewind.com/category/unsolved-mysteries-rewind or subscribe to her podcast by clicking here If you would like to hear more from Mark head over the http://www.vhsrewind.com or subscribe to his podcast by clicking here The opening song "Albert" is written and performed by the amazing Norwegian band, Project Brundlefly and is used with permission. Check them out at: https://www.facebook.com/ProjectBrundlefly

The Daily Swim Podcast
The Swim Dudes Episode 6: Marvel's Civil War Battle w/ Troy & Christian

The Daily Swim Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2020 38:16


Today we welcome on Troy and Christian both Marvel savants, to help us dissect the Airport battle in Captain America Civil War. We expose some things Marvel itself missed while also talking about things we enjoyed and despised. Tune into this episode to find out! Also if you haven't already check out Troy's Podcast, Troy2go Variety show! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Florida Gulf Coast Relocation: Places where you Live, Love, and Play & The People Who Make it Special
Beyond Phoenix Podcast: Authentic Arizona Experience & Lifestyle: The Golden Corridor, Picacho Peak, Lions Den, E Park Link Road, Civil War Battle of Picacho Pass.

Florida Gulf Coast Relocation: Places where you Live, Love, and Play & The People Who Make it Special

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2019 10:53


We take a trip through Arizona's "Golden Corridor". Not far from both Phoenix and Tuscon, a great trip to Picacho Peak State Parm, Lions Den, E Park Link Road. Fun things to do when visiting Arizona or take the family for a drive with the kids to Picacho Peak State Park, and drive down E Park Link Road to see Cholla, and Saguaro Cactus, learn about the Civil War Battle against Confederate Soldiers of Picacho Pass, and a sidebar about the adult entertainment store in the middle of the desert, Lions Den. Today's spotlight interesting facts about Arizona and Pinal County, Saguaro Arborescent cactus species, and the Chollas Cylindropuntia genus of cacti.Blog: https://jimmyventura.blog/Youtube Video of Podcast: https://youtu.be/sizy60Ol68wJoin my Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/beyondphoenixpodcastgroup/Schedule a time to speak with Jimmy: https://calendly.com/jimmyventura/tell-me-what-your-goals-areI moved to Arizona in 1996. I moved from Phoenix in 2019 when I discovered an authentic-Arizona experience--clean air, open spaces, enchanted landscapes, historical wonders, and mountain views-- beyond the brown-cloud of the Valley of the Sun. I want to share with you what I have discovered outside of Maricopa County--beyond the traffic-jams, beyond shopping plazas & beyond the strip-malls--there lies lesser know places of beauty awaiting your discovery. Contact me at ventura.jimmy@gmail.com if you are interested in being on an upcoming episode! Support the show (http://gf.me/u/wrry5a)

Snakes & Otters Podcast
Episode 016 "Monitor Vs. Merrimack and British Intervention in the Civil War"

Snakes & Otters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2019 37:03


Martin challenges the guys to think beyond the politics and explore the strategic options for British intervention in the American Civil War in 1862. Robert's up to the challenge and gives Martin all the argument he can handle. For a good resource on the Civil War Battle of Hampton Roads and all the related materials that the guys discuss in this episode, check out Reign of Iron: The Story of the First Battling Ironclads, the Monitor and the Merrimack by James L. Nelson from 2004. 

Chasing History Radio
Chasing History Radio: The Battle of Gatlinburg in the Great Smoky Mountains

Chasing History Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2019 13:02


In this episode, we cover the Civil War Battle of Gatlinburg where the famous Thomas Legion of Confederate Cherokee fought the Union Cavalry deep in the heart of the Smoky Mountains!

Jack Riccardi Show
Author RALPH PETERS recreates a dramatic Civil War battle in his latest novel

Jack Riccardi Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2019 10:16


KTSA radio host Jack Riccardi interviews Lt. Col. Ralph Peters who describes one of the bloodiest battles in American history that is often forgotten in his latest novel.

GLT's McHistory
McHistory: Civil War Letter Home After Battle

GLT's McHistory

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2019 5:18


And now, one of GLT's recurring features during Sound Ideas using letters, articles, and diaries from McLean County citizens written in times gone by. Today's McHistory is about the Civil War Battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, which took place Dec. 7, 1862. G.W. Howser died about a year and a half after writing the letter, on July 29th 1864 when the regiment was in Brownsville, Texas. Contributors to this episode of McHistory include Museum Archivist Bill Kemp and Director Greg Koos and was produced by GLT's Charlie Schlenker. "McHistory" is a co-production of WGLT and the McLean County Museum of History. People like you value experienced, knowledgeable and award-winning journalism that covers meaningful stories in Bloomington-Normal. To support more stories and interviews like this one, please consider making a contribution .

Laughs from the Past
25. The Civil War | Battle of Bull Run, Spectators & Home Invasions

Laughs from the Past

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2018 37:03


The first land battle of the Civil war was attended by civilians that walked to the field to watch. It also came to the front door of Wilmer McLean, who then moved away only to have the war catch up with him again 4 years later. 

Dr. History's Tales of the Old West

The Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg saw thousands killed or wounded. Kirkland, became known as "the angel of Marye's Heights," as he bravely carried water into no-man's land to give relief to wounded soldiers from both sides. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Literary Studies
Stephen Cushman, “Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War” (UNC Press, 2014)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2017 61:24


How do we use words to tease out the “real” that history strives to capture? Listen to my conversation with Stephen Cushman, as we consider the historian’s art through Cushman’s book, Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). Stephen Cushman is Robert C. Taylor Professor of English at the University of Virginia. In addition to critical scholarly work on poetics and form, he has published five collections of poetry, and another book on the Civil War, Bloody Promenade: Reflections on a Civil War Battle. That is the Battle of the Wilderness, the bloody field of which Cushman lives in close proximity, where it has prodded him over the years to reflect on the history that flows unheeded through our lives, until, at moments, it erupts. In Belligerent Muse, Cushman is interested, and points us with gentle precision, to the act of writing: thinking, deliberating, trying out words and phrases, composing the scene—as the main event of the text, and perhaps the main event of history itself. How do we get the world into words? That is the underlying provocation of our hour-long conversation. Along the way, we ask about the stakes and challenges of such a feat, as well as what constitutes a success and what a failure in the terms of “history.” In citing Walt Whitman’s famous assessment that “the real war will never get in the books,” Cushman places stress on the books. Surely something has gotten in the books. And so, during our conversation, we ask how the “real” of experience, if not representable in a positive, delimited sense, is made real through how exactly it leaves its imprint in our words. We reference examples Cushman uses in his book—which include the well-known speeches of Lincoln, the prose and poetry of Whitman, and the short stories of Ambrose Bierce, as well as the largely forgotten memoirs of Union Generals William Tecumseh Sherman and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain—and touch on themes such as the individual as representational, the effects of a literary culture in writing history (and reading history as something other than fiction), and the place of ambivalence, or the unknown at the core of the historical methods search for truth. “The real” is, finally, not fully containable by any one writer or work. Eventually, words are all that remain. As Cushman so deftly demonstrates, we can all strive to discern how they drag along the material traces of the past, and better attune ourselves to the real with which those words stand aquiver. Michael Amico holds a PhD in American Studies from Yale University. His dissertation, The Forgotten Union of the Two Henrys: The True Story of the Peculiar and Rarest Intimacy of the American Civil War, is about the romance between Henry Clay Trumbull and Henry Ward Camp of the Tenth Connecticut Regiment. He is the author, with Michael Bronski and Ann Pellegrini, of“You Can Tell Just by Looking: And 20 Other Myths about LGBT Life and People (Beacon, 2013), a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Nonfiction. He can be reached at Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Intellectual History
Stephen Cushman, “Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War” (UNC Press, 2014)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2017 61:24


How do we use words to tease out the “real” that history strives to capture? Listen to my conversation with Stephen Cushman, as we consider the historian’s art through Cushman’s book, Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). Stephen Cushman is Robert C. Taylor Professor of English at the University of Virginia. In addition to critical scholarly work on poetics and form, he has published five collections of poetry, and another book on the Civil War, Bloody Promenade: Reflections on a Civil War Battle. That is the Battle of the Wilderness, the bloody field of which Cushman lives in close proximity, where it has prodded him over the years to reflect on the history that flows unheeded through our lives, until, at moments, it erupts. In Belligerent Muse, Cushman is interested, and points us with gentle precision, to the act of writing: thinking, deliberating, trying out words and phrases, composing the scene—as the main event of the text, and perhaps the main event of history itself. How do we get the world into words? That is the underlying provocation of our hour-long conversation. Along the way, we ask about the stakes and challenges of such a feat, as well as what constitutes a success and what a failure in the terms of “history.” In citing Walt Whitman’s famous assessment that “the real war will never get in the books,” Cushman places stress on the books. Surely something has gotten in the books. And so, during our conversation, we ask how the “real” of experience, if not representable in a positive, delimited sense, is made real through how exactly it leaves its imprint in our words. We reference examples Cushman uses in his book—which include the well-known speeches of Lincoln, the prose and poetry of Whitman, and the short stories of Ambrose Bierce, as well as the largely forgotten memoirs of Union Generals William Tecumseh Sherman and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain—and touch on themes such as the individual as representational, the effects of a literary culture in writing history (and reading history as something other than fiction), and the place of ambivalence, or the unknown at the core of the historical methods search for truth. “The real” is, finally, not fully containable by any one writer or work. Eventually, words are all that remain. As Cushman so deftly demonstrates, we can all strive to discern how they drag along the material traces of the past, and better attune ourselves to the real with which those words stand aquiver. Michael Amico holds a PhD in American Studies from Yale University. His dissertation, The Forgotten Union of the Two Henrys: The True Story of the Peculiar and Rarest Intimacy of the American Civil War, is about the romance between Henry Clay Trumbull and Henry Ward Camp of the Tenth Connecticut Regiment. He is the author, with Michael Bronski and Ann Pellegrini, of“You Can Tell Just by Looking: And 20 Other Myths about LGBT Life and People (Beacon, 2013), a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Nonfiction. He can be reached at Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books Network
Stephen Cushman, “Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War” (UNC Press, 2014)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2017 61:37


How do we use words to tease out the “real” that history strives to capture? Listen to my conversation with Stephen Cushman, as we consider the historian’s art through Cushman’s book, Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). Stephen Cushman is Robert C. Taylor Professor of English at the University of Virginia. In addition to critical scholarly work on poetics and form, he has published five collections of poetry, and another book on the Civil War, Bloody Promenade: Reflections on a Civil War Battle. That is the Battle of the Wilderness, the bloody field of which Cushman lives in close proximity, where it has prodded him over the years to reflect on the history that flows unheeded through our lives, until, at moments, it erupts. In Belligerent Muse, Cushman is interested, and points us with gentle precision, to the act of writing: thinking, deliberating, trying out words and phrases, composing the scene—as the main event of the text, and perhaps the main event of history itself. How do we get the world into words? That is the underlying provocation of our hour-long conversation. Along the way, we ask about the stakes and challenges of such a feat, as well as what constitutes a success and what a failure in the terms of “history.” In citing Walt Whitman’s famous assessment that “the real war will never get in the books,” Cushman places stress on the books. Surely something has gotten in the books. And so, during our conversation, we ask how the “real” of experience, if not representable in a positive, delimited sense, is made real through how exactly it leaves its imprint in our words. We reference examples Cushman uses in his book—which include the well-known speeches of Lincoln, the prose and poetry of Whitman, and the short stories of Ambrose Bierce, as well as the largely forgotten memoirs of Union Generals William Tecumseh Sherman and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain—and touch on themes such as the individual as representational, the effects of a literary culture in writing history (and reading history as something other than fiction), and the place of ambivalence, or the unknown at the core of the historical methods search for truth. “The real” is, finally, not fully containable by any one writer or work. Eventually, words are all that remain. As Cushman so deftly demonstrates, we can all strive to discern how they drag along the material traces of the past, and better attune ourselves to the real with which those words stand aquiver. Michael Amico holds a PhD in American Studies from Yale University. His dissertation, The Forgotten Union of the Two Henrys: The True Story of the Peculiar and Rarest Intimacy of the American Civil War, is about the romance between Henry Clay Trumbull and Henry Ward Camp of the Tenth Connecticut Regiment. He is the author, with Michael Bronski and Ann Pellegrini, of“You Can Tell Just by Looking: And 20 Other Myths about LGBT Life and People (Beacon, 2013), a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Nonfiction. He can be reached at Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in History
Stephen Cushman, “Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War” (UNC Press, 2014)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2017 61:24


How do we use words to tease out the “real” that history strives to capture? Listen to my conversation with Stephen Cushman, as we consider the historian’s art through Cushman’s book, Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). Stephen Cushman is Robert C. Taylor Professor of English at the University of Virginia. In addition to critical scholarly work on poetics and form, he has published five collections of poetry, and another book on the Civil War, Bloody Promenade: Reflections on a Civil War Battle. That is the Battle of the Wilderness, the bloody field of which Cushman lives in close proximity, where it has prodded him over the years to reflect on the history that flows unheeded through our lives, until, at moments, it erupts. In Belligerent Muse, Cushman is interested, and points us with gentle precision, to the act of writing: thinking, deliberating, trying out words and phrases, composing the scene—as the main event of the text, and perhaps the main event of history itself. How do we get the world into words? That is the underlying provocation of our hour-long conversation. Along the way, we ask about the stakes and challenges of such a feat, as well as what constitutes a success and what a failure in the terms of “history.” In citing Walt Whitman’s famous assessment that “the real war will never get in the books,” Cushman places stress on the books. Surely something has gotten in the books. And so, during our conversation, we ask how the “real” of experience, if not representable in a positive, delimited sense, is made real through how exactly it leaves its imprint in our words. We reference examples Cushman uses in his book—which include the well-known speeches of Lincoln, the prose and poetry of Whitman, and the short stories of Ambrose Bierce, as well as the largely forgotten memoirs of Union Generals William Tecumseh Sherman and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain—and touch on themes such as the individual as representational, the effects of a literary culture in writing history (and reading history as something other than fiction), and the place of ambivalence, or the unknown at the core of the historical methods search for truth. “The real” is, finally, not fully containable by any one writer or work. Eventually, words are all that remain. As Cushman so deftly demonstrates, we can all strive to discern how they drag along the material traces of the past, and better attune ourselves to the real with which those words stand aquiver. Michael Amico holds a PhD in American Studies from Yale University. His dissertation, The Forgotten Union of the Two Henrys: The True Story of the Peculiar and Rarest Intimacy of the American Civil War, is about the romance between Henry Clay Trumbull and Henry Ward Camp of the Tenth Connecticut Regiment. He is the author, with Michael Bronski and Ann Pellegrini, of“You Can Tell Just by Looking: And 20 Other Myths about LGBT Life and People (Beacon, 2013), a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Nonfiction. He can be reached at Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in American Studies
Stephen Cushman, “Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War” (UNC Press, 2014)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2017 61:37


How do we use words to tease out the “real” that history strives to capture? Listen to my conversation with Stephen Cushman, as we consider the historian’s art through Cushman’s book, Belligerent Muse: Five Northern Writers and How They Shaped Our Understanding of the Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2014). Stephen Cushman is Robert C. Taylor Professor of English at the University of Virginia. In addition to critical scholarly work on poetics and form, he has published five collections of poetry, and another book on the Civil War, Bloody Promenade: Reflections on a Civil War Battle. That is the Battle of the Wilderness, the bloody field of which Cushman lives in close proximity, where it has prodded him over the years to reflect on the history that flows unheeded through our lives, until, at moments, it erupts. In Belligerent Muse, Cushman is interested, and points us with gentle precision, to the act of writing: thinking, deliberating, trying out words and phrases, composing the scene—as the main event of the text, and perhaps the main event of history itself. How do we get the world into words? That is the underlying provocation of our hour-long conversation. Along the way, we ask about the stakes and challenges of such a feat, as well as what constitutes a success and what a failure in the terms of “history.” In citing Walt Whitman’s famous assessment that “the real war will never get in the books,” Cushman places stress on the books. Surely something has gotten in the books. And so, during our conversation, we ask how the “real” of experience, if not representable in a positive, delimited sense, is made real through how exactly it leaves its imprint in our words. We reference examples Cushman uses in his book—which include the well-known speeches of Lincoln, the prose and poetry of Whitman, and the short stories of Ambrose Bierce, as well as the largely forgotten memoirs of Union Generals William Tecumseh Sherman and Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain—and touch on themes such as the individual as representational, the effects of a literary culture in writing history (and reading history as something other than fiction), and the place of ambivalence, or the unknown at the core of the historical methods search for truth. “The real” is, finally, not fully containable by any one writer or work. Eventually, words are all that remain. As Cushman so deftly demonstrates, we can all strive to discern how they drag along the material traces of the past, and better attune ourselves to the real with which those words stand aquiver. Michael Amico holds a PhD in American Studies from Yale University. His dissertation, The Forgotten Union of the Two Henrys: The True Story of the Peculiar and Rarest Intimacy of the American Civil War, is about the romance between Henry Clay Trumbull and Henry Ward Camp of the Tenth Connecticut Regiment. He is the author, with Michael Bronski and Ann Pellegrini, of“You Can Tell Just by Looking: And 20 Other Myths about LGBT Life and People (Beacon, 2013), a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in Nonfiction. He can be reached at Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

History Author Show
Kathleen Shanahan Maca – Galveston’s Broadway Cemeteries / Ghosts of Galveston

History Author Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2016 41:21


October 31, 2016 - This week, is Halloween, so we're piling into the Munsters Car, cranking up the Dark Shadows music, and talking about two books that would fit neatly Morticia Addams' nightstand. Our guest is genealogist and author Kathleen Shanahan Maca, who brings us Galveston's Broadway Cemeteries, and Ghosts of Galveston. One of the oldest cities in Texas, Galveston has suffered many tragedies -- hurricanes, yellow fever, fires, and a major Civil War Battle -- and those who didn't survive, started to fill its cemetery, starting in 1839. It's also why people have a lot of fun with ghost stories, and use people's fascination with things that go bump in the night, to preserve their very real history. You can visit this week's guest at KathleenMaca.com, follow her @AuthorMaca on Twitter, and like her at Facebook.com/AuthorKathleenShanahanMaca -- which you'll certainly want to do if you enjoy old photographs of this great old Texas town on the Gulf Coast.    

Civil War Talk Radio
1027-Linda Barnickel-Milliken's Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory

Civil War Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2014


Linda Barnickel, author of "Milliken's Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory."

Civil War Talk Radio
Linda Barnickel: Milliken's Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory

Civil War Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2014 56:10


Club Podcasts
The Civil War Battle Between The Post For Mexico - MSS vol. 35

Club Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2013


Francisco Guillermo "Memo" Ochoa will not take part in El Tri's September World Cup Qualifiers because he wants to be a starter as opposed to being second choice goalkeeper, that is what Mexico's manager Chepo de la Torre said. Memo has yet to give his side of the story. Rayados and Víctor Manuel Vucetich parted ways, finishing a golden period that included five championships. Jesús "Tecatito" Corona is an official FC Twente player, all this and much more this week with Tom, Jonny, and Nayib.

Regions of Arkansas
Crowley's Ridge Region Lesson 2

Regions of Arkansas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2011 4:09


Learn about the unique features that make Crowley’s Ridge. Explore the park itself and see when it was created and by whom. Learn more about a Civil War Battle that occurred on the Ridge.