Podcasts about Sharpsburg

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  • 55PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Sharpsburg

Latest podcast episodes about Sharpsburg

930 WFMD Local News
WFMD News Podcast May 26, 2022

930 WFMD Local News

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 2:52


A number of security measures have been taken in Frederick County Public Schools to make sure students, teachers and other staff are safe. Planning is underway on filling in the sinkhole along Monocacy Boulevard in Frederick. Sharpsburg's 155th Annual Memorial Day Ceremony and Parade will be on Saturday, May 28. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 628 (5-23-22): Memorial Day's Origin, from a Potomac River Perspective

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:27).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 5-20-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of May 23 and May 30, 2022.  This episode, marking the Memorial Day holiday observed this year on May 30, repeats an episode first done in 2015. MUSIC – ~17 sec – instrumental. That tune, composed during the U.S. Civil War, sets the stage for a water-related exploration of the origin of Memorial Day.  Have a listen to the music for about 35 more seconds. MUSIC – ~35 sec – instrumental. You've been listening to a version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” recorded by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales.  The tune was composed in 1863 by John Hill Hewitt.  The title, and the lyrics associated with the tune, are from “The Picket Guard,” a poem by Ethel Lynn Beers, published in 1861.  The poem relates the loneliness, homesickness, and then sudden death of a rank-and-file soldier patrolling the dark, wooded, and deceptively quiet Potomac riverbank.  As a similar tragic fate befell tens of thousands of Civil War soldiers along rivers, ridges, and battle lines in Virginia and elsewhere, surviving family and friends began honoring fallen soldiers by decorating their graves with flowers, especially during spring.  The practice grew across both North and South, eventually becoming a spring tradition known as “Decoration Day.” On May 5, 1868, Gen. John Logan called for Decoration Day to be an annual, national holiday on May 30, and the first national ceremony was held that year in Arlington National Cemetery, near the banks of the Potomac.  After World War I, the annual observance began to include honoring those who had died in all U.S. military conflicts.  In 1971, Congress declared Memorial Day an official national holiday, to occur on the last Monday of May. Memorial Day invokes very personal and local expressions of honor and remembrance, true to the holiday's origin of individuals decorating Civil War graves with flowers.  In that spirit, we close this tribute to Memorial Day with about 25 seconds of “Flowers of the Forest,” by No Strings Attached, from their 2002 album, “Old Friend's Waltz.” MUSIC – ~26 sec – instrumental. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 215, 5-25-15, and Episode 318, 5-30-16. The version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight” heard in this Virginia Water Radio episode was performed by Chloe Benner and Stewart Scales, used with permission.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 619, 3-7-22.  Another version of “All Quiet Along the Potomac Tonight,” by Bobby Horton, was featured in Episode 101, 3-5-12. Information on “All Quiet Along the Potomac,” about Ethel Beers, the author of the poem from which the song was derived, and about John Hill Hewitt, who composed the tune, is available from Bartleby.com, online at http://www.bartleby.com/270/13/474.html; from Britannica Encyclopedia, online at www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/58438/Ethel-Lynn-Beers; from Library of Congress, “All quiet along the Potomac to-night,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/ihas.200002411/; and from Song of America, online at https://songofamerica.net/song/all-quiet-along-the-potomac-tonight/. “Flowers of the Forest” and “Old Friend's Waltz” are copyright by No Strings Attached and Enessay Music, used with permission.  More information about the now-retired, Blacksburg/Roanoke-based group No Strings Attached is available online at https://www.enessay.com/index.html.  This music was used previously by Virginia Water Radio most recently in Episode 573, 4-19-21.  Information on “Metsäkukkia,” the original Finnish tune on which the No Strings Attached selection was based, is available from Andrew Kuntz, “The Fiddler's Companion,” online at http://www.ibiblio.org/fiddlers/MER_MIC.htm; and from Jeremy Keith, “The Session,” online at http://thesession.org/tunes/4585. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES(Unless otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Looking towards the confluence of the Shenandoah River with the Potomac River at Harper's Ferry, West Va., August 14, 2008.  Harper's Ferry was a strategic location and the site of a federal arsenal during the Civil War era.The confluence of Antietam Creek (foreground) with the Potomac River in Maryland, as seen from the C&O Canal Towpath, August 13, 2008.  The confluence is several miles downstream of where the creek flows through Sharpsburg, Md., the site of a major Civil War battle in 1862.      EXTRA INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF MEMORIAL DAYThe following information is quoted from the Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. “In 1868, Commander in Chief John A. Logan of the Grand Army of the Republic issued General Order Number 11 designating May 30 as a memorial day ‘for the purpose of strewing with flowers or otherwise decorating the graves of comrades who died in defense of their country during the late rebellion, and whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village, and hamlet churchyard in the land.' “The first national celebration of the holiday took place May 30, 1868, at Arlington National Cemetery, where both Confederate and Union soldiers were buried.  Originally known as Decoration Day, at the turn of the century it was designated as Memorial Day.  In many American towns, the day is celebrated with a parade. “Southern women decorated the graves of soldiers even before the Civil War's end.  Records show that by 1865, Mississippi, Virginia, and South Carolina all had precedents for Memorial Day.  Songs in the Duke University collection Historic American Sheet Music include hymns published in the South such as these two from 1867: ‘Kneel Where Our Loves are Sleeping,' dedicated to ‘The Ladies of the South Who are Decorating the Graves of the Confederate Dead,' and ‘Memorial Flowers,' dedicated ‘To the Memory of Our Dead Heroes.' “When a women's memorial association in Columbus, Mississippi, decorated the graves of both Confederate and Union soldiers on April 25, 1866, this act of generosity and reconciliation prompted an editorial piece, published by Horace Greeley's New York Tribune, and a poem by Francis Miles Finch, ‘The Blue and the Grey,' published in the Atlantic Monthly.  The practice of strewing flowers on soldiers' graves soon became popular throughout the reunited nation. “President Lyndon Johnson proclaimed Waterloo, New York, as the ‘Birthplace of Memorial Day,' because it began a formal observance on May 5, 1866.  However, Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, also claims to have held the first observance, based on an observance dating back to October 1864.  Indeed, many other towns also lay claim to being the first to hold an observance. “In 1971, federal law changed the observance of the holiday to the last Monday in May and extended the honor to all soldiers who died in American wars.  A few states continue to celebrate Memorial Day on May 30. “Today, national observance of the holiday still takes place at Arlington National Cemetery with the placing of a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the decoration of each grave with a small American flag.  Protocol for flying the American flag on Memorial Day includes raising it quickly to the top of the pole at sunrise, immediately lowering it to half-staff until noon, and displaying it at full staff from noon until sunset. … “Many veterans of the Vietnam War, and relatives and friends of those who fought in that conflict, make a pilgrimage over Memorial Day weekend to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., where they pay their respects to another generation of fallen soldiers.” SOURCES USED FOR AUDIO AND OFFERING MORE INFORMATION On the History of Memorial Day Library of Congress, “Today in History—May 30/Memorial Day,” online at https://www.loc.gov/item/today-in-history/may-30/. Smithsonian Institution/National Museum of American History, “You asked, we Answered: Why do we celebrate Memorial Day?”, by Ryan Lintelman, May 24, 2013; available online at http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/2013/05/you-asked-we-answered-why-do-we-celebrate-memorial-day.html. Public Broadcasting System, “National Memorial Day Concert/History of Memorial Day,” online at http://www.pbs.org/national-memorial-day-concert/memorial-day/history/. U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs:“America's Wars,” online (as a PDF) at http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/factsheets/fs_americas_wars.pdf;“Memorial Day,” online at https://www.va.gov/opa/speceven/memday; and“Memorial Day Order,” by Gen. John A. Logan, May 6, 1868, online at https://www.cem.va.gov/history/memdayorder.asp. On Rivers and Other Water Bodies in the U.S. Civil War The History PlaceTM, “The U.S. Civil War,” online at http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/ USA Civil War Web Site, “Civil War Rivers and Streams,” online at http://usa-civil-war.com/CW_Rivers/rivers.html RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “History” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on Virginia waters in history related to military conflicts. Battle of Yorktown in the Revolutionary War – Episode 390, 10-6-17.Bull Run's present and Civil War past – Episode 223, 7-21-14. Civil War Battle of the Ironclads – Episode 412, 3-19-18.Lincoln's James River trip to Richmond at the end of the Civil War – Episode 459, 2-11-19.Potomac River in the Civil War – Episode 101, 3-5-12.Rivers and attempts to capture Richmond in the Civil War – Episode 164, 6-3-13 (for Memorial Day 2013).River origins of Virginia signers of Declaration of Independence – Episode 220, 6-30-14. Various waters involved in the Revolutionary War – Episode 168, 7-1-13. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2015 Social Studies SOLs Grades K-3 History Theme1.2 – Virginia history and life in present-day Virginia.1.4 – Lives of people associated with major holidays.2.5 – Lives of people associated with major holidays. Virginia Studies CourseVS.1 – Impact of geographic features on people, places, and events in Virginia history.VS.7 – Civil War issues and events, including the role of Virginia and the role of various ethnic groups. United States History to 1865 CourseUSI.2 – Major land and water features of North America, including their importance in history.USI.9 – Causes, events, and effects of the Civil War.Virginia and United States History CourseVUS.7 – Knowledge of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels.Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rd grade. Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade. Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten. Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade. Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5th grade. Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4th through 8th grade. Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics

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Yinz Are Good
Ep. 54 GLOBAL LINKS and NTN: Greentree or Sharpsburg?

Yinz Are Good

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:13


Based in Pittsburgh, Global Links is a non-profit dedicated to improving health in communities with need both domestically and in 15 Latin American and Caribbean countries. Tressa chats with Executive Director, Angela Garcia, about all they do and how it all works. GLOBAL LINKS https://globallinks.org/ Phone: (412) 361-3424 Email: info@globallinks.org Have a story of GENEROSITY or KINDNESS to share with us? Please email us: yinzaregood@gmail.com To request a KINDNESS CRATE drop off at your business or school: yinzaregood@gmail.com Please visit our website and follow us on Instagram and Facebook: www.yinzaregood.com Instagram: @yinzaregood Facebook: @YinzAreGood

KSR
2022-05-20- KSR - Hour 2

KSR

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 44:09


It's "Ask Anything Friday" with Matt, Shannon, and Drew as well as all the latest news, and Nelly in Sharpsburg, KY.

'Booch News
Starting Out: Boochy Call Kombucha, Sharpsburg, Maryland

'Booch News

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 28:54


This is the first of a new series of Booch News posts telling the stories behind new commercial kombucha brands. The inspiration for ‘Starting Out' was NPR's ‘How I Built This‘. Every kombucha company launched their brand in a unique... The post Starting Out: Boochy Call Kombucha, Sharpsburg, Maryland appeared first on 'Booch News.

Good, but not the best... a Dancing Gnome podcast
January 2022 with Hart Johnson of Mindy's Take & Bake

Good, but not the best... a Dancing Gnome podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 105:15


Happy New Year to all of our listeners! Thank you for joining us for another episode of Good, but not the best... A Dancing Gnome Podcast. We kick off this episode by discussing my recent trip to Charlotte, the breweries I visited while there, the ACC championship game, the "fake slide", Kenny Pickett, and some #PittTwitter personalities. Then, Andrew and I share some of the holiday traditions that our families used to have when we were growing up as well as some "holiday beer" traditions that we have or used to have. Next, we take a look back at December 2021 in the world of Dancing Gnome before taking a look ahead to January 2022 and beyond. Andrew shares with us some of his "plans" for the upcoming year, which includes an "Artist Series" where local artists will reimagine the can labels for 12 Dancing Gnome core brands. We are then joined by our guest Hart Johnson to hear about his wife's and his new catering/meal delivery/weekend pop-up business, Mindy's Take & Bake. We also go down the rabbit hole of Sharpsburg dive bars, the Southside Burger King, and other Pittsburgh eccentricities. We finish out the show with a holiday version of "Watch/Listen/Learn"! Intro & Outro music by: Kabbalistic VillageBreak music by: Kevin MacLeod

Gospelbound
Baptized in Fire and Blood

Gospelbound

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 42:40


“Our cause is sacred. How can we doubt it, when we know it has been consecrated by a holy baptism of fire and blood?”So said a North Carolina minister about the Confederacy in the aftermath of the South's defeat at the Battle of Shiloh in 1862. This arresting quote contributes to the title of James P. Byrd's new book, A Holy Baptism of Fire and Blood: The Bible and the American Civil War, published by Oxford. He writes, “This is a book about how Americans enlisted the Bible in the nation's most bloody and arguably most biblically infused war.”Byrd is chair of the graduate department of religion and associate professor of American religious history at Vanderbilt University Divinity School. And if you're interested in this book you need to also pick up his book Sacred Scripture, Sacred War: The Bible and the American Revolution.Just at the Battle of Antietam, four-times as many American soldiers as died as 80 years later on the beaches of Normandy in World War II. Twice as many Americans died that one horrible day outside Sharpsburg, Maryland, as in the War of 1812, Mexican War, and Spanish American War combined. Americans should have known from the Bible that civil wars are the worst wars, and even God's chosen nations could self-destruct, Byrd argues. They may not have expected such a tragedy at the outset of the war. But by the end they had draped the whole conflict in Scripture, culminating with Father Abraham killed on Good Friday after setting the captives free. Byrd writes, “Americans were never in more disagreement over the Bible, and yet never more in agreement that the Bible proved the sacredness of war.”Byrd joins me on Gospelbound to discuss the jeremiad, Achan, Exodus, camp revivals, Frederick Douglass, and abolitionist views of inerrancy.

15:14  - Biblical Counseling Coalition

Dr. John Crotts is the Senior Pastor of Faith Bible Church in Sharpsburg, Georgia. He is an ACBC Certified counselor and author of numerous books. He joins us for the second time on 15:14 to discuss his recent book Hope: Living Confidently in God, a part of the 31-Day Devotionals for Life Series. This episode is brought to you by the BCC's Building Bridges Campaign. Help us build unity by creating connections in the biblical counseling world by supporting us monthly. Visit biblicalcc.org/donate to give today!

City Climate Corner
Etna PA: 1st Certified EcoDistrict in U.S.

City Climate Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 42:35


Etna, a small suburb of Pittsburgh, became the country's first certified EcoDistrict in 2019. From a place that saw 25% of its homes flood in 2004, learn how collaboration within and between communities made it possible for Etna to green its infrastructure and undergo a grassroots revival. We interview Borough Manager Mary Ellen Ramage and Megan Tuñón, Executive Director of the Etna Community Organization.PhotosEtna Riverfront - before and afterEtna EcoPark - creationResourcesBorough of Etna websiteEtna Green Infrastructure projectsEtna EcoDistrict PlanEtna Community OrganizationTriboro EcoDistrict websiteRiver Bend Comprehensive Plan (for Etna, Sharpsburg, and Millvale)EcoDistricts - website for background informationevolveEA environmental consulting firm in PittsburghEtna EcoDistrict infoTriboro EcoDistrict info

Ghost Travelers Podcast
Episode 38 History & Ghost Stories of Shepherdstown & sharpersburg

Ghost Travelers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 23:21


Hello everyone hope you all been well today on Ghost Travelers Podcast we will be talking with Meredith she is the owner of the Shepherdstown & Sharpsburg ghost tours, we will be talking to her today about her very first experience of the paranormal and also she will be tell us some of the history and some ghost stores that she has collected over the years. So please join us on this journey with Meredith and we hope you all enjoy this episode. Merediths Links: Ghost tour of Shepherdstown Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ShepherdstownGhostTour/?ref=page_internal Ghost tour of Sharpsburg Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/sharpsburgghosttours Ghost Travelers Page Links: Ghost travelers Youtube page: https://www.youtube.com/user/pjkilgorez/videos Ghost travelers adventures & travel vlogs when we are out having fun Youtube page: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8WW0pigjVtTf8oEb_Xw36Q Ghost Travelers podcast Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/GhostTravelers Ghost Travelers instagram page: pj_gtp

NTH Podcasts
Julia Yarbrough

NTH Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 80:49


Julia Yarbrough, a 23-year-old resident of Sharpsburg, talks about her journey thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail from start to finish.  Yarbrough spent six months on the trail and in spite of a number of challenges that faced her down, including a battle with Lyme disease, made it all the way to Maine.

Greater Than Code
246: Digital Democracy and Indigenous Storytelling with Rudo Kemper

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 57:03


02:45 - Rudo's Superpower: Being Pretty Good At Lots of Things! * Learning How to Learn on the Fly * Digital Democracy (https://www.digital-democracy.org/) * Earth Defenders Toolkit (https://www.earthdefenderstoolkit.com/) * Ruby For Good (https://rubyforgood.org/) * Problem-Solving & Mastery: “Fake it until you make it!” 13:14 - Digital Democracy (https://www.digital-democracy.org/) & Terrastories (https://terrastories.io/) * The Amazon Conservation Team (https://www.amazonteam.org/) (ACT) * Matawai People (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matawai_people) * Capturing & Recording Oral History * Ruby For Good (https://rubyforgood.org/) * Mapbox (https://www.mapbox.com/) * Indiginous-Requested, Indiginous-Led * Taking Action When Invited * Listen Before Action * Co Creation * Mapeo (https://www.digital-democracy.org/mapeo/) 27:39 - Defining an “Earth Defender” * Earth Defenders Toolkit (https://www.earthdefenderstoolkit.com/) 30:40 - Community Collaboration/Development Best Practices Without Overstepping Boundaries * Tech Literacy 35:52 - Getting Involved/Supporting This Work * Digital Democracy (https://www.digital-democracy.org/) & Earth Defenders Toolkit (https://www.earthdefenderstoolkit.com/) * Stakeholders & Ownership 45:03 - Experiences Working w/ These Projects * Anyone Can Contribute * Meeting Fellow Dreamers 47:33 - Oral Traditions & Storytelling: Preserving History Reflections: Jacob: Getting involved and connecting virtually. Mandy: Register for Ruby For Good! (https://ti.to/codeforgood/rubyforgood) Happening in-person this year from September 23-26 at the Shepherd's Spring Retreat (http://maps.google.com/maps?q=39.5070593%2C-77.7891734+%28Shepherd%27s+Spring%2C+16869+Taylors+Landing+Rd%2C+Sharpsburg%2C+MD+21782%29), in Sharpsburg, Maryland! Mae: Being able to adapt and learn as a superskill. Be proud of the things you can do. Rudo: It's inspiring to build community around software and the needs that it serves. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: Coming soon! Special Guest: Rudo Kemper.

Iron Sharpens Iron Radio with Chris Arnzen
August 10, 2021 Show with John Crotts on “Hope: Living Confidently in God”

Iron Sharpens Iron Radio with Chris Arnzen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 119:42


August 10, 2021 JOHN CROTTS, author, board member of the Fellowship of Independent Reformed Evangelicals (FIRE) & Senior Pastor @ Faith Bible Church of Sharpsburg, Georgia, who will address: “HOPE: LIVING CONFIDENTLY IN GOD”   Subscribe: iTunes  TuneIn Android RSS Feed Listen:

A Map Of My Evolution
Shanna's Story

A Map Of My Evolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2021 70:05


Shanna is one of the most senior and less traditional member's of Troupe Faraatha (Fah Rah Than). Shanna dances primarily in American Cabaret style as a member of the troupe but individually her dance style could be described more as Cabaret Fusion. She has combined her training in Ballet, Flamenco, Tahitian, and Brazilian samba, along with her training in tribal fusion, and Egyptian cabaret styles of bellydance. Shanna has studied under many teachers and instructors at various workshops, in her pursuit of knowledge. Currently she studies under Jen Gallagher, Simon Phillips and Emily Bowers at Art in Motion Pittsburgh in beautiful Sharpsburg. Shanna is also an award winning costume designer and wears her own designs on the stage. She believes that every costume is special and must fit the dance and the dancer correctly. She has been known to be the one backstage of a performance making sure everyone is pinned into their costumes properly, and securely. She feels that if a dancer does not feel comfortable in their costume, their performance will show it. She has also tried to encourage her fellow performers to learn the basic skill of hand sewing because one never knows when a pesky hook will decide to break. Shanna can also be found on burlesque stages on occasion as her international woman of mystery alter ego, Marianna Morttease. She uses her theatre training to create a plus size seductress who also has a silly side. Though she has been on break because the Pandemic has been annoying. Shanna is a graduate of the University of North Texas with a Bachelors of Arts in Radio Television and Film. When she is not dancing with the troupe she is sharing her love of dance at various shows and workshop galas around the region, or she is in some type of dance class learning more about all the dance world can offer. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/amapofmyevolution/support

Christ Church Fox Chapel Podcast
Bible Study: April 18

Christ Church Fox Chapel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2021 21:41


Rev. Ben and the brilliant Stephanie Wulpi deliver this week's episode from their (oddly quiet) dining room in Sharpsburg. In this week's scripture, 1 Thessalonians 2: 1-8, Paul finds himself defending his ministry to the Thessalonians by reminding them of what they already know and that they are all ministers of the Gospel. 

Marty Griffin and Wendy Bell
Kathleen Stanley

Marty Griffin and Wendy Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 7:22


Outreach Director in Sharpsburg, Kathleen Stanley, joins Marty Griffin to talk about some of the great helping hands in that community.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

NTH Podcasts
Movers, Shakers and History Makers: Michael Sebacher

NTH Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2021 32:30


The art of blacksmithing has a long, rich history but due to technological advances, some traditional arts like blacksmithing are in danger of dying out; however, artisans like Sharpsburg's Michael Sebacher keep these arts alive today. Sebacher created the Artisans Heritage Guild, a local coalition of accomplished artisans dedicated to teaching others and starting a school of traditional arts. https://newnancowetamagazine.com

America at War
104 The Civil War: Antietam and the Emancipation Proclamation

America at War

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2021 23:58


The bloodiest single day of the Civil War occurred at Antietam, outside of Sharpsburg, Maryland. Despite the intelligence find of lifetime (Lee's orders to his army), General McClellan's caution overtook him as he closed on Lee, wasting an opportunity. Nevertheless, Lee and McClellan clashed along Antietam Creek in September, 1862. McClellan, attacked Lee's army in piecemeal, allowing him to counter each attack one at a time. While McClellan stopped Lee's raid, it was a hollow victory as the Army of Northern Virginia left. Nevertheless, it was a victory, allowing President Lincoln the leverage he needed to end slavery in the Confederacy. Have a question, comment, or compliment, contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Behind The Hops
Episode 52: Tyler from Creekside Beer

Behind The Hops

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2020 58:37


This week, Ryan and Scottro are joined by Tyler Azar from Creekside Beer in Sewickley, PA. The trio opens the episode talking some Steeler football before talking about their recent outing at Dancing Gnome's new beer garden.  All three praise the heck out of how well Dancing Gnome is pulling that space off. The Pittsburgh beer conversation continues as they trio talk about how well Hitchhiker Brewing, also in Sharpsburg, is also following COVID-19 guidelines in their taproom and also talk about a certain large business that ISN'T doing a good at it. Tyler than tells us more about his job at Creekside and Ryan praises a lot of the 'market research' Tyler has been doing to ensure that he's selling the beer that everyone wants to drink.  After, before we dive more into Tyler's story in to craft beer and he tells us about some the latest brands their offering as well as some of the latest happenings going down at Creekside. The trio then talks a little about the canning shortage happening in the industry right now and how we're seeing TONS of blank cans at breweries, just waiting to be filled with beer. Before we end the episode, Tyler gives us a quick social media plug and how to keep up with the latest offerings coming to Creekside.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Discover Your Talent–Do What You Love | Build a Career of Success, Satisfaction and Freedom

Josh Steed is the founder of Steed Properties Construction and Renovation, LTD. He has been in the home building, renovation, historic preservation and real estate development business for more than 35 years and has built, renovated and restored more than 300 homes and buildings all across Atlanta and North Georgia. Josh is a graduate of Vanderbilt University and is married to Robbin. They have three adult children and live in Sharpsburg, Georgia.

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)
The Weekly Re-Cap 11/2/20 : Things To Come

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2020 52:08


Episode 122 : Things To Come Alex and Nick get back to the Re-Capping vibe and they start off by saying thank you to Caiti and Trevor. From there, we talk about our feedback. Nick announces our next guest, @hellobrewtifulpgh on instagram. We drop the bomb on Cheers Yinz! Fest and how we're gonna handle being a session on a digital beer fest. We recap the podcast with Caiti for a bit. Nick talks about the new Dancing Gnome fire pits and that leads us down a DG beer rabbit hole featuring Not Always Present and the classic Kolsch style beer. Nick hates on Heineken. Alex talks about classic style beers. We talk about the new players in town, including Mondays Brewing in Peters Township and Redhawk coffee in Sharpsburg. This makes us spin off to a coffee shop x brewery conversation. Nick talks about the FMLFest experience a couple months too late. Talking about Even More Little Tiny Baby Jesus by Evil Twin Brewing sends us down a nostalgia hole. At the end we rehash our upcoming events and our first merch drop. Cheers Yinz! And thank you for listening! Beers We Drank: Exquisite Beast - Dancing Gnome (DIPA - 8.5%) Gravel Grinder - Dancing Gnome (IPA - 6.6%) Music: All The Way Up - Eddy freemusicarchive.org/music/eddy/2_D…th-CloudBounce

Threads From The National Tapestry: Stories From The American Civil War
31 - Mr. Lincoln's Pilgrimage to the Banks of Antietam Creek

Threads From The National Tapestry: Stories From The American Civil War

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 39:44


About this episode: A few nights after September the 22nd, 1862, a band came to serenade the 16th president. Moved by the music and supportive crowd, Abraham Lincoln stepped onto the executive mansion’s balcony and, referring to his recent Emancipation Proclamation, remarked: “I can only trust in God I have made no mistake. It is now for the country and the world to pass judgment on it, and maybe, take action upon it.”But for the President, first things first: To put teeth into his executive proclamation, he would have to win the war - and that prompted him to leave Washington City and travel to the site of this country’s bloodiest single day. His ostensible purpose? To review the Army of the Potomac. His added incentive: to prod the army’s cautious commander, Major General George B. McClelland, into action. This is the story of the President’s visit to Sharpsburg, Maryland - his pilgrimage to the banks of Antietam Creek.----more---- Some Characters Mentioned In This Episode: George B. McClellanJohn A. McClernandOzias M. HatchWard Hill LamonJoseph C. G. KennedyJohn W. Garrett Additional References In This Episode:President Lincoln on battle-field of Antietam, October, 1862 / Alex. Gardner, photographer.From left to right: Colonel Delos B. Sacket, Captain George Monteith, Lieutenant Colonel Nelson B. Sweitzer, General George W. Morell, Colonel Alexander S. Webb [Chief of Staff, 5th Corps], General George B. McClellan, Scout Adams, Dr. Jonathan Letterman [Army Medical Director], unidentified soldier, President Abraham Lincoln, Colonel Henry J. Hunt, General Fitz-John Porter, Joseph C. G. Kennedy, Colonel Frederick T. Locke, General Andrew A. Humphreys, and Captain George Armstrong Custer. Get The Guide:Want to learn more about the Civil War? A great place to start is Fred's guide, The Civil War: A History of the War between the States from Workman Publishing. The guide is in its 9th printing. Producer: Dan Irving

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)
The Weekly Re-Cap 10/25/20 : Dancing Gnome Brewery

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2020 89:07


Episode 121 : Dancing Gnome Beer Here it is FINALLY! Alex and Nick go on-site at Dancing Gnome in Sharpsburg, PA. We sit down with one of DG's brewers Caiti and of course Trevor joins and even Sara makes an appearance. Caiti starts us off by explaining how she got into the brewing track. She tells us about her early home brewing career that focused on wild fermentation and sour beers. From there, Caiti tells us about experiencing the hop selection process at home(the brewery) instead of going to the farm due to Covid restrictions. Trevor gives up the goods about how Caiti is doing some experimental batches at the brewery and that leads us into talking about what Caiti is interested in brewing and her role at Dancing Gnome. Alex asks the tough questions like, “Now that you brew beer, does it take away from your enjoyment of beer?” Caiti educates us on what diacetyl is and how it can ruin a beer drinking experience. Caiti drops an exclusive heard here first that they're collaborating with Necromancer (a new brewery in McCandless) and Old Thunder (in Blawnox), both coming soon. Trevor tells the story of how the “Petite IPA” came around. After that we talk about the effects of Covid on breweries and how we feel about missing the communal gathering of beer drinking. We finish up this podcast with the classic guest questions. First, what are Caiti's top 3 beer styles and of course her top 5 emojis. Toward the end, Alex hints that the party doesn't want to stop so stay tuned for our shorter next episode with some bonus content! Beers We Drank: Okta - Dancing Gnome (Marzen - 5.2%) Barrel Lustra - Dancing Gnome (Barrel Aged Wild Ale - 6.4%) Meditatio - Monkish (Imperial Barrel Aged Stout - 15%) Mean Old Tom - Maine Beer Co (Stout - 6.5%) STARVE: Exhibit C - The Veil Brewing Co (Blended Imperial Stout - 13.1%) Karma Emulsion - Hill Farmstead x Tired Hands (Pale Ale - 5%) Little Sal - Allagash Brewery (Sour Ale - 6.4%) Ginkgo - Dancing Gnome (English Mild - 3.6%)

Conversations with a Calvinist
Interview with Pastor John Crotts of Faith Bible Church in Sharpsburg, Georgia.

Conversations with a Calvinist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2020 13:00


Recently Pastor Foskey had the opportunity to attend the Southeast Regional Conference for the Fellowship of Independent Reformed Evangelicals. During the conference, he had the opportunity to interview several wonderful pastors. On today's episode of Coffee with a Calvinist, we get to meet Pastor John Crotts of Faith Bible Church in Sharpsburg, Georgia and hear how God saved him and called him into the ministry.

Citizen of Heaven
Variety: Fellowship. Versions. Ticket to Ride. Guests: Phillip Martin and Tony Mauck.

Citizen of Heaven

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2020 61:46


I am joined by two of my brethren in the work, Phillip Martin and Tony Mauck. Phillip is the cohost of the Do the Work podcast. He preaches and serves as one of the shepherds for the Eastside church of Christ in Sharpsburg, Georgia. Tony is one of my oldest friends in preaching, currently laboring with the Decker Prairie church of Christ in suburban northwest Houston. I’ve been preaching about the variety we find in our fellowship. It strikes me that many of our brethren over the years have deliberately limited the degree to which we differ in local churches — skin color, native language, clothing styles, you name it. We would all agree that drawing lines of distinction over doctrinal matters is a good thing and occasionally even a necessary thing. But can variety — even in spiritual matters — be a good thing? And if so, is there a way to embrace our differences without compromising Biblical truth?I’ve been reading a variety of Bible versions in recent years, a hard left turn from my “NASB only” past. Three times the Proverbs writer extols the value of a multitude of counselors. But clearly some counselors are wiser than others. How many versions do you read from, do you have a single go-to version, and how important is it for the congregation and the preacher to be (pardon the expression) on the same page?I’ve been playing Ticket to Ride a lot more in recent days. We’ve had the original North America map for years and played it to death. But over time we have collected various expansions with different maps and slightly tweaked rules. And we’ve not only found our interest in the general concept renewed, we have even found ourselves finding joy in the original worn-out version. In short, variety can bring life to old, worn-out forms and rejuvenate our interest. What are some ways we can diversify the service we offer to God and still offer Him what He wants without letting it grow stale in our own minds?

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)
The Weekly Re-Cap 8/3/20 : Beach Beers and Burgh Food

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2020 65:36


Episode 113 : Beach Beers and Burgh Food Alex and Nick sit down with Trevor this week to break up the brothers only podcasts. Trevor discusses Dancing Gnome's handling of the pandemic and other places keeping up with the rules. Trevor spills the beans about a Dancing Gnome pop up to allow for draft beer in Sharpsburg. Trevor then fills us in on his time in Georgia and what the craft scene is like. After that, Alex picks our brains on beach beers and spend most of the conversation flexing on each other with what we're drinking. Nick bashes skyline chili. Alex has a problem with Ham BBQ as a Pittsburgh tradition and we discuss the Super Burger from Eat N Park and beer pairings with local foods. We get into the rules and regulations put on restaurants and bars and what they look like to some of our favorite places and of course we talk about Voodoo's BA Day. Trevor wraps up with talk about new breweries who are working to open up during this whole pandemic craziness. Music: All The Way Up - Eddy freemusicarchive.org/music/eddy/2_D…th-CloudBounce

Phil Shomo Coaching: Adversity to Advantage
10 - JAY HENDLEY: Keys for deeper golf instruction and hope in uncertain times

Phil Shomo Coaching: Adversity to Advantage

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2020 52:30


PGA Professional JAY HENDLEY believes there's a better way to teach the game than mere instruction on the driving range alone. Jay builds driving range work with on-course playing lessons all in one session, and it allows his students to not only learn the technical side but also learn how to apply the techniques to real-life golf.Jay is currently the Assistant Golf Pro at Canongate Golf Club in Sharpsburg, GA. He has experience learning and teaching the game of golf alongside some of the greatest minds in the business at some of the greatest golf locations in the country including Sea Island, GA, Athens, GA, and Panama City, FL, with Tony Ruggiero at Dewsweepers golf.In this conversation we touch on:+ The JOY of personalizing golf instruction for each individual student.+ How to utilize range time PLUS on-course time to maximize learning.+ Holding onto HOPE through all the twists and turns and uncertainty.+ The dream of using golf to impact more and more young people including kids who have no real chance to make golf a part of their daily life.Jay can be found online at the following:+ WEBSITE BOOKING: https://clients.uschedule.com/jayhendleygolf/booking+ FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/jayhendleygolf+ INSTAGRAM: @jayhendleygolfJay's experience and diverse teaching background in the game allow him to bring a perspective full of insights, wisdom, and personality. It is an honor to have him as my guest on this series of the VOICE OF THE PROFESSIONAL PERFORMER.************************************If you'd like one-on-one coaching to grow your Mental Skills and build mental strength for turning Adversity into an Advantage, or are interested in discussing how I might bring value to your team, reach out to me through any of the following:Email: phil@philshomo.comPodcast: philshomo.com/podcastWeb: philshomocoaching.comInstagram: @philshomocoachingYouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-svmY7Uj8XKIvGe9_mV6Fg

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio
Knight Homes Makes its Debut on Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio

Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2020 18:10


Vice President of sales and marketing at Knight Homes, Biff Driver, joins co-hosts Carol Morgan and Todd Schnick on Radio for the first time. Driver discusses Knight Homes' developments and what makes its communities stand out from the competition on this All About Real Estate Segment of Radio. Driver joined the home building and real estate industry in 2000. He has been in and out of sales and management, but his passion is in new home sales. Founded over 40 years ago, Knight Homes has since sold over 8,000 homes. Knight Homes builds primarily south of Atlanta and in 2018 was awarded Builder of the Year by Metro South Chapter of the Greater Atlanta Home Builders Association. The company has already closed on 400 homes this year and is expected to grow 30-40% this year despite COVID-19. The quality of Knight Homes is what makes it stand out from the competition. “I'll put us up against any of the competition,” said Driver. “When you walk in their home and then our home it feels like walking into a starter home and then a custom home. I know that sounds big, it's big talk, but we can back it up.” Knight Homes has many communities already established in the metro Atlanta area, with several coming soon. Towne Center Starting at a price of $205,900, this new gated community is located in Hampton, Georgia a few miles from the Atlanta Motor Speedway. These three- to four-bedroom homes barely have in the framing and are already selling due to the attractive price point and convenient location. Barnsley Farms Priced from the $500,000s, this community of high-end Craftsmen and Farmhouse style homes is located in Senoia, widely considered the “film capital of Georgia.” These homes have a nice custom look with farm sinks, shiplap walls, covered porches and more within their 3,000 to 4,000 square feet of living space. Residents enjoy proximity to Peachtree City, Sharpsburg and Newnan. Atkins Place Starting at $372,900, these large upscale homes are located in Fayette County and sit on 1+ acre wooded homesites. Ranging from a spacious 3,200 to 4,000 square feet of space, these homes are sure to impress with the gourmet kitchens, over-sized owner's retreats and fine craftsmanship that exude a custom feel. Coming soon Knight Homes has an astounding 39 neighborhoods in production. Coming soon is a new townhome community in Cherokee County, along with Peppertree in Newnan, Traditions at Crystal Lake in Hampton and more. COVID-19 Knight Homes has been utilizing Zoom and digital technology in light of COVID-19 (coronavirus), as well as providing hand sanitizer, masks for agents and more. Despite the toll the pandemic has had on many businesses, Knight Homes continues to do well. “With our price point we feel like that's been the reason we've been able to be successful through this downturn,” said Driver. “People want to get out of different housing and into their own home.” For more information on Knight Homes and its communities, visit www.KnightHomes.com or call their online sales counselor at 678-577-9086. Never miss an episode of Atlanta Real Estate Forum Radio! Subscribe to the podcast here. You can also get a recap of any past episodes on the Radio page. Georgia Residential Mortgage Licensee, License #22564. NMLS ID #6606. Subject to borrower and property qualifications. Not all applicants will qualify. New American Funding and Knight Homes are not associated. Click here to view the terms and conditions of products mentioned during the show. Corporate office 14511 Myford Rd., Suite 100, Tustin, CA 92780. Phone: (800) 450-2010. (July/2020) New American Funding is a family-owned mortgage lender with a servicing portfolio of over 123,000 loans for $30.4 billion, 198 branches, and about 3,100 employees. The company offers several niche loan products and has made Inc. 5000's list of Fastest-Growing Companies in America six times. It has a state-of-the-art career training facility a...

PreserveCast
PreserveCast Ep126: Descending into the Bloody Cornfield with Civil War Historian, David A. Welker

PreserveCast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2020 46:53


Few names are as synonymous with Civil War battlefields as “The Bloody Cornfield.” It conjures up visions of harrowing bloodshed and the tragedy of fratricidal combat. Yet, for over 150 years, the story of this struggle has been difficult to track – the sway of battle back and forth over David R. Miller’s cornfield was a confusing melee of destruction. To help interpret this pivotal story, historian and author David A. Welker has produced a detailed study of this pivotal moment in American history which captures the reader and makes the compelling case for the national significance of these 20+ acres of Maryland soil. On this week’s PreserveCast, we’re taking a trip back to Sharpsburg, Maryland, on the morning of September 17, 1862, and descending into the Bloody Cornfield.

Inside Scoop Live!
A Time to be Brave - An Interview with Author Holly Moulder

Inside Scoop Live!

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2020 20:16


Holly Moulder is a former elementary school teacher who left the classroom in order to write historical fiction for middle-grade students. Her fascination with history has helped her create four award-winning novels: Eyes of the Calusa, A Cord of Three Strands, Crystal City Lights, and A Time To Be Brave. Moulder has two adult daughters and one granddaughter, Macie. She and her husband, Don, live in Sharpsburg, Georgia. For more information about Holly Moulder and her books, visit her website. Topics of conversation: Her favorite authors and books The decision to write historical novels Strong Female Characters The hardest thing about writing a book  

South Metro Ministries Sermons
God Of Miracles - Audio

South Metro Ministries Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2020 23:24


Dino Rizzo shares how we all have a common need for a God of miracles, especially with all that’s unfolding in our world today. He uses the story of Jesus healing a leper in Luke 5:12 to describe how someone who was diseased, socially isolated, and banished from society could call on Jesus in their time of need.

South Metro Ministries Sermons
God Of Miracles - Audio

South Metro Ministries Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2020 23:24


Dino Rizzo shares how we all have a common need for a God of miracles, especially with all that’s unfolding in our world today. He uses the story of Jesus healing a leper in Luke 5:12 to describe how someone who was diseased, socially isolated, and banished from society could call on Jesus in their time of need.

GO Church Sermons
God Of Miracles - Audio

GO Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2020 23:24


Dino Rizzo shares how we all have a common need for a God of miracles, especially with all that’s unfolding in our world today. He uses the story of Jesus healing a leper in Luke 5:12 to describe how someone who was diseased, socially isolated, and banished from society could call on Jesus in their time of need.

GO Church Sermons
God Of Miracles - Audio

GO Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2020 23:24


Dino Rizzo shares how we all have a common need for a God of miracles, especially with all that’s unfolding in our world today. He uses the story of Jesus healing a leper in Luke 5:12 to describe how someone who was diseased, socially isolated, and banished from society could call on Jesus in their time of need.

South Metro Ministries Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt3 - Audio

South Metro Ministries Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2020 36:10


Pastor JC ends the Faith Over Fear series talking about how we can use this time where fear and uncertainty is prevalent to, instead of succumbing to everything going on around us, feed our spiritual discipline and allow God to draw us back to Him!

GO Church Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt3 - Audio

GO Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2020 36:10


Pastor JC ends the Faith Over Fear series talking about how we can use this time where fear and uncertainty is prevalent to, instead of succumbing to everything going on around us, feed our spiritual discipline and allow God to draw us back to Him!

South Metro Ministries Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt3 - Audio

South Metro Ministries Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2020 36:10


Pastor JC ends the Faith Over Fear series talking about how we can use this time where fear and uncertainty is prevalent to, instead of succumbing to everything going on around us, feed our spiritual discipline and allow God to draw us back to Him!

GO Church Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt3 - Audio

GO Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2020 36:10


Pastor JC ends the Faith Over Fear series talking about how we can use this time where fear and uncertainty is prevalent to, instead of succumbing to everything going on around us, feed our spiritual discipline and allow God to draw us back to Him!

South Metro Ministries Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt2 - Audio

South Metro Ministries Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2020 38:59


Pastor JC talks about having perspective of how God sees things, not focusing on fear, but living within the security that God's sovereignty gives us (nothing takes God by surprise). He is in control. What is God showing you during this unprecedented time?

GO Church Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt2 - Audio

GO Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2020 38:59


Pastor JC talks about having perspective of how God sees things, not focusing on fear, but living within the security that God's sovereignty gives us (nothing takes God by surprise). He is in control. What is God showing you during this unprecedented time?

GO Church Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt2 - Audio

GO Church Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2020 38:59


Pastor JC talks about having perspective of how God sees things, not focusing on fear, but living within the security that God's sovereignty gives us (nothing takes God by surprise). He is in control. What is God showing you during this unprecedented time?

South Metro Ministries Sermons
Faith Over Fear Pt2 - Audio

South Metro Ministries Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2020 38:59


Pastor JC talks about having perspective of how God sees things, not focusing on fear, but living within the security that God's sovereignty gives us (nothing takes God by surprise). He is in control. What is God showing you during this unprecedented time?

Behind The Hops
Dancing Gnome

Behind The Hops

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 34:06


On today's episode, Joe and I sit down with Andrew from Dancing Gnome brewery in Sharpsburg, PA (Pittsburgh).  We talk about his story in to craft, how the brewery came to exist, the story behind the "Gnome" concept as well as the logo, his plans for the future with Dancing Gnome and more!

Monster of the Geek
Operation: Bloody Hallow Episode 1

Monster of the Geek

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2020 63:17


The team is off on another adventure! Something is going funny with the ghosts up in Sharpsburg, Maryland. Who ya gonna call?No, really. They need an adult.

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)
The Weekly Recap 2/19/20 : Juicy Brews Valentine's Day and more!

The Weekly ReCap (Beer Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2020 67:48


Episode 91 : Juicy Brews Valentine's Day and More! Nick and Alex hold it down this week. We discuss our friends' podcasts and then Nick recounts his Juicy Brews Valentine's Day experience! The VIP bottle share was a highlight of the weekend and then the festival was incredible as usual. We need your opinion on the “Bottle Carrier reusable bag.” Alex recaps his Valentine's Day and visited 4four6 distillery in Sharpsburg. Toward the end we talk about brewery merch and we continue to plug FueledFest412 and everything else coming up. Thanks for listening! Beers We Drank: Batida - Southern Grist x Finback (Sour Ale - 6.5%) Energy Equals - Equilibrium (DIPA - 8%) Bogtrotter - Dancing Gnome x Humble Sea (Stout - 10%) Music: All The Way Up - Eddy freemusicarchive.org/music/eddy/2_D…th-CloudBounce

NTH Podcasts
Movers, Shakers, and History Makers: Mayor Blue Cole

NTH Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2020 32:38


A Sharpsburg native, Blue Cole was elected after the resignation of former mayor Wendell Staley, who resigned due to health reasons and later passed away. Cole says Sharpsburg is a fast-growing area with the potential to become a vibrant, active community with a small-town feel.Cole said his vision for Sharpsburg includes careful, deliberate growth guided by the engagement of citizens, property owners and the business community. Expanding town services and amenities are key goals and in this podcast, Cole talks a little about his vision for the future of the town.

History That Doesn't Suck
52: From Second Bull Run, or Second Manassas to Antietam, or Sharpsburg

History That Doesn't Suck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2019 56:27


“Come on God damn you.”This is the story of the Second Bull Run/Manassas Campaign and the Battle of Antietam.Robert “Bobby” E. Lee isn’t content to run George “Little Mac” McClellan down to the James River. With the help of Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, James Longstreet, J.E.B. Stuart, and others, Bobby’s ready to use his aggressive, divide and conquer tactics on the Union’s new Army of Virginia. The question is: can the bickering Union generals put their pettiness aside and work together? Or will the Confederates make short work of them at the Manassas railroad junction?Bobby Lee has another bold plan as well: time to take the fight to US soil. The Virginian Commander invades the US slave-state of Maryland, where he hopes to enlist Confederate sympathizers, demoralize Americans going to vote, and draw international recognition for the CSA. It’s an ambitious goal. And it means fighting the most deadly, violent battle in American history near Antietam Creek, right by Sharpsburg, Maryland.

Ultrarunning History
37: Soldier Barnes – Six-day Race Relic (1846-1916)

Ultrarunning History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2019 32:57


By Davy Crockett  Old Soldier Barnes was a Civil War veteran from Pennsylvania who became a very popular professional ultrarunner in 1900 when he was in his early 50s. He must have not worn his age well, because people always thought he was much older than he really was. He entered the sport when the six-day race was making a comeback in Pennsylvania, about 20 years since its heyday in the 1800s when it was a huge spectator sport, watching walkers and runners go in circles for six days trying to travel as many miles as possible. There was a brief resurgence of six-day "go as you please" races in America from 1898-1903 until states passed laws to halt these all-day and all-night running affairs along with similar six-day bicycle races. Soldier Barnes, in his 50s, became a highly competitive tough multi-day runner who was well-respected and always a crowd favorite. He was one of the most prolific six-day runners of that time. This article will follow his participation in the sport and hopefully leave readers with a deep understanding of the fascinating six-day running races that were held about 120 years ago. Stephen Gilbert Barnes was born on May 23, 1846, in Sharpsburg, Pennsylvania. He lived in that area near Pittsburgh his entire life and went by "Gilbert" during his running years. Gilbert Barnes’ ancestors were nonconformists of England, some who suffered martyrdom in England.  His ancestor, Richard Barnes settled in the Massachusetts Bay Colony before 1636. His grandfather and namesake, Captain Stephen Barnes (1736-1800) commanded a company during the Revolutionary war and settled in Pennsylvania. His parents were Pennsylvania natives. His father, Joseph Barnes (1777-1855), was a millwright and built ferry boats, and his mother Clara Elizabeth Leer (1818-1847), died about a year after he was born. Early Life At the outbreak of the Civil War, Barnes enlisted in the Pennsylvania Reserves. At the end of his enlistment, he tried to reenlist but they were not recruiting at the time. He then joined Company K of the Pennsylvania Cavalry and fought with them throughout the rest of the war. 1870 Census. Occupation: dry goods merchant After the war, in 1868, Barnes married Margaret Elizabeth Couch (1848-1915) and they had six children from 1869 to 1884. By 1874, he was a dry goods merchant in Springdale, Pennsylvania, but had huge debts of about $7,000 and filed for bankruptcy. It was granted and some of his property was put up for sale and liens liquidated within two years. 1880 census. Occupation: Ticket Agent By 1880 he lost his store and was a ticket agent for the railroad. On Mar 26, 1880, he became postmaster for the town of Armstrong, Pennsylvania. In 1884 a newspaper was started in Indiana, Pennsylvania called the “Indiana Weekly News.” Barnes was employed as the editor for many years. Barnes was always proud of his military service and was a member of the G.A.R. (Grand Army of the Republic) in Post 157. The G.A.R was a fraternal organization composed of veterans of the Union Army, Union Navy, and Marines who served in the Civil War. By 1898 Barnes became a professional runner and he worked very hard to be able to finish high enough to win monetary awards. Fixed-time multi-day races, especially the six-day race had become well-established in the 1870s. Those who competed in them were call pedestrians. These races at first observed strict “heel-toe” walking rules but eventually progressed into “go-as-you-please” formats open to both walkers and runners. Barnes became a runner. 1898 Pittsburgh 72-hour six day race In February 1898, it was announced that the six-day race "go as your please" foot-race would be revived in Pennsylvania after a long absence. A 142-hour race was planned to be held in Saenger Hall, the largest "amusement building" in the city. Unfortunately, plans were changed to hold a six-day bicycle race instead, building on a recent successful event held in M...

Main Entrance FastCast: Theme Parks, Museums, and so much more!
September 17, 2019: Antietam National Battlefield

Main Entrance FastCast: Theme Parks, Museums, and so much more!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2019 4:18


Not all attractions are designed to delight and thrill. Many of the most impactful places in the United States of America have histories behind them that demand introspection and reverence, and today’s spotlight is certainly one of those. It’s easy in the age of blockbuster films and multiplayer video games to think of the World Wars when one considers the most violent periods in American history. But, in reality, the bloodiest day in American military history occurred 157 years ago today, September 17, 1862 outside Sharpsburg, Maryland, when the Union Army of the Potomac battled the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia near Antietam Creek. The Battle of Antietam resulted in over 22,000 dead, wounded, or missing. While tactically considered a draw, strategically, most historians consider it to be a union victory, but at a tremendous cost. Following the battle, Abraham Lincoln felt he had the political capital to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, which would go a long way toward preventing international recognition of the Confederacy and hastening the end of the American Civil War. Today, the battlefield of Antietam rests within Antietam National Battlefield, administered by the US National Park Service. The 3,230 acre reserve preserves the landscape of the battlefield, and efforts have been made over the years to restore previously developed portions back to their 1860’s state. Within the site, Guests can visit the Visitor Center, which contains exhibits on the battlefield and events of the day, as well as an observation room, theater and museum store. The Visitor Center also features a 26-minute orientation film narrated by the legendary James Earl Jones. Around the battlefield are many resources to better help Guests understand the scope and importance of the battle. The National Park Service has installed Wayside signage at key locations within the complex. These explain the battles that occurred within the grounds and interpret the events for the general public. Predating the NPS waysides are over 300 19th-Century tablets created by the War Department that detail the regiments and actions of the battle. The National Park Service recommends that Guests have a good working knowledge of the battle of Antietam to best use these landmarks to interpret the site. Following the battle, veterans’ organizations and states commemorated the sacrifice of their troops by constructing memorials at the battle site. Today there are 96 distinct monuments, most of them Union in origin. Exploring the grounds further, Guests can also find artillery locations, denoted by decommissioned cannons on the battlefield, mortuary cannons, which indicate the locations where three Union generals and three Confederate generals were killed or mortally wounded, and can see fence placements from the battle. If an aerial view is more your speed, the site also contains an observation tower built in 1896. The battlefield is also home to the Pry House Field Hospital Museum where visitors can learn more about the medical treatments of the day. Insider tip, come with a strong stomach. Guests can also experience the hallowed ground of the Antietam National Cemetery, the final resting place of over 4,000 Union troops, including over 1,800 unknowns. The cemetery is also home to the Private Soldier Monument, originally displayed at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia and then moved to Sharpsburg. This is only the briefest of overviews of this poignant site. A place like this cannot be sufficiently described in the time we have today, so I encourage all of you to visit this site as well as any of the 11 national battlefields, nine National Military Parks, four National Battlefield Parks and the sole remaining National Battlefield Site. A visit to Antietam is certainly an opportunity to reflect and respect the sacrifices made by so many.

The Rogue Historian
Review - Six Days in September: A Novel of Lee's Army in Maryland, 1862 by Alexander B. Rossino

The Rogue Historian

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2019 4:56


Those of you with an interest in the Battle of Antietam (or Sharpsburg, if you must...) will love the hell out of this fictionalized account of Lee's 1862 invasion of Maryland. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-rogue-historian/support

Haunted Talks - The Official Podcast of The Haunted Walk
Ep 62 - Sharpsburg Civil War Ghost Tours

Haunted Talks - The Official Podcast of The Haunted Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2019 30:21


Sharpsburg, Maryland is a place heavy with the weight of history. It was site of The Battle of Antietam during the Civil War. The battle was the bloodiest day in the history of the United States with over 22,000 dead, wounded, or missing. We explore the history and legends of the area with Mark Brugh, owner of Sharpsburg Civil War Ghost Tours. Mark also hosts his own Civil War podcast. 

Addressing Gettysburg Podcast
Narrative Episode 1: "Introduction: Antietam to Chancellorsville"

Addressing Gettysburg Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2019 45:47


  The Battle of Gettysburg can trace its origins back to September of 1862 when Robert E Lee audaciously lead his Army of Northern Virginia on an invasion of the North.   Since taking command in June of 1862, Lee had beaten back Major General George B McClellan’s Army of the Potomac and secured the Confederate capital of Richmond during the peninsula campaign. He then moved to Northern Virginia where he thrashed Major General John Pope’s Union Army of Virginia in August at the battle of Second Manassas.   After this victory, Lee strategically chose to keep his aggressive momentum going rather than settle into a defensive posture around Richmond. So he turned his attention to Northern Territory; specifically, Pennsylvania, probably, Harrisburg. This, Lee knew, would draw the Union Army out of Virginia.   By September 16, Harpers Ferry had fallen and Jackson’s Corps, save A.P. Hill’s Division, which was en route from Harpers Ferry, had been reunited with Longstreet and Lee on the bluffs along the Antietam Creek outside of Sharpsburg, Maryland. Early that misty morning, Confederate guns opened fire from the high ground northwest of town.   The bloodiest 12 hour period in American history was underway. When it was all over, 23,000 Americans would be killed, wounded or missing.   The battle of Antietam is considered a draw and Lee withdrew his Army back into Virginia.   General George McClellan sat on his laurels and failed to pursue and crush Lee’s army. Lincoln had had enough. By November, Lincoln fired McClellan. Taking his place was Ambrose E Burnside, a General who is best described as “a modest man with much to be  modest about”. This description betrays his flamboyant and unique facial hair styling, which may have given birth to the term sideburns. Upon taking command, Burnside planned an aggressive offensive against Richmond, Virginia by way of Fredericksburg. But this boldness was immediately met with troubles crossing the Rappahannock River, mainly because of delayed pontoon bridges. This gave Robert E Lee time to entrench his army on Marye’s Heights behind the town of Fredericksburg.   On December 13, Burnside ordered the battle begin. Orders from Burnside were to “send a division or more” in an effort to seize the high ground west of Fredericksburg. The approach was fraught with difficulties: fences, gardens, a canal, narrow bridges over the canal and scattered homes, barns and, eventually, the fallen, all promised to break up and slow the Federal advance over the open plain.   Longstreet’s men were hidden behind a stone wall that ran along a sunken road at the base of the heights, known at that time as the Telegraph Road. Major General Lafayette McLaws had about 2000 men on the front line and an additional 7000 reserves on the crest of and behind Marye’s Heights. Batteries pointing in every possible direction had very few target-deficient spots on the Union approaches. As soon as Union troops came out of the city, they came under artillery fire. Next Major General Winfield Scott Hancock’s Division’s emerged to suffer the same fate as French’s. The Irish Brigade, commanded by Brigadier General Thomas Francis Meagher, was first to go up.   Before going into battle, Meagher addressed his men, saying, “This may be my last speech to you, but I will be with you when the battle is the fiercest; and, if I fall, I can say I did my duty, and fell fighting in the most glorious of causes.” His men gave him three cheers. Meagher remained behind, naming a bum knee as the cause.   On the order: “Shoulder arms, right face, forward, double quick, march!” The Irishmen raced toward the enemy.   Immediately they came under artillery fire.   One well-placed Confederate shell exploded among the 88th NY, taking out 18 men. The Confederate line opened fire with a galling sheet of flame.   MULHOLLAND: "Officers and men fell in rapid succession," wrote Lt. Col. St. Clair Mulholland of the 116th Pennsylvania Volunteers. "Lieutenant Garrett Nowlen fell with a ball through the thigh. Major Bardwell fell badly wounded; and a ball whistled through Lieutenant Bob McGuire's lungs. Lieutenant Christian Foltz fell dead, with a ball through the brain. The orderly sergeant of Company H wheeled around, gazed upon Lieutenant Quinlan, and a great stream of blood poured from a hole in his forehead."   By day’s end, Burnside sent Seven Union divisions against Marye’s Heights, one brigade at a time, making a total of fourteen individual charges, each of which failed, costing the United States Army around 7500 casualties. The total Union casualties is the Battle of Fredericksburg were well over 12,000   Confederate losses at Marye's Heights totaled around 1,200 and their total losses in the battle were just over 5000. _______________________________   Major General Joseph Hooker came to command the Army of the Potomac by undermining Ambrose Burnside in any way he could while politicking and forming a band of Hooker-loyalists within the high command of the army. Being fully aware of this and in spite of it, Lincoln gave Hooker the command.   For all his bombast, “Fighting Joe” Hooker played a crucial role in the evolution and condition of the Army of the Potomac. Upon taking command, Hooker implemented changes that made the army easier to manage and that improved the health and morale of its troops.   “I have the finest army on the planet,” Hooker boasted. “I have the finest army the sun ever shone on. ... If the enemy does not run, God help them. May God have mercy on General Lee, for I will have none.”   Joe Hooker was plotting and planning a great campaign that would take his army across the Rappahannock yet again, but this time, not straight at the city of Fredericksburg like his predecessor did.   Instead, Hooker would hold a portion of his army, under Major General John Sedgwick, at Falmouth, across from the city, while marching the remainder north to swing down on Lee’s flank.   Lee, on the other hand, had sent almost half of his army away on a foraging mission under the command of Lieutenant General James Longstreet. This had to be done because the Confederate army was always plagued by shortages in food, clothing and other supplies and equipment. Remaining with Lee were the men of Stonewall Jackson’s corps and two of Longstreet’s divisions. Hooker had Lee outnumbered two to one. Moreover, Hooker had gotten his army safely across the Rappahannock and Rapidan rivers and on Lee’s flank. All that was left to do was crush Lee’s smaller Army of Northern Virginia and march on down to Richmond.   If only it were that easy.   On the night of May 1, Lee and Jackson held a council of war to decide on what to do next. Something needed to be done. They were badly outnumbered. Jackson told Lee that Hooker’s right flank was “in the air”- a term meaning that it wasn’t anchored by a topographical feature like a hill or a river-- and that he knew of a road that could conceal his troops as he moved them on a flanking march of the Army of the Potomac.   When Lee asked which of his troops Jackson would require for the operation, Jackson’s reply was simply: “All of them.”   And so the next day, Jackson lead his men, some 30,000 strong, on a dozen-mile march around the Union right.   Holding the Union right, for now, was the pious Major General Oliver Otis Howard’s XI Corps, made up mostly of German immigrants.   By afternoon, reports filtered in to Howard’s headquarters  and to Hooker’s about Confederate troops being spotted to the west of Howard’s position, which was facing south.   Three colonels in Howards corps reported personally to headquarters. All three reported being laughed at and sent away. Late in the afternoon, as Howard’s men were preparing coffee and food, a massive wave of deer, turkeys, rabbits and the like came charging out of the woods. At first, the Union troops laughed and jeered, some probably thought of what a nice meal some of the animals might provide. But their amusement wouldn’t last long, for, hot on the heels [BEGIN FADE IN OF REBEL YELL, MUSKETRY, MEN RUNNING] of the wildlife came the wild-eyed troops of  Robert Rodes’ Confederate division. Howard’s XI Corps was caught totally off-guard.   Rode’s rebels swept through the Yankee camps as eleventh corps soldiers fled for safety.   Just five Union regiments offered resistance...until they, too, caved to the massive gray wave.   Nightfall brought an end to Jackson’s attack. Jackson, however, wasn’t ready for it to end and took to taking a personal reconnaissance of the enemy positions in hopes of making a rare night attack. Upon returning to his lines, Jackson and his staff were mistaken for enemy cavalry by Confederate pickets and were fired upon. Two of his aides were killed. Jackson was hit twice in the left arm and once in the right hand. While carrying him off on a littler, the litter-bearers tripped and fell, dumping Jackson off the litter on his left side. AP Hill was now in command, but he would soon be wounded through the calves and command of Jackson’s Corps went to Lee’s Cavalry commander, General James Ewell Brown “JEB” Stuart. Outnumbered over two to one, Robert E. Lee won his “perfect battle”. Casualties for the Army of Northern Virginia were more than it had taken at Antietam. Of the roughly 60,000 men engaged, over 13,000 were casualties.But that was 21 and a half percent.   Arguably the costliest casualty of the battle of Chancellorsville was that of Stonewall Jackson. Upon learning of Jackson’s loss of his arm, Lee famously said that Jackson “has lost his left arm, but I have lost my right.”   Stonewall Jackson’s wounds resulted in the amputation of his left arm. By May 9th, he was in repose at the office of Thomas Chandler’s Fairfield Plantation in Guinea Station, Virginia. His wounds were healing much to the satisfaction of his young surgeon, Doctor Hunter McGuire, but, along his road to recovery, Jackson had developed pneumonia. Doctor McGuire had consulted other doctors and Jackson’s prognosis was grim: he would die within the day.   “Presently a smile of ineffable sweetness spread itself over his pale face, and he cried quietly and with an expression as if of relief, ‘Let us cross over the river and rest under the shade of the trees’; and then, without pain or the least struggle, his spirit passed from earth to the God who gave it.”-- Dr. Hunter McGuire ____________________________________________________________________ SPONSORS GettysBike Tours- www.gettysbike.com Rick Garland- http://www.obejoyfull.com/ ______________________________________________________________________ CREDITS: Written, narrated and edited by Matt Callery Historical consultation by Licensed Battlefield Guide Bob Steenstra.   Music by Dusty Lee Elmer, Pearle Shannon and Kelley Shannon, O Be Joyful, and the California Consolidated Drum Band   Recorded in Studio A at the GettysBike Tours studios   Copyright 2019   _____________________________________________________________________   REFERENCES:   The National Park Service http://www.battlefields.org/learn/civil-war/battles/fredericksburg Battle of Fredericksburg in Encyclopedia Virginia Official Records Mackowski, Chris, and Kristopher D. White. Simply Murder: The Battle of Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862 Wert, Jeffry D. The Sword of Lincoln: The Army of the Potomac.   For recommended reading about the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, please go to www.addressinggettysburg.com/books and follow us on Instagram and Facebook @addressinggettysburg    

B98.5 Morning Show

Laurie in Sharpsburg wants to take that $100 from Kara but will she be able to do it? It's the 5 @ 7:35 on B98.5!

B98.5 Morning Show

Scott and his son Saul called in from Sharpsburg today to try and take down Kara. Can the duo do it?

Clint Byars Podcast
How To Stop The Pain - Jim Richards

Clint Byars Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2018 65:44


Dr. Jim Richards ministers at Forward Church in Sharpsburg, GA on his book, How to Stop the Pain. This book has been setting people free from offenses and unforgiveness for nearly 20 years. This paradigm-changing book is a must-read for people who are stuck in the pain of the past, you can end the suffering. This book is also a must-have for counselors and ministers seeking to equip people to forgive and move forward. Visit www.impactministries.com

History with Mark Bielski
Antietam with Jack Mountcastle

History with Mark Bielski

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2018 42:51


Jack Mountcastle returns to discuss the momentous battle of Antietam in September 1862. It was the single bloodiest day of warfare in American history. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, emboldened by the victory at Second Manassas in August 1862, had crossed into Maryland. Near the little town of Sharpsburg, they clashed with the Union Army of the Potomac under George B. McClellan. Somehow Lee’s battle plans fell into Union hands. Would that make a difference?

Marta On The Move Podcast- Hosted by Marta Napoleone Mazzoni
Gemma Hoskins Researcher From "The Keepers" on Netflix Discusses The Murder Of Cathy Cesnik

Marta On The Move Podcast- Hosted by Marta Napoleone Mazzoni

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2018 51:50


Gemma Hoskins From "The Keepers" on Netflix   This is the lead up to Halloween in which I feature different themes revolving around this holiday. Stories about facing your fears, spooky stories, psychics, magic, murder, and more have been featured, and I could not wait to release this episode. There was once a suggestion on Netflix given to me by a friend, that suggestion was a documentary called “The Keepers”. I had no clue what the show was about, but trusted the source and one weekend while I was ill decided to binge it. I was instantly hooked.   Where do I even start with this? How do I tell you to watch this show without giving too much away? The story is disturbing, but i