Podcasts about Lawfare

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  • 217PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Lawfare

Show all podcasts related to lawfare

Latest podcast episodes about Lawfare

The Lawfare Podcast
What's Up With the January 6 Investigation?

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 48:15


The January 6 investigating committee in the House is busily issuing subpoenas, collecting documents and negotiating with witnesses for depositions. It is also being defied by certain witnesses, and the former president is threatening to try to stop the National Archives from turning over material related to his activities and communications during and leading up to the January 6 insurrection.To chew over the entire spectrum of issues the committee is facing, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Brookings congressional guru and Lawfare senior editor Molly Reynolds, and Quinta Jurecic, also a senior editor at Lawfare and a Brookings fellow focusing on post-Trump accountability issues. They are the authors together of a recent piece on Lawfare on the hurdles the January 6 investigation may face. They talked about executive privilege claims involving witnesses; about executive privilege claims involving documents; about who controls the privilege, the current president or the past president; and about whether this is all just a complex scheme to run out the clock. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rational Security
The "Choosy Spies Choose JIF" Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 63:10


This week, Alan, Quinta and Scott were joined by Rational Security forefather and Washington Post reporter Shane Harris to discuss:“The Hunt for Bread October”: Which country did a U.S. Navy employee and his wife attempt to smuggle nuclear secrets to inside a peanut butter sandwich? And why did that country turn them over to FBI instead?“Turn After Leaving”: Is the intelligence community executing its own pivot to Asia—and will the post-withdrawal collapse of Afghanistan stymie its effort?“You Got Served”: Will the January 6 committee get the testimony and documents it is demanding, over former President Trump's open direction not to cooperate?For object lessons, Alan steered listeners to do some self-guided learning via the Great Courses Plus program; Quinta brought some attention to the unique items former White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham chose to put in her background during her recent appearance on Meet the Press; Scott encouraged D.C. residents to run and get the cocomotion, rum distillery Cotton & Reed's incredibly delicious rendition of a fermented piña colada, before temperatures get too chilly; and Shane doubled down on the Queen's endorsement of her new favorite show, Line of Duty. Be sure to visit our show page at www.lawfareblog.com and to follow us on Twitter at @RatlSecurity. And Rational Security listeners can now get a committed ad-free feed by becoming a Lawfare material supporter at www.patreon.com/lawfare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
What's Going on in Afghanistan?

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 46:38


Bryce Klehm sat down with Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, and Lawfare senior editor Scott R. Anderson, to discuss the current situation in Afghanistan. They covered a range of issues, including the Taliban government's formation since the U.S. withdrawal, the current humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan and the international community's response.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bulwark Podcast
David Priess: Getting the Truth on January 6

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 45:28


Not only is Trump doubling down in support of the Jan. 6 insurrectionists, he's turning Ashli Babbitt into a martyr. Plus, when will Biden build back better bumper sticker-style messaging from the White House? Lawfare's David Priess joins Charlie Sykes on today's podcast. Special Guest: David Priess.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Maria Ressa on the Weaponization of Social Media

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 57:01


From October 15, 2020: On this episode of Lawfare's Arbiters of Truth series on disinformation, Evelyn Douek spoke with Maria Ressa, a Filipino-American journalist and co-founder of Rappler, an online news site based in Manila. Maria was included in Time's Person of the Year in 2018 for her work combating fake news, and is currently fighting a conviction for “cyberlibel” in the Philippines for her role at Rappler. Maria and her fight are the subject of the film, “A Thousand Cuts,” released in virtual cinemas this summer and to be broadcast on PBS Frontline in early next year.As a country where Facebook is the internet, the Philippines was in a lot of ways ground zero for many of the same dynamics and exploitations of social media that are currently playing out around the world. What is the warning we need to take from Maria's experience and the experience of Philippine democracy? Why is the global south both the beta test and an afterthought for companies like Facebook? And how is it possible that Maria is still, somehow, optimistic?Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
White House Pressure, the Justice Department and the Election

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 50:03


The majority staff of the Senate Judiciary Committee has issued an interim report, entitled “Subverting Justice: How the Former President and His Allies Pressured DOJ to Overturn the 2020 Election.” A lot of it covers ground we knew about previously, but it contains a raft of new details about the president's pressure on the Justice Department to support his election fraud claims, the resignation of a U.S. attorney in Georgia, and the bizarre attempt to install as acting attorney general a Justice Department official who might actually support the president's ambitions. To go over it all, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Lawfare senior editors Alan Rozenshtein and Quinta Jurecic, and Lawfare associate editor Bryce Klehm, who has been reading all of the depositions in the matter. They talked about what the committee found, what aspects of it are new and what we might do about this dramatic turn of events.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rational Security
The "What's In The Box?!?" Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 69:58


This week, Alan, Quinta, and Scott were joined by special guest and Lawfare associate editor Bryce Klehm to discuss:"The Problem with Nosy Neighbors": How concerned should we be about the Chinese military getting up in Taiwan's business—and airspace—over the weekend?"If You Want to be Popular, Don't Go to Law School": Does the Supreme Court's declining popularity mean it is headed for a legitimacy crisis? And finally:"Now That's Outside-the-Box Financial Planning": What do the recently unleashed Pandora Papers tell us about the world's wealthy elites—and the people leaking information about them? For object lessons, Quinta encouraged listeners to check out pictures and other remembrances of the COVID memorial exhibit on the National Mall that ended this past weekend; Scott endorsed the YouTube channel of his favorite online bartender as well as his new favorite drink, the Trinidad Sour; Alan sang the praises of his favorite open source operating system, Linux, and urged others to convert; and Bryce spoke of his love for Ken Burns and his latest documentary on Muhammad Ali.And if you have questions for our forthcoming mailbag segment, be sure to send them to us!Be sure to visit our show page at www.lawfareblog.com and to follow us on Twitter at @RatlSecurity. And Rational Security listeners can now get a committed ad-free feed by becoming a Lawfare material supporter at www.patreon.com/lawfare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Mira Rapp-Hooper and Stephan Haggard on North Korea

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 46:52


From August 5, 2017: The growing threat from North Korea has intensified during the past few weeks after a series of missile tests demonstrated that the Kim regime may soon be able to strike the continental United States. This week, Benjamin Wittes spoke with Mira Rapp-Hooper, an adjunct senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, and Stephan Haggard, a distinguished professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego, to discuss recent events and the path forward for the United States and the international community. They addressed the diplomatic and military options for addressing the North Korean threat, the likelihood that the Kim regime will respond to traditional deterrence strategies, and how a new administration in the U.S. changes the dynamics in the region.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Ambassador David O'Sullivan on the US-EU Relationship

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 59:14


From October 9, 2018: It's easy to spend all our time focusing on American domestic politics these days, but the rest of the world is not going away. Take the European Union, for example—our neighbors from across the pond, and one of the US's most valuable economic and security relationships. There's a lot going on over there, and some of it even involves us. How is that relationship faring in the age of tariffs, presidential blusters, Brexit, and tensions over Iran sanctions?To figure that out, Shannon Togawa Mercer and Benjamin Wittes spoke to David O'Sullivan, the EU Ambassador to the United States. They talked about the US-EU trade relationship, Iran and Russia sanctions, Privacy Shield, the rule of law in deconsolidating democracies in the EU, and more.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rational Security
The "Are We Cheugy?" Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 59:26


This week, Alan, Quinta, and Scott were joined by special guest (and our first-ever undisputed Generation Z guest) Lawfare managing editor Jacob Schulz! They discussed:From the Department of the End of the Republic: Should a recently revealed plan to manipulate the counting of the 2020 electoral votes in President Trump's favor have us worried about 2024?A Prisoner Dilemma: What should we make of China's use of hostage diplomacy to secure the release of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou? And,Hitting “Unfriend”: Is a federal court correct that Facebook has an obligation to share information on atrocities with international tribunals?For object lessons, Quinta endorsed "The Other Two" for some wholesome entertainment; Alan sang the praises of the newest pasta shape on the block; Scott dismissed Alan's pasta shape as a thing of nightmares, while endorsing the Tuscan classic "priest-strangler" (and saying hello to some RatSec listeners in the family); and Jacob brought our attention to the trend of French presidents being abused by their constituents, exemplified most recently by the (unsuccessful) egging of French President Emmanuel Macron. Be sure to visit our show page at www.lawfareblog.com and to follow us on Twitter at @RatlSecurity. And Rational Security listeners can now get a committed ad-free feed by becoming a Lawfare material supporter at www.patreon.com/lawfare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Gayle Tzemach Lemmon on ‘Ashley's War' and the Role of Women on the Special Ops Battlefield

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 60:49


From January 23, 2016: The fourth Hoover Book Soiree, held this week in Hoover's beautiful Washington, D.C. offices, featured Gayle Tzemach Lemmon on her newest book, Ashley's War: The Untold Story of a Team of Women Soldiers on the Special Ops Battlefield. At the event, Lemmon, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, and Lawfare's editor-in-chief Benjamin Wittes discussed the growing role of women soldiers in special operations and beyond, examining the story of a cultural support team of women hand-picked from the Army in 2011 to serve in Afghanistan alongside Army Rangers and Navy SEALs. Their conversation dives into how the program developed, the lessons learned in the process, and why its success may provide critical insights for future force integration. Former Marine and current Lawfare contributor Zoe Bedell, who served in a similar capacity in Afghanistan, joined them on the panel to discuss her own experiences.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Shivshankar Menon on India's Role in the World

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 85:18


From October 11, 2014: On his recent trip to the United States, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi emphasized India's desire to take up a greater role on the world stage. With India's renewed ambition, it is increasingly important for policymakers to understand what that role may look like, how it is envisioned from the Indian perspective, and how the country views international developments. Great opportunity exists for improved bilateral relations that bring stability, increased trade, and future defense, intelligence, and counterterrorism cooperation in the region.This week, Ambassador Shivshankar Menon, former national security adviser and former foreign secretary to the government of India, gave a speech at Brookings entitled, “India's Role in the World.” In his address, Ambassador Menon discusses the new optimism in U.S.-India bilateral relations on the heels of newly elected Prime Minister Narendra Modi's recent visit and how leaders can capitalize on this new momentum. Ambassador Menon also delves into India's relations with Pakistan, Bangladesh, and other countries in the region, its evolving outlook on China, and what role, if any, India can play in countering violent extremism found in groups like transnational terrorist organizations like ISIS and al Qaeda.Strobe Talbott, president of The Brookings Institution, introduced Ambassador Menon and moderated the discussion.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rational Security
The "Milley's Crossing" Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 59:45


This week, Alan, Quinta and Scott were joined by special guest Lawfare executive editor (and first-time podcaster) Natalie Orpett! They sat down to discuss:The AUKUS Awkwardness: Why does a new U.S.-U.K.-Australia agreement over submarines have France (and China) up in arms?Not Like on J6: What does the "Justice for J6 Rally" flop tell us about the state of right-wing extremism here in the United States and how the media covers it?Milley's Crossing: Did the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff step out of line in trying to assuage Chinese concerns over President Trump's intentions?For Object Lessons, Alan shared his Midwest pride in his wife's (vegetarian) hot dish (recipe here). Quinta celebrated the tearing down of the monument to inefficiency at the center of D.C.'s Dave Thomas Circle. Scott shared a scandalous discovery he recently made at a family wedding. And Natalie urged listeners to both visit the touching monument to Americans who died as a result of the COVID pandemic on the National Mall and celebrated the French language's special way with outrage, as embodied in the French national anthem. Be sure to visit our show page at http://www.lawfareblog.com and to follow us on Twitter at @RatlSecurity. And Rational Security listeners can now get a committed ad-free feed by becoming a Lawfare material supporter at http://www.patreon.com/lawfare! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
What's Up at Congress with Quinta Jurecic and Molly Reynolds

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 41:28


Congress, which has been on recess for the month of August, has a lot on its plate. The January 6 committee is starting to receive information, and it has gone into stealth mode. If Congress doesn't get its act together, the government is going to shut down and we're going to default on the federal debt. And there's actually been some oversight hearings recently. We decided to check in on it all with Molly Reynolds and Quinta Jurecic, both of the Brookings Institution and both senior editors at Lawfare. They joined Benjamin Wittes to talk about what Congress has been doing, what's coming down the pike and if we are headed toward disaster.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Milley, Trump and Civil-Military Relations with Peter Feaver, Kori Schake and Alexander Vindman

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 58:05


A new book by Bob Woodward and Robert Costa contains reporting about several controversial actions by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley in late 2000 and early 2021, regarding conversations with his Chinese counterparts, his discussion with senior military officers about following standard nuclear procedures (if need be), and reaching out to others like the CIA and NSA directors to remind them to watch everything closely. Were each of these reported actions proper for a Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and why? And what about all of this coming out in books? To talk through it all, David Priess sat down with an A-team on civil-military relations. Peter Feaver is a civil-military relations expert at Duke University and director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies. He served in National Security Council staff positions in both the Bill Clinton and the George W. Bush administrations. Kori Schake is the director of foreign and defense policy at the American Enterprise Institute who has worked in the Joint Staff J5, in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and in the National Security Council's staff, as well as the State Department's policy planning staff during Bush 43's administration. She has also researched and written extensively on civil-military relations. And Alex Vindman is Lawfare's Pritzker Military Fellow and a visiting fellow at Perry World House. His government experience includes multiple U.S. Army assignments, time inside the office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and in the National Security Council staff.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Seth Stoughton on the Shooting of Ashli Babbitt

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 63:42


On January 6, a mob of pro-Trump supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol during the certification of the Electoral College vote. As lawmakers were being evacuated by Capitol police, Ashli Babbitt, a 35-year-old Air Force veteran, tried to climb through a shattered window in a barricaded door. Capitol Police Lt. Michael Byrd shot Babbitt as she was climbing through the window and Babbitt died later that day. In the polarized debate over January 6, the death of Ashli Babbitt has become a focal point and one of unusual political valence. Many on the right view her as a martyred hero and the police officer that shot her as an example of excessive force. Those on the left, who have traditionally been outspoken about police killings, have largely stayed quiet. To the extent they've commented, it's been to emphasize the unique circumstances of the Capitol insurrection as justification for the use of lethal force. The Department of Justice, having reviewed the incident, determined that there was insufficient evidence to charge Officer Byrd with violating Babbitt's civil rights, although DOJ did not conclude one way or the other, whether the shooting was justified under the Fourth Amendment.To work through the legal issues around the shooting of Ashli Babbitt, Alan Rozenshtein spoke with Seth Stoughton, associate professor of law at the University of South Carolina and the coauthor of a recent Lawfare post on the shooting. Stoughton is a nationally recognized expert on police use of force. A former police officer himself, he was a key witness for the murder prosecution of Derek Chauvin, the police officer who killed George Floyd. Alan spoke with Stoughton about the murky factual records surrounding the Babbitt shooting, the complex constitutional and statutory issues that it raises and what its political effects say about the broader prospects for police reform.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Defending an Unowned Internet

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 98:51


A discussion at the Berkman Center: In the wake of the disclosures about government surveillance and the rise of corporate-run applications and protocols, is the idea of an “unowned” Internet still a credible one? The Berkman Center's Jonathan Zittrain moderates a panel, incluing Yochai Benkler (Harvard Law School), Ebele Okobi (Yahoo!), Bruce Schneier (CO3 Systames), and Benjamin Wittes (Brookings Institution) to explore surveillance, and the potential for reforms in policy, technology, and corporate and consumer behavior.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Benjamin Wittes Gives a Talk at Parliament on Whether Drones are the New Guantanamo

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 60:56


Lawfare's editor in chief, Benjamin Wittes, gives a talk at the Palace of Westminster--sponsored by the Henry Jackson Society--on whether drones are becoming the new Guantanamo.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Clint Watts and Christian Finnegan Episode 436

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 65:15


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day.   Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls.   Clint Watts is a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute and Non-Resident Fellow at the Alliance for Securing Democracy. He is also a national security contributor for NBC News and MSNBC. He recently examined the rise of social media influence by publishing his first book entitled Messing With The Enemy: Surviving in a Social Media World of Hackers, Terrorists, Russians and Fake News. His research and writing focuses on terrorism, counterterrorism, social media influence and Russian disinformation. Clint's tracking of terrorist foreign fighters allowed him to predict the rise of the Islamic State over al Qaeda in 2014. From 2014 – 2016, Clint worked with a team to track and model the rise of Russian influence operations via social media leading up to the U.S. Presidential election of 2016. This research led Clint to testify before four different Senate committees in 2017 and 2018 regarding Russia's information warfare campaign against the U.S. and the West.   Clint's writing has appeared in a range of publications to include the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, The Daily Beast, Politico, Lawfare, War On The Rocks and the Huffington Post. Before becoming a consultant, Clint served as a U.S. Army infantry officer, a FBI Special Agent, as the Executive Officer of the Combating Terrorism Center at West Point (CTC), as a consultant to the FBI's Counter Terrorism Division (CTD) and National Security Branch (NSB), and as an analyst supporting the U.S. Intelligence Community and U.S. Special Operations Command.   21:00 Christian Finnegan  is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actor based in New York City. Finnegan is perhaps best known as one of the original panelists on VH1's Best Week Ever and as Chad, the only white roommate in the “Mad Real World” sketch on Comedy Central's Chappelle's Show. Additional television appearances as himself or performing stand up have included “Conan”, “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson”, "Would You Rather...with Graham Norton", “Good Afternoon America” and multiple times on The Today Show and Countdown with Keith Olbermann, and on History's I Love the 1880s. He hosted TV Land's game show "Game Time". As an actor, Finnegan portrayed the supporting role of "Carl" in the film Eden Court, a ticket agent in "Knight and Day" and several guest roles including a talk show host on "The Good Wife". In October 2006, Finnegan's debut stand up comedy CD titled Two For Flinching was released by Comedy Central Records, with a follow-up national tour of college campuses from January to April 2007. “Au Contraire!” was released by Warner Bros. Records in 2009. His third special "The Fun Part" was filmed at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston on April 4, 2013 and debuted on Netflix on April 15, 2014.   Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page    

Rational Security
The “Everyone Is Wrong” Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 71:38


On this week's episode, Alan, Quinta, and Scott are joined by the fourth member of their Lawfare senior editor quartet, Brookings Institution Senior Fellow (and first-time Rational Security guest) Molly Reynolds!They sit down to discuss: the legacy of 9/11 and whether we've really done everything wrong since (including in Congress); the last tragic drone strike in Kabul that now appears to have killed an Afghan aid worker and his family, and what it tells us about the future of the U.S. drone program; and what the fences going up around the Capitol in advance of the right-wing “Justice for J6” rally this weekend mean for the state of our democracy. For object lessons, Alan mentioned this article in The Atlantic on "How Hollywood Sold Out to China"; Quinta highlighted Kim Kardashian's striking outfit at the 2021 Met Gala; Scott bore first-hand witness to the return of bald eagles to our nation's capital; and Molly recommended the new podcast "Bad Blood: The Final Chapter" on the Theranos trial.Be sure to visit our show page at http://www.lawfareblog.com/ and to follow us on Twitter at @RatlSecurity. And Rational Security listeners can now get a committed ad-free feed by becoming a Lawfare supporter at http://www.patreon.com/lawfare/! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Bruce Reidel with Breaking 9/11 News

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 44:08


Lawfare Editor-In-Chief Benjamin Wittes sits down with Bruce Reidel of the Brookings Institution to discuss a pair of new articles in Lawfare on his first hand accounts of events in the wake of 9/11.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dynamic Independence
Vaccine Mandates - Economic Warfare And Lawfare

Dynamic Independence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 52:47


We examine the aspects of what vaccine mandates are now going to mean to you and your wellbeing. Are you now going to lose your sources of income? What is the next step in this form of economic warfare? Is it headed to lawfare? Also, is Biden on the golf course while countless Americans are stranded on the other side of the world? What was his reception from the public at the 9/11 memorial? And, inflation is here. What will this now mean to you at the consumer level? We ask the questions.

The Lawfare Podcast
Jack Goldsmith and Ben Wittes on Lawfare Origins and 9/11

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 60:56


More than 11 years ago. Bobby Chesney, Jack Goldsmith and Ben started a national security law blog called Lawfare. Focused, almost exclusively on issues related to the US government's reaction to 9/11 and the reactions to those government policies and the legal justifications for them in its early days, Lawfare was largely unknown to the general public outside of national security lawyers inside the U S government Lawfare didn't even have a podcast.Jack and Ben joined me to talk through these origins of Lawfare, it's intimate connection to 9/11 and its aftermath, and the importance of analyzing these issues at the intersection of national security, law, and policy.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: How Osama bin Laden Escaped Afghanistan

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 79:36


Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Kent Roach on the 9/11 Effect

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2021 54:00


Lawfare's Alan Rozenshtein interviews University of Toronto Professor Kent Roach about his new book, The 9/11 Effect: Comparative Counter-Terrorism.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rational Security
Rational Security 2.0, The "Bloodless Coup" Edition

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 62:06


On this premiere episode of Rational Security 2.0, new hosts Alan Rozenshtein, Quinta Jurecic, and Scott R. Anderson are joined by special guest Benjamin Wittes to discuss: the Taliban's new government and the brutal way it seems to be governing (especially in relation to women); the Biden administration's border policies, and why they're facing trouble in the courts; and our summer from hell: are recent heat waves, wildfires, and floods now a permanent part of the American experience, and will this change the political calculus on climate change?For object lessons, Alan testified to the charms of Duluth, Minnesota; Ben talked about his efforts to shrink his carbon footprint, including by building Lawfare a new conference table; Quinta discussed an exciting new line of action figures taking toy stores by storm (pictured below); and Scott explained why the end of the global pandemic may just taste like pumpkin beer. Rational Security is a product of Lawfare. Be sure to visit Rational Security's show page and support Lawfare on Patreon to gain access to ad-free podcast feeds and other benefits. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Todd Herman Show
Hour 1: Modern Lawfare

The Todd Herman Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 35:49


Samoan activist Tusitala Toese shot in Olympia, WA by Antifa. General Anthony Tata: We have abandoned Americans in Afghanistan. // Environmentalists push to accord human rights to a river in New Zealand… Texas abortion law is the right using the law-fare tactics of the left // GUEST: Bryan Suits – The Taliban can't hide who they are for long. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Danielle Citron on Feminism and National Security

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 44:07


From December 12, 2019: Live from the #NatSecGirlSquad Conference in Washington, DC, on December 12, 2019, Benjamin Wittes sat down with Danielle Citron, professor of law at Boston University, VP of the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, and MacArthur Genius Grant Fellow. Ben and Danielle talked about technology, sexual privacy, sextortion, and the previously unexplored intersections of feminism and cybersecurity.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Phil Carter on Civil-Military Relations in the Trump Administration

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 38:48


From February 20, 2018: The military has been not been a refuge from the Trump administration's norm-defying nature. Jack Goldsmith speaks to Phil Carter, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, about the history of civil-military relations, episodes that highlight the Trump administration's departure from that tradition, and what that may mean for the future.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Shane Harris on Drones

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 46:38


From January 29, 2012: Our subject in the podcast's inaugural episode is a remarkable article by journalist Shane Harris entitled "Out of the Loop: The Human-Free Future of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles."Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Horns of a Dilemma
Insurgency is Easier than Governing: The Future of the Taliban in Afghanistan

Horns of a Dilemma

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 50:29


With the fall of President Ashraf Ghani's government and the withdrawal of U.S. and NATO forces, most of Afghanistan is now under the control of the Taliban. In this episode of Horns of a Dilemma, we are joined by Dr. Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, and the director of the Initiative on Nonstate Armed Actors at Brookings, and by Scott R. Anderson, a visiting fellow in governance studies at Brookings, a senior editor and counsel for Lawfare, and a senior fellow with the National Security Law Program at Columbia Law School. Felbab-Brown and Anderson discuss the outlook for the Taliban as they seek to shift from insurgency to governance.  The discussion covers questions of formal legal recognition, as well as questions of legitimacy and capacity for governance. Our guests explain why exercising power as the government of Afghanistan is likely to be more challenging for the Taliban than defeating the previous government was. As Dr. Felbab-Brown observed, "it's much easier to be an insurgent than a governor."

Rational Security
A Sneak Peak: Rational Security 2.0: The Next Generation

Rational Security

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 2:01


Rational Security 2.0 returns after Labor Day…You can get the rest of this bonus episode, “The ‘Dry-Runs Are for Cowards' Edition,” by becoming a Lawfare supporter at http://www.patreon.com/lawfare/. And help us plan for our next phase by filling out this survey: https://forms.gle/ga7rUz6QfNSE6NST9.Weekly episodes of Rational Security 2.0 will start returning to this podcast feed after Labor Day… See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Data Brokers and National Security

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 40:58


A privacy and national security threat that goes under-discussed is data brokers, the secretive industry of companies buying, aggregating, selling, licensing and otherwise sharing consumer data. Justin Sherman is a fellow at Duke University's Technology Policy Lab, where he directs the project on data brokers. He also recently wrote a piece for Lawfare about data brokers advertising data on U.S. military personnel. Jacob Schulz sat down with Justin to talk about data brokers and the national security threat that they pose.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Bob Bauer and A.B. Culvahouse on Defending the President

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 35:17


From October 7, 2017: Last month, Lawfare and Foreign Policy hosted an event on lawyering for the Trump presidency. Susan Hennessey spoke with former White House Counsels Bob Bauer, who served in the Obama administration from 2010 to 2011, and A.B. Culvahouse, who served in the Reagan administration from 1987 to 1989, in a lively discussion on providing legal support when your client is the president. They talked about the distinction between a president's personal counsel and White House counsel, the challenges of defending a president during an investigation, and the quotidian aspects of the role of the White House Counsel.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Michelle Melton on Climate Change as a National Security Threat

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 44:56


From April 16, 2019: Since November, Lawfare Contributor Michelle Melton has run a series on our website about Climate Change and National Security, examining the implication of the threat as well as U.S. and international responses to climate change. Melton is a student a Harvard Law school. Prior to that she was an associate fellow in the Energy and National Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, where she focused on climate policy.She and Benjamin Wittes sat down to discuss the series. They talked about why we should think about climate change as a national security threat, the challenges of viewing climate change through this paradigm, the long-standing relationship between climate change and the U.S. national security apparatus, and how climate change may affect global migration.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Why the Taliban Can't Use Facebook

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 57:04


When the Taliban seized power following the U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan this month, major platforms like Facebook and Twitter faced a quandary. What should they do with accounts and content belonging to the fundamentalist insurgency that was suddenly running a country? Should they treat the Taliban as the Afghan government and let them post, or should they remove Taliban content under U.S. sanctions law? If you're coming at this from the tech sphere, you may have been seeing conversation in recent weeks about how this has raised new and difficult issues for platforms thrust into the center of geopolitics by questions of what to do about Taliban accounts. But, how new are these problems, really? On this week's episode of our Arbiters of Truth series on our online information ecosystem, Evelyn Douek and Quinta Jurecic spoke with Scott R. Anderson, a senior editor at Lawfare and a fellow at the Brookings Institution, whom you might have heard on some other Lawfare podcasts about Afghanistan in recent weeks. They talked about the problems of recognition and sanctions law that platforms are now running into—and they debated whether or not the platforms are navigating uncharted territory, or whether they're dealing with the same problems that other institutions, like banks, have long grappled with.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bulwark Podcast
David Priess: Was It An Intelligence Failure?

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 47:27


On today's podcast, Lawfare's David Priess joins host Charlie Sykes to discuss mosquitos, vaccines, and whether Afghanistan represented a failure of intelligence... or policy. Special Guest: David Priess.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Joseph Nye on "Do Morals Matter?: Presidents and Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump"

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 43:22


From March 7, 2020: We ask a lot of questions about foreign policy on this podcast. Why do certain countries make certain decisions? What are the interests of the players in question? What are the consequences and, of course, the legality of foreign policy choices. In a new book, Joseph Nye, professor emeritus and former dean of the Harvard Kennedy School, asks another question about foreign policy. Do morals matter? Jack Goldsmith sat down with Nye to discuss his new book, 'Do Morals Matter?: Presidents and Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump.' They discussed the ethical and theoretical factors by which Nye judged each president before going through many of the cases he focuses on in the book.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Jihadology Podcast: al-Qaeda's Franchising Strategy

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 75:36


From February 2, 2016: Barak Mendelsohn comes on the Jihadology Podcast to discuss his new book, “The al-Qaeda Franchise: The Expansion of al-Qaeda and Its Consequences.” Some of the topics covered include:How organizations expandWhy AQ decided to branch out and the strategy behind that decisionAQ's choices on where to expandCase studies on AQ's different branchesSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
How Can Congress Take on the Ransomware Problem?

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 53:13


The United States government has been wrestling with what to do about a particular type of cyber threat—ransomware—that holds a victim's data and computer systems hostage until they pay, usually in the form of cryptocurrency, to an anonymous recipient. Recent ransomware attacks have threatened everything from hospitals to the media industry, with payment being the main way that most companies are choosing to get back online. But what does giving into such demands mean for broader U.S. efforts to prevent and deter ransomware attacks? Scott R. Anderson sat down on Lawfare Live with Lawfare editor-in-chief Benjamin Wittes and Lawfare fellow in cybersecurity law Alvaro Marañon, who together recently authored a piece for Lawfare entitled, “Ransomware Payments and the Law.” They argue that stemming the flow of payments is essential to deterring ransomware attacks and argue that the United States should adopt a policy banning such payments in all but the most serious cases. They discussed the threat that ransomware poses to the U.S. economy, how payments should be dealt with, and what Congress and the Biden administration seem to be doing about it.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Fighting Deep Fakes

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 45:19


From August 4, 2018: Technologies that distort representations of reality, like audio, photo and video editing software, are nothing new, but what happens when these technologies are paired with artificial intelligence to produce hyper-realistic media of things that never happened? This new phenomenon, called "deep fakes," poses significant problems for lawyers, policymakers, and technologists.On July 19, Klon Kitchen, senior fellow for technology and national security at the Heritage Foundation, moderated a panel with Bobby Chesney of the University of Texas at Austin Law School, Danielle Citron of the University of Maryland Carey School of Law, and Chris Bregler, a senior computer scientist and AI manager at Google. They talked about how deep fakes work, why they don't fit into the current legal and policy thinking, and about how policy, technology and the law can begin to combat them.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: A Conversation with John Rizzo

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 48:36


From April 19, 2014: Benjamin Wittes had meant to have a book review of former CIA lawyer John Rizzo's new book, Company Man: Thirty Years of Controversy and Crisis in the CIA, ready to run along with this episode of the podcast. But he was still working on the review, which will be up shortly, and he didn't want to hold up the podcast while he finished it.Ben caught up with Rizzo at a recent conference at Pepperdine University Law School. They talked about the book, some of its major themes, the persistence of the interrogation controversies and their latest manifestations. They also talked about the growth of lawyering at the CIA and why all the lawyers in the world can't seem to keep the agency out of trouble. And they talked about a career that, in many ways, tells the story of the modern CIA and the effort to do intelligence and covert action under law—from the Church Committee to the post 9/11 scandals.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
A Moratorium Fiasco

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 52:11


You've probably heard about the craziness around the Biden administration's new eviction moratorium. They consulted outside law professors instead of the Justice Department. Or did they? The president said he didn't have the authority to do it, and then he did it anyway. Lawfare has published two big articles on the subject in the last couple of days—one of them by Lawfare senior editor Alan Rozenshtein, and the other by Lawfare founding editor Jack Goldsmith. They both joined Benjamin Wittes to talk it all through. What exactly did the Biden administration say? What exactly did it do? Where was the Justice Department? And did any of this violate the law? Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Ben Kaiser and Jonathan Mayer on Fighting Misinformation Online

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 42:05


The spread of misinformation is one of the biggest challenges facing social media platforms. A standard approach is to label suspicious posts or links so as to warn users that what they're engaging with is not reputable, but warnings, despite their wide use, haven't proven to be particularly successful. So what's a social media platform to do? Two Princeton University computer scientists, Ben Kaiser, a PhD student, and Professor Jonathan Mayer, think they've found a better way. Instead of warning users about misinformation, they propose putting roadblocks between users and the misinformation they're tempted to click on. Alan Rozenshtein spoke with Ben and Jonathan about their research and about a piece they and Dr. J. Nathan Matias wrote recently for Lawfare entitled, "Warnings that Work: Combating Misinformation Without Deplatforming." Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: War Powers History You Never Knew with Matt Waxman

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2021 60:39


From March 9, 2019: For the past year, Matthew Waxman has been writing a series of vignettes on Lawfare about interesting—and usually overlooked—historical episodes of American constitutional war powers in action, and relating them to modern debates. These include the stories of St. Claire's Defeat and the Whiskey Rebellion during the Washington administration, congressional war powers and the surprisingly late termination of World War I, the proposed Ludlow Amendment during the interwar years, and Dwight Eisenhower's surprisingly broad Taiwan force authorization.Benjamin Wittes invited Matt on the podcast to talk about these episodes and how they fit together into the book broader project from which they sprung. It's a great discussion, very different from the usual war powers debates. Even if you think you know a lot about constitutional war powers, you'll learn a lot.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Antony Blinken on the Future of Central Asia

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2021 65:27


From the April 18, 2015: Deputy Secretary of State Antony Blinken visited Brookings for a public address on the current priorities and future prospects for U.S. engagement in Central Asia. With the draw-down in Afghanistan on the horizon, Mr. Blinken makes clear that the United States is not relinquishing its interests in the region. Blinken stresses that the security of the United States is enhanced by a more secure Central Asia, and a stable Central Asia is most likely if the nations there are sovereign and independent countries, connected with one another, and fully capable of defending their own borders. He concludes that investing in connectivity can spur commerce from Istanbul to Shanghai while serving as a stabilizing force for Afghanistan's transition.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Unfinished Business at the Department of Justice

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 65:45


It's been a busy few weeks at the Justice Department. There was a major indictment of the chair of the former president's inaugural committee. There have been new policies promulgated on subpoenas to media organizations and on Justice Department White House contacts. There's been a decision not to defend a member of Congress for his role in the Jan. 6 uprising, and there are questions about what positions the Justice Department is going to take as the Jan. 6 committee begins its work. To talk about it all, Lawfare executive editor Scott R. Anderson sat down with Lawfare editor-in-chief Benjamin Wittes, former Justice Department official Carrie Cordero, now with the Center for a New American Security, and Chuck Rosenberg, who served at both DOJ and FBI. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Lawfare Podcast
Facebook's Thoughts on Its Oversight Board

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 58:36


There have been a thousand hot takes about the Facebook Oversight Board, the Supreme Court-like thing Facebook set up to oversee its content moderation. The Board generated so much press coverage when it handed down its decision on Donald Trump's account that Kaitlyn Tiffany at The Atlantic called the whole circus “like Shark Week, but less scenic.” Everyone weighed in, from Board Members, to lawmakers, academics, critics and even Lawfare podcast hosts. But there's a group we haven't heard much from: the people at Facebook who are actually responsible for sending cases to the Board and responding to the Board's policy recommendations. Everyone focuses on the Board Members, but the people at Facebook are the ones that can make the Board experiment actually translate into change—or not. So this week for our Arbiters of Truth series on our online information environment, in light of Facebook's first quarterly update on the Board, Evelyn Douek talked with Jennifer Broxmeyer and Rachel Lambert, both of whom work at Facebook on Facebook's side of the Oversight Board experiment. What do they think of the first six or so months of the Oversight Board's work? How do they grade their own efforts? Why is their mark different from Evelyn's? And, will the Oversight Board get jurisdiction over the metaverse?Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bulwark Podcast
Benjamin Wittes: Judging Merrick Garland

The Bulwark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 47:41


On today's podcast Lawfare's Benjamin Wittes joins host Charlie Sykes to discuss "crack smoking, demon possessed leftists," Kevin McCarthy's "joke," vaccine passports, and evaluating the Merrick Garland Doctrine. Special Guest: Benjamin Wittes.

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: Mark Rozell on 'Presidential Power, Secrecy and Accountability'

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 37:02


From August 6, 2019: Over the years, presidents have used different language to describe the withholding of information from Congress. To discuss the concept of "executive privilege," Margaret Taylor sat down with Mark Rozell, the Dean of the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University, and the author of "Executive Privilege: Presidential Power, Secrecy and Accountability," which chronicles the history of executive privilege in its many forms since the founding of the United States. They talked about what executive privilege is, what is new in the Trump administration's handling of congressional demands for information, and what it all means for the separation of powers in our constitutional democracy.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.