Podcasts about War on drugs

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campaign of drug prohibition led by the American federal government

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Latest podcast episodes about War on drugs

Deutscher Hanfverband News – Cannabis Social Club Stuttgart
Spanien: Kilos für alle am Strand | DHV-Audio-News #347

Deutscher Hanfverband News – Cannabis Social Club Stuttgart

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 23:23


Zum Hanfverband. Podcast abonnieren: Per RSS Feed: https://csc-stuttgart.org/podcasts/dhv-news/feed Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/5pmLnsXVSVv4WegMEab7P DHV-Eckpunkte aktualisiert Volksabstimmungen in mindestens drei US-Staaten Colorado: Shops halten sich zu 98% an Jugendschutz USA: Drogentests bei LKW-Fahrern verschärfen Engpässe Brittney Griner: Auch in USA Knast für kleine Cannabis-Vergehen Kolumbiens neuer Präsident will “war on drugs” beenden Spanien: Kilos für alle am Strand Beamtenkarriere … „Spanien: Kilos für alle am Strand | DHV-Audio-News #347“ weiterlesen

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2901 - Plea Bargains Creating A Criminal Underclass w/ Dan Canon

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 67:03


Emma hosts Dan Canon, civil rights lawyer and professor at the University of Louisville, to discuss his recent book Pleading Out: How Plea Bargaining Creates a Permanent Criminal Class. Emma begins by running through the arrest of an Iranian citizen for planning an extrajudicial assassination attempt against John Bolton, extrajudicial assassination expert, and Rudy Giuliani assures the public that Donald Trump is actually happier and more secure than ever. Then she's joined by Professor Dan Canon as he walks Emma through the history of the plea bargain – today the most common conclusion to a criminal case (97% end in guilty pleas) – and how we came to put so much discretion in the hands of judicial cops (prosecutors) to center our judicial system around efficiency. First, Professor Canon brings us back to the inception of the plea bargain in 1830s Massachusetts, with the industrial revolution seeing a massive influx of white male suffrage in the working class, resulting in the political elite immediately launching a concerted attack on the labor movement via massive and incredibly vague criminal statutes like vagrancy and drunk and disorderly, thus needing to prosecute these individuals with efficiency the Massachusetts legislature legitimized the plea bargain. This saw a rapid shift in the US judicial system, with plea bargains going from illegal and frowned upon, to making up well over 80% of cases in Massachusetts by 1880, and continuing to effectively null the concept of a “jury of one's peers” well before those “peers” could include women or people of color. Next, Dan and Emma walk through how the US criminal system developed around the plea bargain over the next century, with federal involvement in criminal justice expanding massively during the prohibition era, and continuing in the wake of the 21st Amendment as the US government turned to the beginnings of the war on drugs, only for Nixon and Reagan to massively accelerate it a half-century later, all requiring US prosecutors to charge such mass numbers of people at an incredibly rapid speed, regardless of the context and content of their arrests. Wrapping up, they reflect on the role of union busting in creating the plea bargain, looking at how the US' carceral state works to create this permanent criminal underclass, separated from society and isolated as individuals, before concluding with a discussion on the necessity of rebuilding our system as a whole, rather than reforming it bit by bit. And in the Fun Half: Emma is joined by Brandon Sutton as they take a tour of Mar-a-Lago's lovely facilities, Crowder asks Kari Lake whether she, as governor of Arizona, would disband the FBI and IRS, and the crew debates DeSantis' role in the FBI raid of Mar-a-Lago. Matt from CT talks jury processes, and Brandon and Emma reflect on Howard Schulz, once Hillary's potential NLRB nom, and his violent union busting coming back to bite him. Kilmeade calls out Biden for lowering inflation and also trying to continue to lower inflation, Matthais from New Jersey explores the privatization of public space in the wake of integration, plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Dan's book here: https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/dan-canon/pleading-out/9781541674684/ Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here: https://am-quickie.ghost.io/ Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Get the free Majority Report App!: http://majority.fm/app Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

JOURNEYS - die Reise zu Dir Selbst
075: "Ayahuasca, anxiety, transgenerational trauma and community as the cornerstone of healing" with Dr. Parker Kelly

JOURNEYS - die Reise zu Dir Selbst

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 87:00


In the last episode, Dr. Parker Kelley and I talked about his research into the potential of DMT to treat trauma. However, besides his professional knowledge, Parker has had countless personal journeys with plant medicines and psychedelics. So today we talk about his personal path towards healing, guided by ayahuasca, San Pedro, iboga and 5 MeO DMT. Being three quarters Native American, raised in Louisiana during the opioid epidemic and born to a father who worked for the FBI and DEA and who was involved in the War on Drugs, his relationship with them has always been fraught with anxiety. However, mental ill-health and the loss of two friends to suicide and overdose eventually led him to consider alternative healing methods. You'll hear his story and honest account of our time together in the jungle, as well as getting inside some of the extraordinary dimensions he has experience through medicine work. His answer to my question about tips for people struggling with themselves: "Community is the cornerstone of healing! If you keep being isolated, you'll not feel better. Seek out other people that are working through this and understand it's always a holistic approach to healing. Focus on therapeutic strategies that connect you to people." --------------------------------------- I hope you enjoy this episode! To receive the latest episodes and updates on our upcoming psychedelic retreats by mail, feel free to sign up for the newsletter. --------------------------------------- Retreats & Newsletter: www.essentiya.com Personal: https://www.alexanderfaubel.com Instagram: @alex_faubel @psychedelische_retreats

Met het Oog op Morgen
Met het oog op Morgen 09-08-2022

Met het Oog op Morgen

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 49:20


Met vandaag: FBI-inval bij Donald Trump: wat zoeken ze? | Wie zijn de Oekrainse leiders van de door Rusland bezette gebieden? | Het einde van de ‘war on drugs'| Vogelgriep bij ooievaars: kan de populatie een stootje hebben? Presentatie: Marcia Luyten.  

Centre for Independent Studies
On Liberty EP95 | Simon Breheny | No Harm Done From Harm Reduction

Centre for Independent Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 31:33


We welcome Simon Breheny, Public Policy Manager at Philip Morris International and former Policy Director at the Institute of Public Affairs. Simon argues that it's more humane, less costly, and more effective to focus on reducing harm caused from consumption of lifestyle products, like tobacco and drugs, rather than only seeking to prevent use entirely. Choking supply of potentially harmful drugs doesn't prevent access to, or use of, drugs. But it can unnecessarily result in riskier conditions for users. The goal should be to reduce potential harm, not prevent drug use itself. Harm reduction is not pro- or anti-drug use, but it is pro-user – meaning that it directs unconditional support to individuals without judgment or persecution. Has the ‘war on drugs' failed? Are we too heavy-handed in regulating use of drugs? How can policymakers reduce harm for users? ______________________________________________________________________________________________ CIS promotes free choice and individual liberty and the open exchange of ideas. CIS encourages debate among leading academics, politicians, media and the public. We aim to make sure good policy ideas are heard and seriously considered so that Australia can prosper. Follow CIS on our Socials; Twitter - https://twitter.com/CISOZ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/CentreIndependentStudies/ Linkedin - https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-centre-for-independent-studies/

The Talkative Introvert
S3E11 | Ending the War on Drugs is Ending the War on People w/ Jay Shifman

The Talkative Introvert

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 72:08


In this episode, I am joined by Jay Shifman, the founder of Choose Your Struggle. In this episode, we talk about the War on Drugs. We cover what it is, why is it important, and why the war on drugs is really a war on people.  Check Out Jay's website: https://www.jayshifman.com/ All the good stuff: https://linktr.ee/thetalkativeintrovertTheme Song by Eugene (Mikie) Manalo: https://soundcloud.com/mikieika

The Opperman Report
Unmask Alice: LSD, Satanic Panic, and the Imposter Behind the World's Most Notorious Diaries

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 48:47


Two teens. Two diaries. Two social panics. One incredible fraud. In 1971, Go Ask Alice reinvented the young adult genre with a blistering portrayal of sex, psychosis, and teenage self-destruction. The supposed diary of a middle-class addict, Go Ask Alice terrified adults and cemented LSD's fearsome reputation, fueling support for the War on Drugs. Five million copies later, Go Ask Alice remains a divisive bestseller, outraging censors and earning new fans, all of them drawn by the book's mythic premise: A Real Diary, by Anonymous. But Alice was only the beginning. In 1979, another diary rattled the culture, setting the stage for a national meltdown. The posthumous memoir of an alleged teenage Satanist, Jay's Journal merged with a frightening new crisis—adolescent suicide—to create a literal witch hunt, shattering countless lives and poisoning whole communities. In reality, Go Ask Alice and Jay's Journal came from the same dark place: a serial con artist who betrayed a grieving family, stole a dead boy's memory, and lied her way to the National Book Awards. Unmask Alice: LSD, Satanic Panic, and the Imposter Behind the World's Most Notorious Diaries is a true story of contagious deception. It stretches from Hollywood to Quantico, and passes through a tiny patch of Utah nicknamed "the fraud capital of America." It's the story of a doomed romance and a vengeful celebrity. Of a lazy press and a public mob. Of two suicidal teenagers, and their exploitation by a literary vampire. Unmask Alice . . . where truth is stranger than nonfiction.

The Opperman Report'
Unmask Alice: LSD, Satanic Panic, and the Imposter Behind the World's Most Notorious Diaries

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 48:47


Two teens. Two diaries. Two social panics. One incredible fraud.In 1971, Go Ask Alice reinvented the young adult genre with a blistering portrayal of sex, psychosis, and teenage self-destruction. The supposed diary of a middle-class addict, Go Ask Alice terrified adults and cemented LSD's fearsome reputation, fueling support for the War on Drugs. Five million copies later, Go Ask Alice remains a divisive bestseller, outraging censors and earning new fans, all of them drawn by the book's mythic premise: A Real Diary, by Anonymous.But Alice was only the beginning.In 1979, another diary rattled the culture, setting the stage for a national meltdown. The posthumous memoir of an alleged teenage Satanist, Jay's Journal merged with a frightening new crisis—adolescent suicide—to create a literal witch hunt, shattering countless lives and poisoning whole communities.In reality, Go Ask Alice and Jay's Journal came from the same dark place: a serial con artist who betrayed a grieving family, stole a dead boy's memory, and lied her way to the National Book Awards.Unmask Alice: LSD, Satanic Panic, and the Imposter Behind the World's Most Notorious Diaries is a true story of contagious deception. It stretches from Hollywood to Quantico, and passes through a tiny patch of Utah nicknamed "the fraud capital of America." It's the story of a doomed romance and a vengeful celebrity. Of a lazy press and a public mob. Of two suicidal teenagers, and their exploitation by a literary vampire.Unmask Alice . . . where truth is stranger than nonfiction.

Officer Of The Damn Law (PBWW Channel)
Cop Sexually Assaults Man with Anal Cavity in Public Search for Non-Existent Pharmaceuticals

Officer Of The Damn Law (PBWW Channel)

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 5:34


In the apparent country of liberty, you are not free to do as you choose with your body. From mandated vaccines to abortions after rape, the state will stop at nothing in its terrifying quest to control the single thing you have complete control over. As the vaccine and abortion debates boil on, another equally horrific infringement of bodily autonomy proceeds virtually unimpeded in the background, all owing to the war on drugs. #policeassault #policebrutality #officerofthedamnlaw #policeillegalsearch #usa #virginia #amerikkka #policebrutalitymatters #pbwwchannel . . . . . https://www.policebrutalityworldwide.com/2022/08/cop-sexually-assaults-man-with-anal.html My IG Channel: https://www.instagram.com/pbwwchannel/channel/ My TikTok Channel: https://www.tiktok.com/@pbwwchannel247?lang=en My rumble channel:https://rumble.com/register/PoliceBrutalityWorldwideChannel/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/king-emjay/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/king-emjay/support

MUD\WTR: Trends with Benefits
#49 The War on Drugs is a Failure (:micro)

MUD\WTR: Trends with Benefits

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 12:06


In a since-deleted “fact sheet,” D.A.R.E claimed marijuana had no medical value, weakened the immune system and caused insanity. But as Shakespeare said, “at the length the truth will out” and we now know the War on Drugs was more about criminalizing certain groups of people than keeping the public safe. Whether you need help recovering from addiction, want access to healing or just don't want to be shamed for having a good time at a festival, it's time to reimagine the future of substances. Mushroom boost by MUDWTR is here to support immunity, vitality and mental sharpness. The powder is a blend of eight mushrooms: lion's mane, cordyceps, chaga, reishi, turkey tail, king trumpet, maitake and shiitake mushrooms and mycelium. Use the code BOOST25 for 25% off your first order of mushroom boost. If you dig this podcast please leave a short review on Apple Podcasts. It takes less than 60 seconds and helps a bunch. For weekly stories visit Trends w/ Benefits and sign up for our newsletter. Get 20% off your first MUDWTR by using the code TWB20 at checkout. Reach out and send voice memos to podcast@mudwtr.com Want to join our cold plunge group chat? Here's the link.

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: A Money Laundering Ring Connected To The Cartel Is Broken Up In NYC

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 18:34


The war on drugs is waged on many fronts. One of the major areas where drug enforcement agencies focus is the financial realm. For the cartels moving the drugs is the easy part. It's washing and bundling the return that comes after that is the hard part.(commercial at 11:04)To contact me:bobbycapucci@Protonmail.comsource:https://nypost.com/2022/04/03/how-a-crew-laundered-millions-in-cartel-cash-across-nyc/

Beyond The Horizon
A Look Back: A Money Laundering Ring Connected To The Cartel Is Broken Up In NYC

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 18:34


The war on drugs is waged on many fronts. One of the major areas where drug enforcement agencies focus is the financial realm. For the cartels moving the drugs is the easy part. It's washing and bundling the return that comes after that is the hard part.(commercial at 11:04)To contact me:bobbycapucci@Protonmail.comsource:https://nypost.com/2022/04/03/how-a-crew-laundered-millions-in-cartel-cash-across-nyc/

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast
Sacred Rose 2022 Festival Preview With Karina Rykman

Jrodconcerts: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 21:44


Excited to welcome Karina Rykman, a Musical gem, Bassist and Artist to help us preview the first ever version of SACRED ROSE. A musical festival making its revolutionary debut at Chicagoland's SeatGeek Stadium Campus from Friday, August 26 - Sunday, August 28, 2022. A blooming love-letter to the sweet sounds of Americana, Psych-rock, Jam, Indie, Soul, Funk and Bluegrass, SACRED ROSE boasts an eclectic array of headliners such as Phil Lesh & Friends, Khruangbin, The War On Drugs, Goose, and our friends @moontaxi, @maggierose and @margorprice. SACRED ROSE will host three stages - The Canopy, The Vega, and The Dreamfield - with each daily stage lineup meticulously curated to feel like its own full-length, genre-specific concert. Join us as we chat with Karina about a plethora of topics. Among them, the festival lineup, nerves on stage, gowring up with Academic parents, social media and more. Tickets to sacred Rose available at: www.sacredrosefest.com. for more on Karina Rykman, visit: www.karinarykman.com

The Ben Joravsky Show
"JB Punts & Rodney Speaks" and Michael Gerardi--The Ballad of An Indicted Alderman

The Ben Joravsky Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 79:52


JB Pritzker dodges a question about the mayoral election and Congressman Rodney Davis shows he's still scared of Trump. Ben riffs. And Michael Gerardi--the Neil Young of Chicago--returns. He sings one of his greatest hits: The Ballad of An Indicted Alderman. Then he talks politics. Including the futility of the tax-the-rich messaging, the mixed message in the War on Drugs and a few thoughts on the Greatest Generation. Maybe they're not so great. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Hysteria 51
Project MKOFTEN: Drugs, The Occult, & The CIA | 297

Hysteria 51

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:12 Very Popular


After the planet was ravaged by World War 2 the powers that be were looking for any edge they could. The United States was no different. So, they engaged in many secret medical experiments designed to help win the cold war... But at what cost? Let's just say you can't perfect mind control and Manchurian candidates without breaking a few eggs, and by eggs we mean unknowing subjects, both military and civilian. Oh yeah, black magic and the occult might have been involved as well... you know, for good measure. So, strap in, we are talking MKOften and CIA shenanigans via... wait for it... DRUGS.. this week on Hysteria 51 Special thanks to this week's research sources: Books and PapersSecrets and Lies: A History of CIA Mind Control and Germ Warfare | Gordon Thomas 978-1568526843The Manchurian Candidate | Richard Condon 978-0743482974The Encyclopedia of Delusions | Ronald Duncan & Miranda Weston-Smith ‎ 978-0671423919VideosCIA Mind Control | CIA Secret Experiments - https://youtu.be/NUW-frxo2X4 WebsitesProject MKOFTEN - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MKOFTENProject MKULTRA - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_MKUltra#MKSEARCHThe Manchurian Candidate - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Manchurian_CandidateThe Naked Gun (franchise) - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Naked_Gun_(franchise)The Psychedelic Library - https://druglibrary.net/schaffer/lsd/marks12.htm Skeptic - https://skepdic.com/mindcont.html Sidney Gottlieb - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidney_Gottlieb?fbclid=IwAR2aqRTISjeySOYEQUaEkpnzU37Xq1FRbEef87TKGcnWWdxI7qvp3RUaj8w CNBC - https://www.cnbc.com/2021/06/17/the-us-has-spent-over-a-trillion-dollars-fighting-war-on-drugs.html MusicEpic Trailer by LesFM | https://lesfm.net/ Music promoted by https://www.chosic.com/free-music/all/ Creative Commons CC BY 3.0https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Email us your favorite WEIRD news stories:weird@hysteria51.comSupport the ShowGet exclusive content & perks as well as an ad and sponsor free experience at https://www.patreon.com/Hysteria51 from just $1Join Our Discord Serverhttps://discord.gg/WuPKAZ6cpgShopBe the Best Dressed at your Cult Meeting!https://www.teepublic.com/stores/hysteria-51?ref_id=4106 See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend
Meet the Author - Eric Sande - The King of Miami

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 67:01


For more info please visit: https://ericcurtissandeauthor.com/PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/minddogtvSponsors:https://daily-high-club-affiliate-program.pxf.io/5bE0nnKOA Coffee https://koacoffee.com/?sscid=21k6_79g17FIVERR https://go.fiverr.com/visit/?bta=86037&brand=fiverrcpa&utm_campaign=minddogTVSOUTHWEST RAPID REWARDS https://swa.eyjo.net/c/3290446/517226/4705SUPPORT THE HAPPY MINUTE https://ko-fi.com/minddogtvTRUE FIRE GUITAR MASTERY: http://prf.hn/click/camref:1101lkzyk/pubref:minddogGet Koa Coffee at minddogtv.com/coffee

1869, the Cornell University Press Podcast
1869, Ep. 120 with R. V. Gundur, author of Trying to Make It

1869, the Cornell University Press Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 32:26


Transcript here: https://otter.ai/u/xfIqx8nYUbZu9RWEGgnaa__Svcc This episode, we speak with R.V. Gundur, author of Trying to Make It: The Enterprises, Gangs, and People of the American Drug Trade. https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9781501764479/trying-to-make-it/#bookTabs=1 R. V. Gundur is a criminologist based in Australia. He studies illicit enterprise, gangs, and cybercrime and holds a PhD in criminology from Cardiff University, a Master's degree in Criminology Research Methods from the University of Oxford; aN MA in International Relations from The Australian National University, and a BA in Spanish and Latin American Studies from Tulane University. Follow R. V. on Twitter @gr4d and visit his website at ravejudgerun.com. We spoke to R.V. about both the physical and personal journeys he took in the research and writing of his new book, why it is essential that we all start humanizing, rather than demonizing, the ordinary people involved in the drug trade, and why policymakers need to put an end to their never-ending war on drugs, which has tragically wrecked havoc on our society for decades. If you'd like to purchase R.V.'s new book, use the promo code 09POD to save 30 percent on our website which is cornellpress.cornell.edu. If you live in the UK use the discount code CSANNOUNCE and visit the website combinedacademic.co.uk.

Defend Cleveland Podcast
Episode 227 - "Why Is Deshaun Watson Even On The Browns?!" (Because The Haslams Are And Continue To Be The Biggest Problem With This Team)

Defend Cleveland Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 270:37


All terrestrial segments were recorded live on July 30th (Day 211 of 2022), and all podcast segments were recorded lived on August 2nd (Day 214 of 2022) Part 1 of 3 of the Podcast only content – The decision on Deshaun Watson's punishment has been delivered, and most of the sports talk takes on it unsurprisingly go from the farcical to the outlandish  Terrestrial: Hour 1 (begins around 0:37:00) Yet more Deshaun Watson talk (yeah, we're sick of it too) Rich vs Wealthy, and rethinking the legal responses to stealing from the wealthy, especially when the rich are so disconnected and removed from every day life they're seemingly asking for it The problem with John Stewart (and it has nothing to do with his new show with the same name) Part 2 of 3 of the Podcast only content – Taylor Swift uses her private jet more than any other artist, and we also recently read that her pussy (cat) is worth $94 million  (begins around 1:39:00) Lachlan MacKinnon's ‘Best of Edition' Let Me Tell You A Story: “The Breaks” (begins around 1:59:00) Terrestrial: Hour 2 (begins around 2:10:00) Fan hobos and vanity plates Due to recent events that have nothing to do with golf, we've changed our mind over LIV Golf and the golfers opting to get paid no matter where the money comes from (at least in part), and we explain specifically why that is If you could burn a website to the ground and start a revolution, you should start with Luxury Launches  Part 3 of 3 of the Podcast only content – Mollie's Weekly Reports... (begins around 3:07:00) Terrestrial: Hour 3 (begins around 3:35:00) Clearchannel PSA's end up asking more questions then they answer Be ready the latest salvo in the unwinnable war on drugs by Trump and his sycophants, even if the law has already been on the books since 1994, and even though Trump boasts about getting the idea from China and its dictator Mollie's Weekly Reports, terrestrial edition! All this and so much more on this episode of the Defend Cleveland Podcast. Enjoy~   This show is and forever will be dedicated to Big Mamma   To contribute to this 100% listener supported show please go to our Patreon page by clicking here.   Check out Lachlan MacKinnon's best selling book, ‘Let Me Tell You A Story: Small Stories Of A Large Family'!   Thank yous to  91.1-FM WRUW Cleveland for being home to the show, and to the city that inspires us, Cleveland, Ohio.   Your recommended listening this week is the 1970 debut masterpiece by Exuma   The intro and outro to Lachlan's segment is the song “My Summer In Traction” by the band Ohio Civil War , and it's used with permission

KZYX News
More edits for cannabis equity grant program manual

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 6:30


August 2, 2022 — In the wake of a Mendocino County Grand Jury report that found layers of delay in distributing a grant, a policy manual has been updated, an affidavit is being drafted, and legal review will start up again next week. In 2020, the County received $2.2 million from the state, to administer individual grants to applicants who are eligible to run a cannabis business in the unincorporated areas of Mendocino County; and who can demonstrate that they have been harmed by the war on drugs. But most of that money is held up in legal review. Out of 52 applications, five grants have been awarded. The other 47 approved grant applications are waiting for County Counsel to determine that they won't run afoul of the state's policy about misuse of funds. The Local Equity Entrepreneur Program, or LEEP, is supposed to allocate direct assistance awards to individuals, which puts the county in the position of vouching for the recipients. If the county were to award a grant that doesn't meet the state's strict requirements, the county would have to collect the misused funds as it would any other debt, possibly becoming ineligible to receive further grants. But if the money is not awarded by the end of August, the state could take it back. Michael Katz, the Executive Director of the Mendocino Cannabis Alliance, an industry advocacy group, noted that the Grand Jury report aligns closely with complaints and policy proposals that the MCA has been making for a while. The report's first finding is that “There was no process developed for the distribution of grant funds to individuals prior to applications being received. This has resulted in extended delays at every step from eligibility to application to communication to contract negotiation,” which prevents the timely distribution of funds. “The results of that, unfortunately, have been that some operators have been in this application process since February of last year, counting on these funds to help them move forward in this incredibly challenging business at this incredibly challenging time,” Katz said last week. Kristin Nevedal, the Mendocino County Cannabis Program Manager, uses similar language for what she's faced in her role. Asked about the same finding at July's LEEP meeting, she said, “I think that's absolutely correct. I think the program has been incredibly challenged by changes and lack of leadership, frankly, in the cannabis program as a whole.” Shortly after the county received the first round of funding in February 2021, Megan Dukett, the cannabis program manager at the time, left her position. The county had hired a company called Elevate Impact to administer the grant for no more than 10% of the award, but Nevedal said, “It is completely unfair to expect a contract administrator to develop a program for any local jurisdiction solely on their own.” Nevedal said she learned about the program's complexities at the end of 2021, when she had one part time helper and had been on the job herself for just a little over a year. “So I had no clue how underdeveloped the program was until we started getting into the review of applications and then how we would essentially issue checks,” she acknowledged. “Most local jurisdictions do not include capital improvements in what's allowed as far as expenses that can be paid for using direct grant funds. And I think from the county's perspective, you don't know what you don't know. So I don't believe the county really knew ahead of time the complex nature of the applications we'd be receiving to have the foresight to understand that we also needed planner time to also conduct these reviews.” The Grand Jury also found that “the county did not ask the state for requirements on record keeping until May 2022,” and that this should have been done much earlier in the process. That finding dovetails with the fear of misusing the funds, which Katz thinks has led to unnecessary restrictions. “There are still barriers that are being put in place on certain requests by the department that are not demanded by the state. So for example, there are many folks who are working to create solar usage opportunities on their cultivation sites in various ways. And solar is something that's desirable, obviously. We're trying to phase out generators. We're trying to phase out fossil fuel use…but the cannabis department has been objecting to specific types of solar, being concerned with how much power the solar would provide, and really just putting what seem like unnecessary restrictions that are not demanded by the state on the uses that would benefit the operator. So if they actually revised the manual to allow anything that is not explicitly disallowed, there wouldn't be the need to dig into every item and go back and forth on the minutiae that we've seen happening for applicants.” On Friday, the cannabis program issued V5, the latest edition of the Local Equity Program Manual. In an email, Nevedal wrote that, “The program is still working on a form/affidavit for awardees to sign stating that they've read and understand the grant agreement,” as well as the much-edited manual. Nevedal added that “County Counsel plans to resume the review of approved grant applications next week.” However, the changes to the manual consist of several sets and subsets of requirements for documentation, and do not address what the money can and cannot be used for. County Counsel did not immediately return a call requesting more information, but Katz said yesterday that he thinks that's what County Counsel needs in order to complete its review. “We hope it turns into money in people's hands soon,” he said. He expects the next round of edits will include language expanding the allowable uses of the grant funds. He hopes to see version V6 of the manual sometime next week.

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters
The Philippines Gets a New President With A Very Familiar Name

Global Dispatches -- World News That Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 23:28


On May 9th, Ferdinand Marcos Jr. was elected President of the Philippines. If that name sounds familiar to you, it is because he is the son of Ferdinand Marcos Senior, the brutal kleptocrat who ruled the Philippines for nearly 20 years. Marcos Jr., who is commonly known as “Bongbong,” took office on June 30th succeeding Rodrigo Duterte, whose six year term was marked by a sharp deterioration of human rights in the Philippines, including a so-called “war on drugs” in which several thousands of people were extrajudicially killed by state security forces. Bongbong Marcos' vice president is Rodrigo Duterte's daughter, Sara Duterte.  To help explain this new chapter in Philippines politics is Dr. Tom Smith, Principle Lecturer in International Relations for the University of Portsmouth, and the Academic Director to the Royal Air Force College.

Beyond The Horizon
A Look Back: The Siege Of Caborca

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 21:07


The war on drugs has taken a serious toll on the country of Mexico. With unchecked violence an every day part of life for a lot of hard working Mexican citizens, it's hard to quantify just how much damage has already been done. In this episode, we see that on full display as the city of Caborca comes under siege.(commercial at 12:18)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://english.elpais.com/international/2022-02-19/mexican-military-absent-as-el-chapos-sons-sow-terror.html

Interplace
Bolivian Lithium and Planetary Equilibrium

Interplace

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 26:02


Hello Interactors,EVs made headlines this week as members of the U.S. Congress continue to chase their tail in search of remnants of the Green New Deal. I talked about cobalt last week as a key ingredient for lithium-ion batteries, but a new bill offered by congress this week has implications for another, more obvious, mineral — lithium. The biggest source is in an environmentally sensitive area of Bolivia, and U.S.-Bolivian relations are equally sensitive.As interactors, you’re special individuals self-selected to be a part of an evolutionary journey. You’re also members of an attentive community so I welcome your participation.Please leave your comments below or email me directly.Now let’s go…THE PARADOX OF NATURAL STOCKSToday is the tomorrow you worried about yesterday. These words appeared on a ceramic plaque in the shape of a tea kettle that hung in the kitchen of my grandma’s house. Why do we worry about tomorrow? Is it because we don’t know what it brings? No way to control it? We wake up every day in a past tomorrow living in a future yesterday. Today’s tomorrows are becoming increasingly worrisome on a warming planet that needed help yesterday.Democrats in Washington DC worried about tomorrow focused their action, in part, on Electric Vehicles (EV) this week. As part of the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, they hope to expand EV tax credits and invent $10 billion in investment tax credits to build clean-technology manufacturing facilities.There’s a provision on the EV tax credit regarding the sourcing and processing of the minerals needed to make the lithium-ion batteries found in EVs. It says, “with respect to the battery from which the electric motor of such vehicle draws electricity,” a certain percentage of the “critical minerals contained in such battery” must be ‘‘(i) extracted or processed in any country with which the United States has a free trade agreement in effect, or (ii) recycled in North America.”This might explain why Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen called for more ‘friend-shoring’ while in Seoul South Korea earlier this week. That’s a term she uses to woo countries into trade practices agreeable to the U.S. She chose South Korea because we need their lithium-ion battery production. In April, LG announced plans for a $1.4 billion battery plant in Queen Creek, Arizona. They are the number two battery producer in the world behind China.The provision isn’t just about the source of the battery, but the source of the materials in the battery. Their key ingredient – lithium – will most likely come from one or more of three countries in Latin America. They’ll need to be ‘Friend-shored’ if America wants to dominate the EV market. The country with the largest and most accessible source, Bolivia, has no shore and recently have not been friendly with the United States.The world’s largest lithium reserves sit in the Atacama Desert which forms a triangulated region known as the “Lithium Triangle”. It sits within the geopolitical boundaries of Argentina, Bolivia, and Chile which were drawn in the 19th century. Bolivia, now home to the largest population of Indigenous people, became land locked when Chile crushed them in the War of the Pacific from 1879-1884. They took away land that gained Bolivia access to the Pacific Ocean. Bolivia lost even more land in the Gran Chaco region to Paraguay after the Chaco War from 1932–35Much of the international law that governs these disputes were written to advantage American and European colonist expansion. They were part of a neoliberal agenda by the global North to ensure the rights of these borders and those legally living within them, but also to exploit their natural and human resources. Latin American countries rich with natural resources were eager to participate in the global economy. Many in these Latin American countries viewed their natural resources as an economic blessing – a way to secure and grow their new nation’s economic prosperity amidst a burgeoning global economy. But for most, it was a curse that invited environmental degradation and poverty at the hands of outsiders. This paradox was observed as early as 1711 in a British publication, The Spectator, "It is generally observed, that in countries of the greatest plenty there is the poorest living." In 1995 economist Richard Auty saw this geographical pattern occurring in East Asia, Africa, and Latin America and gave it a name: ‘Resource Curse’.Auty observes the curse is often explained away by neoliberals as a factor of work ethic; they are simply too lazy to keep up with ‘advanced’ economies or lack the necessary resources. But he says politics are blamed as well. The U.S. has spent centuries of time, energy, and money backing Latin American neoliberal regimes and schemes toward their globalist agenda. Both overtly and covertly and always rhetorically. Authoritatively from the right, ‘Peace through Strength’, or diplomatically from the left, ‘Friend-shoring.’The United States has long envisioned an American continent that mimics the United States. University of Iowa international law professor, Christopher Rossi, writes, “Latin Americanism emerged from a deeply circumspect nineteenth century regard for hegemonic foreign policy intentions of the United States, which had weaponized the defensive construct of its Monroe Doctrine (1823) with the annexation of Texas (1845), the Mexican-American War (1846-1848), and an assortment of turn of-the-century interventions and power plays in the Caribbean and Central America over future control of the Panama Canal.”One of the most recent power plays came with the suspected ousting of one of only two elected Indigenous leaders in the history of colonized America, in a country rich with lithium, Bolivia’s 65th president, Evo Morales.REAGAN BIRTHS A POLITICIANEvo Morales was born in western Bolivia in a small Indigenous Aymara village to farmers in 1959. As a young boy he helped his dad grow coca and trade it in the markets of Cochabamba, Bolivia’s third largest city. It took two weeks by foot to get there. Coca is an Aymaran word, “Khoka” – ‘the tree’. It is most associated with cocaine, but the leaf has been central to Andean culture for thousands of years. It’s one of the oldest cultivated plants in South America and has been used as currency, tea, and was even the original ingredient in Coca-Cola. (Kola is a caffeinated African nut) Coca is also commonly chewed by Andeans. Saliva breaks down the leaf to release alkaloids; none of which produce the euphoric effects of processed coca for cocaine but are believed to have health benefits.Growing up, Evo Morales learned Spanish and attended the Agrarian Humanistic Technical Institute of Orinoca (ITAHO), but never finished. After his military service, he became a coca grower. As cocaine gained popularity in America in the 70s, the price of coca increased and farming coca became popular. Morales soon joined a farmers union protecting Indigenous rights to farm coca for traditional Andean purposes in the face of competition among many, and hostilities toward some, coca growers.In 1980 a far-right, anti-union, military dictator, Luis García Meza, became displeased with Bolivia’s turn toward a more pro-civilian communitarian government. He also sensed the decline of the Carter administration in the U.S. and gambled on the country swinging to the right in line with his beliefs. So, as Reagan entered the White House Meza took military control of Bolivia. A year later soldiers kidnapped a coca farmer accusing him of trafficking cocaine, beat him up, and burned him to death. This event is what spurred the young Evo Morales into politics.Reagan distanced himself from Meza, who was eventually pressured to resign. His replacement was a leftist moderate, Hernán Siles Zuazo, who had served previously as president in the 1950s. Amid widespread poverty he came to the U.S. for aid. They agreed under the condition Bolivia would adopt their neoliberal economic plan. That plan involved the privatization of Bolivia’s natural resources – including the coca plant.With Siles back in office in the 1980s, Reagan had a neoliberal ally and a partner in his infamous War on Drugs. Reagan pressured Siles to use military force to suppress coca growers. The U.S. sent troops to help burn coca fields. There were reports of beatings should owners resist. Farmers were offered $2500 an acre to voluntarily eradicate their crops. Morales was one of them and he refused. In that moment, the coca plant became a symbol of Bolivian natural resources, and his Indigenous Andean ancestral heritage, and he didn’t like U.S. imperialists threatening to control it. Activists protested chanting, “Long live coca! Death to the Yankees!"Evo Morales organized similar protests throughout the 1980s and 90s and rose through the ranks of various union groups. He took leadership of MAS (Movement for Socialism) – “an indigenous-based political party that calls for the nationalization of industry, legalization of the coca leaf ... and fairer distribution of national resources." By the 2002 elections MAS became Bolivia’s second largest party gaining 20% of the popular vote.In 2003, more protest erupted after a U.S. company offered to buy a nationalized natural gas pipeline for below market value. Activists took to the street resulting in 80 people dead. Morales called for President Sánchez de Lozada to resign. Lozada fled to Miami, Florida and was replaced by Carlos Mesa who had ties to U.S. In 2004 he resigned fearing a civil war between the upper-class White Bolivian elites concentrated in major cities and the rural working and middle class. In 2005, 85% of Bolivians turned out to vote. Evo Morales earned 54% of the total. This was the first victory by absolute majority in Bolivia in 40 years and the highest national vote percentage of any presidential candidate in Latin American history.President Morales maintained focus on state sovereignty over natural resources. His administration nationalized Bolivian oil and natural gas, telecommunications, electricity, and restructured a state-owned mining company. Thanks to high international commodity prices, for the first time since its borders had been ratified, Bolivia experienced a continuous economic public-sector surplus between 2006-2013.Because of his extractive agenda, Morales is sometimes regarded as capitalist; but a communitarian one. Instead of the profits going to privately held companies and select shareholders, they fund social programs. Morales is also regarded as an environmentalist and a voice for climate justice. His philosophy links to Andean Indigenous heritage and a widely held Amerindian belief in natural rights called “Buen Vivir” or “Living Well”. He ensconced many of these philosophies into the Bolivian constitution. His actions made Bolivia a world leader in encoding Indigenous and natural rights into law.His ‘Living Well’ Bolivian laws, were simply following international law. The Universal Declaration of the Rights of Mother Earth is part of the World People’s Conference on Climate Change and the Rights of Mother Earth. It was this ratification that declared April 22 as International Earth Day. The Declaration is intended to spur every country in the world to enact laws and practices that recognize “Mother Earth is the source of life, nourishment and learning and provides everything we need to live well.” (my italics) There is a difference between ‘living well’ and ‘living better’. The current dominant economic philosophy encourages competition between individuals to live better then another, but Morales, and the UN are asking, what if we all could live well?BATTERY POWERED COUPThe aim to for all to live well is why Morales included laws like: “The State and any individual or collective person must respect, protect, and guarantee the rights of Mother Earth for the well-being of current and future generations” There are 58 articles intended to help countries regulate ‘Living Well’, including: “non-commercialization of the environmental functions of Mother Earth; integrality; precautionary action; guarantee to restore Mother Earth; guarantee to regenerate Mother Earth; historical responsibility; priority of prevention; plural participation; water for life; solidarity among human beings; harmonious relation; social justice; climate justice; plural economy; complementarity and equilibrium; and dialogue of traditional knowledges and science.”It also includes a ‘Right to Development’ that Morales was following with his extractive economic policy.“the right to development [as] an inalienable human right by virtue of which every human person and all peoples are entitled to participate in, contribute to, and enjoy economic, social, cultural and political development, in which all human rights and fundamental freedoms can be fully realized.”The Organization of American States (OAS), an organization largely funded by the U.S. government and headquartered in Washington D.C., helped draft these declarations which Morales inserted into the Bolivian constitution. It’s derived from the 2007 United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that“provides a shared framework for improving temporary situations where two opposed interests collide, that is, the rights of indigenous peoples and State politics.”There are 148 countries who ratified this declaration in 2016, but the United States, Canada, Colombia, and Brazil are not among them. They have issues with ideas of “free determination, consultation, and consent, collective rights, and natural resources, land, and territories.” Which is why the United States may have had issues with Morales.Seeing Bolivia’s lithium stores were the next natural resource to be exploited by the United States, Morales turned his attention to developing lithium according to his ‘Living Well’ constitutional articles. But some Indigenous separatists, and Indigenous people most impacted by lithium extraction, became critical of Evo Morales and his eagerness to capitalize on this economic opportunity.The first attempts at extraction were privatized, but seeking to avoid the ‘resource curse’, Morales formed the state-owned YLB, Yacimientos de Litio Bolivianos, for the sole purpose of lithium development. However, seeing Venezuela’s failure to effectively drill oil without outside investment or expertise, he decided to ease his stance on sole state-ownership and sought public-private partnerships. In 2014 and 2017 he invited a French and a Chinese company to build battery plants. In 2018, he signed on a German company, ACI Systems. And in 2019, the Chinese Xinjiang TBEA Group became a strategic partner to explore new extraction opportunities.In October of that same year, 2019, came the national elections and with it another Morales victory. But he was accused of election fraud. (It’s still disputed, but findings fall along political, ethnic, and cultural lines) Around election time protests erupted in the city where the German plant was built. Locals claimed to unhappy with the ACI deal. In November, Morales cancelled it. A week later the military ousted Morales in what is widely believed to be a far-right coup not unlike the one that spurred Morales to political action in the 80s. Morales escaped in exile to Mexico and then Argentina. He also claims his life had been threatened by U.S. CIA operatives.Predictably, the interim government was led by an opposition senator named Jeanine Áñez. The Catholic pink bible carrying former news anchor not only put lithium projects on hold, but criminal liability for police brutality against protesters enraged by the coup. She also cut off ties to Venezuela, Nicaragua, and Cuba and became cozy with the United States. A year later, October 2020, elections were held again and Morales’s former Minister of Economy, MAS candidate Luis Arce, won in a landslide.Arce is viewed as a pragmatist but also an adherent the principles Morales instilled in the constitution. Including upholding his 2006 implementation of the Productive Community Social Economic Model which distributes economic surpluses to all Bolivian people so they may ‘live well’.Arce said in a recent interview, “Parallel to the economic growth achieved, we managed to reduce moderate poverty from 60.6 percent in 2005 to 37.2 percent in 2019; extreme poverty from 38.2 percent to 12.9 percent and inequality," And just this week Bolivia micro-mobility startup, Quantum, said they hope Arce’s plans to build Bolivian batteries plays out soon, they want to put them in their tiny electric urban micro-cars and motorcycles. They operate out of Cochabamba where Morales traded coca for corn with his dad in public markets decades ago. Bolivian elections come in just three years but even Arce’s allies don’t believe their facilities can bring Bolivian batteries to market before 2030.In the meantime, outside investors continue to court Bolivia, including the United States. But the U.S. hasn’t had an ambassador in Bolivia since Morales kicked Rob Goldberg out in 2008 on counts of espionage. And I’m sure American companies won’t want to legally adhere to the ‘Living Well’ laws of the Bolivian constitution; just as the American government doesn’t want to ratify the UN’s versions into international law. It may be hard for the U.S. to ‘Friend-shore’ Bolivia. Especially when their shore was taken by Chile. Meanwhile environmentalists worry the state’s ambition to curb poverty through extractive mining will continue to harm the environment.Massive amounts of water are needed to lure lithium from their salty beds. Mining operations can use as much water in one day that a single family would use in twenty-two years. Alpine runoff is the only source of water in the ‘Lithium Triangle’ and La Niña can bring extended periods of drought. Furthermore, this area is home to three of the world’s six species of flamingos. Both plants and animals in this rich avifauna area are sensitive to ecological extremes risking further depletion of biodiversity.Little attention is given to the environmental impacts of lithium mining. The largest number of scholarly research on the subject overwhelming comes from the three countries who seek to exploit and consume it the most for the worldwide lithium-ion battery market: The United States, China, and Germany.But if Arce keeps to the laws of his own constitution, as ensconced by his friend and colleague Evo Morales, he must balance “precautionary action”, “guarantees to restore Mother Earth”, “guarantees to regenerate Mother Earth”, and respect “water for life” with “economic, social, cultural and political development” so that “all human rights and fundamental freedoms can be fully realized.”  There’s a mind twisting saying associated with ‘Living Well’ that reminds me of that plaque in my grandma’s kitchen. It says, “that which already is, is that which will be, without yet being what it already is.” Today, that which already is, is the tomorrow, that which will be, that you worried about yesterday, yet being what it already is. We may worry what tomorrow brings on the horizon of life, but this much is for sure: it depends on the recognition, and lawful ratification, of Mother Earth as the source of life, nourishment, and learning because it provides everything we need to live well.Podcast Music:1.      Loca de Remate: Ronny Lovy.2.      Queremos Saya: Los Kjarkas.3.      Huellas de Mi Llamita - Grupo Aymara.4.      Tarpuricusum Sarata - Captain Planet Remix: Luzmila Carpio, Captain Planet. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit interplace.io

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: The Siege Of Caborca

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 21:07


The war on drugs has taken a serious toll on the country of Mexico. With unchecked violence an every day part of life for a lot of hard working Mexican citizens, it's hard to quantify just how much damage has already been done. In this episode, we see that on full display as the city of Caborca comes under siege.(commercial at 12:18)to contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://english.elpais.com/international/2022-02-19/mexican-military-absent-as-el-chapos-sons-sow-terror.html

Hacks & Wonks
37th LD State Representative Position 2 Primary Candidate Forum

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 84:27


On this bonus episode, we present our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street - all running for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative District, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of this forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd!  As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii.   Resources Register to Vote, Update Your Registration, See What's on Your Ballot: MyVote.wa.gov   37th LD Primary Candidate Forum Video and Transcript: https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/37th-ld-candidate-forum-2022   Transcript   [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Hello everyone, this is Crystal Fincher, host of Hacks & Wonks. This is a bonus podcast release of our Hacks & Wonks Candidate Forum with candidates for State Representative Position 2 in Seattle's 37th Legislative district, which includes Beacon Hill, the Central District, Rainier Valley, Columbia City, Rainier Beach, and Skyway. This was originally live-streamed on Facebook and Twitter on July 11th, 2022. You can view the video and access the full text transcript of the forum on the 2022 Elections page at officialhacksandwonks.com. We hope you enjoy this forum, and please make sure to vote by Tuesday, August 2nd! All right. Good evening, everyone. Welcome to the Hacks & Wonks 2022 Primary Candidate Forum for Legislative District 37, for State Representative Position 2. We're excited to be able to live stream this series on Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, we're recording this program, this forum, for rebroadcast and later viewing. We invite our audience to ask questions of our candidates. If you're watching a livestream online, then you can ask questions by commenting on the livestream. You can also text your questions to 206-395-6248. That's 206-395-6248, and that number will intermittently scroll at the bottom of the screen. All of the candidates running for 37th Legislative District State Representative Position 2 are with us tonight. In alphabetical order, we have Andrew Ashiofu, Nimco Bulale, Emijah Smith, and Chipalo Street. A few reminders before we jump into the forum: I want to remind you to vote. Ballots will be mailed to your mailbox starting on July 13th - that's this week, you will be receiving your ballots on Thursday or Friday of this week. You can register to vote, update your registration, and see what will be on your ballot at MyVote.Wa.gov. I want to mention that tonight's answers will be timed. Each candidate will have one minute to introduce themselves initially and 90 seconds to answer each subsequent question. Candidates may be engaged with rebuttal or follow up questions and will have 30 seconds to respond - I will indicate if that's so. Time will be indicated by the colored dot labeled "timer" on the screen. The dot will initially appear green, and then when there are 30 seconds left it will turn yellow, when time is up it'll turn red. I want to mention that I'm on the board for the Institute for a Democratic Future. Andrew and Chipalo are both IDF alums and Chipalo is also on the board. We've not discussed any of the details of this campaign or this forum and are expecting a lively discussion from everyone tonight. In addition to tonight's forum, Hacks & Wonks is also hosting a 36th Legislative District State Representative Position 1 candidate forum this Wednesday, July 13th at the same time - 6:30-8PM. Now we'll turn to the candidates who will each have one minute to introduce themselves, starting with Nimco, then Chipalo, next to Emijah, finally Andrew. Nimco. [00:03:19] Nimco Bulale: Hi, thank you. Good evening and thank you so much for the opportunity to speak to you all. My name is Nimco Bulale and I'm running for the open seat in the 37th Legislative District. I immigrated to Seattle from Somalia at the age of eight, a child of a single mother of nine. I know the importance of education, opportunity, and being supported by a strong, safe and nurturing community. I'm a lifelong community organizer, small business owner, university educator, and education policy expert working every day to help marginalized people in communities. As a woman of color, I'm acutely aware of the issues facing Black immigrant people of color communities and I'm excited to bring a systematically underrepresented perspective. I've spent my career working with marginalized communities and focused on creating a more inclusive, multicultural education system. I've largely worked in education policy, so this is where most of my experience on the issue lies. However, as a legislator, I will have the unique opportunity to look at this issue through a much broader lens. I am the co-founder and CEO of South Sound Strategies, a consulting firm focused on - [00:04:26] Crystal Fincher: That was time. Next we are headed to the next candidate - go ahead. [00:04:41] Chipalo Street: And I'm running here because I want the 37th to have the most effective representation possible. I've seen what education has done for my life and I want every kid to have the same opportunities my education has provided me. Police accountability is near and dear to my heart - during college, I was beaten by the police and so I want to make sure we have an accountable police force, while still working with them to make sure that we increase public safety. I've been a union member, so I would stand with our unions as they fight to make sure that working people can increase their compensation and benefits. In my professional life, I work for Microsoft for the Chief Technology Officer, where I advise our executive leadership on emerging technology. I think it's important we have legislators who understand technology, especially so given Roe, so that we can make sure that data isn't used unintended for people who are trying to get abortions. Serving in the legislature would allow me to magnify my efforts to improve our community. As a former union member, I understand the value of empowering the labor movement. As a BIPOC community member, I have experience with the important issues of our times like education, housing, technology, and interactions with the police. [00:05:50] Crystal Fincher: That is our time - next Emijah. Oh, you need to unmute, Emijah. [00:06:01] Emijah Smith: I was told that your staff would be muting us and unmuting us. So thank you. So my time starts now, or am I using my time? [00:06:12] Crystal Fincher: We'll start now and a reminder to everyone that if you mute yourself, we can't unmute you. If we do the unmuting, then we can unmute you. [00:06:20] Emijah Smith: Thank you. My name is Emijah Smith. I am a lifelong resident of the 37th Legislative District. I have the historical and current perspective of the 37th. I am a mother and I am a grandmother. I am focusing here on - ooh, this is good - I am focused on education policy ever since I was a senior in high school, surviving the War on Drugs - growing up in the Central District in South Seattle, I made a commitment to make sure that we get resources to our community to heal the harms. So I've been doing that - I'm the Mercer PTSA president, I'm the chief of staff of King County Equity Now, and I sit on the board of Tubman Health. So I've been doing the work currently in the Legislature for many years - going to Olympia with families, utilizing the power of our voice to bring meaningful change into our community. I walk with integrity - the integrity I walk in the community doing this work as a community leader - I will take that to Olympia. I have championed and been alongside the families that got us some current wins that is community reinvestment dollars for marijuana. Thank you. [00:07:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and Andrew. [00:07:31] Andrew Ashiofu: Hi, my name is Andrew Ashiofu. I'm coming to you from a lived experience. I'm from - I was born in Houston, Texas and my family's Nigerian. When I came out, I lost my comfort zone. I got kicked out, lost my house due to depression, I couldn't keep up at work, and I was diagnosed with AIDS. And that was a - it was a tough process because I had to navigate ideologies and policies not created for people like me. I always say it was a good Samaritan that gave me accommodation. I have lived the experience currently in Seattle - I'm a coach of the Seattle LGBTQ commission. Here in the 37th district, I sit on the Harborview Medical Community Advisory Board, I am on the Seattle-King County HIV Planning Council. I have done immigration, LGBTQ rights advocacy on a local and global level with the Department of Homeland Security. For me, it's - we talk about healthcare, it's very important. I'm a renter also, so housing is important. But I have lived the experience, I have advocated in that experience and I'm here to serve you. Thank you. [00:08:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much. And with those introductions, we will get to the questions. We're gonna start by talking about housing. Housing affordability is not very affordable these days. We are at a crisis level. Lots of people are losing their housing, people are facing this all over the place. So beyond extending - beyond ending exclusionary zoning and making further investments in the Housing Trust Fund, what else do we need to do to address housing affordability and to prevent displacement? And as a reminder, everyone has a response time of 90 seconds. And we will start with Chipalo. [00:09:19] Chipalo Street: So a bunch of things we can do - in the short term, we can add housing vouchers so that working people can live in existing market rate housing without spending their full paycheck on their shelter. We should have short-term rental assistance so that a temporary hardship doesn't end up in a situation that snowballs - like once you lose your house, it's harder to go to work, it's harder for your kids to go to school - that just gets worse. In addition to those, we need more renter protections. And so some tenant protections that I support are preventing landlords from using past criminal history to discriminate against prospective tenants, limiting the types of fees that can be charged by landlords. And David Hackney has a great bill that would provide recourse for tenants against a landlord who's looking to take some kind of action against them - you can already do that, but it takes a long time and so what's the point of taking action against the landlord if they've evicted you already. The harm has been done, we need to make sure that tenants can make sure that landlords are treating them well. Looks like I have more time, so those would be the main things. What would be some other things that we could do - I think you mentioned the exclusionary zoning - lifting the ban on rent control statewide would also be another option that would allow different municipalities and give them another tool in their tool belt for fighting housing costs. [00:10:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. And next we're gonna head to Nimco. [00:10:47] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe housing is a human right. As somebody that had to - when we moved to the United States to Seattle specifically, that was pushed out of the 37th and more specifically the Seattle Central District - I'm keenly aware of the precarious of housing affordability, similar to many folks. The cost of housing is a major crisis facing working families in Washington State. Affordability is an issue, not only for persons facing or at risk for homelessness, but working families also struggle to ensure that they have secure housing as costs increase, especially around job centers. There are many actions that the state can take to address this. We've already mentioned the Housing Trust Fund, we've talked about land use regulations, encouraging low income and working workforce housing, as well as protections for tenants. But I also want to say that it's necessary to update, as mentioned, our land use laws to move past zoning that privileges single-family homes. Additionally, I think that we need wraparound services such as behavioral health, substance abuse services, as well as providing resources to local jurisdictions to bring their services to scale. I read recently that Black renters can't afford 93% of the zip codes in the top US cities and I think that that's a travesty. I think that those are just some of the ways that we can think about it. And also knowing that 16% of zip codes in the list, on the list had rents that were unaffordable to Latinx households - again, that is unacceptable. And when I do get to the Legislature, I believe that there's things that the state can do. [00:12:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - next we're headed to Andrew. [00:12:35] Andrew Ashiofu: This is very personal to me. That's why my campaign - we signed on to the Initiative 135 - social housing is a key. One thing I've been privileged is to see social housing work in Europe and in Amsterdam, they have the 40-40-20, where 40% of the building is social housing, and another 40% is affordable mid-level housing, and 20% is commercial or community space. I'm big on community space because I play dodgeball every Tuesday in the community space. But it's also very important that we protect - in the 37th district - we protect our housing through preventing gentrification. Property tax for the elderly and people living with disabilities should be eliminated - that's where I'm coming from. But also we have a lot of land in Washington state in cities where the downtown is empty, with population of less than a hundred - we should, we can utilize that to create social wraparound services for teenagers and youth at-risk, for domestic violence victims, for people going through mental and drug addiction. We need to invest in those kind of services as well. Thank you. [00:13:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much - and Emijah. [00:13:52] Emijah Smith: Thank you. As we've heard that housing, healthcare, food are human basic rights. And so the way I would look at how we have to address housing, which is a very complicated issue, but when I think about being a survivor of the War on Drugs, the gentrification displacement that happened in the Central District and has been happening throughout the 37th currently, we have to look at the policies. The home I grew up in was taken from my grandfather due to some bad crime bill policies, but also we want to look at the Housing Finance Commission, most definitely, to make sure there is enough money in there that can come back into the community for housing development. And not just affordable housing, but stable, affordable housing. We have Africatown Plaza, Ethiopian Village, as well as Elizabeth Thomas Holmes - that came from community voice that I was part of to make sure that that money was sent down to the community. It wasn't gonna come to the community a couple years back without the power of our voice. In addition to that, we need to look at the barriers that are in the Department of Commerce, in terms of the application process, to even provide housing developments that could be stable for our community. There's so many loopholes that oftentimes it's the BIPOC and marginalized communities that don't get access to those resources. And although shelters and emergency housing is important to get someone off the streets immediately, it is important that we can provide some stable housing - if it's gonna be temporary, it needs to be temporary for at least a year. As a payee for my uncle who was dealing with addiction, it was because I was able to provide him stable housing for that year that helped him get stable. Thank you. [00:15:28] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Just a reminder to everyone that you do have 90 seconds to respond. It's up to you whether you choose to use that entire 90 seconds or not. If you want your answer to be shorter, feel free. We welcome that. The next question is we've seen - excuse me - significant increased investment in programs meant to reduce homelessness, but a lot of people are saying that they're not seeing the problem get any better despite the increase in funds. A lot of people attribute that to the continuing affordability crisis. Do you agree that this crisis is not improving? And if so, what needs to happen to get results? And we are starting with Emijah. [00:16:11] Emijah Smith: Thank you for that question. I think that's an ongoing issue and I think it's an ongoing issue that has to do with our regressive tax system, our property taxes - people who are being pushed out are low-income working class families that cannot afford the rent, right? So it's a cycle of an issue that is occurring. When that cycle occurs, it's like - the burden of property taxes going up fall onto the renter who is then also gonna continue to be pushed out. So how are we solving the problem if we're not addressing some of the root causes of the issues. The root causes of the issue is also about having fair wages and wages that - where people can actually live in the 37th and pay the mortgages, buy the homes. So also these temporary three-day opportunities just - they're not long enough. And we're pushing people more into being renters who are carrying the burden of even homeowners who want to rent rather than providing stable housing, like I said, for at least a year in some place - so that people can build themselves up, not just go for three three days and then you have to transfer and go to another place, and eventually you're gonna get pushed out of the 37th going south, which is actually having its issues as well as our homeless population. We have the resources, we have the money, the 37th and Washington State can correct this issue. We need to correct the issue and we need to address the root causes of homelessness, not just providing people a three-day motel stay here or there or putting people in tiny home villages. Thank you. [00:17:44] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:17:47] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I also agree that it's an issue. And it's great that we're increasing funding for it, but I don't think the funding is keeping up with the magnitude of the issue. There's many things that are contributing to this - like Emijah mentioned, home costs for someone who's trying to buy a house are skyrocketing. That's pushing up property values, which then increases someone's tax burden. So if you're a low-income person and your property taxes rise, you have less spending power. If you're a senior on a fixed income, you have less spending power and sometimes get forced into selling. We also have insufficient tenant protections. And so if you lose - if you're a renter and you lose your housing, then you end up on the street and that snowballs. You can't go to work, your kids can't go to school, and the issue gets worse. So not only do I support all of those, or means to fix all of those, I also would like to see better paying jobs. So for example, I think it's crazy that after K-12 school, we don't elevate the trades. The trades provide a great means of well-paying stable jobs for everyone. And traditionally we have denigrated the trades like - oh, you went to the trades 'cause you can't hack it. No, these are great jobs that people enjoy. Two of my best friends from junior high school went through four-year college, hated the jobs they got, came back, became electricians, and now love those jobs and get paid more than they did before. So I think this - we need to think of this comprehensively, not only in how do we fix the housing market, but how do we increase job stability and the paying of jobs? [00:19:16] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:19:19] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Homelessness affects all of our communities in Seattle and King County and as mentioned before, it is a very complicated issue, but I think that we all have a role to play. Homelessness represents a multisector, multi-system failures and requires a whole of community solutions. Many of the strategies, connections, and services needed to support individuals experiencing homelessness are managed outside of the homeless service system or in geographically separated systems. So I think as a solution, we need to think about creating long-term institutional alignment across systems serving people experiencing homelessness. We must also ensure that community leaders in business, philanthropy, and those who have lived experience with homelessness and advocates can coordinate and align with regional and state level homelessness initiatives to cultivate share and promote solutions to homelessness. I think, while at times, efforts to support the unhoused in Seattle can appear scattered and disorganized - oftentimes initiatives and task force are renamed, replaced, discontinued. I think that every day we encounter people who are living on the street, often without a reliable place to store possessions, clean clothes, take a shower, and get a solid night of rest. Moving forward, I think that we must continue to invest in housing, supportive housing for people with serious mental illness, emergency housing, and affordable housing. The solution to ending homelessness is to provide more options for housing and that Seattle and King County will need private business to take an active role in housing the unhoused if efforts to end homelessness must be - [00:21:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next Andrew. [00:21:07] Andrew Ashiofu: Thank you for this question. As I said earlier in my introduction, I was able to come out of being homeless by someone giving me somewhere to stay. We've been approaching homelessness in - we'd say one-size-fits-all solution and that's wrong. Homeless has various degrees - from mental health to drugs, to PTSD with the vets, to domestic violence, to people like me that lost their jobs, to youths that are kicked out for coming out. We have a huge problem in the LGBTQ community. The first thing I think we should do is - I'm not a fan of shelters because it's just for overnight. Again, we need more. So we need things like investing in transition housing. We just had one open up right here on 12th. We need to, again, back to wraparound services, housing. We have the space, but we also - people talk about density. We have a lot of high-rises apartments coming. The problem why it's not affordable is one, it's not affordable. Also, it doesn't - it's all one bedroom studios and two bedroom. What about families? What about town homes? We don't have that kind of investment. So we need to create legislation that brings about things like right to return, but also invest in multi-family units, not just one bedroom or studios. We need more, more, more. Thank you. [00:22:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So families have been facing increased financial pressure. The cost of necessities like rent and childcare has been skyrocketing for years. More recently, gas, food and other prices have noticeably increased and people are having to make financial sacrifices. What can you do in your capacity as a state legislator to provide tangible relief to people who are struggling with bills? And we are starting with Andrew. [00:23:05] Andrew Ashiofu: The first thing is we need a tax relief for low-income families, working class families. Two, I think we need a gas tax break - for now - because of the high prices of gas. When it comes to childcare, we - I always say we need childcare vouchers, but also making it applicable whereby people can give what I call family, friends and neighbor - a part of childcare, but it's highly overlooked. So we need to create those vouchers as - oh, I can pay my family, I can pay a friend, I can pay a neighbor to help me take care of these kids. In campaigning, we see childcare as a huge need for people campaigning with children. We have that law that they cannot even use campaign phones for childcare. And a lot of people, especially women, have to drop out for running for office because of things like childcare. So we need that. And for - I think we need transportation, free public transit. I'm a transit - I use the transits occasionally. I've been endorsed by the Transit Riders Union, but we also need to invest in accessible transit and make it free for people to move around and reduce dependency on gas. Thank you so much. [00:24:25] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:24:29] Emijah Smith: Thank you. I think on a state level, the state can provide some relief. They can give credits of some tax credit - we need to address our regressive tax code, period. That will give a lot of relief. Our state is receiving revenue of our marijuana tax dollars. We have the money to make some different choices and we really need to release the burden off of our low-income and working class families. So I definitely just think that there should be some type of package that is offered. But I do agree that I think that things are starting to be cut back because of COVID, coming out of COVID. So we should still be making sure that our students are receiving free breakfast, free lunch - that should not be something that's gonna be cut - the feds are cutting it, the state needs to pick up on that. The state is doing a great job by supporting covering some of the healthcare costs and help for the insurance, but that needs to be extended. It needs to be covered because just to try to buy some food, to go in there and just try to buy fruit and be healthy - the 37th has a lot of food deserts. It costs a lot of money to be healthy and to thrive in this community. So our basic necessities, I think that the state should utilize some of that revenue and give us all some level of a break based on our income. I am a single parent, I have raised my kids, I have found innovative ways to survive and get through that paying through childcare. Definitely advocating for childcare, increasing the income levels for families to be able to access that - this screen is killing me, but - the state can do it. We have the money, we need to take care of our basic needs we need to give food vouchers to our community members. Thank you. [00:26:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:26:15] Chipalo Street: Sure. So one of the places that childcare is provided is in the schools. We have a program for early childhood learning. I think it would be great to expand that, not only because that would provide some relief for childcare, but also the earlier we get a kid into education, the better the outcomes. I think there are some other good ideas thrown out there around like a gas tax holiday, but a gas tax holiday is really a short-term band-aid on the solution where we really need progressive tax reform. Washington State has the most regressive tax code in the country, which is crazy given how fortunate we are in this state to have very good-paying jobs and we need to make sure that everyone pays their fair share. So I would love to see income tax implemented. Unfortunately it seems like there's some issues with that in the constitution, so we need to fight to keep our capital gains tax. There's some corporate tax loopholes that we could close and in doing so, we could then reduce some of the sales tax, which contributes to our regressive tax code. So I think we should look at this a little more holistically in terms of progressive tax reform, because so much of it comes down to where we fund different programs in our state. [00:27:23] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:27:26] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that Washington's economic climate is one of the best in the nation. And this is because unlike other states, our minimum wage is more reflective of the current economy and workers are offered generous employment benefits. However, this is often negated by the fact that we do have the most regressive tax code in our country. Our economy only works for the top, our economy works the best for the top 1%. I believe that workers and small businesses are fundamental to the health of our economy. I think that as a small business owner, we need to create an economy that fosters the growth of these businesses. And we need to invest in apprenticeship programs and strong unions to grow our economy and safe, living-wage jobs. At the same time, we desperately need to reconsider, like I said, our regressive tax code, which exploits working people by lowering taxes on low-income earners. And by requiring the wealthiest in our state to pay their fair share, we can spur economic growth and relieve this population of its economic burden. As a woman of color, centering the voices of Black, Indigenous and people of color is of the utmost importance to me. I'm committed to explicitly centering the perspective and the needs of marginalized groups who are so often underserved by being left out in the policy I work to craft. In addition to this, I support policies that specifically or functionally address the racial wealth gap, including affordable housing that helps people of color generate generational wealth, as well as the universal basic income, which has been shown to reduce the racial wealth gap. I think in addition to cutting taxes, we also - in addition to creating more taxes, we need to also cut taxes for low-income workers. [00:29:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We are sitting here after the Dobbs decision that struck down reproductive rights protections and the right to an abortion for women. According to Axios, 41% of hospital beds in Washington are located in religious hospitals. So although we are not one of the states that has an abortion ban immediately occurring because of the decision, we do have some issues with access. Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of mergers involving religious hospital networks? And we are starting with Nimco. [00:29:49] Nimco Bulale: Can you repeat the last part of the question? [00:29:52] Crystal Fincher: Would you vote to make the continuation of abortion services a requirement of hospital mergers, which we're having a lot of - involving secular or religious hospital networks. And what more can we do to protect abortion access? [00:30:08] Nimco Bulale: So I don't have a paddle, but I will say absolutely Yes, I would support that. I'm pissed - I think access to healthcare, reproductive, and gender-affirming care are at the forefront of my campaign as our nation continues to face an onslaught of threats to the rights of people of marginalized genders. And this is not okay. I think that we need to work harder to make this part of our constitution - the right to bodily autonomy is fundamental and I will always fight to protect these rights, especially in a state like Washington, which is soon to become a safe haven for birthing people in states looking to outlaw abortion entirely. As a longtime education policy activist, I understand the need for comprehensive sex education and I will continue to fight for that when I'm elected in office. I'm firmly committed to creating a world in which all people can decide when, if, and in what manner they decide to have children. Reproductive justice means we must also work to create a world in which those children are born into communities that are safe, healthy, and just. [00:31:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - and next we're going to Andrew. [00:31:15] Andrew Ashiofu: It's a Yes for me - we need to protect the right to choose. And we also need to call a special session to codify this in our constitution and create bills that would protect anyone that comes into our state to seek an abortion - currently there's been an increase. Now, when it comes to hospitals' merger, we need to protect the right to choose as part of this merger. And this is not just - this covers - because some of these hospitals also could choose not to treat me as a gay person because they believe - they might say - because of anti-LGBTQ rhetorics in some of these places. We need - healthcare is very important for everyone. We all deserve healthcare and there should be no barrier against healthcare. I have done a lot of advocacy, I have fought for my right to survive, and I know the red tape and the obstacles. We don't need that now. We need to create access. As a state, we need to call - I call on Governor Inslee to call a special session to codify abortion into our constitution here in Washington State. Thank you. [00:32:30] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:32:33] Emijah Smith: Thank you for the question. And just going directly to it - healthcare is a right and I believe having access to abortion is part of our basic healthcare. And so I definitely believe that we would have to interrogate, and I think that with this merger, those type of access - abortion access - should be available to all - to birthing parents and birthing people who need that. I also am in agreement with our Washington State really looking at our constitution and making sure that if we say we're gonna support and having access to abortion and it is a right for people for that choice, then we need to lock that in now and not be worried about a session or two here and somebody trying to undo that. That's the world that I grew up in and I totally support that no matter what I would choose in terms of if I want to have a child or not. I also want to just say healthcare equities are real. And particularly for Black women, we have the highest risk of death at birth. So this is a real issue for us around trying to have choice and just getting care in general. COVID just lifted up the top of how these he health equities are a real problem in our healthcare system. And too often, some of our healthcare systems are just moving for profit. We need to be moving for health. It is a basic right for our community. Thank you. [00:34:00] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:34:03] Chipalo Street: Yes, I'm a hundred percent supportive of this. If we didn't have enough issues at the state level to deal with before, the Supreme Court has given us a whole host of new issues to deal with, abortion access being one of them. I would love for my first bill to be a bill to enshrine protections for the right to choose into our constitution. Above and beyond that, I think we also need people who understand technology in the Legislature. So I work for the Chief Technology Officer at Microsoft and I think having folks who understand technology is incredibly important, especially for things like Roe, where we don't - where we want to make sure that companies' data can't be inadvertently, or even maybe specifically, used to target people seeking abortions. And then I also agree with Nimco that we need to increase funding for our abortion centers, because we will have an influx of folks coming from our surrounding states where they do not have access to it anymore. So we have to make sure that our folks have it, we have to make sure that we are a beacon of light for other surrounding states so that we can make abortion a option that people have when they consider their overall healthcare. [00:35:09] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. So this next question is a little bit of a question. So crime has been increasing across the state. People are concerned about their safety and whether we're doing the right things to address the current levels of property and violent crime. According to a recent Crosscut/Elway poll, Seattle voters were asked what they think are major factors in the crime rate. The top three answers were lack of mental health and addiction services - that was 85% of Seattle residents gave that answer. Second answer was homelessness at 67%. And the third answer was economic conditions at 63%. When asked specifically if they could direct where their tax dollars were spent, the top three responses were at 92% addiction and mental health services, at 81% training police officers to deescalate situations, and at 80% programs to address the root causes of crime. Those were Seattle residents' top answers. Given that the Legislature has already voted to increase public safety funding, largely devoted to policing and prisons, do you feel that we should increase funding for these things that Seattle voters have requested like behavioral health resources, non-police intervention services, and rehabilitation services before passing further increases for police spending? And we will start with Chipalo. [00:36:34] Chipalo Street: Yeah, public safety and police accountability is a issue that is near and dear to my heart. In college, I was beaten by the police for not showing my ID so bad that I had to be taken to the hospital before they took me to jail. It was so bad that a student who was watching it said that she was traumatized. And so I, 100%, believe that we need an accountable police force. That said, I think police are part of public safety. They should be partners that we can work with and should not be afraid to call to come to violent crimes, to solve robberies. They are part of public safety and I want to work with them to make sure that we have a - we have more public safety. I also encourage our society to think more holistically about public safety - we ask police to do too much and things they're not trained for. So we should have counselors in schools, not cops. We shouldn't be sending police to respond to nonviolent mental health crisis, we should be sending professionals who are trained to do that. And so I think that reflects a lot of what you're seeing Seattle voters say is - yes, we need more addiction counseling, we need more mental health funding - so that we first prevent these issues from starting. And then if they do happen, we want a person who is trained to deal with that issue responding to it. So I would 100% support more of these services to get at the root causes of some of these issues while making our police accountable, just like any other professional accountability. We have professional accountability for lawyers and doctors. We should have the same thing for police. [00:38:07] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:38:10] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. Regarding public safety and police, I absolutely believe that we need more law enforcement jobs that need to be reassigned to social workers and other service providers. I believe that the police are equipped with limited and largely punitive tools to handle many of the crises they're called to address. I support protecting our public safety by investing in broader emergency response teams trained to handle mental health, interpersonal, and addiction crises. Additionally, the police have jeopardized the public safety by systematically inflicting violence, surveillance, and fear on communities of color. I support deescalation, crisis intervention, and accountability in service of protecting public safety. I believe we need a justice system that makes our community safer and healthier. We need proactive policies that emphasize crime prevention and support for vulnerable communities instead of reactive policies that emphasize punishment. I also support setting up effective systems for crime prevention, including mental health and addiction resources, policies that tackle scarcity, and social work. Effective public safety comes from community and requires community healing when harm is done. [00:39:27] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:39:30] Andrew Ashiofu: Thanks. I'm gonna talk from the other side - from someone that has walked through the shoes of the other side, where people think otherwise about you. I tell people I had a mental crisis in 2020, and 'til now I'm still on a wait list to talk to a mental specialist. And what does that tell me is - we don't have enough trained, diverse mental health specialists even in our clinics that are affordable and accessible to many people that really need them. Most of them work for very expensive hospitals or clinics or practices. We, as a state, we need to invest in that form of education. And also when it comes to drug addiction, I tell people I am for safe injection or safe sites. And people say why? I said, because one, it brings these people to a place where you could personally reach out to them. And it also reduces diseases and spread of blood-borne diseases. And our police force - I think we've invested enough. We need more civilian engagement, more social workers, more people that are not violent. We need the police to go back and address sexual assault victims. We need more civil engagement. That's what I think we need in Washington State. Thank you. [00:41:04] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:41:07] Emijah Smith: Yes, thank you for the question. We definitely need - our state needs to invest, provide mental health investments. As a PTSA president at my son's middle school, every year we check in with the families and ask them - what type of resources, what do you need? And for the past few years, especially with COVID, everyone a hundred percent has prioritized social, emotional health and wanting some mental health support for our youth. So mental health supports go across the gamut - I know you were speaking to public safety, crime, and what the poll had indicated, but I want to say it's across the board. Recently had spoke with the leader of the If Project - a police officer who was also sharing - in the past that our police officers weren't even getting properly mental health care. And so how we're trying to look into how they are trying to look and making sure that police officers are getting behavioral health. So the behavioral health is across the board. We, as families have been impacted. And so our state should invest regardless - whether it's those who are having addiction issues, who are untreated or others. And if our youth are not being serviced well, then people are gonna go try to self-medicate and it's going to create a cycle. And we wanna interrupt that cycle of harm. We wanna interrupt that cycle of being untreated. I definitely believe that we need to make sure our resources are equitable, right? So the police force budget is way much larger than our education budget. And so we need to take a look at that. So I definitely believe in police accountability - all the things - deescalation, all the things, the training that's needed. [00:42:49] Crystal Fincher: Thank you very much. Next, we're going to go with a question from a viewer. I'll read it verbatim. We've just found out that Starbucks is closing our CD neighborhood location on 23rd and Jackson due to crime concerns. That's a quote from them. I would be interested to hear candidate thoughts on this decision and how this loss affects a community gathering space. And we will start with Emijah. [00:43:19] Emijah Smith: I appreciate that question - you probably see my eyes. I'll honestly say I'm a little bit heartbroken about what's happening in the Central District. I was just talking with the new development complex about looking at that parking lot just this morning, saying the result of the people who are in that parking lot is a result of the poor policies that have come when you displace and gentrified a whole community. This is a place where people find to be their community. This is sometimes a place where people who are unhoused feel most safe - in that space - because someone will come and smile at them. So crime and different things are happening across not only our City, across the 37th, but across our nation. So to remove something as a community space that we need - so people can come together, come problem solve, come be a support in some way or another - I think that that is not the best move. I think it's like you came and you put your footsteps there, but then you're gonna step away and leave the problem. You need to resource the issue, bring in investments. I would rather Starbucks do that, especially when you look at the racial justice context and how they maybe even came into the community. So I'm disheartened about it, but at the same time, we as community and advocates work in solidarity - are working to address that issue. But I will say I've talked to those people in that parking lot, I've seen people I've grew up with in that community, and I know even a unhoused, homeless woman sleeping in the bench there said that was the safest place for them because they're amongst at least their own community. Thank you. [00:44:53] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:44:55] Chipalo Street: Yeah - if they wanna leave, they can leave - and I don't understand why they would leave for safety concerns. What I hope is that we can have another community business come in and take that spot - let's have Boon Boona Coffee, who has a place down in Renton and a place down on 12th Ave, come in and take that shop because I believe you can do good business in that location without vilifying the people who are in the parking lot. There are definitely issues with unhoused populations choking out businesses. You can see that down on 12th and Jackson where they've moved in front of Lam's Seafood and there's EBT fraud going on there. I would not put 23rd and Jackson in that same bucket. I quite frankly, wouldn't be surprised if there's a little bit of bias or racism going on in that decision to shut down. And Starbucks has shown that they want to do some union busting in other places, so losing Starbucks - to me - isn't the end of the world. I'll bet you that a better business will come in and replace it really soon because that's a booming area - they just opened up a bunch of housing around there. Yeah, that's their decision, that's fine. We'll get a better business in there. [00:46:01] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:46:04] Nimco Bulale: I'm disheartened by the closing, to be very honest - I remember as a young child growing up and meeting my grandfather at that Starbucks because he lived right at a senior center close by. And so I'm gutted to hear that that's happening. And it's unfortunate that - we know that oftentimes communities of color, the ones that are disproportionately impacted by these travesties and by gun violence and public safety - as a representative, I will lead with racial justice being central to the fight to end violence and specifically support policies that are common sense and that reduce police interactions and increase accountability for our communities. I think, as Chipalo mentioned, this could be an opportunity to have a community cafe there, an opportunity to really invest in the Central District and in that area. And I think it's a missed opportunity for Starbucks to leave in this condition and to say that it's because of safety concerns. I would've hoped that they would be a part of that solution in really being able to continue to invest and rehabilitate the community. Yeah, so it's unfortunate, but I think there's more opportunities to be - to really invest in that corner of our community. [00:47:22] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [00:47:25] Andrew Ashiofu: I'm going to address this in various forms for - when they say public safety, I think I go again with what everyone said - is based on racial bias. I really hope Brian of Tougo Coffee down here at Yesler opens another branch there. But also - I, as a frontline worker that has been working hard to be unionized at my airline, I think this is also a form of union busting, as Chipalo said, because we've seen that nearly all the stores that unionize at Starbucks - they close it down. And there's a huge - this is the time, the moment for the unions to come together. And Starbucks is - Okay, we're going to punish you. But also, I think as a state representative, or as on the state level, this is why we should invest in small businesses and among minorities and Black communities, immigrant communities, because - I used to say those are our safe space, even the LGBT community, but reality - those are our brave spaces where we could be who we are. We could be - so we need to invest in small business there and take back what was ours. Thank you so much. [00:48:38] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. Next we are going to a question about the Dobbs decision that eliminated the right to abortion. But in Justice Thomas's concurring opinion, he went further and he identified decisions he felt should be reevaluated after their ruling in Dobbs - cases that established our right to same-sex marriage, rights to contraception, and rights to sexual privacy. What can our state legislature do to proactively protect these rights? Starting with Andrew. [00:49:13] Andrew Ashiofu: Ooh - as a gay person and someone involved in the LGBTQ+ community and advocacy, this is really hard. It brings back memories of when I was kicked out, it brings back memories of being bullied and being called a f*gg*t. As a state, we need to create constitution that protects all those things. Contraception is part of healthcare - it's important, it's not an option. You can't tell me that - as a states we need to provide - contraception should be free, condoms should be free, Plan B should be free, IUD should be free, menstrual pads and all those tampons should be free - should not be for profit. We need to protect and make it accessible, not affordable - accessible for free - because again it's criminalizing minorities. Then when it comes to privacy and this is the whole LGBTQ witch hunting all over again. In this day and age, we need to create that as a protective class in our constitution, in our schools, we need to protect them in our workplace. We need to protect them - I want to walk down the streets and not have someone call me a f*gg*t. So this is something very dear to me. And I would walk hard to codify all that into protection in Washington State. Thank you. [00:50:39] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [00:50:41] Emijah Smith: Thank you. This is an opportunity for Washington State to really walk its talk. We talk about being progressive, we talk about all the things, and this is an opportunity for us to get in front of it. This is why I want to go ahead and be a state representative - because I do not wanna see us go back, turn the clock back. I'm there to push, hold the line, and take us forward - because this type of it's - I have no understanding for it. I'm triggered, right? We're here in the 37th and we talk about the progressiveness and I'm tired of talk and we need representation and leadership that will hold the line and also push the line forward. This is about safety in my opinion. This is a safety issue. If a person cannot show up who they are, then how can they be safe? They're going to be a target of violence. This to me is policy violence, and this is not acceptable. So this is who I am and how I wanna show up moving forward. We leave this place better than the way we found it. I do not need my children or my loved ones, or my neighbors, fearful of their own safety, because they cannot show up as who they need to be - because they don't have the proper resources or then we're gonna be stereotyped in some form or fashion, then more policies and that systemic racism will fall on those who are most marginalized. It's this type of rhetoric that has to come to an end. You have to be about action. Thank you. [00:52:21] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [00:52:24] Chipalo Street: Yeah, I can't agree more with what folks are saying. To me, what's interesting about this and ironic is that this is an example of extreme privilege. My understanding is that he left one issue out that is also built on Dobbs, which is interracial marriage, and he is married to a white lady. But yet he cited every other thing that he wants to take back. So why is it that this person in a position of power over so many people can just selectively exclude it? So I think it hits home for all of us in very many different ways. Personally, this hits home because I'm half Black, half white. And so even though he didn't include it in there, you know it's next - it just means that you can't trust what they say. And it means that you need to elect leaders to state representatives, to Supreme Court - I guess we can't elect people to Supreme Court, but Senators who confirm justices up and down the ballot - who support everyone's right, to see people as equal, who are with us on this march towards equality. [00:53:31] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [00:53:32] Nimco Bulale: Thank you so much for that question. I don't wanna re - I agree with what everybody said. I think additionally, Washington State needs to be in the business of justice. And when I say justice, I really mean the complete physical, mental, spiritual, political, economic, and social wellbeing of all people. It can only - I think that this can only be achieved when everybody has that economic, social, and political power, as well as the resources to make healthy decisions about their bodies, about their sexuality, about their reproductive - reproduction - for themselves, their families, and their communities in all areas of their lives. I think that this is the kind of foresight that we need to have as a state and we really need to lead in these issues. If we say that we are beacon for supporting reproductive rights and other rights of all people, I think that we need to be leading in that. And we need to show the rest of the country that we are an example of folks that take that business of justice seriously. [00:54:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. And with that, we are actually gonna take a short two-minute break to give our candidates a chance to grab some water - it's a hot day. And grab their Yes and No paddles because we're going to be back with a lightning round. So two minutes is starting now and we will see you on the other side. All right. We are getting ready to begin our lightning round. So you all have paddles with - that are green on one side, red on the other. Green is what you show to face - that faces the camera - if your answer is Yes. The other side - red, if it's No. We will do these in rapid succession. And following the lightning round, following all of - the totality of the questions - everyone will have one minute to explain any of the answers that you want to. But we will go through this quickly, so I'll ask the question and then ask you to hold up for people to clearly see the Yes or No to the answers to these questions. So we're starting out - regarding housing and homelessness, are there any instances where you would support sweeps of homeless encampments? Yes or no? It looks like we have two either giving a No or a thumbs down for No. Looks like everybody is a No on that question. Next question. Will you vote to end single-family zoning in order to create more housing density and affordability? Yes or no? Everyone is a Yes. Next question. Would you vote to end the statewide ban on rent control and let localities decide whether they want to implement it? Yes or no. Everyone is a Yes on that question. Next, do you support Seattle's social housing initiative, I-135? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you have voted for the legislature's police reform rollbacks in the last legislative session? Yes or no? A mixed answer. So keep your paddles held up for that. So Emijah is a Yes, everyone else is a No - that's Chipalo, Andrew, and Nimco. Next, should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Yes or no. Repeating the question - should the legislature pass restrictions on what can be collectively bargained by police unions? Everyone is a Yes in that question. Would you vote for any bill that increases highway expansion? Yes or no? Chipalo is a Yes. Emijah, Nimco, and Andrew are No. Do you support calling a special session this year to codify reproductive rights and access into law? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes. Would you have voted this past session - for the session before last - for the Climate Commitment Act? Yes or no? Everybody's a Yes on that question. Do you think trans and non-binary students should be allowed to play on the sports teams that fit with their gender identities? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Will you vote to enact a universal basic income in Washington? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes on that question. Our state has one of the most regressive tax codes in the country, meaning lower-income people pay a higher percentage of their income in taxes than the ultra-wealthy. In addition to the capital gains tax, do you support a wealth tax? Yes or no? Everybody with quick Yeses to that. Do you support implementing ranked-choice voting in Seattle? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes to that. Do you support implementing approval voting in Seattle? Yes or no. These are slow answers. We've got some waffling. We've got a lot of waffling. The only clear answer was Andrew with a No. Do you support moving local elections from odd years to even years to significantly increase voter turnout? Yes or no? Quick yeses for that. Is your campaign unionized? Yes or no? Every - I can't see your answer there, Andrew. Everybody's a No. If your campaign staff wants to unionize, will you voluntarily recognize their effort? Yes or no. Everybody is a Yes. Would you vote to provide universal healthcare to every Washington resident? Yes or no? Everybody is a Yes. That concludes our lightning round. Now we will give each candidate one minute to explain anything they want to explain about their answers or their waffles. And we'll start with Nimco. [01:00:47] Nimco Bulale: About my waffles? [01:00:49] Crystal Fincher: About any of your answers or the answers that were a non-answer - is there anything that you'd want to explain? [01:00:56] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - maybe if I didn't vote on the question - it wasn't the ranked-choice question, it was the question after that. I wasn't familiar unfortunately with that idea. And so my only explanation is - is that I need to learn a little bit more about - can you explain, can Crystal, can you repeat what that question was? [01:01:15] Crystal Fincher: It was about an approval voting initiative that had been collecting ballot signatures, may appear on the ballot. However, we actually just got some breaking news today that there may be an effort from Councilmember Andrew Lewis to actually put ranked-choice voting on the ballot, which would supplant the approval voting process. So tune in there, but there is a possibility for approval voting, which is where you just vote for everyone that you like. And we've discussed it certainly, there's other people discussing it - lots of lively conversation about - the people and interests supporting and opposing it, and the differences between the two. But just an interesting question there. [01:02:02] Nimco Bulale: Yeah - I just will commit myself to learning more about that. Obviously I support ranked-choice voting and will get myself knowledgeable about approval voting. [01:02:13] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:02:17] Andrew Ashiofu: Yeah. I am not in support of approval voting. I'm more in support of ranked-choice voting. Also this very initiative has had a bit of scandal while gathering the signatures and all that - I've heard from them, I've listened to their ideology, which I truly appreciate in creating more voices in - more voices of the people voting in the approval, but I think ranked-choice voting is the right way to go. [01:02:55] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Emijah. [01:02:59] Emijah Smith: Yeah. I wanted to share more information about my answer with regard to the rollbacks, when you spoke about the police legislation initiatives. I define rollbacks as taking us backwards, so I'm not sure how you were defining rollbacks, but when I think about the fact that there's Terry stops now - from the past legislative session, there are now Terry stops. Terry stop is where a person can just be pulled over, asked for their ID, they can be interrogated by the police - without probable cause. And I think that that's a huge problem. And so I'm not in support of things like that - the use of force - and how those things are defined. So I will - I push and want to champion police accountability that's going to make us more safety and bring more balance, not take us back to the 80s, 90s, and 2000s that I'm surviving from right now with overpolicing in our community. [01:03:58] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Chipalo. [01:04:00] Chipalo Street: Sure. So I think the one that I was different from folks was highway expansion. I think the key word to me in that question was "any" - there are times where I could believe you need to expand highways for freight mobility and those support our union jobs. So I would want to make sure that we could at least consider that. In general, I don't think we should be expanding highways. We should be investing in mass transit. But I do want to make sure that we can support our unions and freight transit, 'cause that is - that diversifies our economy and it's one of the strengths that Seattle has. Approval voting - yeah, similar to Nimco, I had no idea what that was. It'll be interesting to learn more about that. And then the police accountability stuff - I have a hard time believing I would've voted for it. The thing that I think that went really well is that Jesse Johnson did ride-alongs with the police - I think we have to be their partners, we have to understand the impacts of our legislation. And so I'd be open to partnering with them to understand how that impacts them and their ability to provide public safety. But given my experience, I have a hard time believing that I would've. But I do believe they're are partners and would like to partner with them to improve public safety. [01:05:05] Crystal Fincher: Thank you. We'll now move on to our regular type of questions. We're currently not on track to meet our 2030 climate goals, and I'm going to ask a question from someone who's watching because of that and because transportation is the biggest polluting sector. They're asking - how can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? And we will start with Chipalo. [01:05:38] Chipalo Street: And one more time for me, please. [01:05:41] Crystal Fincher: Sure. How can we shift people out of cars while making sure we don't hurt those working class people whose commutes are too long for transit or bikes? [01:05:52] Chipalo Street: For sure. So I think one of the things that we have to do, that we saw last cycle when we passed Move Ahead WA, was investing in transit and forms of non-single-occupancy vehicles into our suburbs and rural areas. Mass transit is great, but we can't just focus on our cities because there are people who have longer commutes that need to get to jobs. Often, these are working people who have been pushed and displaced out of cities and into suburban and rural areas. So I want to make sure that whatever we do for transit thinks about the state comprehensively in conjunction with cities and our exurbs. [01:06:36] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Nimco. [01:06:37] Nimco Bulale: Thank you for that question. I believe that to quickly reduce transportation carbon emissions, we need to fundamentally shift our planning, our policy development, and infrastructure investments to prioritize public transit, walking, and biking over personal vehicles. I think often communities of color and working class communities lack access to reliable forms of public transportation or live in areas where bus systems lack sufficient funding. As legislator, I will support any and all legislation that helps expand public transit to be more reliable, accessible, and affordable for Washingtonians, especially for those who currently live in areas with limited access to public transportation and are forced to be more reliant on cars. I think that this will not only reduce carbon emissions, but it'll also help mobilize our communities and promote fuel efficiency. I do support a just transportation package to ensure that when planning transportation systems, there is a focus on people disproportionately harmed by our current transportation choices. No one should be burdened by pollution from transportation or unable to access - unable to access groceries or school without a car. This package must be a catalyst towards protecting future generations from the climate crisis today. [01:07:59] Crystal Fincher: Thank you - Andrew. [01:08:03] Andrew Ashiofu: One, I think is - we need to invest in the expansion of public transportation. There's no rail from here to Tacoma, there's no rail from here to Olympia - that's a red flag right there. We also need to invest in hiring public transport workers, especially bus drivers, to help us with our interconnection with cities, with urban areas. We also need to create incentive for environmental friendly rideshare programs. I hav

KZYX News
Union files complaint; questions about satellite funding at BoS meeting

KZYX News

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 6:27


July 28, 2022 — At a brief Board of Supervisors meeting on Tuesday, the Board heard about Measure B, cannabis, covid, and labor. Public Health Officer Dr. Andy Coren called in to warn about new variants. He is strongly recommending that people wear masks indoors and gather outdoors. Since May, the county has recorded eight deaths from covid, six of them in the greater Ukiah area. The descedents ranged in age from 67-91, and most had comorbidities. And negotiations between the county and the union representing most of its workers are not going amicably. SEIU Local 1021 filed an unfair labor practice charge with the state Public Employment Relations Board, claiming that the county has refused to give union negotiators all the information they need to participate in bargaining sessions. Union representative Patrick Hickey called into the Board meeting on Tuesday to say that he thinks the county does have the money to give members a cost of living allowance, or COLA. “We've been waiting since November for a variety of information requests,” he said. “And the county continues to drag its heels, has failed to present the information that we've needed to analyze the budget…we did finally get a dribble of information from the county last week in our negotiations. They provided a small portion of the information requested regarding the more than 402 unfilled vacant positions in the county…based on the limited amount of information provided, it's clear that there is certainly funding available to provide county employees with a reasonable COLA to address the current high level of inflation. Based on the current budget, a lot more attention is being paid to taking care of the buildings, rather than taking care of the employees. Some of those projects are not imminent or urgent, and certainly can be postponed and that money can be rededicated to COLAs…there's a sizable amount of money set aside to buy new vehicles. The County has a large number of vehicles that are not even used on a regular basis, that are just sitting in parking lots, getting old.” The union told the employee relations board that “the County should be ordered to provide complete and accurate responses to the Union's outstanding requests for information; ” and asked it to “order all other remedies it deems just and proper.” The union frequently contends that low pay leads to understaffing, a theme that emerged in many of the Grand Jury reports, which started to come out last week. Michael Katz, the Executive Director of the Mendocino Cannabis Alliance, drew the board's attention to the Grand Jury report on the cannabis equity grant program, which is supposed to provide grants to people who have been harmed by the war on drugs. The report detailed communications failures, and noted that as of May, the county's Cannabis Department had ten vacant positions and only twelve employees. Katz said the report bolstered many points the board has heard before. “I'm not sure you had a chance to review it. It came in yesterday,” he began. “If you had, you might see that some of the findings and some of the recommendations align with what MCA and stakeholders from the community have been saying for quite some time. One of the first findings indicates that there was no process developed for the distribution of grant funds to individuals prior to applications being received. What that indicates is a project management issue, I believe, that speaks to the need for additional support of the cannabis department by the CEO's office to ensure that as projects are set up, they align with all of the requirements of the county infrastructure and that we are not waiting for the last minute to identify potential roadblocks in getting out these much-needed funds. That goes on, additionally, to finding #2, that the County did not ask county did not ask the State for requirements on record-keeping until May of 2022, and apparently only did so to establish the County's risk of having to repay funds if they were not spent for approved purposes.” The county received $2.2 million for the equity program, and close to $10.5 million for a local jurisdiction assistance grant program to help growers comply with environmental regulations and cover the cost of various fees. Supervisor John Haschak pulled an item from the Board's consent calendar approving a year-long agreement with a company called Planet Labs to provide satellite imaging services, starting July 27, for a little over $350,000. “This is the Local Jurisdiction Assistance Grant money,” he said; “and the concern expressed was that this only be used for helping out with getting people to their annual licenses, which is the intent of the Local Jurisdiction Assistance Grant.” The Mendocino Cannabis Alliance sent a memo to the Board, sounding the alarm over the satellites' potential use for enforcement purposes, which it contends are ineligible uses for the grant money. Katz called out what he sees as a double standard. “It's been made very clear that if funds are misused, we will not be able to retain them,” he warned. “And seeing County Counsel's focus on making sure that the misuse of funds policy was in place for applicants to the equity program, people who have already been harmed by the war on drugs, it seems obvious to us that there should be similar misuse of funds policies in place for the administration of these funds.” The Board passed the consent calendar and agreed to fine-tune the use of the funds later. In the Measure B update, Behavioral Health Director Dr. Jeanine Miller told the Board that a new crisis team of mental health specialists worked with law enforcement to answer about one call a day last year. Sheriff Matt Kendall claimed that law enforcement visits to hospital emergency rooms with people in mental health crises are down 60% since the team started working together. But the mental health training center in Redwood Valley is expensive, and so far not living up to expectations. Again, Haschak was dubious. “We're hearing that there's two trainings per month at this point,” he said. “So that's 24 per year, and if we're looking at the operational cost of $50,000 per year, plus it looks like $30,000 for the capital, so we're talking $80,000 a year just to keep it up and running. So I guess the question is, how do we get better usage of it.” Miller said she expects better marketing will get the training center rented out more often. While the Measure B committee has put aside a prudent reserve, there is no reserve for capital improvement projects or maintenance, though one of the stated purposes of the Measure was to “Provide for the necessary infrastructure to support and stabilize” people needing treatment for a variety of conditions. The Measure B committee has ordered a gun locker for the training center and is deciding where to put it.

Bad With Money With Gaby Dunn
Black Monday: The Mysterious 1987 Stock Market Crash with Cerise Castle

Bad With Money With Gaby Dunn

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 58:27 Very Popular


This week, Gaby and journalist Cerise Castle explain the real life unexplained and mysterious 1987 Wall Street crash and the TV show based on it, Showtime's "Black Monday." To this day, the events surrounding the complete global stock market decimation in the late 80s have never been uncovered. Cerise and Gaby teach you everything we know about what happened, what changed the world, and why. Cerise also shares her knowledge about the War on Drugs, Iran-Contra, Freeway Rick Ross, Gary Webb's Code of Silence, and the CIA's involvement in the crack epidemic. They also break down being Black and being a woman (or both) on Wall Street and what that experience is like, in real life research and also as portrayed in the 2019 comedy. tw: suicide Gaby Dunn Instagram: @GabyRoad BWM Instagram: @bwmpod BWM Facebook group: http://tinyurl.com/badwithmoneyfb The BWM Discord channel: https://discord.gg/dAdxj4JMER Find Gaby on Patreon: patreon.com/gabydunn Shop gabydunn.com/shop for merch! Bad with Money is produced, edited, sound engineered and mixed by Cumulus Podcast Network, The theme song was performed by Sam Barbara and written by Myq Kaplan, Zach Sherwin, and Jack Dolgen. Additional music by Joey Salvia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Trace Material
The Citizen Scientist

Trace Material

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 19:32


The power of fungi has been neglected by academic institutions and marginalized in the larger society. By the 1960s the American imagination had linked fungi to magic mushrooms, the counterculture movement, and Nixon's war on drugs. That lingering association has meant that American mycophiles have gathered in community at the margins.We wanted to dig into those margins with William Padilla Brown, a citizen scientist who's been thriving at them. William is the founder of Mycosymbiotics, and he both sells and researches mushrooms. We went down to Pennsylvania to talk to him about what it took to become a renowned citizen scientist, and what makes the fungi community so special.Here's where you can find more from William: Instagram: @mycosymbiote and @mycosymbioticsWebsite: mycosymbiotics.com For more information, head to our website at healthymaterialslab.org/podcast, or give us a follow on Instagram @healthymaterialslab and Twitter @parsons_HML. If you've been enjoying this season, please take a moment to rate and review us on Apple Podcasts.

Thecuriousmanspodcast
Rick Emerson Interview Episode 56

Thecuriousmanspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 71:48


Matt Crawford speaks with author Rick Emerson about his book, Unmask Alice. In 1971, Go Ask Alice helped to set in motion and fortify our government and cultural perception of drugs and LSD in particular. The supposed diary of a middle-class white female this book was the jet fuel to the war on drugs machine. 5 million copies and 5 decades later it is still having an impact, and it wasn't the only "Diary." Emerson takes the deep dive and unravels this mystery taking us to places we could not imagine. A compelling read that takes its time but keeps you engaged throughout.

Foothills Unitarian Church
The Spirit of Psychedelics

Foothills Unitarian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 27:51


In this week's episode of The Foothills Deeper Pod, Rev. Kristen Psaki shares about The Spirit of Psychedelics. The psychedelic renaissance is here. Fifty years into the "War on Drugs" plant medicines and psychedelics are slowly shedding old stories and resurfacing as powerful allies. What lurks in the shadows of this renaissance and what role might psychedelics play in our personal and collective healing?

To Write Love on Her Arms
Episode 510: "Reframing Addiction From Problems to People" with Dr. Nzinga Harrison

To Write Love on Her Arms

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 59:48


Just say no. Drugs are whack.  Recognize, Resist, Report.   These phrases stem from programs and campaigns and political agendas that ultimately hurt the United States and its people. The Drug Abuse Resistance Education Program or DARE filled schools in the 90s—and while overall being deemed ineffective, it continues today asking youth to take pledges to stay away from drugs and gangs. Then there's the failed and heavily criticized War on Drugs that began in the 70s but really took off in the 80s. With it came laws that criminalized drugs and racially targeted specific groups and communities of people—especially people of color. Its focus weighed heavily on deterring use rather than emphasizing treatment and recovery.   So today, with all of this in mind, we have the immense honor of talking with and learning from Dr. Nzinga Harrison about addiction and the on-growing and growing opioid epidemic. Dr. Harrison is a physician, educator, and the Chief Medical Officer and Co-Founder of Eleanor Health, a value-based provider of comprehensive, outpatient addiction treatment. Above all else, this conversation is about reframing the way we as individuals and as a society view and address addiction and the people who are dealing with substance use disorders.  Show Notes (Links of ours and guests):   Download a transcript of this episode at twloha.com/podcast.   Follow TWLOHA on social media at: twitter.com/TWLOHA instagram.com/twloha/ facebook.com/towriteloveonherarms/   Visit our FIND HELP page of mental health resources at twloha.com/find-help/.   Get connected for free, 24/7 to a trained crisis counselor via Crisis Text Line by texting TWLOHA to 741741.   Connect with our team by emailing podcast@twloha.com.   Learn more about the podcast and previous episodes at twloha.com/podcast. Download TWLOHA's daily-use self-care app, The Hopeful, at twloha.com/thehopeful/.  Credits:   This episode of the TWLOHA podcast was hosted by Chad Moses and produced by Rebecca Ebert. Music assistance was provided by James Likeness and Ben Tichenor. 

Behind The Shield
Kevin Holtry - Episode 645

Behind The Shield

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 131:27


Kevin Holtry is a veteran Boise Police Officer, SWAT operator, undercover officer and adaptive athlete. We discuss his journey into policing, the war on drugs, the shooting that left him paralyzed, his physical and mental rehabilitation, the importance of realism in training, the heroism of K9 officers and so much more.

The Michael Labs Show
The Michael Labs Show #266 w/ Taylor - Almost Got Arrested

The Michael Labs Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 64:04


In this episode I sit down with my Girlfriend and we talk about the recent incident I had with police while hiking, we also talk about cops in general and the flawed views on drugs and the "War on Drugs" - The Michael Labs Show is a long sit down talk formatted Podcast from myself and friends and guests. The subjects and topics are random and it is designed to be a conversation and free flowing based Podcast. Hope you enjoy! Thank You!

The Way Podcast/Radio
88) El Chapo w/ Noah Hurowitz

The Way Podcast/Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 67:35


I'm sure you've heard the name; El Chapo. In today's episode, we talk about the environment that allowed El Chapo to thrive and prosper at the expense of others. One example of this environment; how the war on drugs was actually successful to certain people/organizations. Bio of Noah Hurowitz: I am a freelance reporter based in New York City. I originally started covering domestic drug policy in the U.S., and began covering the drug trade and war on drugs in Mexico when I covered the trial of El Chapo for Rolling Stone. My goal in the work I do is to find innovative and engaging ways to illuminate the stories of people impacted by larger structures and policies while showing how those structures and policies function, who profits from them, and how a better world might emerge from the wreckage of this one. Website - https://muckrack.com/noah-hurowitz Book - https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/El-Chapo/Noah-Hurowitz/9781982133757 Cover made by Kayro The Saint - https://instabio.cc/Kayrothesaint - https://twitter.com/kayrothesaint To watch the visuals with the trailer go to https://www.podcasttheway.com/trailers/ The Way Podcast - www.PodcastTheWay.com - Follow at Twitter / Instagram - @podcasttheway (Subscribe/Follow on streaming platforms and social media!) Thank you Don Grant for the Intro/Outro. Check out his podcast - https://threeinterestingthings.captivate.fm Intro guitar copied from Aiden Ayers at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7UiB9FMOP5s *The views demonstrated in this show are strictly those of The Way Podcast/Radio Show*

The Laura Flanders Show
Reforming Prosecutor Power - Especially After Roe

The Laura Flanders Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 30:10


Prosecutors are immensely powerful, especially now, after the overthrow of Roe. They decide which cases to bring, what charges to make and what sentences to ask for. Until this year, only internal committees could investigate misconduct, even after hundreds of exonerations and allegations of abuse. After years of grassroots effort, New York now has an independent commission, but the process was hard, and there's still no power to punish. In this episode, reporter Kizzy Cox reports on how New York's new Independent Commission on Prosecutorial Misconduct came to be, and Laura talks with Andrea James, executive director for the National Council for Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Women and Girls, and Sakira Cook, Co-Interim Vice President at Color of Change, about what prosecutors can do, or not do, especially when it comes to implementing new abortion bans.“I'm not trying to  indict every district attorney, I'm sure that there's probably some good ones who really go to work to do their job and be fair, but for those [that don't], there should be a system in place, to make those bad District Attorneys terrified to do anything wrong.” –Roger Clark, Community Activist, Vocal-NY“Reform is a high priority for us in our movement to reimagine safety in America and redefine, or transform, the way that the criminal legal system operates in our country.” –Sakira Cook, Co-Interim Vice President, Color of Change“What's the appropriate accountability for somebody that locked you up for 25 years, and took away your whole life?…This commission is the right thing to do. I'm proud of it” –Derrick Hamilton, Co-founder, Family & Friends of the Wrongfully Convicted“Commissions are absolutely necessary because who else, but the people who are most directly affected—the people like myself who have been to a prison, the people like Sakira, who have family, who they have been caring for and loving who have been in prisons for decades—who else can raise these issues and expand the dialogue about what's necessary?” –Andrea James, Executive Director, National Council for Incarcerated & Formerly Incarcerated Women & GirlsGuests: Bill Bastuk, President, It Could Happen to YouSakira Cook, Co-Interim Vice President, Color of Change Roger Clark, Community Activist, Vocal NYNick Encalada-Malinowski, Civil Rights Campaigns Director, Vocal NYDerrick Hamilton, Co-founder, Family & Friends of the Wrongfully ConvictedAndrea James, Executive Director, National Council for Incarcerated & Formerly Incarcerated Women & GirlsDavid Soares, District Attorney, Albany County, NYYour support makes it possible for us to continue uplifting the hard work of community organizers like you heard today who's work benefits us all.   It takes a lot to keep this reporting available to millions on public television, community radio and as a podcast.  Go to Patreon.com/theLFShow and join today as a monthly contributor, or go to  LauraFlanders.org/donate for more options.  Thanks for listening!

Beyond The Horizon
A Look Back: The War On Drugs Has Failed

Beyond The Horizon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 15:30


The war on drugs has failed. It's story is told in every city and town in the country. You would be hard pressed to find someone, anyone, who hasn't been scarred by the war on drugs in one way or another. Yet, we continue to pursue the same strategies that have got us here. Will our politicians ever figure it out? Or are we destined to continue on the path we've been on wasting money, time and lives fighting a war that cannot hope to be won?(commercial at 10:53)To contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://sentinelcolorado.com/orecent-headlines/guest-opinion-the-war-on-drugs-has-failed-lawmakers-must-find-new-solutions/

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: The War On Drugs Has Failed

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 15:30


The war on drugs has failed. It's story is told in every city and town in the country. You would be hard pressed to find someone, anyone, who hasn't been scarred by the war on drugs in one way or another. Yet, we continue to pursue the same strategies that have got us here. Will our politicians ever figure it out? Or are we destined to continue on the path we've been on wasting money, time and lives fighting a war that cannot hope to be won?(commercial at 10:53)To contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://sentinelcolorado.com/orecent-headlines/guest-opinion-the-war-on-drugs-has-failed-lawmakers-must-find-new-solutions/

I Catch Killers with Gary Jubelin
The frontlines on the war on drugs

I Catch Killers with Gary Jubelin

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 52:31


Former Drug squad  Detective Inspector Paul Willingham has seen first-hand the destruction drugs can cause and the sophisticated operations that keep a steady supply flowing to the streets. In Part one of his chat with Gary, Paul takes us into the world of drug labs and busts.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Epstein Chronicles
A Look Back: What Are NarcoCorridos?

The Epstein Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 22:48


As we continue our discussion about the war on drugs, we take a look at a genre of folk music in Mexico that memorializes the activities and the crimes of the mafioso within the lyrics of songs. These songs are wildly popular in Mexico but writing them does not come without risk.Join me as I dive in!(commercial at 11:42)To contact me:bobbycapucci@protonmail.comsource:https://www.npr.org/2009/10/10/113664067/narcocorridos-ballads-of-the-mexican-cartels

You Say Bitch Like It's a Bad Thing
087 - The War on Drugs & Natalie de Blois

You Say Bitch Like It's a Bad Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 63:53


While Minnesota accidentally legalized marijuana this month, millions of Americans are still incarcerated over BS drug charges all thanks to the bogus War on Drugs. Let's dig into that. Plus, a bad bitch that dominated and made waves in a traditionally male industry.