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International nonprofit organization founded in 1950

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Best podcasts about Aspen Institute

Latest podcast episodes about Aspen Institute

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
Where Is the Eviction Tsunami?

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 5:49


Warnings about an “eviction tsunami” have yet to materialize. Extended moratoriums and rental assistance programs have delayed evictions in some areas, some housing experts had predicted 40 million evictions last fall. As reported by the news blog, fivethirtyeight.com, those experts are “still waiting.”Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Some renter protections are still in place or just now expiring in some states and jurisdictions, so an eviction surge could be looming in those areas. But housing experts had expected a U.S. eviction tsunami in September, after the national eviction moratorium was lifted. Although there's been an increase in evictions, it hasn't resulted in a tsunami, so far.Evictions at Low LevelsThe fivethirtyeight article cites information from a website called “Eviction Lab” which tracks eviction data that's been made public. That data doesn't cover the entire nation, but it shows that, as of October of last year, evictions in most parts of the country were 40% lower than an historical average, and have not returned to pre-pandemic levels.So what's going on? It's difficult to know for sure, but there are various theories. Some housing experts think that some renters are still enjoying the benefits of the stimulus payments, extended unemployment insurance, and rental assistance programs, along with the moratoriums. There's also a theory that many “mom-and-pop landlords” have worked out deals with renters to avoid evictions. And there are some who feel that the eviction data just hasn't been very accurate. The fivethirtyeight authors believe it's probably a combination of those three, but there is no nationwide database to track that data. They say as many as one-third of U.S. counties don't publish an annual report on the number of evictions that make their way through courts. And then there are the so-called “informal evictions,” which are not tracked at all. That happens when landlords refuse to make repairs or abruptly change the locks on rental units. The blog suggests that informal evictions could be five times more common than the formal ones.Predictions Were Likely ExaggeratedDespite the lack of solid figures for the current status of U.S. evictions, the warning about a tsunami of 40 million evictions was very likely exaggerated, by a lot. That figure was largely based on something called the U.S. Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey which asks Americans how confident they are in paying their rent, on a weekly basis. And then week-after-week, between 25 and 33% didn't think they'd make rent.That survey was used by the Aspen Institute and the COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project to come up with projections about how many households were at risk. The figure was between 12.6 million and 17.3 million households or 30 to 40 million renters. That made for some big headlines and the passage of legislation for almost $50 billion dollars in rent assistance.The government hand-out probably protected a lot of renters. But as the fivethirtyeight blog points out, the legislation was probably “based on an overestimate” that was determined by renter confidence levels, and not facts. The Aspen researchers included responses from people with no confidence, a slight amount of confidence, and a moderate amount of confidence in being able to pay rent. Plus, they included not just the people who were already behind on the rent, but those who were up to date and just feeling worried.As the blog points out, while a third of the renters said they were not feeling very confident about paying rent, only 13.9 percent were both low on confidence AND behind on their rent. So how many renters were truly at risk? Fivethirtyeight calculated that number at 6 million households and 14 million renters. That's less than half of what Aspen had predicted, at the low end.The Aspen research grabbed the most headlines, but there were other estimates that came out a lot lower. The Urban Institute crunched the numbers from the Census Bureau's Household Pulse Survey but only included people who were already behind on their rent. That report determined that 10 million renters were at risk of eviction. The National Multifamily Housing Council estimates were also showing lower numbers, although that organization only covers multi-family.Single-Family EcosphereBut the single-family ecosphere also fared well. We were reporting on how well our affiliates were doing with rent collection during the pandemic. Our affiliate in Jacksonville, who renovates and manages a large number of single-family rentals, says he hasn't noticed a big surge in evictions. He attributes that to Florida's landlord and business-friendly environment.He says: “Since the outbreak of Covid, we have remained in one of the strongest rental markets I have experienced in 25 years as a professional landlord. Businesses, families, homeowners, and renters are moving to Florida because of these fundamentals which allows our state and real estate markets to continue to grow both on the equity and rental side of the business.”You can read more about this topic by following the links in the show notes at newsforinvestors.com.You can also join RealWealth, for free, to learn more about residential real estate investing in landlord and business-friendly markets. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources. That includes experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke. Links:1 - https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/what-happened-to-the-eviction-tsunami/

More Than Profit
The Need for Good Jobs with Betsy Biemann

More Than Profit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 40:02


On this episode of More Than Profit, Bryce talks with Betsy Biemann, CEO of Coastal Enterprises Inc., a nationally-known community development financial institution founded in 1977 that works to grow good jobs, green enterprises, and shared prosperity in Maine and rural regions across the U.S. Bryce and Betsy discuss the seven elements that make up a "good job" and who is responsible for creating those jobs. In addition, they discuss the relationship between capital and justice, the impacts of globalization and technology on workers, the differences between rural and urban CDFIs, and the importance of childcare to a functioning economy. Betsy is a graduate of both Harvard and Princeton Universities and is the Vice-Chair of the Opportunity Finance Network and serves as the Treasurer of both the New Growth Innovation Network and the Elmina B. Sewall Foundation. She dedicated her life to impact-minded work at organizations including the Rockefeller Foundation, The Synergos Institute, Main Technology Institute, and The Aspen Institute. Learn more on this episode of More Than Profit, The Need for Good Jobs with Betsy Biemann. Check out the living wage calculator to estimate the cost of living in your community or region based on typical expenses More Than Profit is a podcast from Access Ventures and is produced by Render. Host: Bryce Butler Executive Producer: Tim Harris Associate Producer, Recording, Editing: Per Nordgren Graphic Design: Olivia Allison Social Media: Per Nordgren

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls on Biden to cancel student debt

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 164:13


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if they think the lies of the 2020 election will repeat themselves in the 2022 midterms and 2024 presidential race. Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls for President Joe Biden to cancel student loan debt, criticizes Governor Charlie Baker's pandemic response and pushes for urgent action on voting rights. Pressley is the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts 7th District. Rep. Mike Connolly weighs in on state debates over rent control, and whether he thinks there is enough momentum to get Mayor Michelle Wu's housing plan passed. Connolly is a Massachusetts State Representative and co-sponsor of the Tenant Protection Act. Shirley Leung talks about today's tent demolitions at Mass. and Cass, and luxury apartment buildings providing access to rapid tests. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Corby Kummer updates listeners on changes to SNAP benefits that would allow people to purchase hot meals and from restaurants, and Taco Bell's new subscription service. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Art Caplan discusses the first heart transplant using a genetically modified pig heart, and debates over the severity of Omicron. Caplan is director of the division of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine. We end the show by talking with listeners about whether they have attended large events or made other risky pandemic decisions they regret.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Food stamp benefits could soon be used to purchase restaurant meals, prepared foods

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 20:25


Numerous states are looking into extending food stamp use to restaurants and prepared meals to keep up with what academics are calling the lack of time, skills, resources, and physical abilities of some SNAP users. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share why more states are looking into joining the SNAP Restaurant Meals Program, and where food policy needs to change. “When it comes down to it, realistically, the people who need and rely on nutrition assistance often work two jobs, they're supporting families, and they have no time at all to cook and prepare the wholesome food that SNAP was originally designed to restrict them to buying,” Kummer said. When Restaurant Meals started in 2003, 19 states participated in the program. That number shrank to just four states by 2018. Now, six states — Arizona, California, Maryland, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Virginia — let some people who receive SNAP benefits use food stamps at restaurants. Illinois and New York are both in the process of applying to the Restaurant Meals Program. Kummer told Boston Public Radio that states have to prove that there are enough high need residents — such as “adults over 60, people with disabilities, and those who are homeless and their spouses” — to get exemptions in the Restaurant Meals Program and SNAP. While the Restaurant Meals Program has been applauded by food equity advocates and anti-hunger organizations, small restaurants have been slow to participate in the program due to lengthy bureaucratic processes. Instead, large chains like McDonald's and Subway are often state-certified for the program. “It's a lot of paperwork on the part of the restaurant, and so this in the beginning seemed like it was going to be a boon for for smaller restaurants, especially with [something like a] high volume, local sandwich shop that opens,” Kummer noted. “But [the paperwork] turned out to be so cumbersome that it discouraged all but the largest chains.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
‘No More Pussyfooting Around': Food Writer Corby Kummer Cheers Starbucks' Latest Employee Vaccination Effort

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 24:36


On Tuesday's Boston Public Radio, food writer Corby Kummer said he's hoping more companies follow in the heels of coffee behemoth Starbucks, which is now requiring proof-of-vaccination for its hundreds of thousands of U.S. employees. Workers who opt out of vaccines will have to submit weekly tests, conducted at the employee's expense.  “This is an example of a big company saying ‘we've had it, we just have to get vaccinated, this is the wave of the future – no more pussyfooting around,' and I think it's great,” Kummer told hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan.  He did, however, raise concerns that public perception of Starbucks as a “liberal” corporation might dissuade business leaders on the conservative side of the political spectrum to shirk responsibility for getting employees vaccinated against COVID-19.  “I think that we all wish that it wasn't a seeming political litmus test,” he lamented. “‘Oh, Starbucks must be Democratic, they must be liberal!'” Kummer went on to list Tyson Foods as an instance of a corporation with a perceived conservative bent taking steps to protect workers from infection. “If there were more and more right wing-perceived companies mandating this, it would really help,” he said. “But Starbucks is big [and] publicly influential, and I hope this will have the effect of causing many others to impose mandates.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Circling back to unpacking the pivot

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 164:22


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they're faring as students, teachers and parents figure out back to school plans amid Omicron spread. Trenni Kusnierek talks about Antonio Brown walking off the field mid-game and getting fired from the Buccaneers, and a hockey fan saving an NHL staffer from cancer by spotting a mole from the stands. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Carol Rose discusses the ACLU's national and local priorities in 2022, including work on voting rights, police reform and facial recognition software. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. A.C. Thompson previews his documentary on the Jan. 6 insurrection, and weighs in on the state of far-right extremism in the U.S. Thompson is a senior reporter at ProPublica and a FRONTLINE correspondent. His documentary, “American Insurrection,” airs at 10 p.m. eastern on PBS and will be available to stream on Frontline's website, YouTube, and the PBS video app. Corby Kummer talks about the Biden Administration's push to aid small meat producers, Starbucks requiring all U.S. employees to get vaccinated and a pastry program in an Italian prison. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King weighs in on the status of Build Back Better and the state of media and democracy in the U.S. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners what phrases they would like to get rid of in 2022.

Chatting With Betsy
Laughing at Myself

Chatting With Betsy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 25:03


The Guest today with Betsy Wurzel is Dan Glickman Author of, Laughing at Myself. Dan Glickman discusses why he wrote the book, how humor has helped him in his life and how we need to laugh at ourselves! Dan tells a funny story in this interview concerning a pork chop!  Dan Glickman also discusses how he became Chairman of the Motion Picture Board of America, Inc. A Congressman for 18 years representing the 4th Congressional District of Kansas, The first Jewish  Secretary of Agriculture, and Chairman of the Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. Dan Glickman is also also a former Vice President of the Aspen Institute. A Senior Fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center and a board member of the World Food Program USAFor more information on Dan Glickman and more: https://bit.ly/3pNd5zK

Working Capital Conversations
Walter Isaacson: The Science and Business of CRISPR

Working Capital Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 26:22


Throughout nearly the entirety of human history, we have accepted a simple truth: A person's genetic makeup is beyond one's choice. Until now. In 2020, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna for the development of CRISPR, a method for genome editing. CRISPR may change everything -- and land us in a world previously imaginable only in science fiction. CRISPR can be wonderful and incredible. It may eliminate a child's susceptibility to a genetic condition, such as cleft lip or cystic fibrosis or devastating disease. Imagine that. However, it also makes it possible to choose a child's height or hair color. With these and other possibilities, the moral and ethical implications are important and immense. The race to discover CRISPR was one of the great science tales of the 21st century, a cross-continent battle of discovery and speed. So how did CRISPR arrive? And more importantly, where might it take us? Walter Isaacson is one to tell that story -- a professor of history at Tulane, he has been CEO of the Aspen Institute, chair of CNN, and editor of Time. He has written numerous No. 1 best-selling books, including on Leonardo DaVinci, Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein, and Ben Franklin, each one of the great creators of their time, who transformed not only their fields, but also the way humans connect -- offering new ways to think about and engage in meaningful human interaction. Isaacson's latest book is The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race. It's part mystery, part science, part personal, and completely compelling. Isaacson details the discovery of the CRISPR method and tells the story of the groundbreaking, female scientists who revolutionized the world.

Disruptors for GOOD
Creating a Non-Predatory FinTech Startup for Underserved Communities in America - Rodney Williams // Co-Founder of SoLo Funds

Disruptors for GOOD

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 36:37


In episode 121 of the Disruptors for GOOD podcast I speak with Rodney Williams, Co-founder of SoLo Funds, on building a non-predatory FinTech startup for underserved communities in America.Check out the Partners here.Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.Rodney has been recognized with numerous awards, including Ad Age's 40 Under 40 in 2012; the Ernst & Young EDGE Award in 2013; Cannes Gold Lion award in 2015; Tech Entrepreneur of the Year by Black Enterprise, 2016; NAACP Inspiring Innovation list 2017; 25 Inspiring Entrepreneurs Under 40 by Entrepreneur Magazine 2016; Entrepreneur of the Year in Connected World Communications in the Ohio Valley Region by EY in 2017; Ebony's Power 100 in 2018 and CNBC Disruptor 50 List in 2015, 2016, 2018 and 2019.Rodney attended West Virginia University, where he earned his BBA in finance, his BA in economics, and his MS in integrated marketing communications.Rodney also holds an MBA in finance & supply chain management from Howard University. He is a member of the 2019 Class of Henry Crown Fellows within the Aspen Global Leadership Network at the Aspen Institute.SoLo Funds is a mobile lending exchange that connects lenders and borrowers for the purpose of providing more affordable access to loans under $1,000. SoLo was created to disintermediate the predatory payday lending system. Today, SoLo is one of the fastest growing fintech companies in the country.SoLo's story starts the way every SoLo request begins: with someone needing a hand. Co-founders Travis Holoway & Rodney Williams were noticing that family members, friends, and roommates were asking for financial help here and there, and they understood why. There weren't any fair, reputable options for small, short-term loans.They decided to create one by harnessing the power of community. SoLo was formed in 2018 to create a viable, non-predatory option for moments when life happens. SoLo tap's into the power of community and generosity to form an online safety net that is mutually beneficial to all of its members.Travis and Rodney know that SoLo is needed because they needed it. Our loved ones needed it. And they know that SoLo makes a difference because nearly 80% of Americans live paycheck to paycheck.Today, SoLo is driven to new heights, but grounded in the same hope and mission: to build a community that enables financial autonomy for all.Check out the Partners here.Subscribe to the Causeartist Newsletter here.Listen to more Causeartist podcast shows hereFollow Grant on Twitter and LinkedInFollow Causeartist on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Instagram

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: How to eat an oyster

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 161:56


Today on Boston Public Radio: Michael Curry talks about the status of the pandemic as the Omicron variant spreads throughout the country, and his reactions to West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin rejecting President Joe Biden's Build Back Better plan. Curry is the president and CEO of the Massachusetts League of Community Health Centers and a member of Gov. Charlie Baker's COVID-19 vaccine advisory group. He's also a member of the national NAACP board of directors and chair of the board's advocacy and policy committee. Then, we ask listeners their reactions to Manchin curtailing efforts to pass Build Back Better. Corby Kummer discusses the potential for an egg shortage as regulations for farmers change, and how to best enjoy oysters. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jennifer McKim and Philip Martin share insights from their latest investigation into the sex trafficking of young men, and how traffickers prey on those suffering from drug addiction. McKim and Martin are senior investigative reporters at GBH. Together they've been working on a months-long series examining those left out of the narrative around sex trafficking: young men. The latest installment of the series, Unseen, is out today. The Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III commemorate bell hooks, the theorist and activist who championed intersectional feminism, who died last week at 69. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist, the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Price is the founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the inaugural dean of Africana studies at Berklee College of Music and co-host of the All Rev'd Up podcast. Jenna Russell and Penelope Overton explain what climate change means for the lobster industry in Maine. Russell is a reporter with the Boston Globe. Overton is a reporter with the Portland Press Herald. Together they wrote this series in the Boston Globe: The Lobster Trap. We end the show by asking listeners if their holiday plans have changed as the Omicron variant spreads across the country.

HTW with Zoe and Erica
136. Taking the Headache Out of Holistic Healthcare with Krista Berlincourt of Kenshō Health

HTW with Zoe and Erica

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 59:37


Wouldn't it be great if we all had better access to doctors, practitioners, and specialists that we wanted to work with? Well, Krista Berlincourt is the Co-founder and CEO of Kenshō Health, a network of holistic healthcare providers you can trust. As is often the case with founders, she has her own story about personal health issues that led her to question why there weren't better options out there. Krista was named a Top Female Founder to Watch, is a founding member of both The Forbes Councils and The Aspen Institute's Fringe Diplomacy. Krista is an internationally accredited coach and author whose work traverses transformation and all that makes us human — exploring the science of shame, emotion, and connection. An Oregonian at heart, Krista is an avid cyclist, naturalist, and outdoorswoman. You'll hear her whole journey from health crisis to groundbreaking CEO and everything in-between.   Krista talks about... How her upbringing colored her human experience Her healthcare journey and struggles Making holistic wellness more accessible in the US through Kenshō Health The road to getting insurance companies on board with functional medicine   Resources: kenshohealth.com Instagram: @kberlinc + @kenshohealth LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/kristaberlincourt Visit earthandstar.com and use the promo code “PODCAST” to get 15% off your first order   Highway To Well is a production of Crate Media

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Chance Encounters

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 122:14


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether they would be open to becoming chattier on the T, following Mayor Michelle Wu's invitation for riders to talk with her. Trenni Kusnierek discusses the $380 million settlement reached between USA Gymnastics and the victims of Larry Nassar. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Corby Kummer talks about the latest news on a potential statewide egg shortage, and the fifteen-minute grocery delivery start-ups opening up in downtown Boston. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Meredith Goldstein answers listeners' questions on romance and relationships, and shares advice from her recent columns. Goldstein is an advice columnist and features writer for the Boston Globe. Her advice column, “Love Letters,” is a daily dispatch of wisdom for the lovelorn that has been running for more than a decade. She also hosts the “Love Letters” podcast. John King updates us on the latest political headlines, focusing on the texts from Trump allies to former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows surrounding the Jan. 6 Capitol riots. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m.

The Ezra Klein Show
Timeless Wisdom for Leading a Life of Love, Friendship and Learning

The Ezra Klein Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 65:06


“Today, we are supercompetent when it comes to efficiency, utility, speed, convenience, and getting ahead in the world; but we are at a loss concerning what it's all for,” Leon Kass writes in his 2017 book “Leading a Worthy Life.” “This lack of cultural and moral confidence about what makes a life worth living is perhaps the deepest curse of living in our interesting time.”Kass spent more than 30 years as an award-winning teacher at the University of Chicago, where he gained a reputation among students for his commitment to the big questions of human existence and the study of classic texts. And he's written books and essays on marriage, sports, ethics, friendship, romance, the philosophy of food, biblical wisdom and more. In many ways, Kass's career represents a lifelong effort to grapple with the biggest question of all: What does it mean to live a meaningful life?This conversation, between Kass and the New York Times Opinion columnist David Brooks, is an attempt to answer that question. Along the way, they discuss the difference between choosing a career and discovering a vocation; the key ingredients of a successful romantic relationship; how to distinguish between superficial friendships and life-altering ones; why finding the right job is less about searching within ourselves and more about committing to something beyond ourselves; Kass's view that the most distinctive thing about individuals isn't their race, gender or class but “the ruling passions of their souls”; and what the biblical Exodus story can teach Americans about how to live together more harmoniously.Mentioned:Founding God's Nation by Leon KassThe Second Mountain by David BrooksBook Recommendations:Nicomachean Ethics by AristotleThe Hebrew Bible, especially Genesis and ExodusDemocracy in America by Alexis de TocquevilleDaniel Deronda by George EliotThis episode is guest-hosted by David Brooks, a New York Times columnist, whose work focuses on politics, culture and moral formation. He currently serves as chair of Weave: The Social Fabric Project at the Aspen Institute in Washington, D.C. and is the author of several books, including “The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life.” You can follow him on Twitter @nytdavidbrooks. (Learn more about the other guest hosts during Ezra's parental leave here.)Thoughts? Guest suggestions? Email us at ezrakleinshow@nytimes.com.You can find transcripts (posted midday) and more episodes of "The Ezra Klein Show" at nytimes.com/ezra-klein-podcast, and you can find Ezra on Twitter @ezraklein. Book recommendations from all our guests are listed at https://www.nytimes.com/article/ezra-klein-show-book-recs.“The Ezra Klein Show” is produced by Annie Galvin, Jeff Geld and Rogé Karma; fact-checking by Michelle Harris; original music by Isaac Jones; mixing by Jeff Geld; audience strategy by Shannon Busta. Special thanks to Kristin Lin and Alison Bruzek.

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast
Spotlight - Resilience: The Global Adaptation Podcast + Update on Climate Curricula with K-12 Climate Action

America Adapts the Climate Change Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 47:34


The hosts of a new climate adaptation podcast, Resilience: The Global Adaptation Podcast, join the show to talk about international adaptation. Elizabeth Bernhardt and Marcus Neild, from the United Nations' Environment Program, discuss the origins of the podcast and why there's a need to tell more international adaptation stories. Also joining is Laura Schifter of the Aspen Institute who gives an update on the climate curricula initiative, K12 Climate Action. They've just released a new report and we'll hear the status of climate curricula in the country. A great episode, have a listen! Donate to America Adapts Listen to America Adapts on your favorite app here! Sign up to be a guest on Cimpatico Studios! cimpatico.tv Facebook and Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/americaadapts/ @usaadapts @laschifter12 @AspenInstitute @K12ClimateAct @UNEP Donate to America Adapts Follow on Apple Podcasts Follow on Android Doug Parsons and Speaking Opportunities: If you are interested in having Doug speak at corporate and conference events, sharing his unique, expert perspective on adaptation in an entertaining and informative way, more information can be found here! Now on Spotify! List of Previous Guests on America Adapts Follow/listen to podcast on Apple Podcasts. Donate to America Adapts, we are now a tax deductible charitable organization! Links in episode: https://www.unep.org/gan/what-we-do/resilience-global-adaptation-podcast https://www.unep.org/gan/ https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/resilience-the-global-adaptation-podcast/id1588280014 https://k12climateaction.org/ https://www.aspeninstitute.org/ https://www.gse.harvard.edu/faculty/laura-schifter America Adapts was published in the Federal Reserve Newsletter! Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco Strategies to Address Climate Change Risk in Low- and Moderate-income Communities - Volume 14, Issue 1 https://www.frbsf.org/community-development/publications/community-development-investment-review/2019/october/strategies-to-address-climate-change-low-moderate-income-communities/ Podcasts in the Classroom – Discussion guides now available for the latest episode of America Adapts. These guides can be used by educators at all levels. Check them out here! The best climate change podcasts on The Climate Advisor http://theclimateadvisor.com/the-best-climate-change-podcasts/ 7 podcasts to learn more about climate change and how to fight it https://kinder.world/articles/you/7-podcasts-to-learn-more-about-climate-change-and-how-to-fight-it-19813 Directions on how to listen to America Adapts on Amazon Alexa https://youtu.be/949R8CRpUYU America Adapts also has its own app for your listening pleasure!  Just visit the App store on Apple or Google Play on Android and search “America Adapts.” Join the climate change adaptation movement by supporting America Adapts!  Please consider supporting this podcast by donating through America Adapts fiscal sponsor, the Social Good Fund. All donations are now tax deductible! For more information on this podcast, visit the website at http://www.americaadapts.org and don't forget to subscribe to this podcast on Apple Podcasts.   Podcast Music produce by Richard Haitz Productions Write a review on Apple Podcasts ! America Adapts on Facebook!   Join the America Adapts Facebook Community Group. Check us out, we're also on YouTube! Executive Producer Dr. Jesse Keenan Subscribe to America Adapts on Apple Podcasts Doug can be contacted at americaadapts @ g mail . com

Charlottesville Community Engagement
December 13, 2021: UVA committee briefed on progress of Emmet-Ivy Corridor, another learns about Karsh Institute of Democracy

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 15:23


The word penultimate means “the one before the last.” But what about the one before that one? For this is the third to last Monday of 2021, and it feels there should be a better way of saying that. In any case, this is the first edition of Charlottesville Community Engagement for the third to last week of the year. That’s twice we’ve needed that word in this newsletter so far. I’m your host, Sean Tubbs, here again to bring you information about the area even if not every word is precise.Charlottesville Community Engagement is a reader-supported publication. To receive new posts and support my work, consider becoming a free or paid subscriber.On today’s show:An update on the Emmet-Ivy corridor and sustainability efforts from the University of VirginiaThe new Dean of the School of Architecture and the director of the Karsh Institute of Democracy introduce themselves to a Board of Visitors panel More on the search for a corporate-appointed City Manager for CharlottesvilleA COVID update and a few more bills are before the General AssemblyIn today’s first Patreon-fueled shout-out: Colder temperatures are creeping in, and now is the perfect time to think about keeping your family warm through the holidays. Make sure you are getting the most out of your home with help from your local energy nonprofit, LEAP. LEAP wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round, and offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents. If you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!COVID updateThere have now been over a million reported cases of COVID-19 in Virginia since the beginning of the pandemic, and a total of 14,957 deaths. The seven-day average for positive cases is now at 8.7 percent. That number is a little higher in the Blue Ridge Health District at 8.9 percent. For most of the pandemic, the Charlottesville area has lagged behind the statewide number. There are 58 new cases reported in the Blue Ridge Health District today, but no new fatalities. The seven-day average for new cases in the state is 2,520 a day. RFP closingThe window closes tomorrow at 4 p.m. for firms who are interested in assisting the city of Charlottesville with interim management services until a new top official is appointed. The RFP issued on December 3 requires a firm to provide someone with at least ten years of municipal management experience to run the city on an interim basis. Two addendums to the proposal were made Friday. (read the proposal)This process is not without precedent in Virginia. The Town of Amherst hired the Berkley Group in 2017 to hire a former Pulaski County administrator to serve as interim manager. Peter Huber served for five months as part of the Berkley Group’s Executive Transition Assistance program.  Huber is now serving in a similar position in Alleghany County according to his LinkedIn profile. According to Berkley’s website, they’ve provided this service in dozens of Virginia localities, from the town of Abingdon to the town of Windsor. General Assembly 2022There is less than a month until the Virginia General Assembly convenes for the 2022 session. Several bills have already been filed, and the number coming in right now is low enough to report some of what’s currently in the legislative information system.Senator Mamie J. Locke (D-Hampton) has filed a bill calling for a Constitutional amendment granting the right for people convicted of felons to be able to vote upon release. (SJ1)Delegate James Morefield (R-North Tazewell) has filed a bill establishing a Flood Relief Fund using a portion of the state’s proceeds from Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative auctions. (HB5) Senator Travis Hackworth (R-Richlands) filed a bill that would terminate power of attorney for anyone convicted of acting against their client. (SB10)Senator David Suetterlein (R-Roanoke) filed a bill increasing the standard deductions for Virginia income tax for both single and married people. (SB11)Senator David Suetterlein (R-Roanoke) has another that would allow localities to issue refunds on excess personal property taxes. (SB12)Delegate Lee Ware (R-Powhatan) has filed legislation that would compel “accomodations providers” to provide more information to localities upon request in the collection of transient lodging taxes. (HB7)Sustainability and Emmet-Ivy updatesLast week, the University of Virginia Board of Visitors met, and the December 10 edition of this show featured some information. On Friday, Bryan McKenzie reported in the Daily Progress that the Board voted to increase tuition by 4.7 percent in the 2022-23 school year and 3.7 percent for the following year. Read his story for more details. On Thursday, the Buildings and Grounds Committee meeting was a shorter one than usual, but members were briefed on several items of note. One related to UVA’s sustainability efforts. Colette Sheehy is the Senior Vice President for Operations and State Government at UVA.“You’ll recall that the big audacious goal for sustainability is to be carbon neutral by 2030 and fossil-fuel free by 2050,” Sheehy said. “Overall our emissions are down by 44 percent over the last decade which is equivalent to about 160,000 tons of carbon.” However, that doesn’t include the carbon footprint of new buildings built at UVA during the period, though they are built to LEED certification according to Green Building Standards. Sheehy said UVA has to do more to meet its goals.“In order to reach our carbon neutrality goal by 2030, we need to reduce our current emissions by another 160,000 tons and probably another 36,000 related to new construction,” Sheehy said. Sheehy also briefed the Buildings and Grounds Committee on efforts to reduce single-use plastics in order to comply with an executive order from Governor Ralph Northam. She said it’s a University-wide effort. “The biggest challenge is actual single-use plastic water bottles which is why you now see aluminum water bottles used to the extent that we can get them,” Sheehy said. “One of the issues is supply-chain and quantity, particularly if you are at a football and tens of thousands of water bottles that are sold.” Sheehy concluded her presentation with an update on construction of the new Emmet-Ivy precinct, which will house the School of Data Science, the Karsh Democracy Institute, and a hotel and convention center. Utility work has been underway on the site of the former Cavalier Inn, which was demolished to make way for the future. “We expect to be complete with all the utility and road work that sits outside the construction fencing by the end of the first quarter of 2022,” Sheehy said. The south side of Ivy Road will also be altered with new retaining walls and a monumental staircase leading up to the International Residential College. “The foundation work for Data Science should start in early January with completion of that building in the fall of 2023,” Sheehy said. “The plan is the hotel should begin construction in the spring with completion in the fall of 2024.” Design work has begun for the Karsh Institute of Democracy. Höweler+Yoon is the architect. Emmett Streetscape newsThere was also news about the Emmet Street Streetscape, one of the first projects funded through the Virginia Department of Transportation’s Smart Scale process. A design public hearing of the $12 million project was held in December 2019 and is being overseen by the City of Charlottesville. Alice Raucher is the UVa Architect. “They submitted their complete documents to VDOT which is one of the required steps in order to begin the negotiations for the right of way,” Raucher said. Appraisals are underway for the easements or property acquisitions needed for the project. Raucher had no timetable for when that might happen. The Emmet Streetscape runs from Ivy Road to Arlington Boulevard and includes a 10-foot wide multiuse path on the western side of the road. (read the brochure)In today’s second Patreon-fueled shout-out: The Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Campaign  an initiative that wants you to grow native plants in yards, farms, public spaces and gardens in the northern Piedmont. Winter is here, but spring isn’t too far away. This is a great time to begin planning for the spring. Native plants provide habitat, food sources for wildlife, ecosystem resiliency in the face of climate change, and clean water.  Start at the Plant Northern Piedmont Natives Facebook page and tell them Lonnie Murray sent you!*Architecture and Democracy at UVAAfter the Buildings and Grounds Committee concluded on Thursday, the Academic and Student Life Committee met and heard from the new dean of the School of Architecture and the director of the Karsh Institute for Democracy.  First up: Malo Hutson took over as Dean of the School of Architecture at the beginning of the academic year. He previously was at Columbia University where he directed the Urban Communities and Health Equity Lab. Hutson said the study of architecture is focused on the public realm. “We’re focused on addressing some of the biggest issues of the world, ranging from climate change all the way to the importance of cultural landscape and heritage, to thinking about do you build with healthy materials and so forth and transportation,” Hutson said. Hutson said the School of Architecture has several priorities and values shared with the rest of the UVA Community. He said the four departments in the school are all focused on climate resilience and climate justice, as well as equity and inclusion. Hutson said faculty and staff have an eye on Virginia’s needs as they craft the Climate Justice Initiative. “We know that we are susceptible to storms and flooding all kinds of things that are going on and so how do we engage in a way from whether we’re talking about Northern Virginia to Hampton Roads to all the way in Southwest Virginia?”The Karsh Institute of Democracy exists to reflect on the same basic question. Melody Barnes is the first executive director of the new entity which was founded in 2018. She said democracy is in trouble in the United States and around the world, citing a CBS News poll from January.“Seventy-one percent of Americans believe that democracy in the United States is threatened,” Barnes said. “A more recent poll from just about a month ago, the Pew Research Center indicates that there are about 19 percent of Americans who believe that American democracy is still a role model for democracy in the world.”Barnes said the University of Virginia is well-positioned to take up the cause and the Democracy Initiative has built on the work. “We also believe that this is a moment that we have to do more and that we are well-situated to do more,” Barnes said. Barnes said the Institute will be public-facing and will seek to engage with the community around UVA. “We want to use this moment, we want to leverage the assets and resources that we have to develop solutions, best practices, and new ideas to address the very challenges I just mentioned,” Barnes said. This Institute’s mission is to “generate new ideas and share them with policymakers and citizens” but Barnes said the work doesn’t stop there.“But then we translate them and use diverse communications channels to push them into the public bloodstream,” Barnes said. “To engage policymakers, journalists, the private sector, the public and beyond so people can take those ideas up, they can be debated. They can become policy. They can become practice. They can start to shape the way that we think, talk about, and do democracy. Hopefully the best ideas get taken to scale.” Barnes said one idea may be to offer a prize related to a specific solution. For instance, the Aspen Institute offers $1 million for community college excellence. “We are thinking that a X Prize for Democracy in partnership with others and leveraging the assets of the University and all the knowledge that’s here could be a wonderful way to bringing greater attention to some specific challenges that are facing democracy,” Barnes said. Barnes said a democratic society will always face existential challenges. She said the Institute will be set up to take a long-term view towards curating conversations.“This will be the journey and an issue for the country I think for the life of the country,” Barnes said. “We will always be engaged in these battles and these debates.”  Stay tuned. Special announcement of a continuing promo with Ting! Are you interested in fast internet? Visit this site and enter your address to see if you can get service through Ting. If you decide to proceed to make the switch, you’ll get:Free installationSecond month of Ting service for freeA $75 gift card to the Downtown MallAdditionally, Ting will match your Substack subscription to support Town Crier Productions, the company that produces this newsletter and other community offerings. So, your $5 a month subscription yields $5 for TCP. Your $50 a year subscription yields $50 for TCP! The same goes for a $200 a year subscription! All goes to cover the costs of getting this newsletter out as often as possible. Learn more here! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Shades of Freedom
Can We Depolarize Justice Reform?

Shades of Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 26:59


Guest BioAn attorney and accomplished author, Marc Levin serves as Chief Policy Counsel to the Council on Criminal Justice, a membership organization that provides a center of gravity in the field for objective analyses of research and policies. He began the Texas Public Policy Foundation's criminal justice program in 2005 and in 2010 developed the concept for its Right on Crime initiative. In 2014, Levin was named one of the “Politico 50” in the magazine's annual “list of thinkers, doers, and dreamers who really matter in this age of gridlock and dysfunction.”  Levin has authored numerous book chapters, policy papers, and articles on criminal justice policy and serves on the National Association of Drug Court Professionals Board of Directors, Aspen Institute Criminal Justice Reform Initiative Advisory Council, and the Urban Rural Action Board of Advisors.He has testified on criminal justice policy on four occasions before Congress and before numerous state legislatures. Levin graduated with honors from the University of Texas with a B.A. in Plan II Honors and Government and received his J.D. with honors from the University of Texas School of Law. Levin served as a law clerk on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and Staff Attorney at the Texas Supreme Court.  As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, The Aspen Institute is nonpartisan and does not endorse, support, or oppose political candidates or parties. Further, the views and opinions of our guests and speakers do not necessarily reflect those of The Aspen Institute.Visit us online at The Aspen Institute Criminal Justice Reform Initiative and follow us on Twitter @AspenCJRI.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: A new addition to Flavortown

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 164:17


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners whether they think Vice President Kamala Harris is being treated unfairly by the media, and how women and people of color face double standards in politics. Art Caplan discusses the state of testing in the U.S., how the country went wrong by failing to push a broader testing regimen and the latest news on the Omicron variant. Caplan is director of the division of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine. Juliette Kayyem updates listeners on the status of the Jan. 6 investigation and gun laws in the aftermath of the Michigan school shooting. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Corby Kummer talks about Guy Fieri's latest restaurant in Boston, and why the government should end restrictions on what food people on federal food assistance programs can buy. Kummer is the executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Ali Noorani explains why federal courts forced the Biden Administration to reinstitute the Trump-era “Remain in Mexico” policy, and how Build Back Better would affect immigration reform. Noorani is the president and chief executive officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” We end the show by asking listeners whether golf courses should be scaled back given their negative impact on climate change.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
"Nothing Should Be Forbidden": Corby Kummer on Guy Fieri's Kitchen + Bar

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 28:08


Ahead of the opening of Guy Fieri's Kitchen + Bar in the Theater District, food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio to share his thoughts on the celebrity chef's second restaurant in Boston. Fieri, known for his eccentric taste in food, included menu items from his other restaurants, such as trash can nachos from Guy Fieri's Tequila Cocina and Guy's Famous BBQ Bloody Mary. Diners can also order specialties like Cajun chicken Alfredo, hot pastrami grinders, and candy apple sangrias. “It's like somebody has said, ‘let me think of everybody's secret food desires, and I'm gonna let it run rampant,'” Kummer said. “‘Here it all is, come on and let let loose your secret desires.'” Restaurant critics have largely panned Fieri's restaurants, though Kummer notes that Bostonians should give Guy Fieri's Kitchen + Bar a chance. “Enjoy yourself: nothing should be forbidden,” Kummer said. “This is about being libertine and being indulgent, which everybody needs to be every so often or else the food police are really going to be out of business.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

UBC News World
Suffering From Chronic Pain? Try Effective Exosome Treatment In Denver, CO Today

UBC News World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 2:19


Aspen Institute for Anti–Aging And Regenerative Medicine (970-279-8348) in Denver, CO is known for its exosome treatments that use only cutting-edge technology for the immediate resolution of your chronic or acute pain. Learn more at https://aspen-regenerativemedicine.com (https://aspen-regenerativemedicine.com) 

The Lawfare Podcast
Lawfare Archive: A House Divided

The Lawfare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021 55:22


From May 6, 2017: Three months into the Trump presidency, where does the relationship between the President and the intelligence community stand? Donald Trump is no longer quite so regularly combative in his tweets and public comments about the various intelligence agencies, but the White House-intelligence community relationship is still far from normal under this very unusual presidency. Here to ponder the question are former NSA and CIA director General Michael Hayden, former acting and deputy director of CIA John McLaughlin, and former deputy national security advisor for combating terrorism Juan Zarate, who spoke with the Washington Post's David Ignatius in a recent event at the Aspen Institute.Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/lawfare. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Substitute horror stories

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 164:21


Today on Boston Public Radio: Superintendent Brenda Cassellius answers questions from listeners about the state of schools, including the teacher shortage and wait lists for Boston's exam schools. Cassellius is the superintendent of Boston Public Schools. Then, we ask listeners about the Omicron variant and how the pandemic is playing out in schools, including hearing from Massachusetts Teachers Association President Merrie Najimy. Makinde Ogunnaike and Josh Sariñana talk about how they turn physics and neuroscience into art and poetry, and the intersection of physics and religious faith. Ogunnaike is a PhD candidate in physics at MIT, where he researches quantum systems and the new states of matter they can create. He also runs the Harvard-MIT chapter of the National Society of Black Physicists. Sariñana is a fine art photographer, a writer and neuroscience marketing professional. He's also the director of “The Poetry of Science.” Corby Kummer weighs in on who has intellectual property claims to a recipe, and where restaurants stand with restrictions and masking. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Andy Ihnatko discusses the latest developments in electric car technology, and Jack Dorsey's decision to step away as CEO of Twitter. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Sue O'Connell updates listeners on the latest news in the Cuomo family scandal, after Chris Cuomo was suspended indefinitely from CNN. She also talks about the success of Amy Schneider, the first trans person to make “Jeopardy!” Tournament of Champions. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. We end the show by talking with listeners about how they treated substitute teachers back in the day, amid a teacher shortage and dire need for substitutes.

Public Health Out Loud
Dr. Megan Ranney on the Pandemic's Evolution and “Long COVID”

Public Health Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 26:40


This week on Public Health Out Loud, we're joined by guest expert Dr. Megan Ranney, an emergency physician at Rhode Island Hospital and Miriam Hospital. She is also the Associate Dean of Strategy and Innovation for the School of Public Health, founding Director of the Brown-Lifespan Center for Digital Health, and co-founder and Senior Strategic Advisor to the American Foundation for Firearm Injury Reduction in Medicine at the Aspen Institute. Her full biography is available on this web page.  In this episode, co-hosts Dr. Jim McDonald and Dr. Philip Chan ask Dr. Ranney about her experience working on the front lines of a local emergency department since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. “It has been a series of ups and downs. I was actually in the emergency department the night that the very first identified COVID-19 patient in our state came in,” Dr. Ranney says. “I remember the feeling that night knowing that it finally hit us here in Rhode Island.” Dr. Ranney also talks about her work with Dr. Ashish Jha on the Long COVID Initiative, which is a coalition of clinicians, researchers, and public health communicators working together to shed light on the long-lasting impacts that a COVID-19 diagnosis has had on some patients' health.  Download this week's episode to learn more.  

Discover Lafayette
Dr. Vincent June, Chancellor of South Louisiana Community College

Discover Lafayette

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 38:12


Dr. Vincent June, Chancellor of South Louisiana Community College (SLCC), joins Discover Lafayette to discuss his mission to provide educational opportunities to all people, no matter their age or background. Dr. June provides oversight for all academic and operational functions of SLCC's nine campuses in eight parishes, serving more than 17,000 students annually.  Before joining SLCC, Dr. June served diverse communities in public higher education for over two decades, including Florida Gulf Coast University, Florida A&M University and Georgia Perimeter College. He earned a degree in business and economics from Florida A&M University, and an MBA and Ph.D. in educational leadership from Washington State University.  South Louisiana is a natural fit for Dr. June. He was born in Belle Glade FL, near Lake Okeechobee, an agricultural area of Palm Beach County, Florida. Farmers grew sugar cane, corn, beans, celery, oranges, and tangerines, and there was also fishing. "It was a one-stoplight community." Dr. June was fortunate to come from a background of educators. His grandmother, one of thirteen children, was an adult education schoolteacher, and that is actually how she met Dr. June's grandfather, who originally came to Florida from Jamaica to cut sugarcane. Both parents were educators. Always thinking he would be a dentist, he was a biology major until he took a class in economics which deeply captured his interest. A professor encouraged him to change course and he switched to economics and Spanish studies. Dr. June says he stumbled on the community college career path and his career journey has provided experience in all areas of higher education including student life, financial aid, admissions, and enrollment services. "I came to embrace the access mission of the community college. It provides a rich and deep experience and you're exposed to so many different levels of student-types. In a comprehensive community college, there is an avenue for everyone: individuals who don't have a high school diploma, those who want a technical background, as well as those who want an associate's degree and then move on to a traditional four-year institution." Photo by Brad Kemp of the Acadiana Advocate. SLCC is actively shifting its training opportunities to meet education and business trends. With a new strategic plan in place, the college is examining the programs that may need to be added to meet demands in fields such as nursing, welding, general studies, HVAC, automotive, commercial truck driving, and culinary arts. They are identifying optimal times to offer programs, including evening and weekend hours, to accommodate students who work full-time. Business developers in the Workforce and Corporate division of the college seek out business advice on programming that meets current workforce demands. COVID has ushered in a plethora of funding sources to help students meet their tuition, including the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act, a Louisiana initiative called "Reboot Your Career" which provides retraining for people in as short a period as 8 to 12 weeks, and the MJ Foster Promise Program created in honor of Louisiana's late governor Mike Foster. The "Reboot Your Career" program provides short-term retraining for unemployed workers looking for high wage career pathways at reduced tuition at Louisiana's Community and Technical Colleges. For more information visit https://www.lctcs.edu/rebootyourcareer SLCC stands out among its peers nationwide. Recently, The Aspen Institute named SLCC one of the 150 institutions  (out of over 1000 nationally) eligible to compete for the $1 million Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the nation's signature recognition of high achievement and performance among America's community colleges. This is the second year in a row SLCC has been named a Top 150 Community College. In addition, SLCC was awarded a $1.16 million grant by the U.S.

B&H Photography Podcast
"I Knew This Was Powerful" – Build Community Through Photography

B&H Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 63:02


The title for this episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is taken from a comment made by guest Tonika Johnson, describing the moment she recognized the effect her work could have on citizens of her hometown of Chicago. I'm certain that our other guests have had a similar moment when they see that their artistic work has gone beyond just the oohs and ahhs of aesthetes and afficionados and truly helps to educate and change the world for the better.   On today's program, we speak about photo projects that are used to address social problems and to bridge gaps between diverse people. In addition to Johnson, we welcome photographer John Noltner, the founder of A Peace of My Mind, and Michael Skoler, Communications Director at Weave: The Social Fabric Project.   From Skoler we learn of the founding of Weave by the Aspen Institute and its mission to enable “weavers” to create connections between varied people, to act as good neighbors, and to “heal” communities. A Peace of My Mind, which has collaborated with Weave, uses photography and portraiture to foster discussions on peace and its many interpretations. Through exhibitions, workshops, and even his new book, Noltner's visual storytelling sparks conversation and, hopefully, brings new understandings on diversity and tolerance.   In the second half of the program, we focus on the work of Tonika Johnson and her Folded Map Project, which provides a unique method to compare historically segregated neighborhoods in Chicago and, ultimately, to bring the residents of these neighborhoods together. We speak with Johnson of her work as a photo teacher and activist and learn how this project had been gestating since her high-school days. Join us for this inspirational conversation.   Guests:  Michael Skoler, John Noltner, Tonika Johnson  Photograph © John Noltner

Slices of Wenatchee
Wenatchee Valley College competes for $1 million prize; Over 60% of state is vaccinated, boosters available

Slices of Wenatchee

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 7:32


  Today -  Wenatchee Valley College is one of 150 community colleges advancing to the second round of a competition for a portion of $1 million in prize money from the Aspen Institute. And later, More than 60% of people in the state are fully vaccinated with booster doses and pediatric COVID-19 vaccines now becoming available.  Support the show: https://www.wenatcheeworld.com/site/forms/subscription_services/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Bryan Hyde Show
2021 November 26 The Bryan Hyde Show hour two

The Bryan Hyde Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 42:27


  Pay close attention to the kinds of things that command your attention. Are you more focused on the personalities and issues in the news or with improving yourself and your understanding of the world? Alex R. Knight III says to conserve your sympathies and fight your own battles if you want to have impact. One of the most positive things we can do for ourselves is to learn to be less enemy-driven in our thinking. Kent McManigal reminds us that the other side isn't what's evil. It's what's in our own hearts that needs our strongest efforts. One of the surest ways that we can recognize how quickly our liberty is dwindling is when free speech comes under direct attack. Jonathan Turley clues us in on how the Aspen Institute has created a commission of 16 individuals whose job is to fight "information disorder." If you're a truth-seeker, you'll want to know about this. Right on cue, as the prevailing Covid narrative begins to fall apart like a soup sandwich, another variant is being touted by the narrative managers. Joakim Book reviews some of the key lessons learned over the past couple of years regarding the race to win Covidfinity. Show some love to my sponsors: Monticello College Lifesaving Food (use the coupon code "HYDE" at checkout for a 25% discount) The Heather Turner Team at Patriot Home Mortgage HSL Ammo Sewing & Quilting Center Govern Your Income Solar Patriots

Loving Liberty Radio Network
2021 November 26 The Bryan Hyde Show

Loving Liberty Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 85:19


I tried, and failed, to strictly regulate my food consumption for Thanksgiving day. However, I did manage to give some serious thought to what it means to be thankful. Barry Brownstein has another great essay on transforming our ingratitude into gratitude. Just how important is a sense of gratitude? Daisy Luther reminds us that the more unstable things become, the more important it is to appreciate what you already have. Pay close attention to the kinds of things that command your attention. Are you more focused on the personalities and issues in the news or with improving yourself and your understanding of the world? Alex R. Knight III says to conserve your sympathies and fight your own battles if you want to have impact. One of the most positive things we can do for ourselves is to learn to be less enemy-driven in our thinking. Kent McManigal reminds us that the other side isn't what's evil. It's what's in our own hearts that needs our strongest efforts. One of the surest ways that we can recognize how quickly our liberty is dwindling is when free speech comes under direct attack. Jonathan Turley clues us in on how the Aspen Institute has created a commission of 16 individuals whose job is to fight "information disorder." If you're a truth-seeker, you'll want to know about this. Right on cue, as the prevailing Covid narrative begins to fall apart like a soup sandwich, another variant is being touted by the narrative managers. Joakim Book reviews some of the key lessons learned over the past couple of years regarding the race to win Covidfinity. www.thebryanhydeshow.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/loving-liberty/support

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Three men found guilty of murdering Ahmaud Arbery

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 164:28


Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan begins the show by updating listeners on the latest in the pandemic, including why cases are on the rise in some parts of the country and how to have a safe Thanksgiving. Caplan is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor and founding head of the division of medical ethics at NYU School of Medicine in New York City. Then, we ask listeners their safety plans going into Thanksgiving as cases rise. Ali Noorani shares his thoughts on President Joe Biden's immigration policy, and updates listeners on the status of the evacuation from Afghanistan. Noorani is the president and chief executive officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” Corby Kummer talks about how climate change could make food less nutritious and how New Mexican chiles made it to space. Kummer is the executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Jared Bowen previews the latest in Boston's arts scene, including the play “The Last Five Years” and what's new at the Cape Ann Museum. Bowen is GBH's executive arts editor and the host of Open Studio. Sy Montgomery explains how turkeys went from being almost extinct to a common Thanksgiving favorite, and her favorite personality traits of whales. Montgomery is a journalist, naturalist and a BPR contributor. We end the show by broadcasting the news that the three men on trial in Georgia were found guilty of the murder of Ahmaud Arbery, and heard listener reactions to the verdict.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer on the Space-grown, ISS New Mexican Hatch Chiles

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 26:30


The galaxy's first space-grown New Mexican hatch chile peppers have been harvested from the International Space Station (ISS). Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio in studio Wednesday to discuss the space-grown chiles, and what these chiles could mean for the future of indoor farming. NASA employees brought 48 chile seeds aboard a spacecraft at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for growth on the ISS. This past October —- the end of New Mexico's hatch chile season — the ISS crew harvested 7 mature hatch chiles. ISS crewmembers celebrated the growth of the peppers by throwing a taco party. “It's been very good for the mental health and psychology of the people in the space station, no doubt, to tender these plants and smell the leaves and smell the green,” Kummer said. The hatch chile seeds used in the ISS gardens were NuMex Española Improved, a hatch chile variety known for its early-maturity and medium-heat profile. The seeds were planted in an “oven-sized growth chamber” on the ISS, with NASA and ISS crew controlling lighting, temperature, trimming, and irrigation. The contained growth of these hatch chiles is big news for the future of indoor farming as well, Kummer notes. “There are billions of venture capital dollars being put into these indoor farms,” Kummer said. “This is like a very high profile, highly publicized example of growing things [indoors] if you control the humidity and the ultraviolet light.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Hell & High Water with John Heilemann

In which John Heilemann talks with Chris Krebs, founding director of the federal Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and the last Donald Trump appointee to be fired by tweet (after he declared that the 2020 election was the “most secure in American history”). Heilemann and Krebs discuss his work as a co-chair of the Aspen Institute's Commission on Information Disorder and its recently released final report, which focuses on the root causes of America's mis- and disinformation crisis and its proposals to combat it, his tumultuous experience in the Trump administration, and his fears that 2022 and 2024 could propel the country into an "anti-democratic death spiral." See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Our Body Politic
Honoring the Emanuel Nine, What We Can Do about Information Disorder, and Critical Race Theory as a Political Football

Our Body Politic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:21


Host Farai Chideya talks about the power of forgiveness with Sharon Risher, whose relatives were among the Mother Emanuel shooting victims. Michael Arad, the architect behind the new memorial to the Emanuel Nine, discusses the collaborative process of designing an homage to the congregation. Civil rights leader Rashad Robinson talks about the final report from the Aspen Institute's Commission on Information Disorder. On Sippin' the Political Tea, Karen Attiah of the Washington Post and Khiara Bridges of UC Berkeley examine the way politicians use Critical Race Theory to win elections.EPISODE RUNDOWN0:15 A family member of those slain at Emanuel AME Church in 2015 on the recent settlement by the Department of Justice12:36 Architect Michael Arad on building a memorial honoring the “Emanuel Nine”19:14 Civil rights leader Rashad Robinson on the Aspen Institute's report on information disorder31:30 Sippin' the Political Tea: columnist Karen Attiah and law professor Khiara Bridges examine the impact of critical race theory on our politics right now

Ink Stained Wretches
Free Speech: Not a ‘Straw Man'

Ink Stained Wretches

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 56:31


The Aspen Institute takes on “misinformation,” the left wants in on the right's media “dominance,” and POLITICO fills us in on the mental health travails of State Department employees Times 03:45 - Segment: Front Page 03:53 - The federal investigation into Project Veritas and First Amendment questions 07:31 - Substack CEO's interview with Substacker Mike Solana 11:25 - Aspen Institute commission on disinformation 15:17 - One America News Network backs Gigi Sohn, Biden's left-wing nominee to the FCC  18:26 - The Daily Beast reports that Newsmax is eyeing former Fox News talent 23:15 - Rupert Murdoch bashes Trump for focusing on the past 26:15 - Politico's report on Democrats launching left-wing media outlets 31:49 - CNN's report on Kamala Harris's tumultuous relationship with the West Wing 38:44 - The Washington Post headline on Trump's bureau of land management and racism 42:42 - Segment: Obsessions 42:53 - Former New York Times CEO says TV news is in "dead trouble" (Chris) 47:05 - Politico on State Department officials' mental health the Afghanistan withdraw (Eliana) 51:38 - Segment: Favorite Item of the Week  51:53 - Importance of obituaries (Chris) 54:23 - John Malone blasts CNN during CNBC interview (Eliana) Links The Washington Post article on Project Veritas and James O'Keefe Substack CEO's sound off Politico article on State Department officials' mental health post-Afghanistan withdraw Poynter article on obituaries 

Aspen Ideas to Go
Mark Bittman on Reimagining America's Food System

Aspen Ideas to Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 44:14


Longtime food journalist Mark Bittman says America's food system needs to be reimagined so land is used fairly and well and people have access to food that promotes health, not illness. His latest book, Animal, Vegetable, Junk: A History of Food, from Sustainable to Suicidal, tells the story of humankind through the lens of food. The frenzy for food has driven human history to some of its most catastrophic moments from slavery and colonialism to our current moment of Big Food. Big Food—driven by corporate greed and gluttony—is exacerbating climate change, plundering the planet, and sickening people. He speaks with Kathleen Finlay, president of the Glynwood Center for Regional Food and Farming, about what needs to change so that agriculture doesn't wreck the planet and healthy food is available to all.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: The Tuna Story That Keeps On Giving

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:07


The Subway tuna sandwich saga continues: Food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio to discuss new claims in a lawsuit against the sandwich chain that its tuna subs don't contain tuna at all. “This is one of the best stories ever,” he said. “Everybody wants to test Subway tuna sandwiches and find out what's in it.” Earlier this year, the New York Times sent out samples of Subway tuna sandwiches to a laboratory, only to find that “no amplifiable tuna DNA was present” and the species couldn't be identified. Subway has repeatedly denied the allegations. Corby Kummer is executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: 15-minute cilantro

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 164:21


Today on Boston Public Radio: Spencer Buell and Erica Walker talk about the rise of noise complaints in Boston, and what -- and if -- residents and politicians should do about it. Spencer Buell is a staff writer for Boston Magazine. Erica Walker is a noise researcher who founded Noise and the City. She is an assistant professor of epidemiology at Brown. Then, we asked listeners their experiences with noise in the city. Juliette Kayyem updates listeners on the latest in the Jan. 6 committee investigation, including Steve Bannon's contempt charge. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Corby Kummer discusses the pros and cons of emerging grocery delivery services that promise groceries in 15 minutes, which have arrived in New York City. Kummer is the executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Rick Steves tells stories from his latest trip, in which he spent three weeks in Italy and Greece, and his experience hiking Mont Blanc. Steves is an author, television and radio host and the owner of the Rick Steves' Europe tour group. You can catch his television show, “Rick Steves' Europe,” weeknights at 7:30 p.m. on GBH 2 and his radio show, “Travel With Rick Steves,” Sundays at 4 p.m. on GBH. Jon Gruber weighs in on the economic impact of the infrastructure bill. Gruber teaches economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts healthcare reform and the Affordable Care Act, and his latest book is “Jump-Starting America: How Breakthrough Science Can Revive Economic Growth And The American Dream.” We end the show by asking listeners their thoughts on 15 minute grocery delivery.

Into The Wild
94. How to Market to Gen Z Consumers with Tina Wells

Into The Wild

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:28


Tina Wells is a business strategist, advisor, author, and the founder of RLVNT Media, a multimedia content venture serving entrepreneurs, tweens and culturists with authentic representation.  She has been recognized by Fast Company's 100 Most Creative People in Business, Essence's 40 Under 40 and more. For over two decades, Tina has led Buzz Marketing Group, an agency she founded at age 16 with clients like Dell, The Oprah Winfrey Network, Kroger, Apple, P+G, Johnson & Johnson, and American Eagle.  She is also the author of seven books, including the best-selling tween fiction series Mackenzie Blue, its 2020 spinoff series, The Zee Files, and the marketing handbook, Chasing Youth Culture and Getting It Right. Tina's board positions have included THINX, the United Nations Foundation's Global Entrepreneurs Council, The Franklin Institute and Young Entrepreneur's Council. She has also served as the Academic Director for Wharton's Leadership in the Business World Program at the University of Pennsylvania and is a member of the 2017 Class of Henry Crown Fellows within the Aspen Global Leadership Network at the Aspen Institute. Grab something hot and listen in to hear what you need to focus on when marketing to Gen Z consumers.  In this episode you will learn about: What prompted Tina to start her business at 16 year old Building on foundations  What it's like to write middle-grade fiction What compelled Tina to write books for middle-grade fiction Where the idea of the book series came from  The keys to marketing to Gen Z The importance of authenticity and creativity when marketing to Gen Z The Gen Z mindset and what we need to know  What it means to be a wild woman: "Existing on my own terms, and not letting anyone define for me what that means." ------------- Got a minute? Would love a review! Click here, scroll to the bottom, tap, and give me 5-stars. Then select "Write a Review." Make sure to highlight your favorite take aways. Subscribe to level up your businessSubscribe here. ------------- Connect with Tina Wells Tina Wells RLVNT Media @tinawells_ Facebook LinkedIn @tinacwells Connect with Renée Warren @renee_warren @we.wild.women www.wewildwomen.com  

Shades of Freedom
Survivors Choose Healing and Restoration

Shades of Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 28:57


Danielle Sered envisioned, launched, and directs the nonprofit organization Common Justice. She leads the project's efforts locally and nationally to develop and advance practical and groundbreaking solutions to violence that advance racial equity, meet the needs of those harmed, and do not rely on incarceration.  Before planning the launch of Common Justice, Sered served as the deputy director of the Vera Institute of Justice's Adolescent Reentry Initiative, a program for young men returning from incarceration on Rikers Island. Prior to joining Vera, she worked at the Center for Court Innovation's Harlem Community Justice Center, where she led its programs for court-involved and recently incarcerated youth.Her book, Until We Reckon, received the Award for Journalism from the National Association for Community and Restorative Justice and was selected by the National Book Foundation for its Literature for Justice recognition. An Ashoka fellow and Stoneleigh fellow, Sered received her BA from Emory University and her masters degrees from New York University and Oxford University (UK), where she studied as a Rhodes Scholar.As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, The Aspen Institute is nonpartisan and does not endorse, support, or oppose political candidates or parties. Further, the views and opinions of our guests and speakers do not necessarily reflect those of The Aspen Institute.Visit us online at The Aspen Institute Criminal Justice Reform Initiative and follow us on Twitter @AspenCJRI.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer on the Dining Shed Dilemma

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 21:58


Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to explain why outdoor dining could destroy neighborhoods, following a recent New York Times article on issues with outdoor dining sheds in the Lower East Side. Small business owners in the neighborhood have lodged complaints about high noise levels, increasing rat populations, and trash generated from restaurants' outdoor dining sheds, claiming that the area has become “unlivable.” “It's other businesses that are trying to keep alive next to [outdoor dining sheds] now,” Kummer said. “I hope that Boston will do a better job of responding to complaints. [Small businesses] are on margins as thin as a lot of the restaurants.” While outdoor dining has served as a boon for restaurants throughout the pandemic, Kummer notes that long-term solutions for both restaurants and local businesses must be found. “Cambridge, for example, has been so ahead of other cities in terms of bike-friendly lanes and pedestrian zones,” Kummer said. “I think the answer is going to be a great parking lot behind Central Square — just making things pedestrian zones over the long run.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: BPR and Chill

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 162:26


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if they have quit their job or gone on strike, as many use this stage in the pandemic to try something new in their lives. Lylah Alphonse reports on the latest news from Rhode Island, including a coach fired from a South Kingstown school after conducting “fat tests” on naked male athletes, and the latest political headlines from the state. Alphonse is the Rhode Island editor for the Boston Globe. Juliette Kayyem updates listeners on the status of the Jan. 6 investigation, and what happened at the tragedy at Astroworld Festival in Houston, where eight people died during a crowd surge at a Travis Scott concert. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Corby Kummer weighs in on the pros and cons of outdoor dining, and recent investigations into sexual harassment at fast food joints. Kummer is the executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Michael Bobbitt talks about the state of the arts and culture sector at this stage in the pandemic, and gives an overview of the Massachusetts Cultural Council's first ever racial equity plan. Bobbitt is the executive director of the Massachusetts Cultural Council. Matt Gilbert discusses what's new on TV, including the latest seasons of “Succession” and “Dexter” and the prevalence of psychiatrists on screen. Gilbert is the TV critic for The Boston Globe. We end the show by asking listeners what they've been watching on TV lately.

Aspen Ideas to Go
Why Our Partisan Differences Are Threatening National Security

Aspen Ideas to Go

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 45:39


It's clear the United States isn't united right now. A Pew Research poll done before the 2020 election showed about 9 in 10 voters worried a victory by the other party would lead to lasting harm for the country. Our partisan divides aren't just endangering relationships and slowing progress in Washington, they're threatening our national security. "The greatest gift the United States can give to our national foes is hating each other. Why? Because it's the ultimate distraction," says Arthur Brooks, professor at Harvard's Kennedy School and Business School. He speaks with Amy Walter, editor and publisher of The Cook Political Report, and Susan Glasser, staff writer for The New Yorker, about this month's election results, the psychology behind our partisanship, what history shows us about division, and why there's hope on the horizon.

Pixel Therapy Pod
Reclaiming Narratives and Centering Community in Never Alone with Charitie Ropati

Pixel Therapy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 89:14


Mix up your mulled cider and grab a fuzzy blanket - it's time to get cozy and grab your bi-weekly dose of Pixel Therapy! This week, Spencer takes their maiden voyage with their new gaming computer and joins Jamie in playing Witch Beam's brain massaging masterpiece Unpacking - a little game about the familiar experience of pulling possessions out of boxes and fitting them into a new home. Then Jamie explores the unexpectedly heartwarming and wholly entertaining new Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy from Square Enix -- the mashup you never knew you needed. This week we're also excited to be joined by Yup'ik and Sāmoan Columbia University student and Native rights advocate Charitie Ropati (she/they)! A film buff and iconic tweeter, Charitie is also known for their work in public education honoring the resilience and diversity of Alaska Native culture with decolonized history curricula that's since been adopted in her home of Anchorage. We had an awesome time with Charitie diving deep on Upper One Games' and E-Line Media's Never Alone (Kisima Inŋitchuŋa), a puzzle-platformer adventure game about a young Iñupiat girl and an arctic fox that was developed in collaboration with 30+ Iñupiat elders, storytellers and community members. Follow Charitie on Twitter: https://twitter.com/charitieropati Daniel Starkey's Never Alone review: https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2014-11-20-never-alone Side Quest The Center for Native American Youth (CNAY) at the Aspen Institute is a national education and advocacy organization that works alongside Native youth—ages 24 and under—on reservations, in rural villages and urban spaces across the country to improve their health, safety, and overall well- being. All Native youth deserve to lead full and healthy lives, have equal access to opportunity, draw strength from Native culture, and inspire one another. At CNAY, this is achieved through empowerment and culturally-competent methodologies that include leadership, youth-led policy agenda, and youth-led narrative. They're also hiring right now! Learn more about this important organization and donate at cnay.org/ ! About Pixel Therapy New episodes drop every other Tuesday. Learn more at pixeltherapypod.com or follow us on social media @pixeltherapypod. We're proud members of the But Why Tho? Podcast Network: visit ButWhyThoPodcast.com for everything pop culture in an inclusive geek community! If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate us, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts (or your listening app of choice) & subscribe! Want more? Unlock monthly bonus episodes for $2/mo at patreon.com/pixeltherapypod ! Support this podcast

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: “It's Going to Get Worse Before It Gets Better” for Restaurant Industry, Closures

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 19:56


Craigie on Main, The Asgard, Tiger Mama, The Kinsale — these are just a few examples from a long list of Boston-area restaurants that have shuttered during the pandemic. With the end to outdoor dining this winter and uncertainty around the future of COVID, more restaurants could meet the same fate. “It's going to get worse before it gets better,” Corby Kummer told Boston Public Radio on Tuesday. “There's so many factors, all of them precipitated by the close downs of the pandemic.” Long-term, industry-wide issues, such as low profit margins and low pay for restaurant staff, were exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. At the same time, restaurants are facing new pandemic-era challenges in the high number of staffers leaving the industry and “fights over rent,” as was the case of Eastern Standard and Island Creek Oyster Bar in Kenmore Square. Kummer notes that some restaurants, however, may have closed due to inadequate business planning. “Some very sharp business people are saying [that] there are so many restaurant business people who shouldn't have been in business in the first place, if they didn't have three months of reserves or if they didn't know how to write a business plan,” he said. “That means there should be more assistance to restaurant owners on how to run businesses.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Election Day

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 165:43


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners about their experiences with election day, and talking with Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi George about their final pitches for their candidacy as voters head to the polls. Tenni Kusnierek discuss former Chicago Blackhawks Kyle Beach's accusations against the team for mishandling his report of sexual assault by former Assistant Coach Brad Aldrich. She also previews the U.S. Curling Team's journey to the 2022 Winter Olympics. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Carol Rose weighs in on the Supreme Court's consideration of the Texas abortion law, and how she thinks Boston's government should approach the crisis at Mass. and Cass. Rose is the Executive Director of the ACLU of Massachusetts. Then, we talk with listeners about a recent Boston Globe report showing how racial segregation persists in Boston. Corby Kummer update listeners on all things food, including the carbon footprint of coffee and his thoughts on Fluffernutter. Kummer is the executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King gives an election day politics update, including the stakes of Virginia's gubernatorial election, and the fate of President Joe Biden's spending bill. King is CNN's chief national correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays at noon and Sundays at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners whether they love or hate fluffernutter, which Merriam-Webster Dictionary recently made an official word.

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation
125: HOT BENCH Judge Michael Corriero and his eye-popping insight

Jones.Show: Thought-Full Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 22:37


Judge Michael Corriero (Ret.) serves as one of three judges on CBS Media Ventures' Emmy-nominated syndicated court program HOT BENCH, created by Judge Judy Sheindlin. The show returned for its eighth season on September 13, 2021. During the 2020-21 season, HOT BENCH was once again the #2 court program in daytime television in household ratings and all major demographics. It has been # 2 across-the-board in all those categories since 2015. Prior to joining HOT BENCH, Judge Corriero served as a prosecutor in the office of Manhattan District Attorney Frank Hogan, a criminal defense attorney and a judge for 28 years in the criminal courts of New York State. For 16 years, he presided over Manhattan's Youth Part, a special court he created in the Supreme Court of New York State designed to focus attention and scarce resources on young offenders prosecuted as adults pursuant to New York State's Juvenile Offender Law. Under Judge Corriero's innovative leadership, the Youth Part became a model for mobilization and coordination of treatment and social services for children prosecuted in adult courts. He retired from the bench in 2008 to become the Executive Director of Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City. In 2010, he left Big Brothers Big Sisters to establish the New York Center for Juvenile Justice. The Center promoted a comprehensive model of justice for minors that treats children as children and responds to their misconduct with strategies designed to improve their chances of becoming constructive members of society. An important element of the Center's advocacy was recognized in the enactment of New York State's 2017 Raise The Age Legislation which incorporated and institutionalized the Youth Part Model. In 2012, Judge Corriero founded, along with the New York Foundling, one of New York's oldest and respected social service agencies run by the Sisters of Charity, the Families Rising Project - an alternative-to-incarceration program that works not only with a young offender but with his/her entire family. Judge Corriero is an alumnus of St. John's University School of Law and St. John's University. He was a member of the Law Review and served as an associate editor. He graduated from St. John's University College with a Bachelor of Arts degree majoring in social science. He is the author of a book titled, “Judging Children as Children: A Proposal for a Juvenile Justice System,” which is a blueprint for juvenile justice reform. He is regarded nationally and internationally as an expert in juvenile justice. He has traveled extensively, lecturing and advising legal institutions in numerous countries, including Israel, South Africa, Sierra Leone, Kazakhstan and Peru. Judge Corriero is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including: The New York Foundling's Lifetime Achievement Award (2015); Advocate of the Decade (2014) presented by Families on the Move of New York City, Inc.; The Eleanor Roosevelt Award (2011), presented by Citizens Committee for Children; Asian Pacific American Advocates (OCA – New York) Community Service Award (2011); Excellence in Juvenile Justice, Juvenile Detention Association of New York State (2007); Frank S. Hogan Associates Recognition Award (2007); Excellence in Children's Advocacy, presented by 100 Women Against Child Abuse (2006); The Citizens' Committee for Children's Annual Founders' Award (2004); The Howard A. Levine Award for Outstanding Work in the area of children and the law (New York State Bar Association 1999); The Livingston Hall Juvenile Justice Award (American Bar Association 1997); Outstanding Service on Behalf of Youth Award (ELEM 1996, 2007); The Conrad B. Mattox, Jr. Commonwealth Debate Winner (University of Richmond 1996); The Charles A. Rapallo Award (Colombian Lawyers Association 1994); and he participated as a Polsky Judicial Fellow at the Aspen Institute's Justice and Society Seminar (2003). Judge Corriero served at the request of the former Chief Judge of New York State, Judith Kaye, on the New York State Permanent Commission on Justice for Children. He also served on Mayor Michael Bloomberg's Committee on the Judiciary. He has previously served on the New York State Probation Commission Task Force and former New York Governor David Patterson's Task Force on Transforming Juvenile Justice. Judge Corriero also served as Chairperson of the Committee on Juvenile Justice of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York. He was Co-chair of the American Bar Association's Juvenile Justice Committee. He is a member of the New York State Bar Association's Committee on Children and the Law. He served as a trustee of Big Brothers Big Sisters of New York City; a member of the Advisory Committee of Citizens' Committee for Children; a member of the Professional Committee of ELEM (Youth at Risk in Israel); and a board member of Transfiguration Grammar School Education Association. HOT BENCH is created by Judge Judy Sheindlin and executive produced by David Theodosopoulos. Belinda Jackson and James Glover are co-executive producers. Patricia DiMango, Tanya Acker and Michael Corriero comprise the three-judge panel. HOT BENCH is produced by Big Ticket Pictures and Queen Bee Productions. It is distributed by CBS Media Ventures. JONES.SHOW is a weekly podcast featuring host Randall Kenneth Jones (author, speaker & creative communications consultant) and Susan C. Bennett (the original voice of Siri). JONES.SHOW is produced and edited by Kevin Randall Jones. HOT BENCH Online: Twitter: https://twitter.com/HotBenchTV Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HotBench Web: www.hotbench.tv JONES.SHOW Online: Join us in the Jones.Show Lounge on Facebook. Twitter (Randy): https://twitter.com/randallkjones Instagram (Randy): https://www.instagram.com/randallkennethjones/ Facebook (Randy): https://www.facebook.com/mindzoo/ Web: RandallKennethJones.com Follow Randy on Clubhouse Twitter (Susan): https://twitter.com/SiriouslySusan Instagram (Susan): https://www.instagram.com/siriouslysusan/ Facebook (Susan): https://www.facebook.com/siriouslysusan/ Web: SusanCBennett.com Follow Susan on Clubhouse Web: KevinRandallJones.com LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kevin-randall-jones/ www.Jones.Show SFX: "big clap" by kellieskitchen on freesound.org licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported. SFX link: https://freesound.org/people/kellieskitchen/sounds/209991/ License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/legalcode

Aspen Ideas to Go
Journalism's norms are changing. Here's why you should care.

Aspen Ideas to Go

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 59:33


Norms in newsrooms across the United States are being upended thanks to deep polarization, a racial reckoning, and the pandemic. Hallmark journalistic traits like neutrality and objectivity are being redefined. Eric Deggans, TV critic for NPR, says it's impossible to be objective, and journalists have long been advocates for the status quo. “We've seen newspapers apologize for how they covered the Civil Rights Movement because they marginalized civil rights advocates." Still, today's challenges are unique. Newsrooms are grappling with generational change, the Me Too movement, and journalists who became oppositional following President Trump's "enemy of the people" comments. Deggans speaks with Joanne Lipman, former editor in chief for USA Today, and Vivian Schiller, executive director of Aspen Digital.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
Corby Kummer: Restaurant Industry Wage Theft Has Worsened During the Pandemic

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 12:35


Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Tuesday to discuss a pandemic-era increase of wage theft in the restaurant industry, following a recent report by the nonprofit restaurant advocacy group One Fair Wage. “[Forty-three] states still allow a tipped minimum wage, which means as low as $2.13 an hour,” Kummer said. “Employees who are waitstaff have the liberty to take home all their tips based on that. The catch is that it's on the restaurant manager to look to see, ‘what's the average hourly earning of those tipped minimum wage staff members of mine,' and ‘did it equal or better the state's minimum wage.' And if it didn't, they — the managers — have to make up for it by paying them enough money to make them whole.” “There's never been much enforcement of this, and there's less than ever enforcement now,” Kummer added. “There's evidence that there's more of this failure to make up for any of these losses than there was before the pandemic.” Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: Say Cheese!

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 164:27


Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they feel about President Joe Biden's spending bill shrinking as it nears finalization. Trenni Kusnierek updates listeners on all things sports, including anti-vaccine protesters storming barricades at Barclays Center to support Kyrie Irving, and Tom Brady's 600th touchdown ball. Kusnierek is an anchor and reporter for NBC Sports Boston, as well as a Boston Public Radio contributor. Ali Noorani talks about why despite the United States' declaration of China's policies against its Uyghur community as a genocide, the government has not provided anyone refugee status. Noorani is the President & Chief Executive Officer of the National Immigration Forum. His forthcoming book is “Crossing Borders: The Reconciliation of a Nation of Immigrants.” Gov. Charlie Baker talks about how he thinks the state is doing on vaccinations following his mandates, and how he plans to approach housing issues. Baker is the governor of Massachusetts. Corby Kummer discusses the growing issue of wage theft in the restaurant industry, when waitstaff fail to make minimum wage off tips and their employer fails to pay the difference. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. John King weighs in on Virginia's mayoral race and the state of the Democrats' spending plan. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of “Inside Politics,” which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners if bad photos are dead in the age of iPhones.

Finding Harmony Podcast
Lu Duong: The Western Wing

Finding Harmony Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 111:39


It is probably no secret to you all that we (Harmony & Russell) enjoy watching television together (shhh…!). After finishing over 21 seasons of Hell's Kitchen, we moved on to prestige dramas like The Handmaid's Tale and Mrs. America, and our current obsession, Succession… and often you'll find references to these narratives percolate in conversations with our guests. We're in the Golden Age of Television, but the real prototype of our time is the “Walk and Talk” by Aaron Sorkin, The West Wing, which is absolutely beloved. For many of our generation it was the show that precipitated an interest in sincere and earnest political activism. Our guest today, Lu Q. Duong, is both a result of that movement and quite coincidentally an example. Lu's father, a French Vietnamese chef, was founder of a restaurant in DC that became the center for Republican Beltway work lunch. It was not uncommon, for example, to see former GOP VP Dick Cheney eating there on any given day. Lu's father remains a dynamic example of the immigrant experience: An indefatigable worker and idealist for the American way of life. Lu is now Principal Director for the Tech and STEM Initiatives unit for The United Negro College Fund and a former communications lead at the very influential education initiative the Aspen Institute. He took his degree in Political Science at Virginia Commonwealth University and applied his expertise in growth and marketing to his interest in Ashtanga Yoga (in his spare time!). He created Ashtanga: Parampara, an online magazine, which sought to build on and develop the stories told in Guy Donahaye's book “Guruji” with long form interviews from other teachers within our global Ashtanga yoga community. We think it's fair to say, Lu is kind of a big deal (not to mention a incredibly talented, thoughtful, empathetic and all-round fabulous human being). In today's episode we asked Lu his professional opinion to the question... “What would you do with the Ashtanga Yoga brand?” Listen along as he reluctantly explains his opinion from the perspective of a political marketing expert. FIND OUT MORE ABOUT LU - ASHTANGA PARAMPARA I INSTAGRAM - ashtangaparampara.org The Finding Harmony Podcast is hosted, edited and produced by Harmony Slater and co-hosted by Russell Case. A big heart of thanks to our friends, family, and students from around the world, who've generously supported this podcast through your comments, sharing, and financial donations. ❤ Your contributions have allowed us to keep our podcast ad and sponsor free. If you've enjoyed today's podcast, please consider supporting our future episodes by making a donation. Every little bit goes a long way and we are immensely grateful for any and all of your support. Find out more about Harmony - harmonyslater.com Don't forget to subscribe and leave a review! ❤ Give us a 5★ rating! We love to read and respond to your comments - So drop us a note in the comments below and give us a shout out on IG! Opening & Closing Music by Nick Evans - purchase your own copy - Click Here.

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish
#121 Walter Isaacson: Curiosity Fuels Creativity

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 68:08


What do Steve Jobs, Leonardo da Vinci, Benjamin Franklin and Jennifer Doudna all have in common? Celebrated journalist and author Walter Isaacson calls upon his years of research to explain how curiosity has always fueled creativity among history's greatest innovators, and how each of those individuals shaped the world around them. On this episode Issacson dives deep into the curious obsessions of Jobs, da Vinci's ability to develop a brilliant mind, Ada Lovelace and how she developed the algorithm, and how Doudna's work with gene editing could shape the future to come.   A journalist by trade, Issacson served as the editor of Time and then chairman and CEO of CNN before eventually spending 15 years as president and CEO of the Aspen Institute, the international research institute and think tank. Isaacson has also written bestselling biographies on Jobs, da Vinci, Franklin and Albert Einstein, and in 2021 released his latest biography, The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race.   Go Premium: Members get early access, ad-free episodes, hand-edited transcripts, searchable transcripts, member only episodes, and more. https://fs.blog/knowledge-project-premium/ Every Sunday our newsletter shares timeless insights and ideas that you can use at work and home. Add it to your inbox: https://fs.blog/newsletter/

1A
Teaching Climate Change in the Classroom

1A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 22:31


What role can schools play in making the country greener and cleaner?Public schools serve nearly one in six Americans, and a new commission concludes the role of schools in the U.S. has yet to be clearly defined. The K12 Climate Commission from the Aspen Institute seeks to make amends.Its report lays out a path that would see schools successfully transition into using clean energy, rethinking food use, and embracing non-fossil fuel transportation over the next decade.Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to this podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1A.