Podcasts about technological

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The Data Stack Show
115: What Is Production Grade Data? Featuring Ashwin Kamath of Spectre

The Data Stack Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 54:55


Highlights from this week's conversation include:Ashwin's background in the data space (2:43)The unique nature of working with data in finance (7:32)Technological challenges of working in the finance data space (13:55)The third-party data factor and judging if it is reliable enough (17:07)What made Ashwin decide to go out and build his own company? (31:47)Defining data decay and data storing and why both are important (37:52)Advice on the importance of data quality (42:10)Final takeaways and wrap-up (50:49)The Data Stack Show is a weekly podcast powered by RudderStack, the CDP for developers. Each week we'll talk to data engineers, analysts, and data scientists about their experience around building and maintaining data infrastructure, delivering data and data products, and driving better outcomes across their businesses with data.RudderStack helps businesses make the most out of their customer data while ensuring data privacy and security. To learn more about RudderStack visit rudderstack.com.

Regenerative Skills
Jake Leguee gives a perspective from modern technological farming: Part 1

Regenerative Skills

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 68:35


Today I'll begin the first in a two part interview that I've been looking forward to doing for a long time, but let me give you some background context before we get started. It's no secret that I'm a major proponent of regenerative agriculture and many of the different methodologies, practices, and concepts that this wide label contains. I believe strongly that our generation has an opportunity and an obligation to reconcile our food production system with the natural world that we depend on and to use our knowledge, wisdom, and access to resources to regenerate the health of the Earth's biomes as a primary function through which we produce value for our own species in the form of food, fiber, fuel, and medicine.With that said, I've long been observing an ugly manifestation of this advocacy creep into the online and media discourse around regenerative agriculture. As we hold up examples of success stories and best practices, many of these discussions are also propped up on derogatory mentions of conventional or industrial farmers and farming practices. Some of these even expand into contests of who is more regenerative or who is doing better for the climate. I am certain that insults, negative assumptions, and general dismissal of the people and practices in this sector does nothing to bring their voices to the table, and often serves to further separate our ideals in the regenerative ag movement from the people who we should be working hardest to welcome.  For this reason I've been speaking with conventional and industrial farmers for some time, not only to better understand the industry and the management practices they use, but also to understand the people who manage these farms, the decisions and challenges they face, and both the differences and commonalities they have with the regenerative farmers I speak to more regularly.  In an effort to raise awareness of these issues and to introduce some perspective into the conversation that is going on now around the world about how we should produce food and manage the natural world that we've come to dominate, I reached out to a voice that I've been following for a number of months and that I believe represents very honestly the realities of modern industrial farming operations in North America. Jake Leguee is managing over 15,000 acres near Weyburn in southern Saskatchewan in Canada. He grows durum, wheat, canola, peas, lentils, and flax and farms with his family, including his wife and three young sons, and several other family members. Together they are a 3rd-generation farm that strives to continually improve - to leave things better than they found them. Jake is also involved in various places in the agriculture industry as well. As a farmer and an agronomist, agriculture, and the science and business therein, is his fascination and passion. My intention with this interview needs a little explanation. I've been reading Jake's blog on thelifeofafarmer.com since the beginning of the year. There are few other places on the web where I've found confident and first hand defenses of many of the pariahs of regenerative and organic agriculture such as the use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides, GMOs and the massive increase in the average size of farms, yet Jake manages to do so in an articulate and compassionate way.I need to also mention that I do not agree with or defend the positions that Jake promotes in this talk, but that's not at all the point. If you've been listening to this show for any length of time, you're already well aware of my beliefs and opinions. The guests that I've interviewed over the last 6 years have done a much better job than I could at explaining them as well. My hope here is rather to reconnect those of us who are so susceptible to getting lost in an echo chamber of agreement with the humanity and core motivations that we share with the very people we often think we oppose. The biggest takeaway from this conversation for me was just h...

The Last Optimist
The Technological Case for Optimism: Part 2

The Last Optimist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 57:27


In Part 2 we highlight some specific technologies and sectors where radical, promising new products and services are already emerging, i.e., we predict a future “that’s already happening” per that great aphorism from the late great management consultant Peter Drucker. Source

For The Love of EdTech
Advocating for and Implementing Technological Solutions in Elementary School Specials with Kristin Scott

For The Love of EdTech

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 28:44


 For Kristin Scott, using technology during specials is all about advocacy, collaboration and creativity. In this episode, we'll learn how she went from borrowing an old projector to using classroom Chromebooks to help students use technology to creating curriculum-driven art projects. Episode sponsored by: VIZOR, helping you and your district simplify management of a fleet of chromebooks. https://www.vizor.cloud/loveedtech

Monster Man
Special Episode: Technological Terrors

Monster Man

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 21:56


Patreon backer Rafe brings you this special episode all about mechanical monsters! If you're enjoying the show, why not consider supporting it on Patreon? You'll get access to lots of new bonus content, including my other podcast, Patron Deities! Get your US copies of the Pamphlet here and the Magonium Mine Murders here. In the UK? Get your physical copies of the Pamphlet of Pantheons, the Magonium Mine Murders, or both direct from me. Looking for digital copies? Find them on Itch or on Drivethru. Thanks to Ray Otus for our thumbnail image. The intro music is a clip from "Solve the Damn Mystery" by Jesse Spillane, used under a Creative Commons Attribution License.

TrueLife
Alan Willett - Lead with Speed

TrueLife

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 66:57


https://exceptionaldifference.com/https://alanwillett.comExpert consultant, speaker, and award-winning author of Leading the Unleadable:How to Manage Cynics, Divas, and OtherDifficult People, and Lead With Speed, AlanWillett is co-founder of ExceptionalDifference.Alan works with clients around the world,including the UK, Turkey, South Africa, China,India, Canada, and Mexico, and of course,throughout the United States. Alan Willett hasconsulted with HP, Oracle, Microsoft, NASA,General Motors, Intuit, NAVAIR, Orbital ATK,OnStar, Cornell University, Rutgers University,Technological de Monterrey, and many more.Alan's passionate work has focused onleadership and the unique challenges ofleading in the elevated pressure environmentsof high-technology developments.Alan was a member of an elite team at theSoftware Engineering Institute (SEl), locatedat Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. AtSEI, Alan joined other renowned thoughtleaders in developing cutting-edgemethodologies adopted by corporationsglobally. Through this work, Alan was able toestablish a worldwide network of peers andthought leaders that constantly push thehigh-tech development world to"do better." Itis from this position that Alan launched hisconsultancy in 2012. Alan has designed and taught many differentworkshops at universities and corporationsaround the world, reaching over 2000 peopledirectly. His personal backstory enlivens hiswriting and his speaking. He grew up on adairy farm that had been in the family for over170 years and which was honored as the dairyfarm of the year for New York State for manyyears running. Alan has run across the UnitedStates from ocean to ocean with his collegeteam, beating the record of the Pony Expressand earning him a spot in the Guinness Bookof World Records. He is a co-founder ofEcoVillage at Ithaca, the largest co-housingecovillage in the world, which is spotlighted inthe news on a global basis, including in Japanand France, and featured in the book"Ecovillage at Ithaca: Pioneering a SustainableCulture" by Liz Walker, (New SocietyPublishers: 2005).Collaboration with Exceptional DifferencePrincipal Julia Mullaney inspired him to doubledown on his love for training the bestengineering minds in the world. Willett holds aB.S. Computer Science from RochesterInstitute of Technology, and Master's inTechnology from Walden University.Alan encourages everyone to get out thereand make a positive difference in the world.

The Last Optimist
E25. The Technological Case for Optimism: Part 1 of 2

The Last Optimist

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 52:36


Politicians aren’t innovators or inventors. Economic growth—wealth creation—is dominated by technology progress and then what policymakers either impede or encourage. Of course politics matter, but what we know about emerging technologies can change the framing, and the stakes. In Part 1 we revist the big-picture macro trends that point to a promising future. Source

That Real Blind Tech Show
Episode 103 - Twitter, The Technological Hindenburg

That Real Blind Tech Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 68:25


It's an all new That Real Blind Tech show. The entire gang is here in their lair of choice.   We start off discussing the upcoming Sight Tech Global, as Brian will be the Host of this year's Virtual Conference which you can register for free to attend here.   Air Canada is the latest airline to make a blind person's life absolutely miserable while traveling with their guide dog. Will the airlines ever get it?   It happened a week ago, but we dive in to the blindness communities reaction to the entire accessibility team being laid off at Twitter. Allison educates us a little about the new social media craze of Mastodon. Or as the kids are calling it, the new Twitter. And finally just when you think things couldn't get any worse at Twitter Elon Musk goes all nuclear. And because we doubt this will be the last we talk about Elon Musk, we try and decide on a nickname for Elon Musk moving forward.   And because Zuckhead couldn't take Twitter getting all the press, Facebook/Meta decided to fire 11,000 employees, and did it by email. How classy!   Out of nowhere Amazon announced they are putting the A Lady under a performance review, which made us wonder, could the A Lady have peeked at Amazon?   We have screamed about our frustration for quite awhile about our devices and Bluetooth connectivity, so it is great to see the mainstream is getting on board with this frustration. Here are some basic tips that could help improve your bluetooth connectivity.   After a discussion about an injury a friend of the podcast had, we dive in to the good and bad we have been experiencing on Mac OS Ventura.   To contact That Real Blind Tech Show, you can email us at ThatRealBlindTechShow@gmail.com, join our Facebook Group That Real Blind Tech Show, join us on the Twitter @BlindTechShow , or leave us an old school phone message at 929-367-1005.

Growth Experts with Dennis Brown
GE Ep 315 [2021] - The Science Behind What's Working in Marketing Today w/ Bill Durrant

Growth Experts with Dennis Brown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 27:41


Bill Durrant is the Founder and President of the fasting growing full-service media agency in the world and Ad Age's Small Agency of the Year, Exverus Media. Bill and Exverus empower growth-stage, culture-creating brands through data, creativity, and insight-driven media planning. He develops creative media ideas and grows brands that he believes in. On top of that, he's the author of a new book, Digital Stone Age. Is TV dead? Despite the rise of digital media and advertising, Bill is here to discuss what's really working to drive growth in business, giving us the scientific research behind why we need to execute a balance of traditional brand building tactics with modern, digital brand building tactics. Tune in to learn the best way to grow a brand in 2021 and beyond, why it's importance to stay ahead of measuring and understanding success, and what advertising strategies businesses with smaller budgets should be using. During this interview, we discuss: 2:08 – The inspiration behind Bill's book, Digital Stone Age 3:32 – Bill's entrepreneurial journey + How his agency has growth in the past decade 5:31 – The most effective way to grow a brand in 2021 + Binet and Field study 10:04 – Is TV dead or are agencies just trying to push digital advertising too much? 11:26 – How brands with smaller budgets and investment levels benefit from the same media strategies as large companies 13:16 – Shifts in media and marketing to be aware of in 2021 and beyond 16:19 – Where is TV going and how is television going to compete with other media channels? 18:27 – How to be one step ahead of measuring and understanding success 20:25 – Data and privacy concerns + Technological innovations in privacy 24:39 – Bill's takeaway about the mindset needed for building your brand effectively 25:23 – Bill's favorite growth tool + How it works 26:10 – His most recommended book 26:42 – How to connect with Bill and get a copy of his book Plus, a whole lot more! Resources: Exverus Media Connect with Bill on LinkedIn Get his book: Digital Stone Age Binet and Field study theTradeDesk Concentric Market Restoring the Soul of Business by Rishad Tobaccowala ————————- If you enjoyed this episode, please RATE / REVIEW and SUBSCRIBE to ensure you never miss an episode. Connect with Dennis Brown  AskDennisBrown.com LinkedIn Twitter Instagram [Free Giveaways]

On Tech & Vision With Dr. Cal Roberts
New Approaches in Access: Smart Tools for Indoor Navigation and Information Transfer

On Tech & Vision With Dr. Cal Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 39:13


This podcast is about big ideas on how technology is making life better for people with vision loss. Artifacts from Blackbeard's sunken pirate ship are on display in the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort, North Carolina. But now they are also accessible to visitors who are blind, thanks to the efforts of Peter Crumley, who spearheads the Beaufort Blind Project. In this episode, we ask: How can new technology help make sites like these as accessible to people who are blind as they are to sighted people? We profile three companies applying new technologies paired with smartphone capabilities, to make strides in indoor navigation, orientation, and information transfer. Idan Meir is co-founder of RightHear, which uses Apple's iBeacon technology to make visual signage dynamic and accessible via audio descriptions. We check in with Javier Pita, CEO of the NaviLens QR code technology which we profiled in our first season to see what they have been developing in the last two years. Rather than iBeacons or QR codes, GoodMaps uses LiDAR and geocoding to map the interior of a space. We speak with Mike May, Chief Evangelist. Thanks to Peter Crumley, the North Carolina Maritime Museum is fully outfitted with GoodMaps, and will soon have NaviLens as well. As the prices of these tools come down, the key will be getting them into all the buildings, organizations, and sites of information transfer that people who are blind need to access – which is all of them.   The Big Takeaways: Beaufort Blind Project. Peter Crumley, a blind resident of Beaufort, North Carolina, has advocated having accessibility tools brought to various parts of his hometown. Along the way, he helped the North Carolina Maritime Museum outfit itself with GoodMaps technology for indoor navigation, and with NaviLens QR codes for information transfer. Thanks to these new technologies, the museum artifacts are now accessible to everyone. RightHear. Idan Meir cofounded RightHear, which uses iBeacon technology paired with users' smartphones to guide visitors who are blind through an indoor space. iBeacons send unique signatures via low Bluetooth signals to phones inside the radius. When these iBeacons are paired with areas of interest in a space (e.g. the front door, the counters, or the bathrooms) users can orient themselves within a space, and identify where they want to go and how they want to navigate to each location. RightHear translates the information embedded in each beacon into audio feedback for users. On the subject of feedback, Idan Meir is looking for beta testers to try out RightHear and provide him with constructive feedback. NaviLens. We profiled NaviLens QR code technology in an episode from our first season. In this episode, we follow up with Javier Pita to see what has been in development in the last two years. Since we last spoke, NaviLens has launched NaviLens 360, which uses magnets to help guide users who are blind to the NaviLens codes, even if their camera is having trouble picking up the code, making the app even more user-friendly. In addition, NaviLens has launched a partnership with Kellogg's in Europe and North America to test the effectiveness of the Navilens code on consumer product packaging. GoodMaps. GoodMaps uses LiDAR technology to map a space. Lasers are sent out from the LiDAR sensor, and when they bounce back, they have captured distances from the point of origin. Institutions work with GoodMaps to pay for the mapping service, and then users can access the maps for free. The app uses audio to communicate navigational directions with users. Technological advancement. Each of these tools relies on component technologies that have gotten less expensive in recent years (iBeacons, QR Codes, and LiDAR). They are also able to exist because their target markets carry smartphones in their pockets, enabling these potential users to access the tools quickly and easily, without much additional hassle or investment. Distribution. In this episode, we profile three different approaches to broadening access to indoor navigation technology, including for orientation and information transfer, proving there are many ways to solve these problems. It is good that some of these tools can be paired, as has been done at the North Carolina Maritime Museum, and that users may be able to choose which tools work best for them. The key will be getting them into all the buildings, organizations, and sites of information transfer that people who are blind need to access – which is all of them.   Tweetables: “The advocacy is so important; when you're actually interfacing with the app to make the app better and make it work in a way that a blind person really needs it to work.” – Peter Crumley, Beaufort Blind Project “Well, it's gonna be built from blind perspective philosophy. So not only will it work for me — it will work for anyone, totally blind and fully sighted to give an interactive experience.” – Peter Crumley, Beaufort Blind Project “Imagine, if this technology will be in all the products, we will solve the problem of accessible packaging for all users.” – Javier Pita, NaviLens “The point is we have solved the last few yards of the wayfinding problem that is super important for a blind user. And this was born in New York City with the collaboration with the MTA and the department of transportation of New York City.” – Javier Pita, NaviLens “That camera picks up the environment and it compares it with that point cloud and says, “I see based on this particular image … that you are near the Starbucks,” or “You're near Gate 27.” –Mike May, GoodMaps “It was important and kind of obvious for us from the very early on, you know, that nothing about us without us. It was clear to us that we have to involve users in the process. –Idan Meir, RightHear   Contact Us: Contact us at podcasts@lighthouseguild.org with your innovative new technology ideas for people with vision loss.   Pertinent Links: Lighthouse Guild RightHear NaviLens GoodMaps

Today with Claire Byrne
In Praise of Chicken Thighs

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 12:08


Chef Brian McDermott, Agnes Bouchier Hayes, Home Economist and lecturer at University of the Technological

Fridays at Five
Our Favorite Products, NYC Marathon, and Technological Difficulties at Work

Fridays at Five

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 52:24


Welcome back! This week we discuss all of our favorite products from TV shows, to makeup, to cups? Also, technological difficulties at work, Teslas, and why the NYC marathon makes Grace cry. Our instagram: https://instagram.com/fridays.atfive Grace's instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lipsticksndlattes/ Chelsea's instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chelseamcnulty_/

Moving Into The Future
A Look Inside OMA Partners' Technological Advancements

Moving Into The Future

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 28:47


In this episode of "Moving Into the Future," Jack Macejka, VP of National Accounts at The Advance Group, sits down with Brian Bowers, Chief Revenue Officer at Precision Facility Group, to discuss the incredible growth both companies have experienced since joining OMA. Since becoming OMA members, both companies have made significant strides toward a more technologically advanced future that not only reduces the possibility of errors in the moving process, but also contributes to the development of a stress-free, completely transparent experience for the client. Listen to the full episode to learn more about how OMA has facilitated limitless networking opportunities and partnerships for companies such as The Advance Group and Precision Facility Group.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Keeping It 100 Radio: Uncensored Diabetes Conversations
EP 67: Six Until Me with Kerri Sparling

Keeping It 100 Radio: Uncensored Diabetes Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 38:36


I first joined the diabetes online community in 2016 after graduating college and wanting to learn more about actually living with this diagnosis. What I didn't know? This community had been being built for years - even before Instagram and TikTok made their way as platforms. Meet Kerri Sparling, the author of Six Until Me: Essays from a life with diabetes. Kerri created her blog after being diagnosed with diabetes in 1986 and wanting to share connections throughout the T1D community. She has now inspired others to do the same. Inside this episode, we discuss our diagnoses in different generations and how we get to choose how we engage and share in the online space. SHOW NOTES ⏰ (1:20): Introductions ⏰ (3:34): Different diagnosis stories ⏰ (7:15): The Pee Alarm ⏰ (9:27): Technological advances ⏰ (13:05): How did “Six Until Me” get started? ⏰ (16:35): Feelings around the numbers ⏰ (20:25): What experiences came with sharing so much of your journey online? ⏰ (27:52): Rage Bolusing ⏰ (31:03): Best and worst things of sharing online ⏰ (34:50): Best piece of advice ⏰ (37:15): Where can everybody find you? Resources for this episode: Hang out with Kerri on IG: @sixuntilme https://www.instagram.com/sixuntilme/ Buy her books: https://kerrisparling.com/ Grab your pack of Skin Grip using code "LISSIE" at www.skingrip.com Join us inside the Keeping it 100 Diabetes Coaching Experience: https://needlesandspoons.kartra.com/page/keepingit100 Grab the Keeping it 100 Diabetes Journal: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0BB5ZL6R8?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860 Check out our blog: https://www.needlesandspoons.com/blog Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ki100official_/ Check out our free resource hub: https://needlesandspoons.com/free-resources/

The Steve Gruber Show
Scott Cleland, A Declaration of Independence from Unchecked Technological Tyranny

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 11:00


Scott Cleland is the Executive Director of the Restore Us Institute (www.RestoreUsInstitute.org). A Declaration of Independence from Unchecked Technological Tyranny

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner
Building A Cyber Security Culture To Protect Your Organization From Cyber Threats With Perry Carpenter

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 21:38


Technological advancement provides more efficiency, accuracy, and preciseness in our work but not all things are wrapped in gold. This advancement also poses cyber threats to business, and understanding the need for cyber security culture allows us to avoid these threats. In this episode, https://www.linkedin.com/in/perrycarpenter/ (Perry Carpenter), a Chief Evangelist and StrategyOfficer for https://www.knowbe4.com/ (KnowBe4), shares his insights about cyber security culture, its failures, and how you can avoid them. Tune in to gather more information on protecting your business from cyber threats by building an effective cyber security culture in your organization!   What You'll Discover About Cyber Security Culture: What is Cyber Security Culture? How can you change behavior to achieve a conducive and tight cyber security culture? What is the root cause of cyber security failures in an organization? How can you start building a cyber security culture from the beginning?   Guest Bio: Perry Carpenter, C|CISO, MSIA, who currently serves as chief evangelist and strategy officer for KnowBe4, the world's most popular security awareness and simulated phishing platform. A recognized thought leader on security awareness and the human factors of security, he's provided security consulting and advisory services for the world's best-known brands. His previous book, Transformational Security Awareness: What Neuroscientists, Storytellers, and Marketers Can Teach Us About Driving Secure Behaviors, quickly gained a reputation as the go-to guide for security awareness professionals worldwide, and, in 2021, he was inducted into the Cybersecurity Canon Hall of Fame. He's the creator and host of the popular 8th Layer Insights podcast and co-author of the new book The Security Culture Playbook: An Executive Guide to Reducing Risk and Developing Your Human Defense Layer.   Related Resources: https://www.facebook.com/Perry.Carpenter.Author (https://www.facebook.com/Perry.Carpenter.Author) https://www.linkedin.com/in/perrycarpenter/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/perrycarpenter/) https://twitter.com/PerryCarpenter (https://twitter.com/PerryCarpenter) https://www.amazon.com/Security-Culture-Playbook-Executive-Developing/dp/1119875234/ref=sr_1_1?crid=20YOVCQ02XHH9&keywords=the+security+culture+and+carpenter&qid=1659639608&s=books&sprefix=the+security+culture+and+carpenter%2Cstripbooks%2C55&sr=1-1 (https://www.amazon.com/Security-Culture-Playbook-Executive-Developing/dp/1119875234/ref=sr_1_1?crid=20YOVCQ02XHH9&keywords=the+security+culture+and+carpenter&qid=1659639608&s=books&sprefix=the+security+culture+and+carpenter%2Cstripbooks%2C55&sr=1-1)   SUBSCRIBE, RATE AND REVIEW: Subscribing is easy and lets you have instant access to the latest tactics, strategies and tips.   Become a https://businessconfidentialradio.com/preferred-listener-signup (Preferred Listener) or https://businessconfidentialradio.com/subscribe-to-podcast/ (subscribe) to the show through your favorite podcast feed.   Rating and reviewing the show helps us grow our audience and allows us to bring you more of the information you need to succeed from our high-powered guests.   Download ♥ Subscribe ♥ Listen ♥ Learn ♥ Share ♥ Review ♥ Enjoy

Ward Scott Files Podcast
October 27, 2022 - Technological Tyranny

Ward Scott Files Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 60:54


Today on The Ward Scott Files Podcast: Ward will discuss Technological Tyranny with Scott Cleland, Executive Director of the Restore Us Institute. Also, will discuss local Alachua County news, weather, and more!

Trends from the Trenches
Episode 10: Dr. Kiana Aran on a New Wave of Technological Advancements With Graphene

Trends from the Trenches

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 31:24


Graphene has quickly become a biotech buzzword as scientists aim to better connect with biology and usher in a new wave of technological advancements. Outperforming silicon at nearly every turn, graphene is one of the most biocompatible tools for extracting valuable information without disrupting biological systems. “Graphene is a single layer of carbon molecules. Everything in our body is made of carbon. It's the most compatible material we can find that has amazing electronic properties. You can build electronics and conjugate with biology without impacting the biology and without biology impacting it,” says Dr. Kiana Aran, chief scientific officer at Cardea Bio, Keck Graduate Institute associate professor of bioengineering, and founder of the Aran Nebula Foundation.  In the latest episode of Bio-IT World's Trends from the Trenches podcast, host Stan Gloss, founder of BioTeam, speaks with Aran about the scientific advantages of merging graphene with modern technology. She also discusses her work in creating graphene-based biological transistors for pathogen detection, CRISPR-based gene editing, and plant genotyping. Finally, Dr. Aran provides an update on the Aran Nebula Foundation, an organization designed to help women in science build their scientific skill sets in preparation for leadership roles. 

Talk Justice An LSC Podcast
Technological Innovations in Pro Bono Services

Talk Justice An LSC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 46:23


Tech tools can minimize tedious, routine legal work, allowing attorneys more time to dedicate to higher-level strategic tasks and their clients. Tech also enables unrepresented people to better navigate complex legal systems. This is how streamlining repetitive processes improves the efficiency of legal services organizations and promotes increased access to justice. Guests Include: Ransom Wydner, Vice President of Pro Bono and Social Impact at SixFifty Sam Flynn, Chief Operating Officer and Co-founder at Josef

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics
Technological Innovations in Pro Bono Services

Legal Talk Network - Law News and Legal Topics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 46:23


Tech tools can minimize tedious, routine legal work, allowing attorneys more time to dedicate to higher-level strategic tasks and their clients. Tech also enables unrepresented people to better navigate complex legal systems. This is how streamlining repetitive processes improves the efficiency of legal services organizations and promotes increased access to justice. Ransom Wydner, Vice President of Pro Bono and Social Impact at SixFifty Sam Flynn, Chief Operating Officer and Co-founder at Josef

Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Karen Covy on Divorce, Technological Traps, and Hidden Assets

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 24:56


Oct 24 – In today's Lifetime Planning episode, Financial Sense Newshour's Jim Puplava speaks with divorce coach and attorney Karen Covy on the role of technology on divorce today, the impact that Covid has had not just on divorce rates but also...

Machination Log
Machine learning on the job

Machination Log

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022


Go to http://machinationlog.com/podcast/2022-10-24-machine-learning-on-the-job for full episode notes0:00 - What do we want out of a job?6:20 - What's this AI all about and is it bad?32:00 - So what?52:50 - Technological limitations, and how this is all YET AGAIN nerds' faults.1:06:10 - Filling the void with doing something about all this1:40:50 - Broader personal teleology

The Nonlinear Library
EA - What is the likelihood that civilizational collapse would cause technological stagnation? (outdated research) by Luisa Rodriguez

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 61:46


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: What is the likelihood that civilizational collapse would cause technological stagnation? (outdated research), published by Luisa Rodriguez on October 19, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Important note This is a rough draft I wrote between October 2019 and April 2020. It's incomplete, and doesn't reflect updates in my views in the 2+ years since I worked on it. I think there are serious downsides to sharing the draft publicly, because I think some parts of it are likely to be substantially wrong. I'm posting it anyway (with the hope that flagging the potential substantial wrongness will help people be especially skeptical of the conclusions) because I think the benefits outweigh those downsides. The benefits: Transparency: I've shared the draft with a number of researchers exploring civilizational collapse, and they've built off some of the research. It seems bad for an unpublished piece of research to be informing other research without being public (citable, scrutinizable) itself. Potential insights: To the extent that not everything in this post is wrong, it seems good for people to be able to easily draw/build on any good arguments in it (rather than have to start from scratch). Noticing bad arguments: As per Cunningham's Law: “The best way to get the right answer on the internet is not to ask a question; it's to post the wrong answer.” I think the probability of technological stagnation is somewhat higher than I did when I was working on this piece in earnest for a number of reasons — most of which I don't have capacity to write up at the moment. The biggest reason is probably the risk of extreme, long-lasting climate change. It seems possible that anthropogenic climate change could cause global warming extreme enough that agriculture would become much more difficult than it was for early agriculturalists. Temperatures wouldn't return to current levels for hundreds of thousands of years, so if the warmer temperatures were much less conducive to recovering agriculture and downstream technological developments, humanity might be stagnant for millennia. Acknowledgements This research was funded by the Forethought Foundation. It was written by Luisa Rodriguez under the supervision of Lewis Dartnell, and draws heavily on research and conversations with Lewis and Haydn Belfield. Thanks to Max Daniel, Matthew van der Merwe, Rob Wiblin, Howie Lempel, Aron Vallinder, and Kit Harris who provided valuable comments. Thanks also to Will MacAskill for providing guidance and feedback on the larger project. And thanks to Katy Moore for editing this piece, and for drafting the summary. All errors are my own. Summary In this post, I explore the probability a catastrophe that caused civilizational collapse might lead to indefinite technological stagnation (and eventual human extinction) — even if it didn't cause extinction in the very short term (a topic I covered in What is the likelihood that civilizational collapse would directly lead to human extinction (within decades)?). To do this, I ask three key questions: 1. If we “re-ran” history, would we see the agricultural and industrial revolutions again? If a catastrophe caused a return to hunter-gatherer levels of society, we'd have to undergo the agricultural and industrial revolutions all over again to get back to our current levels of technological civilization. How likely is it that we'd overcome those hurdles again? Because the first agricultural revolutions happened in multiple places following the stabilization of the climate after the last glacial period, I expect it's very likely that we could expect to see subsequent agricultural revolutions within years (once the climate is suitable for agriculture). I feel less confident, but still fairly optimistic, that another industrial revolution — which has only happened o...

Branch Out - A Podcast from Connection Builders
Drive Innovation with Curiosity & Discipline - Gary Thomson

Branch Out - A Podcast from Connection Builders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 44:36 Transcription Available


Insatiable curiosity is often correlated with leadership and business success. But if it isn't combined with a healthy dose of strategy and discipline, it can have the opposite effect. With more than 35 years of experience in public accounting, Gary Thomson is a sought-after consultant and leadership development expert. His years of experience working in firm structures and as an entrepreneur make him well equipped to discuss what it takes to drive innovation and growth for yourself and your business. Although every person and every situation is unique, Gary shares his thoughts on why curiosity and discipline are two essential keys to success and how you can cultivate these traits and use them to your advantage along your own career journey. For the technology geeks out there, we also go down a bit of an unplanned rabbit hole about the rapid pace of technological advancements today. Make sure to tune in today!Key Points From This Episode: The biggest change that Gary has witnessed in his industry since his career began.Technological advancements that are taking place in the CPA world today. Why a high level of curiosity is correlated with great leadership.The downsides of too much curiosity amongst people within an organization.How taking breaks will benefit your business.The value in setting goals and being flexible in your approach to achieving them.Cultivating your curiosity within a corporate structure.A hypothetical example of implementing a cascading, organization-wide strategy.How boundaries promote creativity.How to foster creativity amongst your employees.A better way to think about sunk costs. Examples of indirect ROIs, and the value these hold.Thomson ConsultingGary Thomson on LinkedInTrue ProfessionalismExtreme OwnershipConnection BuildersAlex Drost LinkedInBranch Out Podcast LinkedInConnection Builders LinkedIn

The PR Maven Podcast
Episode 207: Stand Out From the Crowd by Going Old School: Write Personal Thank-You Notes

The PR Maven Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 10:04


In today's world, more people than ever have a voice. Technological innovation, namely in the realm of social media, has democratized discourse in ways that few thought possible only two decades ago. In the comfort of our own living room, or on our phone while at a restaurant, we have the power of self-expression more than ever before.   And that's a good thing! From Facebook posts to tweets and Yelp reviews, it is relatively easy to state your opinion, circulate it among family and friends, and perhaps even become an "influencer."   However, this democratization has made public discourse a more competitive space and has made it more difficult for any individual to stand out from the pack. Across the globe, there are over 2.9 billion monthly active Facebook users, more than half of whom use the social media platform on a daily basis. Twitter is used by roughly 450 million people worldwide each month. More than 500 million Instagram users create Instagram Stories every single day. That is a whole lot of noise, and it can be heard throughout the professional world.  Continue reading here.    The article read in this episode originally appeared on the Forbes Agency Council CommunityVoice™ in July 2019.    Activate The PR Maven® Flash Briefing on your Alexa Device.    Join The PR Maven® Facebook group page.    Sign up for email notifications for when new episodes are released. 

LensWork - Photography and the Creative Process
HT1321 - Technological Progress

LensWork - Photography and the Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 2:43 Very Popular


HT1321 - Technological Progress/H3> What would you do, that is, what changes would take place in your photography is all technological advancements in photography stopped right where they are today. Would your interest in photography wane? Would your direction change?

Learning Counsel EduJedi Report
Removing Accent Bias in the Classroom: Where Technological Excellence Meets Human Intelligence

Learning Counsel EduJedi Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 32:51


Listen in to guest Maya Goodall, Senior Director, Emergent Bilingual Curriculum - from Lexia Learning - as she informs us about accent bias and how technology is coming to the rescue.  Host LeiLani Cauthen marvels at the ingenuity of this latest technological breakthrough that uses Artificial intelligence (A.I.) alongside advanced speech recognition and human intelligence to help students from many languages with English language development. Learn important points about capitalizing on learning in a foreign language to advance English language learning. Hear the thinking around how supporting heritage languages creates more culturally sustaining learning environments where all students can equitably feel welcome and advance in their learning.

The Shift with Shane Hewitt
Technological World with Blaine Kyllo - October 12, 2022

The Shift with Shane Hewitt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 13:16


On the Technological world, Blaine Kyllo looks at Meta's massive gamble in VR, the next Google Pixel phone, and more!  Find Steve at stevestebbing.ca and on twitter @theStevilDead 

First Business Bank Podcast
Tips To Improve Accounts Receivable Collections

First Business Bank Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 31:23


Whether you're operating a nonprofit or for-profit business, receivables keep the doors open and efficient receivables collection can bolster your cash position. Technological advances over the past several years make it possible to drastically reduce the time it takes to get those receivables into your operating account.  In this informative episode of the First Business Bank podcast, our business banking experts, Directors of Treasury Management at First Business Bank, Melissa Fellows and Kim Preston, discuss the benefits of improving your receivables process, various options available like Remote Deposit Capture, and the potential ROI of accessing your cash sooner in a rising rate environment. #Businessloans #Financing #Businessplan #InterestRate

Tech for Non-Techies
120. Think like a Venture Capitalist to have a great career

Tech for Non-Techies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 14:43


Technological change can feel overwhelming even to the world's top technologists. To figure out what's relevant for your career, learn from people who do this professionally: venture capitalists. “The business strategies employed by highly successful start-ups and the career strategies employed by highly successful individuals are strikingly similar," says Reid Hoffman in his book The Startup of You.  Venture capital premise 1: technology is a tool that solves a problem Ask yourself: what problems is your industry facing now? What problems are you dealing with on day-to-day basis? Venture capital Premise 2: the problem must be important enough to solve Even if the problem exists, it might not be important enough to solve. This is why, you need to think: where is the biggest money drain? Where is the biggest productivity drain? Venture capital premise 3: Invest in the future, not in the now VCs are not investing in today. They are investing in years and even decades ahead. Let's use the same approach to your career. Does your industry or the company you are working at look promising? Make a plan for how to adjust for future changes. Making a career change always takes longer than we want. Venture capital premise 4: diversify your assets This means doing well in your current role well, and also getting involved with other projects. One of the best ways to do this is to get involved with start-ups, because this helps you understand how innovation works in practice and gives you fresh ideas.  Resources mentioned in this episode: Speak Tech: the top 10 tech concepts for business leaders (FREE GUIDE) Non-Technical Founders Don't Need to Cod‪e‬ - Sophia's podcast interview with Alexandra Zubko, 3 x tech founder 74. How I got to the top in tech - Sophia's podcast interview with Jennifery Byrne, ex CTO Microsoft US ----- If you like learning about how tech products and profits get made, you'll like our newsletter. It's funny too. Sign up here. ----- Tech for Non-Techies clients  Reach senior leadership positions in Big Tech firms Lead digital transformation in established businesses Create tech businesses as non-technical founders Pivot into careers in venture capital If you want to have a great career in the Digital Age, then APPLY FOR A CONSULTATION CALL.   What happens when you apply for a consultation call: Sophia and her team will look through your application. If they genuinely think Sophia could help you, you will get a link to her calendar.. You will have a 20 – 30 minute call to discuss your goals and see if you are a good fit for each other.  If we establish that Tech for Non-Techies courses + coaching could help you and believe we would enjoy working together, we will discuss a relevant approach to suit you. The aim of the call is not to sell you on anything that is not right for you. We both win if you get results, but we both lose if you don't. We love hearing from our readers and listeners. So if you have questions about the content or working with us, just get in touch on info@techfornontechies.co   Say hi to Sophia on Twitter and follow her on LinkedIn. Following us on Facebook, Instagram and TikTok will make you smarter.  (Photo by charlesdeluvio Unsplash)

Old Movies For Young Stoners
S1E12 - Technological Disruption w/ Singin' in the Rain (1952) and Modern Times (36)

Old Movies For Young Stoners

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 74:05


Technological disruption wasn't just dreamed up by annoying tech bros in Silicon Valley. Fortunes have been made and lost over advances in technology ever since the stone age gave way to bronze. And Hollywood has definitely seen more than its share of it over the past 100 years or so with talking pictures, television, home video and streaming all bringing on one form of creative destruction or another to the movie industry. In this episode, we talk about a pair of classic films that tackle this topic. First up, Gene Kelly is back on OMFYS with Singing' in the Rain (1952), a musical spoof of Hollywood's transition to talkies in late 1920s that came out when the movie industry was facing a similar upheaval brought on by the proliferation of television. Co-starring Donald O'Connor as a wise-cracking songwriter, and introducing Princess Leia's mom, Debbie Reynolds, as Kelly's love interest. Also featuring Jean Hagen doing the comedic heavy-lifting in the thankless role of the villainous Lina Lamont, a diva with a voice for silent movies, plus an early appearance by EGOT winner–that's Emmuy, Grammy, Oscar AND Tony– Rita Moreno, and CYD CHARISE putting a bit of sizzle in the sensual ballet sequence. Co-directed by Kelly and Stanley Donnen and produced by Arthur Freed, who also supplied the songs, this is widely considered the best movie musical. Singin' in the Rain is streaming on HBOMax. Next, Charlie Chaplin, arguably the biggest silent movie star of them all, keeps the silents alive well past their sell-by date, with this slapstick farce with his Little Tramp persona driven to madness by the drudgery of industrialization. Also starring Paulette Goddard, Chaplin's wife at the time, as the gamine, and Al Ernest Garcia, cast as the control-freak factory owner because of his resemblance to Henry Ford. Featuring some amazing Metropolis-like sequences with the Little Tramp literally being caught in the gears of machinery and him roller skating on the edge of certain death or at grievous least injury. Directed, written, produced and starring Charlie Chaplin, who also composed the musical score that inspired a later hit by Nat King Cole. Modern Times is streaming on HBOMax, Criterion Channel, and Kanopy. Starting off the episode, Philena, Bob and Greg take apart the Letterboxd Top 100, and Philena schools the olds on the definition of vintage. It's a pretty rousing chat as Bob was, um, a little bit caffeinated, maybe? Cory Sklar is on assignment but he does make a special appearance via the magic of modern video editing technology. Weed is at your local dispensary. If you get it on the streets, we don't need to know. Hosts: Philena Franklin, Greg Franklin, Bob Calhoun Co-producers: Bob Calhoun & Cory Sklar Audio production: Cory Sklar

TonioTimeDaily
My childhood of survival sex, child human trafficking, sexual slavery, and adult human trafficking!

TonioTimeDaily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 51:44


“Survival sex is a form of prostitution engaged in by a person because of their extreme need. It describes the practice of people who are homeless or otherwise disadvantaged in society, trading sex for food, a place to sleep, or other basic needs, or for drugs.[1] The term is used by sex trade, poverty researchers, and aid workers.” We were all forced into sexual slavery, involuntary prostitution of kids and adults, sexual exploitation, and sexploitation. Sometimes they made us have sex with sex workers (prostitutes for the most part) and they made us do ALL types of sex work. “Trafficking Child sex trafficking refers to the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, obtaining, patronizing, or soliciting of a minor for the purpose of a commercial sex act. Offenders of this crime who are commonly referred to as traffickers, or pimps, target vulnerable children and gain control over them using a variety of manipulative methods. Victims frequently fall prey to traffickers who lure them in with an offer of food, clothes, attention, friendship, love, and a seemingly safe place to sleep. After cultivating a relationship with the child and engendering a false sense of trust, the trafficker will begin engaging the child in prostitution, and use physical, emotional, and psychological abuse to keep the child trapped in a life of prostitution. It is common for traffickers to isolate victims by moving them far away from friends and family, altering their physical appearances, or continuously moving them to new locations. Victims are heavily conditioned to remain loyal to the trafficker and to distrust law enforcement. No child is immune to becoming a victim of child sex trafficking, regardless of the child's race, age, socioeconomic status, or location, and every child involved in this form of commercial sexual exploitation is a victim. Technological advances, in particular the Internet and mobile devices, have facilitated the sex trafficking of children by providing a convenient worldwide marketing channel. Individuals can now use websites and social media to advertise, schedule, and purchase sexual encounters with minors. The Internet and mobile devices also allow pimps and traffickers to reach a larger clientele base than in the past, which may expose victims to greater risks and dangers. Child sex trafficking investigations present unique challenges to law enforcement and require a robust multijurisdictional response, with multiple agencies playing a critical role in ensuring the protection of victims and effective prosecution of offenders. The method by which most traffickers identify, recruit, market, and maintain their victims results in a unique combination of sustained violent criminal behavior with reluctant victims and witnesses. Although interviews of sex trafficking victims frequently identify traffickers and other accomplices, some child victims may resist identifying their traffickers because of fear or other means of manipulation that the pimp has exercised over them. Furthermore, the victim may only know their traffickers' street name and cannot fully identify their traffickers. Child sex trafficking victims are often not recognized as victims and may be arrested and jailed. The dangers faced by these children—from the traffickers, their associates, and from customers—are severe. These children become hardened by the treacherous environment in which they must learn to survive. As such, they do not always outwardly present as sympathetic victims. They also frequently suffer from short–term and long–term psychological effects such as depression, self-hatred, and feelings of hopelessness. These child victims also need specialized services that are not widely available given they often have illnesses, drug addictions, physical and sexual trauma, lack of viable family and community ties, and total dependence—physical and psychological—on their abusers.” --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/antonio-myers4/support

The Cis Are Getting Out of Hand!
#275 - Up Early for the Technological Difficulties Hour, Also Fake Outrage No. 32482384

The Cis Are Getting Out of Hand!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 46:19


Support this show at patreon.com/qaf, paypal.me/RissyMcCool, or Venmo@ThePurpleAmazonThis week, we're awake early and Eli's internet won't work right, but we attempt to talk about the latest fake outrage that's being used to bully people and give governors talking points about something that doesn't actually exist but you're not mad enough about the thing they made up. Music by The Midnight

The Shift with Shane Hewitt
Technological World with Blaine Kyllo - October 5, 2022

The Shift with Shane Hewitt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 14:58


Blaine tells us of Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed plan. Plus, how the European Union has passed a law to standardize charging cables for mobile devices. Find Blaine on twitter @solocorps and at solocorps.com

The Common Sense Show
HOW DID THE US SUDDENLY GAIN TECHNOLOGICAL WONDERS AFTER 1947-DOUG&DAVE INTEL REPORT

The Common Sense Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 54:59


HOW DID THE US SUDDENLY GAIN TECHNOLOGICAL WONDERS AFTER 1947-DOUG&DAVE INTEL REPORT

OnTrack with Judy Warner
Overcoming Technological Challenges in the PCB Industry

OnTrack with Judy Warner

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 37:13


Matt Kelly is the  Chief Technologist at IPC. In this episode we will discuss all about the technological challenges the industry is facing. Matt will help us understand the “ecosystem” involving the semiconductor industry, advanced packaging, and IC substrates. Watch this episode here OR listen on the go! Check the show notes and additional resources below. Show Highlights: Matt Kelly's role as the Chief Technologist at IPC The Moore's Law is continuing, but it is economically becoming difficult to maintain, this has become the driving force behind heterogeneous integration  What does the CHIPS Act really mean for manufacturers? Production of semiconductors is an expensive business–one fabrication infrastructure can cost an average of 20 billion dollars Matt stresses the need in the industry to use, and understand the “ecosystem” involving the semiconductor industry, advanced packaging, and IC substrates The US has a 20-year market leader, knowhow gap, weak sub-tier supply, skilled workforce shortage, and lack of raw materials The industry needs to spend time looking at the big picture, take the bigger messages, and convert them into actual change A significant shift in the workforce–PCB designers are a scarce commodity. In the near future, printed circuit board designers may have to double as IC substrate designers The global supply chain is alive and well, a change to a regional and global mindset is necessary to overcome most of the industry challenges Matt shares the same scenario with produce shoppers in the summertime, you try to buy your fresh fruits and vegetables locally from your local farmers or whatever, but yet you still go to the grocery store IPC's focus is on increasing workforce skills development in the areas of design and assembly IPC is sponsoring the Advanced Packaging Symposium, Building the Substrate and Packaging Assembly Ecosystem in Washington, DC, on October 11th and 12th Links and Resources: Follow Matt Kelly on LinkedIn Learn more about the IPC's Advanced Packaging Symposium, Building the Substrate and Packaging Assembly Ecosystem Watch related podcast episode:     The Benefits of Diversifying PCB Industry Supply Chain     IPC CEO John Mitchell on the Supporting American Printed Circuit Boards Act     What is in the PCB Bill? Connect with Zach on LinkedIn Full OnTrack Podcast Library Altium Website   Claim the special offer for Podcast listeners only

Kerry Today
Strategic Plan for Cork and Kerry’s Munster Technological University – October 4th, 2022

Kerry Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022


Professor Maggie Cusack, who’s president of MTU, discusses the ambitious plan for 2022 – 2027.

Hot Take Central
9-30 Segment 1 - Exploring the wonders of Tik Tok - Technological difficulties - Charcuterie boards and night caps - Rick Hummel retiring

Hot Take Central

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 59:13


9-30 Segment 1 - Exploring the wonders of Tik Tok - Technological deficiencies - Charcuterie boards and night caps - Consuming certain spirits during various seasons - Rick Hummel retiring from the Post-Dispatch -

The Counter Culture Mom Show with Tina Griffin Podcast
Technological Advancements and Nations Aligning Signal Coming Antichrist says Pastor Duke Hergatt

The Counter Culture Mom Show with Tina Griffin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 27:06


Is the world coming to an end? Is Jesus coming back during our lifetime? These are the pressing questions Pastor Duke Hergatt answers as he shares insight into the shocking and exciting world events moving into place as the time of Christ's return draws near! We are in a spiritual battle, and many prophecies that need to be fulfilled to usher in the end of the age have already transpired. Pastor Duke talks about the technological advancements that now exist to facilitate global control over the world's population, as well as what types of protocols are currently conditioning people to later accept the mark of the beast. The last days are close, Pastor Duke contends. Get ready to see Jesus!   TAKEAWAYS Pastor Duke's Hippy Dippy podcast focuses largely on decoding Biblical prophecy Christ's return is very near, and it will likely happen during the Jewish Feast of Trumpets Israel has always leaned on America for protection, but leaders are turning their backs on God's chosen people China's Silk Road is under construction, literally paving the way for future Eastern armies to coalesce in the final battle of Armageddon  

The Shift with Shane Hewitt
Technological World with Blaine Kyllo - September 28, 2022

The Shift with Shane Hewitt

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 13:40


On this edition of the Technological World, Blaine takes us through the new Call of Duty, great games coming to new consoles, and what's next for YouTube. Find Blaine on twitter @solocorps and at solocorps.com

Night Clerk Radio: Haunted Music Reviews

Support Night Clerk Radio on Patreon In this episode, we're talking about the classic music of the DOOM video games, focusing on the work of Bobby Prince in 1993 and Mick Gordon in 2016. Not only did both composers produce memorable and compelling soundtracks for their respective games, they did so under very different market and technological conditions. We talk about these changing conditions and how they manifest in each soundtrack.References and Additional LinksMasters of Doom: How Two Guys Created an Empire and Transformed Pop Culture by David Kushner Do Androids Dream of Computer Music?DOOM - SCARYDARKFAST by Dan PinchbeckBobby Prince, composer of DOOM & DOOM 2 Interview with QuartercirclesThe Sound Design Of DOOM - Exclusive Q&A with ADSRSatanic figures are hidden in Doom's soundtrack - The VergeHow the ‘Doom' Soundtrack Was Made Will Melt Your Puny Mortal Mind in ViceRip & Tear: Deconstructing the Technological and Musical Composition of Mick Gordon's Score for DOOM (2016)DOOM: Behind the Music at GDCMusical inspirations behind Doom's music at Doomwiki.orgDOOM: Behind The Music Part 1DOOM: Behind The Music Part 2The INSANE Rhythms of Doom Eternal | Jazz Pianist ReactsCreditsMusic by: 2MelloArtwork by: Patsy McDowellRoss on TwitterBirk on TwitterNight Clerk Radio on Twitter

Framework with Jamie Hopkins
Dave Francis: Bringing Technological Transformation to Medicare Shopping

Framework with Jamie Hopkins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 39:20


With too many choices and confusing deadlines, it's no wonder enrolling for Medicare is one of the most frustrating experiences many Americans will have. But it doesn't have to be that way, insists Dave Francis, co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Healthpilot. Healthpilot aims to bring the same ease and convenience to the Medicare shopping experience that consumers now enjoy on sites like Amazon and Warby Parker. As the former COO and CFO of eHealth, a health insurance marketplace, Dave is very familiar with how healthcare can be made better using technology. You can find show notes and other information at CarsonGroup.com/Framework.

The Convivial Society
Taking Stock of Our Technological Liturgies

The Convivial Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:23


Welcome to the Convivial Society, a newsletter about technology and culture. In this installment, I explore a somewhat eccentric frame by which to consider how we relate to our technologies, particularly those we hold close to our bodies. You'll have to bear through a few paragraphs setting up that frame, but I hope you find it to be a useful exercise. And I welcome your comments below. Ordinarily only paid subscribers can leave comments, but this time around I'm leaving the comments open for all readers. Feel free to chime in. I will say, though, that I may not be able to respond directly to each one. Cheers! Pardon what to some of you will seem like a rather arcane opening to this installment. We'll be back on more familiar ground soon enough, but I will start us off with a few observations about liturgical practices in religious traditions. A liturgy, incidentally, is a formal and relatively stable set of rites, rituals, and forms that order the public worship of a religious community. There are, for example, many ways to distinguish among the varieties of Christianity in the United States (or globally, for that matter). One might distinguish by region, by doctrine, by ecclesial structure, by the socioeconomic status its members, etc. But one might also place the various strands of the tradition along a liturgical spectrum, a spectrum whose poles are sometimes labeled low church and high church. High church congregations, generally speaking, are characterized by their adherence to formal patterns and rituals. At high church services you would be more likely to observe ritual gestures, such as kneeling, bowing, or crossing oneself as well as ritual speech, such as set prayers, invocations, and responses. High church congregations are also more likely to observe a traditional church calendar and employ traditional vestments and ornamentation. Rituals and formalities of this sort would be mostly absent in low church congregations, which tend to place a higher premium on informality, emotion, and spontaneity of expression. I am painting with a broad brush, but it will serve well enough to set up the point I'm driving at. But one more thing before we get there. What strikes me about certain low church communities is that they sometimes imagine themselves to have no liturgy at all. In some cases, they might even be overtly hostile to the very idea of a liturgy. This is interesting to me because, in practice, it is not that they have no liturgy at all as they imagine—they simply end up with an unacknowledged liturgy of a different sort. Their services also feature predictable patterns and rhythms, as well as common cadences and formulations, even if they are not formally expressed or delineated and although they differ from the patterns and rhythms of high church congregations. It's not that you get no church calendar, for example, it's that you end up trading the old ecclesial calendar of holy days and seasons, such as Advent, Epiphany, and Lent, for a more contemporary calendar of national and sentimental holidays, which is to say those that have been most thoroughly commercialized. Now that you've borne with this eccentric opening, let me get us to what I hope will be the payoff. In the ecclesial context, this matters because the regular patterns and rhythms of worship, whether recognized as a liturgy or not, are at least as formative (if not more so) as the overt messages presented in a homily, sermon, or lesson, which is where most people assume the real action is. This is so because, as you may have heard it said, the medium is the message. In this case, I take the relevant media to be the embodied ritual forms, the habitual practices, and the material layers of the service of worship. These liturgical forms, acknowledged or unacknowledged, exert a powerful formative influence over time as they write themselves not only upon the mind of the worshipper but upon their bodies and, some might say, hearts. With all of this in mind, then, I would propose that we take a liturgical perspective on our use of technology. (You can imagine the word “liturgical” in quotation marks, if you like.) The point of taking such a perspective is to perceive the formative power of the practices, habits, and rhythms that emerge from our use of certain technologies, hour by hour, day by day, month after month, year in and year out. The underlying idea here is relatively simple but perhaps for that reason easy to forget. We all have certain aspirations about the kind of person we want to be, the kind of relationships we want to enjoy, how we would like our days to be ordered, the sort of society we want to inhabit. These aspirations can be thwarted in any number of ways, of course, and often by forces outside of our control. But I suspect that on occasion our aspirations might also be thwarted by the unnoticed patterns of thought, perception, and action that arise from our technologically mediated liturgies. I don't call them liturgies as a gimmick, but rather to cast a different, hopefully revealing light on the mundane and commonplace. The image to bear in mind is that of the person who finds themselves handling their smartphone as others might their rosary beads. To properly inventory our technologically mediated liturgies we need to become especially attentive to what our bodies want. After all, the power of a liturgy is that it inscribes itself not only on the mind, but also on the body. In that liminal moment before we have thought about what we are doing but find our bodies already in motion, we can begin to discern the shape of our liturgies. In my waking moments, do I find myself reaching for a device before my eyes have had a chance to open? When I sit down to work, what routines do I find myself engaging? In the company of others, to what is my attention directed? When I as a writer, for example, notice that my hands have moved to open Twitter the very moment I begin to feel my sentence getting stuck, I am under the sway of a technological liturgy. In such moments, I might be tempted to think that my will power has failed me. But from the liturgical perspective I'm exploring here, the problem is not a failure of willpower. Rather, it's that I've trained my will—or, more to the point, I have allowed my will to be trained—to want something contrary to my expressed desire in the moment. One might even argue that this is, in fact, a testament to the power of the will, which is acting in keeping with its training. By what we unthinkingly do, we undermine what we say we want. Say, for example, that I desire to be a more patient person. This is a fine and noble desire. I suspect some of you have desired the same for yourselves at various points. But patience is hard to come by. I find myself lacking patience in the crucial moments regardless of how ardently I have desired it. Why might this be the case? I'm sure there's more than one answer to this question, but we should at least consider the possibility that my failure to cultivate patience stems from the nature of the technological liturgies that structure my experience. Because speed and efficiency are so often the very reason why I turn to technologies of various sorts, I have been conditioning myself to expect something approaching instantaneity in the way the world responds to my demands. If at every possible point I have adopted tools and devices which promise to make things faster and more efficient, I should not be surprised that I have come to be the sort of person who cannot abide delay and frustration. “The cunning of pedagogic reason,” sociologist Pierre Bourdieu once observed, “lies precisely in the fact that it manages to extort what is essential while seeming to demand the insignificant.” Bourdieu had in mind “the respect for forms and forms of respect which are the most visible and most ‘natural' manifestation of respect for the established order, or the concessions of politeness, which always contain political concessions.” What I am suggesting is that our technological liturgies function similarly. They, too, manage to extort what is essential while seeming to demand the insignificant. Our technological micro-practices, the movements of our fingers, the gestures of our hands, the posture of our bodies—these seem insignificant until we realize that we are in fact etching the grooves along which our future actions will tend to habitually flow. The point of the exercise is not to divest ourselves of such liturgies altogether. Like certain low church congregations that claim they have no liturgies, we would only deepen the power of the unnoticed patterns shaping our thought and actions. And, more to the point, we would be ceding this power not to the liturgies themselves, but to the interests served by those who have crafted and designed those liturgies. My loneliness is not assuaged by my habitual use of social media. My anxiety is not meaningfully relieved by the habit of consumption engendered by the liturgies crafted for me by Amazon. My health is not necessarily improved by compulsive use of health tracking apps. Indeed, in the latter case, the relevant liturgies will tempt me to reduce health and flourishing to what the apps can measure and quantify. Hannah Arendt once argued that totalitarian regimes succeed, in part, by dislodging or disemedding individuals from their traditional and customary milieus. Individuals who have been so “liberated” are more malleable and subject to new forms of management and control. The consequences of many modern technologies can play out in much the same way. They promise some form of liberation—from the constraints of place, time, community, or even the body itself. Such liberation is often framed as a matter of greater efficiency, convenience, or flexibility. But, to take one example, when someone is freed to work from home, they may find that they can now be expected to work anywhere and at anytime. When older patterns and rhythms are overthrown, new patterns and rhythms are imposed and these are often far less humane because they are not designed to serve human ends.So I leave you with a set of questions and a comment section open to all readers. I've given you a few examples of what I have in mind, but what technological liturgies do you find shaping your days? What are their sources or whose interests do they serve? How much power do you have to resist these liturgies or subvert them if you find that they do, in fact, undermine your own aims and goals? Finally, what liturgies do you seek to implement for yourselves (these may be explicitly religious or not)? After all, as the philosopher Albert Borgmann once put it, we must “meet the rule of technology with a deliberate and regular counterpractice.” Get full access to The Convivial Society at theconvivialsociety.substack.com/subscribe

The Good Question Podcast
Analyzing And Interpreting Ancient Religious Texts With Renowned Scholar And Teacher Amy-Jill Levine

The Good Question Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 58:22


In this episode, we connect with Amy-Jill “AJ” Levine. AJ is an E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Professor of New Testament Studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School, Department of Religious Studies, and Graduate Department of Religion. She is also the author of many notable books, including The Misunderstood Jew, Light of the World, and The Bible With and Without Jesus. AJ joins us today to discuss her extensive research of ancient religious texts, and outline her journey as an internationally renowned scholar and teacher. Tune in now to discover: The difference between the Old Testament and the Tanakh. What archeology can tell us about ancient religious texts. How translations can alter the meaning of historical texts like the Tanakh. Technological innovations associated with ancient texts. The study of the Bible and books like it is constantly changing and revealing new things. Scholars like Amy-Jill Levine play an important role in the refinement of these texts so that our society can better understand what they mean… Want to learn more about Amy-Jill Levine and her work? Click here now! Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/38oMlMr

The Jenna Ellis Show
THE COMING TECHNOLOGICAL RESET

The Jenna Ellis Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 35:10


Major technological innovations are on the brink of fueling momentous change throughout the world. Exposing the Great Reset is key to understanding the motives and goals of the World Economic Forum. Docuseries producer Kian Simone joins to discuss the latest episode: The Technological Reset.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health
“We are a part of nature, just like everything else”- Autism ADHD and pursuing a PhD w/ Gökçen Şahin

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 22:31


Gökçen Şahin, M.Sc., who successfully completed her master's degree in Genetics, has just registered for the PhD program to start her education this fall. Technological advances in the field of genetics in the last 20 years have brought with it a large pile of data waiting to be made sense of. Gökçen will do her PhD in bioinformatics in order to learn how to draw meaningful conclusions from these data and to find solutions for this purpose. Gökçen, who loves to learn new things and is curious, developed a machine learning model in her thesis that can predict the muscle heteroplasmy ratio of patients with given demographic features, family history, and clinical table caused by a mitochondrial DNA point mutation causing mitochondrial diseases. She made these by learning everything herself. She reviewed more than 450 publications fastidiously and worked with doctors to generate her data. Gokcen, who wants to improve herself in this field, wants to have a solid foundation. Therefore, she decided to take her education in this field. Gökçen actually qualified to enter another PhD program last year for the same purpose and started her education. During this period, she was diagnosed with ADHD in December and in January, she learned that she is autistic. While the diagnoses were a great shock at first, she shared her diagnoses with her supervisor in order to pass this period in a healthy way. Afterwards, she was exposed to various mobbing by this supervisor. The severity of mobbing had increased over time. And in February, she was fired by him from the PhD program in an e-mail. Not long after, her ex-boyfriend's family, who learned that she is autistic and ADHDer, did not want them to get married, and they broke up after a 2-year relationship, which was a first for Gökçen. She had many reasons to lose hope. But the opposite happened. The diagnoses resulted in her accepting herself. She faced many challenges throughout her life and she saw that the challenges she experienced was the result of not being accepted as she was. Realizing this, she wanted to go on further and apply for a new program, but she also had fears. She explained everything to her new supervisor before application. And she was encouraged by new supervisor to apply for the program. Now she's telling people that “Being autistic and ADHD is part of the diversity in nature and being able to live as ourselves, to be free of masks is what we have a right to do. The only thing that can hinder this view is when we begin to look at ourselves as people who do not accept us as we are. When we come back from this mistake, we start living a healthy life. Because not being able to be what we are, not being accepted is ignoring us and it hurts. Nobody has the right to this. We are a part of nature, just like everything else." This is a great one- enjoy!   In this episode Peter and Gökçen discuss:   00:40 - Thank you so much for listening and for subscribing! 00:50 - Apologies for the near horrid audio- Peter is still in a hotel. 00:56 - Intro and welcome Gökçen Şahin! 02:45 - Your story is incredible; and it's frustrating professors would still be so ignorant! 03:21 - So you said that you wrote something out that you wanted to share with us, feel free!  03:35 - On being accepted for PhD programs 04:03 - On the first meeting with her supervisor/professor 04:51 - On the 2nd meeting with her supervisor 05:50 - What happened next? 08:16 - A little while later… 08:45 - Studying about ADHD 10:00 - On being diagnosed by a child psychologist and then given meds 10:19 - Her professor's reaction 11:05 - Back to the psychologist 11:51 - On being made a study and the discovery of Autism 13:00 - Amazing. A couple of questions… 13:15 - The fallout and heartbreak 14:00 - Did you go back to your former professor? 15:05 - What types of things that you used to think were negatives, do you now understand to be positives? 15:56 - Fun fact: Your subconscious mind controls about 80percent of what you think; be mindful in your self-talk/inner dialogue.  16:24 - On being happy inside and being kind to yourself! 17:44 - What advice would you give to someone who has been told that they are broken? 17:55 - THIS PART.  RIGHT HERE. 19:56 - What happened with her new supervisor? 21:30 - How can people find more about you? @GKCNSHN on Twitter 21:30 - Guys, as always thanks so much for subscribing! Do you have a cool friend with a great story? We'd love to hear. I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via email at peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  21:40 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits  — TRANSCRIPT via Descript and then corrected.. somewhat:  [00:00:40] Hey guys, Peter, Shankman welcome to another episode of Faster Than Normal. Unfortunately, again, I'm still recording from a hotel. Uh, we should be back in my apartment within a week or so, but oh my God, has it been not fun? Anyway, I do wanna talk about something fun today. I have an amazing story here I was on Twitter and someone tagged me in a post and said, you've gotta read what's going on here. And I was introduced to a one whose name. Uh I'm I'm despite my best efforts, I'm probably gonna screw up and I wanna say it's Gokcen shine and I'm pretty, I'm sure I'm relatively close there, but lemme tell you something about Gokcen was in a. PhD program. And, uh, she was doing her PhD in bioinformatics in order to learn how to draw meaningful conclusions from data and find solutions. She was, she loved new things; she's very curious. She discovered a machine learning model and her thesis that could predict the muscle hetero PLAs ratio of patients with given demographic features basically stuff way beyond my pay grade. Right. She's dealing with Mitocondrial DNA, uh, point mutation. I mean, incredible stuff. So what happens. She gets into another PhD program and gets diagnosed with ADHD in January. She learns that she has ADHD and learns that she's autistic. And while this diagnosis works a great shock to her, she shared a diagnosis with a supervisor, and guess what happened with her supervisor? Her supervisor fired her from her PhD program via email! Okay. That's like breaking up with someone over a text message, not cool! Okay. And then after that, her ex-boyfriend's family or her boyfriend at the time who learned that she was a autistic and ADHD, did not want them to get married and they broke up a over a 2 year relationship. Unbelievable. But despite having many reasons to lose hope the opposite happened and the diagnosis resulted in G accepting herself and saw these challenges for what they were through her life, realizing that she applied for a new program. Got in. And now she tells everyone that being autistic and ADHD is part of the diversity in nature. And being able to live as ourselves to be free of masks is what we have a right to do. I am so excited to talk to you. Thank you so much for being here today Gokcen.  [00:02:41] Gokcen: Uh, thank you so much for inviting me, Peter,  [00:02:44] Peter: uh, an amazing, an amazing story. I, I, I, I, I remember reading it on Twitter and just being blown away that, that, that, you know, of, of all things, professors could still be that, uh, closed mind truly, truly just incredible. [00:02:58] Gokcen: Actually leaving it was very hard, but eventually I just, uh, get something at you get new thing at you then .Right now I'm totally okay.  [00:03:10] Peter: Yeah. I mean, it sounds like, it sounds like you took this, you know, as, as, as difficult as it was, you saw this as an opportunity and, and, you know, used it to your, to your advantage. [00:03:20] Gokcen: Sure, sure.  [00:03:21] Peter: So, so you said that you wrote something out that you wanted to share with us, feel free.  [00:03:25] Gokcen: Yes. Okay. Uh, you can just, uh, cut me if I exceed the time.  [00:03:29] Peter: really not a problem. Go ahead. Okay, go ahead. [00:03:32] Gokcen: Uh, just let me mention about myself a bit. I completed my master on genetics in 2021. I am accepted to PhD program and I will, uh, start my education in the field of bioformatics and system biology in this semester. I was actually accepted to PhD program last year, too. Uh, three acceptance. Actually, I got three acceptance last year from three different universities. In the one that I choose I was fired after six months by my supervisor. Uh, I met with him on 6th of July, 2021. In the meeting I mentioned about my background, about my thesis, about my current knowledge in this field and I, um, What I want to do, et cetera. And he spoke very positively about my answers. Uh, and he said, a few people at your level can answer these questions so well, you know why you did what you did. Um, so I said to him that I didn't get any education on this topic. I. In my thesis, uh, I just did something learning on internet, et cetera, but I didn't get any, um, base education on this topic so I need someone to guide me. I'm looking for, um, my master and he said, okay.  In the second meeting, uh, he wanted me to prepare a project, uh, based on my performance. I will get a chance to apply. I finished my project and email, but he was kind of person that don't answer emails. Meanwhile, I was accepted by two other universities. I dunno why, but I see him as someone that I can trust, but I was totally wrong. Anyway, uh, I sent so many emails to myself, to him. Eventually he wrote something like this. Uh, you are a person who tries to do a given test properly. Is determined by technically needs to move forward. However, I think it will not cause any problems with study. So then I, I applied, accepted government accepted me, a university accepted me in the interview. Supervisor accepted me. So, um, let's start . Our courses was removed. Uh, however, I went to Institute for a journal club and was going meet with my friends, uh, my team friends. Uh, we were supposed to meet with each other. I expected that they will introduce themselves. Ask my name, myth[?] With me, ask about my background, et cetera. Just some friendly talking, but it didn't happen. They were really cold people. After journal club I went our teams room supervisor came too. Uh, he started to talk with his students. They got along very well in a kind of manner that I don't have any idea. Supervisor, um, open potato chips package. He offered to everyone in the room. I politely said that I didn't want, um, he asked why; I said that I have a high intolerance to lactose and I cannot eat packaged foods. Then very interestingly, he got very closer to my ear, very closer and started to eat potato chips there. It was not nice at all, but I thought that probably this was how they make jokes. Um, because I can't understand jokes most of the time. And I. even can't understand why they are made. Um, while he was eating chips. I, he wanted me to ask a question to him. I asked, uh, why he put advanced statistics in the first term while introductory statistics in the second term, he started to laugh again and with his students and said, oh, did I really do this? Oh my God. And last lovely. Um, In the period of this course choice he didn't say anything to me. Um, so these two courses actually was his own courses, but he didn't warn me. He accepted my course choices and not surprisingly, I couldn't succeed because I was almost your own statistics. And this course what was advanced, I said to him, I wish you would inform me at the beginning, but I will, uh, I said that I will fail in this course and take first of all the introductory course and take this course again later. He said, OK. Uh, one day he called me to his room, uh, take a white paper in front of him, asked me, do you know this topic. I said, no, he wrote the paper. Do you know, this topic. I said, no; he wrote the paper. Uh, he wrote so many topics that I didn't know about. And he said, okay, go and study them. You should be ready because you are here to do my job. I will do my job. Uh, you will do my job, then I will be able to look something else. Um, I didn't like this attitude at all. I didn't study, I couldn't study what he gave me because this is not the way that I can study. Uh, But eventually he started to get angry with me. Uh, these times I was wondering so much about ADHD, uh, because my psychologist thought that I have. She was, um, nervous because uh, she also got a diagnosis for a while ago and she told me about the common traits that we share. And then I started to study so deeply on ADHD in a kind of manner that hyperfocus . I was collecting my traits to tell all of them to my psychiatrist. Uh, the hospital that I'm going is a medical hospital of Istanbul for, of medicine of Istanbul university. So doctors are working there with rotation, for education. Each doctor see patients for just one month. Uh, when I went to hospital for ADHD evauation , this was maybe the only chance that I have got in my whole life because doctor was a child psychiatrist She evaluated me. It was the 24th of December 2021 I diagnosed with ADHD . Gave me a drug after this session. She said she wanted to see again, very soon. I thought that she will probably ask me whether the drugs work or not.  I told, um, my diagnosis to my supervisor, I was waiting some understanding, but instead he said that, um, a man without hands cannot be a Shoemaker and no matter how much he wants. But if he works hard, he can become a marathon runner. Maybe he [you] should try another sector. I. Trying to explain that ADHD is not a kind of attention deficit, actually. It's a problem of regularizing of pay attention wherever we can focus, whatever we do more than neurotypicals. But he didn't seem to understand at all. And maybe didn't listen at all. Um, it was 12th of January. I went to a hospital again, I told my psychiatrist that, um, about this, uh, supervisor's unpleasant behavior. And she told me to relax because she said no one had right to kick me out of the schools. I informed her about the effect of drug. Then she asked me tons of questions I didn't understand because these questions was not related with medicine or ADHD. After this session she just said that she wanted to invite me to their department community meeting with the justification of I was their patient for long and she wanted, uh, her professor also evaluate me. Then I said, okay, but this wasn't seem normal to me after going home. I checked each, each question and still didn't understand and what is them about? I Google check [unintelligible] five, watch videos, one thing, but I got shocked. Me? Autism? Is that possible? Then the face to face community meeting the professor who is the head of the psychiatric department of the hospital, and almost all psychs of the hospital was there approximately 20, 30 doctors. And this time professor asked me so many questions and all of them evaluated. I shared my bad language too, because I sit to someone, uh, after the meeting, my own psych took me her room and explained that I'm autistic. Uh, it was 26th of January this year. Uh, so, and my age is 29. It's surprising.  [00:12:55] Peter: So, uh, it it's, let me, let me interrupt just, just for a minute, because I, I, I am, I am grateful to you for telling your story. I have, I have a couple of questions that I, I think my audience would wanna know are on the answer to as well. What, what did you, when you were told by your professor that a Shoemaker cannot make shoes, if he doesn't have hands, how did that make you feel?  [00:13:15] Gokcen: Terrible because you feel like you don't have an ability to think, have an ability, don't have an ability to do something. Uh, you don't have a brain. You cannot think, you cannot be a scientist. Uh, these are, these are incredibly bad things. And, uh, you know what happens in after he said all this to me, I started to cry very deeply and he just look at me with a cold face and it was really horrible.  [00:13:54] Peter: When you let's fast forward to when you were accepted into your new program? Um, I'm I was curious, you didn't mention this. Did you at all, at any point, go back to this professor and tell him that you were, that you made into this new program?  [00:14:08] Gokcen: Uh, no, I didn't. I didn't.  [00:14:11] Peter: Do you have any desire to do that?  [00:14:14] Gokcen: Uh, actually, I have a really big desire to tell him, um, in a, in maybe I know government education department or something. I really don't want to see him again anymore. [00:14:30] Peter: Right. I understand that. It just seems to me that, that I think there's, you know, for what he's done and had the way he did it, uh, there should be some consequences for him. Um, you know, that's a, obviously a bigger story, but I do think that that's something you shouldn't, shouldn't just let go.  [00:14:45] Gokcen: Um, and I will tell, um, more about what he did. Actually. There is so much bad things too, and it's coming.  [00:14:55] Peter: Well, let's focus. Let's focus on the positives for a second. So let's fast forward to the point where you were accepted into the new program. Yes. What have you noticed? What have you noticed about yourself since your diagnosis? What types of things that you used to think were negatives are, do you now understand to be positives and things like that? [00:15:14] Gokcen: Uh, could you repeat the question again, please?  [00:15:17] Peter: Um, now that you're diagnosed, you know, for instance, I'll give you an example. My, uh, my ability to, to multitask I realize is a, is a positive, but when I was in school, uh, it was framed as not being able to pay attention. And so I thought it was a negative. Yes. Right. Once I was diagnosed with ADHD, I realized that it could be a positive. So I'm, I'm curious as to what sort of things that, that you might have thought of as bad things, um, have you since maybe sort of rethought of as possibly good things now that you understand sort of where your, how your brain works.  [00:15:53] Gokcen: Um, actually, there are lots of things like that until to the diagnosis I always thought that I am weird because everybody in your environment say that you are weird. And when they say until that age, when everybody say this, eventually you also believe them. Um, but I actually, without thinking them, I was already happy in my inside. I couldn't show it to the people, but I was happy too inside because I was, um, I love, uh, in, in a way that what makes me Gokcen and everything. Every trait of autism or ADHD, give me that they are my traits and this is, these are my parts. And I love myself. Uh, but after diagnosis, I can say it loudly that I love myself.  [00:16:54] Peter: I think that that in itself is an amazing story right there. The fact that you've been able to; understanding sort of how your brain works has allowed you to be kinder to yourself, right?  [00:17:04] Gokcen: Sure. Because I able to make this master thesis, which is very, uh, hard actually in that time, I didn't know any knowledge about machine learning and I apply and even I created my own data set. Uh, examining more than, uh, 450 articles. This was a huge job. And needs a really strong attention. So this is why ADHD is my superpower and autism, my superpower. Um, yes.  [00:17:44] Peter: What would you tell, what would you tell students or people who were in your position who might have been told that they were broken as well? What would you, what advice would you give to them?  [00:17:55] Gokcen: Um, the thing that really saved my life is, um, just accept yourself as you are, because you are incredible, whatever other people say. Um, And be always kind. This is for everyone. Uh, as Robin Williams said, this, the quote that I love so much: Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know, nothing about. Be kind, always. Because until the time of the diagnosis, I had so many tons of psychological problems. I even stay one month in mental health hospital, like a prison. I suicide twice, uh, heavy drugs. Therapies, tons of therapies. None of them worked. Everybody thought that you are not normal. You just want, don't want to be alive. But, um, but this is not true. Because if you can discover yourself, this is a gift, not a curse. Yeah. And after diagnosing all of the psychological problems just gone away. And I just right now use just one drug and this is for, to, to make it gradually decrease. Uh, and very soon that I will give up all the medicines I will take none of them.  [00:19:26] Peter: That is wonderful. What a great, what a great story. I love that, you know, when I saw your original tweet, I was sort of blown away about how anyone could be that sort of close-minded, um, especially in education where you're supposed to have an open mind, you're supposed to, uh, embrace that. But, um, it seems to me Gokcen that you've definitely come out on top of this, that you have, you have come out the winner in this story, and I hope that you keep writing and I hope that you keep tweeting and keep sharing your story with the world because you're an inspiration.  [00:19:54] Gokcen: Thank you so much. Uh, what happened lastly, I wanna share with you. I told my new supervisor about a bit about my situation, and she said; uh, you have had a bad experience, but, uh, don't be discouraged. I'm sure that, uh, you will be much more happier in here. Uh, there are bad peoples in the world, but fortunately they're good ones too. I am grateful to her. Uh, but when I said that I'm grateful she to accepted me, she said that I didn't do anything. You deserve it. We evaluated you as we did to all students. And you deserve it. This is so precious because people pity you uh, about your autism about your ADHD, and this is especially so in my country. But my dear supervisor treated me like she tries to everyone and she didn't show sympathy because I'm autistic. She said I was accepted because I deserved; this is so precious. [00:21:00] Peter: I love that. I love that. What a wonderful story. Gokcen, Thank you so much for taking the time. My pleasure. Give us your, give us your Twitter account so people can follow you.  [00:21:09] Gokcen: Uh, sure. Um, my, my, uh, name with, uh, letters, uh, G K C N S H N. This is my Twitter. Thank you so much.  [00:21:21] Peter: This. Awesome. Thank, thank you so much for taking the time. We're definitely gonna have you back in several months to talk about, to give us an update on what's going on.  [00:21:28] Gokcen: Thank you so much. You can.  [00:21:30] Peter: All right guys, as always, thanks for listening to fast than normal. We will see you next week with a brand new episode. Hopefully I'll be back in my office and not in our hotel room and we will talk to you soon. Stay safe, stay well.    Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at shankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week!

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy
Rizwan Virk | Simulation Assimilation, Technological Synchronicity, and Dream Physics

My Family Thinks I'm Crazy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 117:47 Very Popular


Buy The Simulated Multiverse Now!https://bookshop.org/a/86490/9781954872004Buy The Simulation Hypothesis Now!https://bookshop.org/a/86490/9780983056904Rizwan Virk, successful entrepreneur, investor, futurist, bestselling author, video game industry pioneer, and indie film producer, Joins Mystic Mark for a conversation about the potential that we are living in a simulated multiverse. Riz shared his story and where this research began, his thoughts on Synchronicity, the indicators that we may be in a simulated multiverse and so much more. I asked Riz about Aliens, Psychedelics and the parallels between simulation theory and theology or creationism. Riz has produced many indie films (imdb link), including Thrive,  Sirius,  Knights of Badassdom, starring Peter Dinklage and Summer Glau, The CW's The Outpost, as well as adaptations of the works of Philip K. Dick and Ursula K. Le Guin.Riz's books include Startup Myths & Models, The Simulation Hypothesis, Zen Entrepreneurship, and Treasure Hunt: Follow Your Inner Clues to Find True Success, and The Simulated Multiverse. Buy Riz's Books Here: https://www.zenentrepreneur.com/more-infoLearn more about Rizwan Virk Here: https://www.zenentrepreneur.com/Share This Episode: https://share.transistor.fm/s/5e7b4808Get the SEEEN Travel Guide!https://ko-fi.com/s/6f1e1173a0Synchro-Wisdom Dialogue: https://linktr.ee/mysticmarkpodcastMFTIC Merchhttps://mftic-podcast.creator-spring.comJoin us on TelegramLeave me a message On Telegram!For Exclusive My Family Thinks I'm Crazy Content: Only 3$ get 50+ Bonus Episodes, Sign up on our Patreon For Exclusive Episodes. Check out the S.E.E.E.N.or on Rokfin@MFTICPodcast on Twitter@myfamilythinksimcrazy on Instagram, Follow, Subscribe, Rate, and Review we appreciate you!https://www.myfamilythinksimcrazy.comhttps://altmediaunited.com/my-family-thinks-im-crazy/Listen to Every AMU Podcast with this link. https://lnns.co/pI5xHeyFdfgGET A NEW PODCASTING APP! https://podcastindex.org/appsHelp fund the show, I cannot do this without your support.CashApp: $MarkSteevesJrVenmo: @MysticMarkPaypal: @mysticmarkPatreon: https://www.patreon.com/MFTIC?fan_landing=trueRokfin: https://www.rokfin.com/myfamilythinksimcrazyKo-fi: https://ko-fi.com/myfamilythinksimcrazyBuy Me A Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/MFTICWithout you this Podcast would not exist, bless all who support.MUSICAL CREDITSIntro Song by Destiny LabMusic: Shadow Of ElaraBy The Europa Protoharmonic Symphony OrchestraOutroMusic: 36g/8gBy: Monplaisir Feat SouthmanMusic: It Takes A VillageBy HoliznaReleased under a Creative Commons Attribution International 4.0 License Thanks To Soundstripe and Free Music Archive ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Doctor's Art
A Physician-Engineer and His Patient Stories (w/ Dr. Bryant Lin)

The Doctor's Art

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 42:50 Transcription Available


Technological advancements have enabled us to accomplish medical miracles through novel medical devices, algorithms, and digital tools. At the same time, the exponential entanglement of tech with healthcare has led many clinicians to feel disconnected from the human element of medicine. Here to discuss this conundrum is Dr. Bryant Lin, the director of Medicine and the Muse, the medical humanities program at Stanford Medical School, and a mechanical engineer by training who focuses on medical device development. Dr. Lin also conducts research in Asian population health and is the cofounder of Stanford's Consultative Medicine Clinic, which evaluates patients with medical mysteries. In today's episode, Dr. Lin shares his unique perspective at the crossroads of technology and the humanities, and discusses how storytelling can be a powerful instrument to keep physicians grounded in what truly matters for their patients.In this episode, you will hear about:How an early interest in engineering led Dr. Lin to medicine - 1:42A poignant letter Dr. Lin received from one of his long-term aging patients that reaffirms why his medical career is meaningful - 4:10A discussion of how medical bureaucratization has stolen away much of the human connection that underpins fulfilling medical work - 7:39How Medicine and the Muse, the medical humanities program at Stanford, helps clinicians connect with the meaning in medicine - 12:40What Dr. Lin hopes to achieve through teaching medical humanities to future clinicians - 25:45How storytelling helps healthcare providers better connect with their patients - 27:28How Dr. Lin integrates storytelling into medical device design, and why it is imperative to not allow technology to distance physicians from their patients - 31:24Dr. Lin manages the forthcoming digital medical humanities newsletter Panacea Health. Visit our website www.TheDoctorsArt.com where you can find transcripts of all episodes.If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe, rate, and review our show, available for free on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you know of a doctor, patient, or anyone working in health care who would love to explore meaning in medicine with us on the show, feel free to leave a suggestion in the comments or send an email to info@thedoctorsart.com.Copyright The Doctor's Art Podcast 2022

Reconcilable Differences
189: The Cutting Edge of Technological Grievance

Reconcilable Differences

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 100:21


In Follow-Up, John reminds everyone that RecDiffs listeners knew what's bad about TV stands before any of the normals. John also shares his Vacation Results—alongside some anthropological observations on the state of air travel in 2022. Finally, your hosts dig in to the continuing saga of John's TV. (_Recorded August 9, 2022_)

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur
The Fermi Paradox: Technological Timebombs (Narration Only)

Science & Futurism with Isaac Arthur

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 30:25


We often wonder where all the aliens are out in the galaxy, but could it be that the technologies needed to get to space and travel the stars lead to inevitable catastrophe?Visit our Website: http://www.isaacarthur.netSupport us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/IsaacArthurSupport us on Subscribestar: https://www.subscribestar.com/isaac-arthurFacebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1583992725237264/Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/IsaacArthur/Twitter: https://twitter.com/Isaac_A_Arthur on Twitter and RT our future content.SFIA Discord Server: https://discord.gg/53GAShECredits:The Fermi Paradox: Technological TimebombsScience & Futurism with Isaac ArthurEpisode 355, August 11, 2022Written, Produced & Narrated by Isaac ArthurEditors:David McFarlaneJason BurbankCover Art:Jakub Grygier https://www.artstation.com/jakub_grygierGraphics:LegionTech StudiosMusic Courtesy of Epidemic Sound http://epidemicsound.com/creatorSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.