Podcasts about army reserve

Military organization composed of citizens of a country who combine a military role or career with a civilian career

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War Stories by Preston Stewart
225: Fighting the Global War on Terror with the Bastogne Brigade of the 101st Airborne Division

War Stories by Preston Stewart

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 54:09


Today we are joined with Michael Franks. Michael joined the Army in 2005 on an 18X contract inbound to Special Forces. Injury changed his course where he then found himself with the historic 2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry (No Slack) of the 101st Airborne Division. Michael served in both Iraq and Afghanistan with No Slack and served during the events which were filmed for the documentary Hornet's Nest—specifically the Battle of Barawala Kalay Valley. We highly recommend giving Hornet's Nest a watch if you haven't already seen it. We discuss Michael's experience and feelings during the Global War on Terror, and the meaning many of us learned then, and continue to search for. Since leaving active duty, Michael transitioned to the Army Reserves and for his "day-job," serves as a senior wealth advisor in the Cincinnati, OH area.

Warriors In Their Own Words | First Person War Stories

In this special episode, Captain Torres explains how landfill-like burn pits in Iraq gave him a chronic lung injury and a toxic brain injury.  Captain Le Roy Torres served in the U.S. Army Reserve for 24 years, and spent a year on duty in Balad, Iraq. While there, Torres lived and worked in close proximity to a burn pit. These burn pits act as landfills, where everything from trash, to jet fuel, to medical waste was burned. They were extremely large, and the one near CPT Torres was approximately 10 acres in diameter. It burned 24/7, pumping toxic chemicals and smoke into the air, and into the lungs of soldiers. As a result of breathing in these fumes, CPT Torres developed chronic lung and brain injuries, which forced him to visit the hospital over 400 times in 10 years. Burn Pits 360 was founded by Torres and his wife in an attempt to improve post-deployment health outcomes for veterans, especially those caused by the burn pits. Recently, they helped pass the PACT Act, which expands benefits for veterans who were exposed to the burn pits.  You can find CPT Torres on Twitter at @leroytorres01

Veterans In Politics by CampaignForce
Councillor Michael Kurn- The sports journalist who answered the call to serve to lead

Veterans In Politics by CampaignForce

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 31:49


Veterans In Politics- Season 6, Episode 6- Councillor Michael Kurn- The sports journalist who answered the call to serve to lead by joining the army reservesWe met Councillor Michael Kurn at Conservative Conference 2022 to grab a quick interview ahead of his final stages of commissioning into the army reserves.  We are pleased to report that since recording, Michael successfully completed the army reserves commissioning course and now holds the King's Commission in the Royal Logistic Corps!  We delve deep into the 'why' Michael holds around service, what drove him into local government, and what made him sign up for the army reserves.  You will find out that much of this is firmly rooted in his family history, and how he holds the privilege of service dear.  Michael is a breath of fresh air and we are confident he will truly 'serve to lead' as goes the mantra of Sandhurst. And here's a little about Michael:Michael Kurn is a TV presenter, Author and Broadcaster who's career to date has included work on: BBC One, Sky Sports and Talk Sport.Growing up though Michael's ambition was to be a professional footballer. Pulling on that three lions jersey and playing in the Premier League was the focus, but after the realisation he wasn't going to make it he had a choice.Give up on something he loved, or find another way to get there.A career in broadcasting was the new path and the way to the Premier League. By the age of 24 he made his Premier League debut, not as a player but as a presenter. His journey so far has led to shows on TalkSport in the UK and the chance to broadcast across the globe.After following his dreams to achieve his goal Michael is a firm believer that:“WHATEVER YOU WANT IN LIFE…IF YOU WANT IT BAD ENOUGH YOU CAN GET IT”You just have to have a DESIRE, a DREAM and a VISION.For more information on our epic sponsors Salesforce, see here: https://www.salesforce.com/uk/and Vetforce, here: https://veterans.force.com/s/

ScreenHeatMiami
Vincent Vargas

ScreenHeatMiami

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 96:15


Vincent Vargas Vincent “Rocco” Vargas was born and raised in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, California. After several years of college baseball, Vincent enlisted in the US Army and went on to serve 3 combat deployments with 2nd Battalion of the elite 75th Ranger Regiment. After 4 years of active duty service to his country, he joined the U.S. Army Reserves and continues his service until retirement. In 2009 he became a Federal Agent with the Department of Homeland Security, and was a Medic with the Special Operations Group. Vincent is currently an entrepreneur, actor, writer, author and producer. Previous film credits include: Lucy Shimmers and the Prince of Peace (2020-Actor and Co-Executive Producer), Not a War Story (2017-Self and Executive Producer,) and Dads in Parks (2016-Self and Writer). Currently, Vincent plays ‘Gilly' on the #1 cable television series “Mayans MC” for FX. A graduate of the Veterans Writers Guild Screenwriting program and has since been invited to write on Season 5 of Mayans MC. When time allows, he also is a motivational speaker that focuses on Veteran advocacy, Leadership, Military transition and motivating youth audiences. Vincent is married with 8 kids.

Pratt on Texas
Episode 3090: Army Brigadier Gen. (Retired) John Compere on the Texas Cowboys’ Christmas Ball - Pratt on Texas 11/24&25/2022

Pratt on Texas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 43:27


Retired U.S. Army Brigadier General (Retired) John Compere tells us about the history of the Texas Cowboys' Christmas Ball. Compere is the official historian of the association that maintains this official Texas historical event.John Milsap Compere is a West Texas rancher and retired U.S. Army Brigadier General, Texas lawyer, U.S. judge and Vietnam-era disabled veteran.General Compere is a descendant of the Rev. Lee Compere, who came to America as a missionary to the Native Americans.For half a century, General Compere practiced law as a US Army lawyer and Texas lawyer, mediator and arbitrator in Federal and State Courts. For 4 years, Compere served in Washington D.C. as Chief Judge of the US Army Court of Military Review, a tenured Federal Court position requiring nomination by the President of the United States of America and confirmation by the Senate.Serving for 26 years in the U.S. Army and Army Reserve, General Compere began as an ROTC cadet at Texas Tech University before beginning active duty as a 101st Airborne Division paratrooper, where he served in Thailand, Vietnam, Honduras, Panama and the USA. Compere retired from the Army as a Brigadier General and Vietnam Era Disabled Veteran.You can learn more by reading the histories here: https://texasccb.com/www.PrattonTexas.com

Rotary Wing Show - Interviews from the Helicopter Industry
RWS 111 – Rescue Helicopter Crew Duties to 4300km R22 Ferry Through Remote Australia w/ James Koens

Rotary Wing Show - Interviews from the Helicopter Industry

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 70:47


James Koens is a Check and Training Aircrew Officer on very expensive rescue/aeromedical helicopters. He also finds time to be a helicopter charter pilot, Army Reserve aircrewman, volunteer rural firefighter and a podcast host. This episode is being pushed out the door half cooked so that you can hear it sooner. Please forgive any short … Continue reading "RWS 111 – Rescue Helicopter Crew Duties to 4300km R22 Ferry Through Remote Australia w/ James Koens" The post RWS 111 – Rescue Helicopter Crew Duties to 4300km R22 Ferry Through Remote Australia w/ James Koens appeared first on The Rotary Wing Show Podcast.

Zero Limits Podcast
Ep. 73 "Mick" former 1RAR, 2nd/14th Light Horse Regiment and 2nd Commando Regiment Special Forces Operator

Zero Limits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 212:45


On today's episode I sit down for a face to face chat with "Mick" former 1RAR,  2nd/14th Light Horse Regiment and 2nd Commando Regiment Special Forces Operator. Growing up in central Queensland Mick did terribly at school which he ended up leaving in year 10and shortly after he joined the local Army Reserve unit in his area serving two years before applying to enter the fulltime army. Mick was posted to the 1st Battalion Royal Australian Regiment and deployed twice to East Timor, however on his second trip to Timor he was part of a recon patrol which in this patrol there were some notable soldiers that eventually would be killed in Afghanistan and in Fiji. Jason Brown SASR - Josh Porter SASR - Todd Langley 2CDO.At the conclusion of his second Timor trip he transferred back to reserves to wind down. Soon getting the itch again to go back to fulltime he did a corps transfer to Royal Australian Armoured Corps posting to 2nd/4th Light Horse Regiment and getting a deployment to Afghanistan. Upon return to Australia Mick attempted SASR selection, however withdrew a few days in. The following year he attempted 2 Commando selection passing and completing the commando reinforcement cycle to earn the role as a special forces operator. The years to come he deployed to multiple highly kinetic Afghanistan combat trips and a deployment to Iraq also the Philippines. Listen in for his full story, Let's GO! Support the show - https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=9LG48GC49TW38Website - www.zerolimitspodcast.comInstagram - https://www.instagram.com/zero.limits.podcast/?hl=en

After the JAG Corps: Navigating Your Career Progression
46. A Conversation with Jordan Walerstein, Counsel for Tech and Security

After the JAG Corps: Navigating Your Career Progression

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 29:52


In today's podcast, I talk to Jordan Walerstein, who leveraged his time as a member of the U.S. Army JAG Corps to working in the area of technology and security after a brief stint with the Department of Justice. Jordan is a wealth of knowledge, and provides his perspectives on the value of continued military service in the Army Reserves, USAJobs, the challenges associated with immediately going into an in-house counsel office, Amazon's hiring process, what it was like to work there, and even the quality of coffee served there! He has since moved on, but Jordan packed a lot into our 30 minutes. Jordan's profile is available at https://www.linkedin.com/in/walerstein/.

Creating Phenomenal For Your Life
Ep #164 - The Pain of Indecision

Creating Phenomenal For Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 26:56


Today's episode is about Indecision and what it steals from our lives.  You'll see why it is difficult to make decisions, and learn a simple tool to assess the weight of any decision you are making.  You'll also gain a better framework for making powerful decisions more often.  There may even be some conversation about the Army Reserves (big smile).   Decisions can be easy, fun, meaningful, light, humorous, and with far less suffering than you've experienced in the past.  They are what lead to a more unstoppable life.

Two Smart Assets
From Zero to More Than $250 Million in Multifamily Real Estate with Stas Grinberg

Two Smart Assets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 26:14


Join your host, Daniel Nickles, and guest, Stas Grinberg, as they talk about Stas earning more than $250 million in multifamily real estate from zero. Starting with only a car, a handful of 3-ring binders, laptops, mobile phones, and a printer, Stas and his childhood friend and business partner, Peter Gizunterman, pushed through the odds and created a multimillion-dollar real estate investment firm. So, tune in to learn more and enjoy!   Outline of the episode: How challenges build character How to choose your fights for better results How to hire the right people How to get the opportunities Know where to invest based on your criteria Know when to adjust to the changing market   About Stas Grinberg: Stas is the managing principal and Co-Founder of Vision & Beyond. He has over a decade of Real Estate knowledge and expertise. Stas served as an Investor Relations Manager (IR Manager) at 2 Israeli-based investment firms that targeted and financed new construction in Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, and Los Angeles, CA. As IR Manager, he developed a passion and concept for the idea that became the thriving and innovative Vision & Beyond. Stas has been at the helm of Vision & Beyond with his childhood friend and business partner, Peter Gizunterman, since 2017. Armed with only their car, two 3-ring binders, laptops, mobile phones, and a printer, Stas and Peter set up shop daily, operating from a local Starbucks. Their business savvy, trustworthy characters, positive attitudes, and impervious approach allowed them to gain momentum quickly for their dream. Today, Vision & Beyond has expanded rapidly into five profitable companies with three corporate offices located in Ohio, New York, and Israel, close to 60 employees, and many investors worldwide. Not only does Stas have proven, documented success in Real Estate Investment and Acquisition, but he also graduated from Law School at the Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya with honors and is on the Dean's List. Stas is also a decorated military Veteran, working closely with the United States of America and received the prestigious Israeli President's Outstanding Soldier badge, and proudly serves as an IDF officer in the Armored Corps in the Army Reserve. In addition, Stas and his wife are proud parents to 3 beautiful children and enjoy family time in their home, located in an upscale Cincinnati suburb. Stas' personal business motto is to be bold and original. It is important to always be purposeful, not passive, in all areas of life.   Connect with Stas Grinberg: Website: https://www.vnbinvest.com/ LinkedIn: Stas Grinberg   Catch The Two Smart Assets Real Estate Investing Podcast here: https://twosmartassets.com/   Catch Daniel Nickles and get a copy of the Passive Investors Handbook here: https://upstreaminvestor.com

New Books in European Studies
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/european-studies

New Books in German Studies
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

Words On Water
Words On Water #227: Lt. Col. Dale Kooyenga on Joining the U.S. Army Reserve

Words On Water

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 15:52


November 16, 2022 Dale Kooyenga is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve. In this episode, he discusses a … More

New Books Network
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in British Studies
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in British Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/british-studies

New Books in French Studies
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in French Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/french-studies

New Books in National Security
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in National Security

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/national-security

New Books in Military History
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Military History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/military-history

New Books in History
Michael A. Hunzeker, "Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 34:08


In Dying to Learn: Wartime Lessons from the Western Front (Cornell UP, 2021), Michael Hunzeker develops a novel theory to explain how wartime militaries learn. He focuses on the Western Front, which witnessed three great-power armies struggle to cope with deadlock throughout the First World War, as the British, French, and German armies all pursued the same solutions-assault tactics, combined arms, and elastic defense in depth. By the end of the war, only the German army managed to develop and implement a set of revolutionary offensive, defensive, and combined arms doctrines that in hindsight represented the best way to fight. Hunzeker identifies three organizational variables that determine how fighting militaries generate new ideas, distinguish good ones from bad ones, and implement the best of them across the entire organization. These factors are: the degree to which leadership delegates authority on the battlefield; how effectively the organization retains control over soldier and officer training; and whether or not the military possesses an independent doctrinal assessment mechanism. Through careful study of the British, French, and German experiences in the First World War, Dying to Learn provides a model that shows how a resolute focus on analysis, command, and training can help prepare modern militaries for adapting amidst high-intensity warfare in an age of revolutionary technological change. Michael A. Hunzeker is Assistant Professor in George Mason University's Schar School of Policy and Government. Follow him on Twitter @michaelhunzeker Sam Canter is a policy and strategy analyst, PhD candidate, and Army Reserve intelligence officer. His views are his own and do not reflect any institution, organization, or entity with which he is affiliated. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

After the JAG Corps: Navigating Your Career Progression
45. From the Military to Microsoft: Faisal Akhter, U.S. Army Reserve

After the JAG Corps: Navigating Your Career Progression

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 29:59


In today's podcast, Faisal Akhter talks about his career progression from active duty as a member of the U.S. Army JAG Corps to working at Microsoft, where he now serves as a Senior Corporate Counsel. Faisal shares how his lifetime interest in technology led him to target employment opportunities in the tech sector, the interview process, how the COVID pandemic changed everything, how his experience the Army prepared him to assume his current leadership role as a director, and his belief of the important role, if not duty, that veterans have in helping those who come behind them. To that end, he encourages judge advocates to send those cold messages via LinkedIn to veterans at companies in which they are interested to learn about that organization's culture. Faisal's LinkedIn profile can accessed by clicking HERE. This conversation was recorded on October 24, 2022.

Women on The Move Podcast
U.S. Military Spouse Chamber of Commerce Founders talk supporting entrepreneurship among a unique demographic

Women on The Move Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 30:50


Jaime Chapman and Stephanie Brown are on a mission to empower military spouses. Both military spouses themselves, the two founded and run the U.S. Military Spouse Chamber of Commerce. Here they talk with Women on the Move Host Sam Saperstein about the unique challenges facing military spouses, why the population is often drawn to entrepreneurship, and the work the Chamber is doing to foster military spouse entrepreneurs. Relocation, pay disparities, and other facts of military life Jaime and Stephanie both describe their own journeys as military spouses. Stephanie tells Sam that she was a business owner in Washington, DC, more than two decades ago when she met her late husband, got married, and moved overseas. “I very quickly became unemployed and unemployable,” she says. Jaime had served in the Army Reserves for six years and thought she was done with the military when she “married into the army” nearly seven years ago. Before they knew each other, both women shared the experience of learning how difficult it was to maintain their professional careers as military spouses, and both were involved in the world of entrepreneurship. Many factors combine to make employment complicated for military spouses: they relocate a lot, there's often a lack of affordable—or any—childcare, and there's often a lack of family or friends to help out due to the relocations. On top of that, they note, there's a big disparity in pay between military spouses and other civilians. Perhaps because of these factors, military spouses have a particularly high rate of entrepreneurship. Both Stephanie and Jaime were entrepreneurs with a passion for helping others, and the two were initially brought together by a mutual colleague who recruited first Stephanie and then Jaime to work on a Military Spouse Entrepreneur Task Force. It was while working on that task force that the idea of the Military Spouse Chamber of Commerce first came to Stephanie. “I one day said to Jaime and [another colleague], you know, we really need to have a military spouse chamber of commerce because I've been working on this certification for military spouse–owned businesses for a long time with USAA and we need a forum through which we can provide this certification and really change things for spouses and small business owners,” she recalls. Launching a network for military spouse entrepreneurs The two women launched the U.S. Military Spouse Chamber of Commerce in 2020. As Stephanie describes, gaining recognized certification of military spouse-owned business was a driving force. “So what we began doing is researching how other third parties and the Veterans Administration actually reviewed and certified veteran-owned service, disabled veteran owned, minority owned, women owned, et cetera. And so we took those best practices and narrowed it down and kind of customized it for the lifestyle of the military spouse.” Another key aim of the organization, Jaime explains, was to help military spouse entrepreneurs with essential business functions like setting up retirement plans and employee benefits for themselves and their employees. “Because the first thing you should be asking when you're self-employed is, how do I save for retirement?” she notes. “But most people are more worried about setting up their website and logo and getting their business off the ground and marketing it when they should be thinking about taking care of themselves.” Today, Jaime notes, the Chamber has 1,100 military spouse members spread across 35 states in five countries running businesses ranging from artisanal handmade products to multi-seven-figure firms. The organization is involved in several legislative initiatives, including a push to streamline occupational licensing for relocating spouses. But Stephanie says one of the biggest benefits has been the recognition of the value of the community. “I think we also are beginning to recognize that there is a huge network out there of other military spouse, business owners that we can turn to, to collaborate, to mentor, which is really kind of the secret sauce,” she says. In terms of how others can support military spouses (and, in turn, support veterans and active military members, who also benefit from their spouses' success), the two suggest a two-pronged approach. First, doing business with certified military spouse–owned businesses, either as an individual or as a business hiring contractors, helps them succeed. And second, anybody can support military spouse–owned businesses by seeking them out and buying from them.   Full transcript here 

Everyday Peacemaking
A Father and Son Talk Politics, Family, & Faith — Doug & Jon Huckins

Everyday Peacemaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 69:58


In today's episode, we have the privilege of meeting Jon's dad, Doug Huckins. Jon and his dad share how they have navigated their own conversations (and convictions) around politics, faith, and their commitment to each other. The episode is both personal and accessible. They discuss the impact of their families of origin on their politics, the historical relationship between faith and politics in the United States, and what they learned from working through hard conversations as father and son. They haven't always seen eye to eye on these topics, but their shared willingness to continue to lean in and get curious has sustained the trust needed to move forward in relationship. It's a model of the curiosity and humility needed to do this work.   LINKS: Download the free Peace & Politics Practice Guide: https://globalimmerse.org/podcast Become an EMBER: https://globalimmerse.org/donate/ Learn about our cohorts: https://globalimmerse.org/leaders/cohorts/ Contemplative Prayer with Global Immersion (Weekly on Tues, Wed, and Thur at 7am PST): https://share.hsforms.com/1KMGPA1DaSxOQs9GOp3gDowc3ovn Conflicted Allegiance: https://globalimmerse.org/public-programs/conflicted-allegiance/ Learn more about Global Immersion: https://globalimmerse.org   Doug Huckins Bio: From 1969 to 1973, Doug Huckins served in the US Coast Guard as an electrician and scuba diver and in the Army Reserve from 1979-2001, which included a tour of duty in the Gulf War and advancement to Major. Doug also served as a Game Warden until his retirement in 2014, fulfilling a lifelong dream, earning the California governor's Medal of Valor for rescuing three fishermen in the surf whose boat had overturned in February 1996. It was while he was serving in the Coast Guard that Doug became a Jesus follower and later served as a youth pastor and deacon in Morrow Bay and later as an elder at SVCC in Salinas. He has been married to his beautiful wife since 1973, and together they have four children, including Global Immersion's own Jon Huckins. And in 2008, Doug became a Grampy, which in his mind is the best role ever.    Music from Epidemic Sound: We Are Giants by Silver Maple:https://www.epidemicsound.com/track/ICEht6ut6b/

Community Access
Commissioner Saadi CT Department of Veterans Affairs

Community Access

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 10:39


Thomas J. Saadi serves as Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Veterans Affairs since his reconfirmation by the Connecticut General Assembly in March 2019, after serving as Commissioner since February 2018. Commissioner Saadi previously served as Acting Commissioner of the Department from October 2017 through February 2018, and prior served as Chief of Staff and General Counsel for the Department. Commissioner Saadi is a Lieutenant Colonel in the U.S. Army Reserve. He retired from the Danbury City Council after twenty years of service in March 2019, and previously served on the Danbury Zoning Commission, Board of Tax Review and is a Justice of the Peace.

Breaking Battlegrounds
Congressman Byron Donalds on Getting Government to Work Again

Breaking Battlegrounds

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 55:27


This week on Breaking Battlegrounds, Chuck and Sam are joined by Republican candidate for Nevada's governor, Sheriff Joe Lombardo, and Congressman Byron Donalds, a Republican from Florida's 19th congressional district.-Joe Lombardo began his service to others in the United States Army and served bravely in the Army, National Guard, and Army Reserve - protecting Americans both domestically and abroad. After his service to his country, Joe dedicated himself to protecting our communities – serving in law enforcement over the last 30 years.Joe quickly rose through the ranks of the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department (LVMPD) and, after 26 years on the force, was elected as Sheriff of Clark County, Nevada in 2014.Throughout Joe's career, his leadership of our communities has never faltered. He now intends to further his public service and represent, protect, and serve the entire state of Nevada.  Sheriff Lombardo maintains professional affiliations which include Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA), Major County Sheriffs of America (MCSA), National Sheriffs Association (NSA), FBI – Law Enforcement Executive Development Association (LEEDA), Vice-Chair Nevada Commission for Homeland Security and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) National Academy Associates. He has also served as Board Member for the LVMPD Foundation (2007-2014), After School All-Stars (2015-2020), Goodwill of Southern Nevada (2007-2009), Make A Wish (2015-2020), Committee Member for the NV Communications Steering Committee (2012-2014) and MCC's representative to the Public Safety Advisory Committee (2012-2014).  Joe currently serves as a Board Member for Nevada Child Seekers and Chairman of MCCA Intelligence Committee.Sheriff Lombardo holds a B.S. and a M.S. in crisis management, both from UNLV.-Byron Donalds grew up in Brooklyn, New York, and he is also the proud son of a hardworking and loving single mother. His mother dedicated her time instilling in him that greatness requires sacrifice, which drives him as a devoted family man and United States Congressman.Byron is a graduate of Florida State University and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in finance and marketing. Byron's career led him to Southwest Florida, where he worked in the banking, finance, and insurance industries. Elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2016, Byron represented Hendry County and east Collier County in the State Capitol. During his tenure in the Florida House, Byron served as the PreK-12 Quality Subcommittee Chair during the 2018-2019 Legislative Session and served as the Insurance & Banking Subcommittee's Chairman 2019-2020 Legislative Session. While serving in the Florida House, primarily focused on elder affairs, criminal justice reform, and ensuring that each child has access to a world-class education.Byron is committed to serving and giving back to the community that gave him so much. He has served Southwest Florida in many ways, including previously serving on the Board of Trustees for Florida Southwestern State College after being appointed by then-Governor Rick Scott. Byron continues to volunteer in his church as a youth leader and a mentor. He also enjoys volunteering as a coach in youth football and basketball leagues.Congressman Byron Donalds lives in Naples, Florida, with his wife, Erika, and their three sons: Damon, Darin, and Mason. Byron has spent his entire adult life serving others, whether it be through volunteering, business, or leadership. He is committed to representing Florida's 19th Congressional District's conservative values in Washington DC to ensure a stronger Florida and a stronger nation.-Connect with us:www.breakingbattlegrounds.voteTwitter: www.twitter.com/Breaking_BattleFacebook: www.facebook.com/breakingbattlegroundsInstagram: www.instagram.com/breakingbattlegroundsLinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/breakingbattlegrounds This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit breakingbattlegrounds.substack.com

Slalom On Air
Civil affairs and consulting: A Slalom military story

Slalom On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 14:23


In honor of Military Appreciation Month, host Kim Taylor sits down with Jon, a former Active-Duty Air Force Officer who now serves as a Major in the Army Reserves.  As someone that has spent over 50% of his life in the military, Jon's split identity as a veteran and a civilian gives him a unique insight on solving problems in both business and civil service. Kim and Jon discuss balancing a business career at Slalom with his military career, the struggles of leaving his family for service, and the lessons learned while serving the needs of local communities around the world.

Serve Strong Finish Strong
Freedom Through Healthy Living - Patrick Becker

Serve Strong Finish Strong

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 32:26


You crave freedom. Who doesn't? But freedom so often eludes you. Why is that?The answer, according to my guest, is a healthy lifestyle. Freedom to move, to do what you want to do. To get down on the floor with your grandkids. To stay up with your spouse when walking through town. Freedom.Listen as we talk about what keeps a person in their 40-50s from healthy living and what you can start to do as soon as you finish the episode to get on your own path to freedom.In fact, here's the link to simply have a discussion about what you can do and how Patrick can help you:https://form.jotform.com/ThrivingWithPatrick/Health-EvaluationPatrick W. Becker retired from a 28-year career in the US Army Reserve in 2017 as a Lieutenant Colonel. During his career, he held a variety of staff and leadership positions, culminating in his assignment as an Area Coordinator for the Army Reserve's Command & General Staff College instructional unit in the western US.  Shortly before his retirement, he opened his own health & wellness practice where he provides access to information, support and a positive Community to anyone wanting to live a better life. He also guides his entrepreneurial-minded clients to create their own successful businesses to create impact across generations.  Patrick is also a founding member of the 123 HELP App, LLC partnership preparing to launch a new app for homeowners enabling them to connect with reliable emergency service providers in a time of need.In addition to his entrepreneurial interests, Mr. Becker has also been employed for over 16 years by United Healthcare, where he is currently a Program Solutions Manager for the Community & State Government Operations segment. He manages a remote team of 6 analysts across the US supporting numerous Medicaid reporting requirements and is responsible for their career development and advancement. A native of western Pennsylvania, Mr. Becker has been a full-time resident of the Phoenix metropolitan area since moving to Arizona in 1992. He is the proud father of one son who is attending Law School at the University of Pittsburgh.You can contact Patrick using these links:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HealthCoachPatrickInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/ThrivingWithPatrick Mobile: 1-602-509-5763To learn more, visit:www.servingstrong.comListen to more episodes on Mission Matters:www.missionmatters.com/author/scott-couchenourManaging Projects Doesn't Have to Be a MessBasecamp helps teams organize projects in a way that makes sense for all. Try Basecamp.Brand

Mujeres In The Know Podcast
Mujer In The Know: Dr. "ET" Edith Treviño

Mujeres In The Know Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 36:34


For this episode, Natalie has a conversation with the one and only, Dr. "ET" Edith Treviño. Dr. ET was born and raised in Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila, Mexico. She learned English when she was 7 years old. For many years she was a transnational student, as she crossed the border daily for school.  She fell through the cracks and failed high school. Higher education was not in the plans for her and she joined the U.S. Army Reserves to give back to the USA for taking them in as immigrants. As a soldier in basic training she had an epiphany moment. Her life goals, and the trajectory of her life changed. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mujeresintheknow/support

Is That Even Legal?
Interview with Abe Hamadeh, Attorney General Candidate for AZ

Is That Even Legal?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 13:08


He was an intelligence officer in the U.S. Army Reserves.  He's a former prosecutor of the Maricopa County Attorney's office. Should Abe Hamadeh be Arizona's next Attorney General? On November 8, Arizonans will decide.  It seemed only fitting that the world's leading legal podcast - which happens to be based in Arizona - should interview the leading candidates for the top lawyer job - encapusulating the types of choices all Americans will soon be making. This week, Bob interviews Abe, next week, his opponent, Kris Mayes.Give it a listen!

Hacks & Wonks
Steve Hobbs, Candidate for Washington Secretary of State

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 52:39


On this midweek show, Crystal chats with current Secretary of State Steve Hobbs about his campaign for Washington Secretary of State - why he decided to run for re-election, the threat of misinformation campaigns and cyber attacks on Washington's elections, how partisanship affects the office, and whether partisan attacks on his opponent are warranted. On the topic of elections, they discuss how he builds trust in the system in an environment of disinformation, addressing issues with disproportionate rates of signature rejection across the electorate, his plans to increase voter turnout, and his stance and approach to local jurisdictions potentially adopting alternative systems such as ranked choice voting. The conversation continues with the experience Secretary Hobbs brings to manage other components that fall under the Secretary of State's large umbrella and his vision to create greater accessibility for experiencing the state archives' historical records, resources for corporate and charity filings, and requesting governmental documents via public disclosure requests. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii and find Secretary Steve Hobbs at @electhobbs.   Resources Campaign Website - Steve Hobbs   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes.   Today, I'm thrilled to be welcoming a candidate and the current officeholder for one of the most important roles that we have in our state - Secretary of State. Welcome, Secretary of State Steve Hobbs. [00:00:51] Secretary Hobbs: Thank you. And thank you for saying it's very important. Thank you - I appreciate that. [00:00:56] Crystal Fincher: It is extremely important. And I think a lot of people are recognizing just how important it is now perhaps. Many more people are recognizing that than they have before because of how much talk we've had over the past couple of years about how important elections and election integrity are. But also, in addition to elections, all of the other things that the Secretary of State is responsible for like archives and records management and all those different things. And we're seeing an increasing amount of news stories and coverage in issues and challenges in those areas. So with all of that, what made you decide that - one, you wanted to take this on in the first place, and two, that you want to run for a new term? [00:01:41] Secretary Hobbs: Well, first of all, I've always dedicated myself to public service - starting at the age of 17 when I enlisted in the Army Reserves - then, and then going on to active duty shortly after that. So this was a nice transition from serving in the State Senate, which I did for 15 years, into this role because it's a nice little Venn diagram - you know how you have the two circles there? So one is defending democracy in my role in the military and the other is serving in the State Senate. And this is a great overlap because right now, as and your listeners would know, our elections have been under attack. Our democracy has been under attack. [00:02:30] Crystal Fincher: Sure has. [00:02:31] Secretary Hobbs: And so having that background that I have in the military - serving in the National Security Agency, being a Public Affairs Officer - having been in that role and defending elections in both Kosovo and Iraq, this is a great fit for me. And I enjoy it, I love it - but it of course has its challenges, which we have had several this year with three misinformation campaigns and a cyber threat that has occurred already just this year alone. [00:03:04] Crystal Fincher: So how do you defend against those? And what is the plan to combat all of this misinformation and the targeted attacks? [00:03:12] Secretary Hobbs: Well, it first started when I got into the office and there was an outbriefing by former Secretary Kim Wyman, who is now working for the Biden administration. And in that outbrief, she had told me there were several thousand - thousands - of attacks, cyber attacks, on elections and 180 instances of misinformation and disinformation. We all know about what happened in January 6 in our nation's capital, but some of you may not know or remember - there was an attack on our own State capital. We had to deploy the National Guard there. In fact, several of my soldiers had to go on that mission to defend our capital. And so I started by looking at the budget that was submitted by Kim Wyman and pulled it back and resubmitted it. And what I did was expanded the cyber security team. So we had a cyber team of four, now we've gone to eight. We're strengthening our relationships with the Air National Guard that we call upon for cyber security when we are overwhelmed. We are looking into doing exercises - one step up from a tabletop exercise, but actually a full-blown exercise in 2023, where we'll be having folks who are trying to penetrate our system through cyber and through misinformation, disinformation - a closed system there where we can react to it. We have created a team that would combat misinformation and do voter outreach and education, because some of the vulnerabilities that we have of people not having trust in our elections is because they simply don't know how we do elections here in Washington State. So we've got to do a little more education of that. And then creating a team of outreach to our disenfranchised and underserved and underrepresented communities that we're doing. Sorry, I went on, but there's a lot to do. And there's a lot that we have done so far in trying to push back on some of the misinformation campaigns that happen and the cyber threat that happened this year. [00:05:23] Crystal Fincher: Well, and it's really important - there is a lot going on. And I guess one of the more fundamental questions that people are asking themselves is - with the nature of the office and because this is a little bit different this year in that you're running against someone who identifies as an Independent, not as a Democrat or a Republican, what is the role of partisanship in this office? Is this an office that should be a partisan office? Is there any advantage or disadvantage to being a partisan in this office? How do you view that? [00:05:53] Secretary Hobbs: Well, in my personal view, I can operate in this office if the Legislature deems that it should be a nonpartisan office. Now, in order for that to happen, you have to pass a bill to do that. I doubt that will make it out of the Legislature since the Legislature is controlled by Republicans and Democrats and I don't see that happening any time soon. I think what you have to do is look at the individual who's occupying this office. How do I say this? Well, I go back to a motto - when I'm serving an infantry battalion, all infantry battalions have mottos and mine was, or ours was - "Deeds, not words." So look at what I've done, not what I say. And you'll see that I'm a person that works across the aisle. You'll see that I'm a person that can get things done. And you look at the list of endorsements that I have - I have Republican endorsements, Democratic endorsements. I have the endorsement of the Association of Washington Business and the Washington State Labor Council. And having a label on there - it doesn't do anything if you're going to be a bad person. So the last three Secretaries of State were partisan - Sam Reed, Kim Wyman, and Ralph Munro - and they were trusted with the public and they got the job done. I will say - in this day and age, though, people tend to trust Democrats running the elections, because they know where they're coming from. And I'm not going to back away from the fact that I am a Democrat. I'm proud that I'm pro-choice. I'm proud that I'm pro-labor. I'm proud that I support the environment. I don't think those are bad things at all. Whatever the Legislature decides - if they want to make this a partisan office - or nonpartisan office - that's fine. But I can operate in any environment. And I don't think it really matters anyway, at this particular time, but I'm not going to back away who I am. I'm a Democrat. [00:08:05] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. No secret here. I think the values that you listed are very good. And that the people, in this day and age - given the harboring of anti, disproven, disinformation about elections and campaigns that they see coming from the Republican Party are comfortable - more comfortable - with the Democratic Party in this position. But with that said, there have been - I don't know that any of this has come directly from your campaign. But the State Party and the leader of the State Party has attacked the other candidate, your opponent Julie Anderson, for her associations with some Republicans, or the Republican Party. Given that - you just talked about, hey, it's about who you are, it's about what you do - do you think those attacks are warranted or fair? [00:08:57] Secretary Hobbs: Crystal, you did bring up a couple of points that have been brought up recently in this campaign. And all I can say is - to the listeners out there, look into it, right? So she did show up at the fundraiser of the minority party in the House who wants to take control of the House - that's JT Wilcox, Representative Wilcox. If you're calling yourself nonpartisan, I'm not sure why you would go to that fundraiser, representing a party and some folks out there that want to put these elections back to poll voting and eliminate vote by mail. And the same group of folks that fan the flames of misinformation and disinformation. She does have a political consultant that's Republican, and a communications team that's Republican, and a treasurer that's Republican. But I'm not here to bash on her. I'm just saying to the listeners out there - do your own research on it. But yeah, that's true that there are, she's - has some ties there. [00:10:07] Crystal Fincher: You mentioned your willingness to work across the aisle. Could that just be her attempting to do the same types of things that you were talking about in reaching out? To that, it does look like she has also, in the past - I don't know if she has in this general election - but met with Democrats and Democratic organizations. Do you put that under the same umbrella? Or is that different than just trying to work in a bipartisan manner? [00:10:33] Secretary Hobbs: I think it's an attempt to look at this race and go - okay, well, Steve's got the Democrats, so maybe I'll go get the Republicans. Because there are Republicans out there that simply just don't want a Democrat in office - and doesn't matter if that person's a good Democrat or not - they just can't stand the fact that there's a Democrat occupying that office. And so - she's going to reach out to those folks, it's just a campaign strategy. But again, I stress to the listeners - look at the backgrounds and see the deeds of the person and see what they can bring to the office. Again, I've been in the office so far for almost a year. And you got to ask yourself - is anything wrong with what's going on? And if not, why change horses at this particular moment in time? Crystal, I mentioned the three misinformation campaigns and the cyber threat - these are real things. These are real threats to democracy - I would say that you'd want someone who understands how to counter those threats. There was a story in NPR All Things Considered about a recent misinformation campaign that we pushed back on. And that happened in February - and it had to deal with one of the cybersecurity devices known as an Albert sensor that Homeland Security asks every government agency to have on their system network so that they can be warned when there's a suspicious IP address that data is coming from and to - because that's what an Albert sensor does - it tells you where the data is coming from and to. And you're not going to believe this, but the misinformation campaign directed at the Albert sensors was trying to tie the Albert sensor to George Soros. I'm not making this up. [00:12:30] Crystal Fincher: Well, unfortunately, I do believe it, but it is wild. That is - the attempt to tie everything - my goodness. [00:12:39] Secretary Hobbs: Yeah, yeah. [00:12:40] Crystal Fincher: I'm sure lots of people are shocked to hear that what they've been working on is somehow masterminded by that person. But yeah, there have been wild and malicious attacks and just an outright denial of what has happened in elections. And I actually think you raise an excellent point that we don't talk about a lot - in that you brought up even - we see this stuff happening on the national level and even January 6th on a national level. But that we did experience that in our own state at that time - both in-person and the attacks on our voting system. And so I guess one of the questions I have is given that we're in this environment of not just misinformation, but malicious disinformation, and people with an agenda to erode and degrade trust - how do you build trust in our electoral system? Because although there are absolutely people who are intentionally misleading people, there's a lot of people who sincerely believe we have issues within our system - and for a variety of different reasons and from different perspectives - this is not just Republicans, it can be a variety of people. In an environment where there is so much disinformation, how do you build trust and credibility with voters in this state? [00:13:58] Secretary Hobbs: Oh, it's a long-term campaign that you have to start right away and not only be aggressive on, but consistent on. So for example, the misinformation campaign on the Albert sensor, you have to - we brought together all the county auditors and we brought, we invited county commissioners, and we brought in Kim Wyman, Homeland Security and FBI to inform the county auditors - hey, don't believe this misinformation. It's not true. The Albert sensor is simply a device that protects you, not a George Soros machine. Unfortunately, one county removed that system and now we're still working with that. But we are right now launching a major voter information campaign called "Vote with Confidence" - we launched it yesterday. It'll be out on TV and probably when you're pumping gas - sometimes you see those video screens that are up that's showing commercials - and on social media platforms. And basically we're going to do more than just remind people to vote because we've done a great job of reminding people to vote. Myself and the county auditors have have all done that, but what we haven't done a good job of is letting you all know what happens to your vote and how it is secure, transparent, and accessible. You may know this here, Crystal, because you're familiar with politics - that you can go to your county auditor and witness the process. You can see these ballots come in, you can see them get counted, you can see every signature being checked. But the average person doesn't know that and that's what we need to start doing. We need to start telling people - even things that are somewhat technical - that this state is part of the ERIC system, the Elections Registration Information Center, where our state is connected to other states and different databases so that if you were to move to another state and register there and fail to cancel your registration here - guess what? We're going to know about it. Don't try to vote multiple times in the same election by trying to register in different counties because guess what? We're going to catch you and we have caught people doing that. This whole myth about dead people voting - that's just not true and when it does happen on very rare occasions, it's because a spouse votes for a recently deceased loved one and maybe that spouse, before they died, said who they were going to vote for and they voted for them and they signed their ballot and guess what? We catch that. We find that out, but we have to do more though - we have to let people know what happens with their ballot and we haven't been doing that. [00:16:49] Crystal Fincher: Well, and one question I have - we have seen, and there have been reported on, inconsistencies in how rigorous people are in either checking signatures or even potentially malfeasance in checking signatures. And we saw in a report on a county in our state where people with Latino surnames had signatures that were rejected at a much higher rate than those with other names, even though it appears they were valid voters, that everything else was in order - but they seemed to be disqualified visually with the commonality that they did have a Latino surname. And questions about whether racism was at play and bias within our electoral system - what role can you as the Secretary of State play to make sure that we're implementing process and executing processes across the state, throughout all of the counties, in a consistent way? And how do you hold counties accountable to that? [00:17:48] Secretary Hobbs: Yeah, thank you for that. That was a study that came out of the State Auditor. And she had - it's very shocking - Blacks were four times as much rejected, Hispanics three times as much, Asians twice as much. Young men were actually rejected at a slightly higher rate. And our role on that one is we're taking action on it. So already we're working with the Legislature. Now we know about this data, now we got to find out why that is - and so we're doing another study with the Evans School at the University of Washington. But we're not going to stand idly by and wait for the study. There's some actions that we can take already to try to mitigate that. And one of the things that we are doing, though it won't come online for probably another - probably not 'til next year - and that is text messaging the voter the moment their ballot is rejected. Because the main reason why ballots are rejected - it actually has to do with not signing the ballot. A lot of folks just fail to sign it because they - maybe they didn't see the signature block. Or, especially those where English is not their first language, they just didn't read it because it was in English. And so you have ballot rejections happening because people fail to sign. And right now the current system is we send you mail, which - not very efficient. Counties might call you. But what we're thinking about doing and what we'd like to do is - hey, send a text message out to them right away so that they know their ballot is rejected and so they can do something about it before, and sometimes even before the Election Day. Because right now most people get their ballots cured - and the term cured is used when your signatures don't match, or you failed to sign your signature - is there's a close election and a bunch of people go into a particular Legislative District or jurisdiction and they're curing ballots because there's a campaign - the campaign is trying to get their candidate across the finish line. [00:20:12] Crystal Fincher: So now - with that, and you're trying to get voters there, you're trying to make sure every vote counts. Do you also see one of your core roles as getting more people to vote - increasing turnout and participation? And if that is, how do you plan to do that? [00:20:30] Secretary Hobbs: Oh, absolutely. I think it's very important. I think we have to constantly try to do that. It's a struggle because sometimes voters just - oh, this election is not important, so I'm not going to vote. Well, we have to constantly remind folks that, hey, elections are important, it's part of the democratic process. That's why I'm happy that the Legislature gave me the funding to not only do this voter information campaign letting people know how their ballots process, but also reminding them again - hey, don't forget you got to vote, there's an election coming up. One thing that we are trying to do to increase voter turnout and increasing the amount of people getting registered - because there's a lot of people out there who are eligible to be voters but haven't done it yet - is getting at young people before they even turn a voting age. And so we're looking at, and this is theoretical this moment, but we're going to try to really push it in the next - if given the opportunity to serve out the rest of the term - a mobile gaming app targeted at young people. Maybe it is where they vote in a fantasy setting, they vote for imaginary folks - we throw on some civics questions, and maybe they get points, and they level up - to get them jazzed up, if you will, about voting and participating in our democracy. And looking at our curriculum, because we do provide curriculum to the elementary, middle school, and high school about elections - and so maybe there's a way we can make that more exciting, maybe we team up with our local tabletop game companies here in the State of Washington and send out - in a form of a game. The other thing we need to do is reach out to our underserved communities out there. And so taking a great idea from King County, the trusted messenger program - hiring folks that come from a particular community - knowing the language, knowing the community, knowing the culture. They go out there and do the outreach necessary to get people registered to vote, and teaching them and informing them about the process of voting. I can't hire enough people to do that, so we're already looking at - well, maybe we also contract out to different organizations that do that already. I was talking to the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce a couple weeks ago - maybe that's an opportunity there out in the Tri-Cities - I'm going to go visit them again on the 18th of October. But we just have to do more. I was very excited - we started because COVID is slowly getting manageable - we were able to go to the July 4th naturalization ceremony in Seattle and we registered about 300 new citizens. And that is exciting - we're going to be at those events as well. [00:23:41] Crystal Fincher: So in a debate early in this race, you shared your view that we shouldn't change our electoral process to ranked choice voting, which is on the ballot in a handful of jurisdictions in our state, or approval voting - because you had concerns that some people already have issues with trust in our system and making changes might make that problem even worse. Is not making changes because of a fear of misinformation a valid reason not to explore changes? Or should we be investing in things that help make the process more clear to people, especially if it's going to update them on a voting system that should increase turnout? How did you come to that decision? [00:24:19] Secretary Hobbs: Well, Crystal, it basically - it comes to the fact that I've been in this job for a while, I've seen the amount of disinformation that's going out there. There's a King 5 poll that showed 35% of Washingtonians didn't trust the 2020 election - that's Washingtonians. And looking at the voter turnout - right now our system is pretty easy - you vote for the person that you like and it's one vote. Under ranked choice voting, you have an algorithm, you rank people. And at this particular moment in time, when you have this amount of disinformation going on and you have the situation in our own - US capital and or state capital - really now is not the time to do something like that. But one thing that I get very concerned about, and this is my own personal connection to this, is that you're asking people to vote in a foreign way, something completely different. And that we have a huge population of people where English is not their first language. And so now you are going to disenfranchise a group of people. And that's something we certainly do not want to happen. I think about my own mother who naturalized to this country - English is not her first language - and I can't imagine if you go back in time and all of a sudden you said - hey, vote ranked choice voting, and you didn't have a voter's guide or any explanation to her in her language, it'd be very difficult. I also think about my son. I have a - my middle son, Truman, who's got a cognitive disability. It's very easy for him to vote because I show him the ballot and I show him the voter's guide and I go - hey, Truman, all you do is you color in the bubble to the person that you like. And for Truman, a lot of it's visual - he's going to look at the picture, he's not going to do a lot of reading. And by the way, he has every right to vote. If you have a disability, that shouldn't prevent you from voting. [00:26:29] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. [00:26:30] Secretary Hobbs: He is going to have a hard time doing ranked choice voting. It's just not possible for him. And so I know the advocates out there pushing the ranked choice voting, but let's not disenfranchise a whole group of people out there. They may not be the majority, but they're out there and we shouldn't disenfranchise them. Also, I don't know what this is solving. I really don't. We have the most diverse legislative body right now under the current system of voting, a very diverse city council if you live in the City of Seattle. I'm not quite sure what this is trying to solve. But I will say this because I know that there has been - people say, oh, well, he's not going to help us out when we do ranked choice voting. That's not true. My job as Secretary of State is to support the elections in the state and local municipalities. And that is exactly what I'll do if a municipality or county chooses to do ranked choice voting. But I am telling you and I am asking the citizens, please pause and think about it before you choose ranked choice voting, because there are other people out there that may not get it. It may be difficult to understand. Let's not leave them out in the cold and let's think about our democracy right now with the amount of misinformation that's out there. [00:27:59] Crystal Fincher: Well, and I guess I should ask a clarifying question because ranked choice voting is certainly one reform or change that is on the ballot. There's also another change currently on the ballot in a jurisdiction this year - approval voting. We see different methods of voting - one, just in our neighbor to the south in Portland - there they have a different type of voting on the ballot for their city this year. We're seeing a number of different types. So is your opposition strictly to ranked choice voting or to any of the kinds of changes, whether it's ranked choice or approval voting or any kind of change that would be made? [00:28:36] Secretary Hobbs: It's right now - this particular moment in time - is any kind of change, unless you can find a way where you're going to get the word out to those individuals where English is not their first language, where they've got cognitive disabilities, and the fact - hey, is this vulnerable to a misinformation? Because right now, if there's a close election, you just count out the votes and whoever has the most votes wins. That's how it's done, right - in close races. But let's say it's ranked choice voting or preferred voting - it gets slightly complicated. In ranked choice voting, you're basing it upon an algorithm. And so now, what's going to happen? Well, what's going to happen is you're going to have a group of individuals who didn't get their way, and they're going to say, oh, this algorithm got hacked, which is not true. This algorithm, written by George Soros, and again, not true. But that's what's going to happen. [00:29:36] Crystal Fincher: Well, I don't know that I would call it an algorithm, but a different method of tabulation and rounds of tabulation. [00:29:42] Secretary Hobbs: Well, that's what we call it - it doesn't make it a bad thing. It just - that's what it is. There's nothing wrong with it. I'm just saying to you that you just leave yourself vulnerable to misinformation that could attack it. [00:29:59] Crystal Fincher: I got you - but I think the underlying, as you pointed out, related concern is they are on the ballot and those changes may be made in places. And so the role of - again, in the implementation of these things - certainly there can be a lot of challenges that are introduced with implementation - how well just the system itself is implemented, and how well residents are trained and informed and educated before it happens. Do you plan on playing a role in that and being an advocate for voting and participating in the system should one of those be implemented? [00:30:41] Secretary Hobbs: Well, we have to - that's the role. I can't not do that as Secretary of State. I have to make sure that these - if a local jurisdiction chooses this form of election, then of course, we're going to be there to support it. [00:30:59] Crystal Fincher: And so I do want to talk about - we've talked about elections - and that's, to most people, the most visible thing that you're involved with as Secretary of State. But my goodness, you have a lot more responsibilities than that - just going down the list, aside from dealing with elections and initiatives and referendums - producing and distributing the Voters' Pamphlet and any legal advertising; registering private corporations, limited partnerships and trademarks; registering individuals, organizations and commercial fundraisers involved in charitable solicitations; administering the State's address confidentiality program, which is really important for survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking; collecting and preserving the historical records of the state and making those records available for research; coordinating implementation of the State's records management laws; affixing the State seal and attesting to commissions, pardons and other documents to which the signature of the governor is required; regulating use of the State seal, which came in handy in another state - there was a whole thing about - that is an important and relevant thing. Filing and attesting to official acts of the Legislature or governor and certifying to the Legislature all matters legally required to be certified. You're also frequently called upon to represent the State of Washington in international trade and cultural missions, and greet and confer with dignitaries and delegations visiting the State of Washington from other countries. This is a big, big job and my goodness, you have your hands full with just elections, but there are so many other things underneath the umbrella of your responsibility. How do you both focus on elections and all of the other stuff? And how has this gone so far? [00:32:47] Secretary Hobbs: Well, I've got a great staff and I got great people who manage these different divisions. Thank you for mentioning those other things because sometimes my employees that are in libraries and corporations and nonprofits and legacy - which is history of Washington State - not to mention our CFD, our Combined Fund Drive - sometimes they feel neglected. My Secretary of State's office is about nearly 300 people and 22 people occupy Elections. There's a lot more that we do than just elections and I love it. I actually love the other side. It's very therapeutic to me because there's not the controversy that's involved in those other aspects. Libraries are near and dear to my heart. In fact, we have libraries in every state institution - our state prisons and our state hospital. I'm proud to announce that we're actually going into our state juvenile detention facilities, which we haven't done, and I'm glad we're doing that. It's about time - they should be in there. What I'm going to do and what I'm starting to do is use our state libraries as a place for rehabilitation - getting folks who are incarcerated, giving them the skills necessary when they leave the prison. We really haven't done that in the past and I'm looking forward to doing that. I get it's not going to be a lot of people, but you know what? Let's not let that space go to waste. I'm also excited using libraries as a place where we can provide therapy for the incarcerated. I'm working with, or talking with, some of the tabletop gaming companies - the use of RPGs and gaming as a form of therapy is an opportunity for us - to have that in our state libraries, so I'm looking at that. We team up with rural libraries and community libraries out there in Washington State - we're looking at doing more of that - creating game libraries out in the rural communities. They do it in Vancouver and in Spokane - they actually have game libraries where you can go and play games and it's an opportunity to create a safe space for young people out there in rural communities where a library is the only place where they can go to. And of course, corporations, charities - you had mentioned that. We are on the verge of creating satellite offices so that you don't have to drive all the way to Olympia if you have a problem with your corporate filings and your nonprofit filings, so I'm looking forward to that. People shouldn't have to drive to Olympia if they're having major problems. And there's a lot of people out there just - it's hard for them to navigate the internet, especially those who are older. So we're doing a lot out there with the other agencies of my office, so thank you for bringing it up. [00:35:53] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, absolutely. And so there are a few things - so many things we could talk about - these are all things that have areas, they're crucially important, they require deep expertise. You are there, and as in many departments and in many areas, there are very professional, dedicated, experienced staff who keep this running between and across administrations who are crucial to the work. But there are conversations about how important having a leader with experience in these types of work is. And that's been one of the areas that your opponent, Julie Anderson, has talked about as an advantage that she has in this race - as an auditor who, in addition to dealing with elections, also deals with a broad portfolio of responsibilities - that she has experience with many of these things, in addition to elections. And decades of experience she talks about, and that it's important to have that kind of experience in elections and in these other areas in the office, and saying you don't have it. How do you respond to that? [00:37:06] Secretary Hobbs: Well, I would say that clearly she doesn't know my background. And again, I offer anyone to look at my background, but I've been in the military for 33 years. And I've had varying levels of experience in the military leadership - commanded recently a 750 joint task force dealing with COVID support operations in Western Washington. That is far more employees than I even have now as Secretary of State, far more than what Julie Anderson has in her office doing multiple tasks. And that's just not just one thing - commanding companies and commanding battalion-level units - multiple people in a unit. Also, the the fact that I'm doing it right now. I've been running the Secretary of State's office for almost a year, and no complaints - I really haven't heard any major complaints from anybody. And it's been a blast doing it, using my skills - not just in the military - but having a Master's in Public Administration, my service in the State Senate. It's not easy being Chair of Transportation and managing that very large budget and navigating legislation. So I have more than enough skill, right now, in this office. Again, I just invite you to look at the backgrounds of each of us. [00:38:41] Crystal Fincher: Which makes sense. And so within those, what are you doing to preserve historical records, which is one of the things within the state - especially as we see in some areas, there are people who are much less interested in the preservation of historical records. And sometimes challenging that and attacking that at the federal level, bleeding down to other levels. And how do you make those records more readily available to the public than they are today? [00:39:09] Secretary Hobbs: Ah, yes. Well, so one of the things that we're doing - and it's challenging, because we just have so much paper records right now - digitizing all those records. So we're trying to provide more, hiring more people to do that, hiring better equipment. Just as I got into office, I traveled all - most, pretty much all the state archives buildings, except for one - talking to rank and file there. When I went to Bellingham, I talked to the archives folks there. And they were telling me, Hey, we need a large scanner to be more efficient, because right now we got to take - so you got to scan sometimes larger maps and stuff, you got to send it all the way to Olympia. It's well, let's see if we can purchase and get you a scanner so that you can do it there to make things more efficient. So those are the things I've been looking at. And of course, being able to have access to that online is very important to me. And digitizing our records is just one small part in keeping our records, but also telling the story about our state. As the state archives, I have the - we have the State Constitution, we have these old documents, and they shouldn't be behind a vault, a dark vault. People should see this, so I'm again, this is theoretical, and hopefully I have to get the Legislature's funding approval on this. But I'd like to bring these artifacts out, this history out, and travel the state and show people, show young people - visit, maybe, the high schools and elementary schools - hey, this is the history of our state. We're building a new library, and we're going to put a lot of info - not just our archives in there and books, but the state's history and the state's culture - let's tell the story about, especially in my community - I'm an Asian American, there's the Japanese that were put into camps. Let's talk about that story. Let's talk about Native, our Native peoples in this state - how we took their land and how they were struggling, and now they've become a political power in this state and how great that is, and how they have educated us on the environment - saving salmon. We need to tell these stories, and I've been looking at using our archives and our libraries to develop - not competition with you, of course - but doing a podcast. [00:41:35] Crystal Fincher: I'm all for it. I'm all for it. [00:41:38] Secretary Hobbs: Yeah, and talk and do it in the style of YouTube and Twitch, so there's interaction there at the same time. And I'm going to go on a bit of a tangent here, because I forgot to mention this, but - the listeners out there, if you're really into podcasts, there's one called Ear Hustle, which is a podcast ran by those incarcerated in the California penal system. And I want to do that here in the State of Washington. I want the prisoners to do their own podcasts to talk about how they got there, and how is life behind bars, and how they're changing themselves for the better. No, I really want to bring to life, light, what is going on in Washington State. [00:42:26] Crystal Fincher: So is it fair to say that you would want to - we have our physical libraries, we have our archives across and around the state - that you want to also create a digital library that is accessible to researchers, to the public - to see these artifacts. I was on a different site reading treaties, actually, that are incredibly interesting - to see what was promised and agreed to, and what actually wound up being delivered - which are in most cases, two very different things. But is that what you're looking to do - to be able to have people access, have access to these things - to view, to see - virtually as well as in-person? [00:43:08] Secretary Hobbs: Oh, yes, absolutely. You can do some of that already. But man, we have so much - so much archives. I was up in, again, the Bellingham one, and I pulled out this old, dusty, large leatherbound book. And I opened it up - a lot of the pages were empty. I just kept on turning the page, turning the page, and finally a page came up, and there was this story. It was very funny - it was nice handwriting - it basically said something like, Laura Smith marries David Hamilton, and two chickens, a cow, and some land was exchanged, or something like that. That, I don't know, I geek out over that. I think that's totally cool. It was a story of, obviously, a wedding, because we counties always record marriages, and that was recorded before the days of statehood in our territorial days. So all that needs to be preserved, that needs to be digitized, and we all need to see it. I think that's fantastic. [00:44:09] Crystal Fincher: All right - so we have heard from several municipalities, several reporters in municipalities about challenges with record management. And this is another part of your portfolio - records management across the state, which is also really related to the ability to deliver on public records requests, public disclosure requests - the ability to do that. And how many challenges there are within the system - hearing from municipalities and from reporters across the state that wait times for documents, for discovering whether something exists or doesn't exist, for records that should have been retained that have been deleted - creating lots of challenges for - really the goal of retaining a record is so you can be able to access the information. And so people who are entitled to that information, including the public, can access their information. We are seeing so many challenges with that right now - in the length of time it takes to fulfill requests, in the consistency of how records are retained and managed. What can you do to improve that? [00:45:15] Secretary Hobbs: Well, just like I said last time, I just got to get more people to do the digitization of our records and better equipment - especially the older documents - to have that scanned in. But the other thing that we've been noticing, Crystal, and maybe your listeners out there might know this - is the weaponization of the public records requests, where you have somebody making an outrageous request of a government agency to simply overwhelm them. And we have seen the rise of that as well, which is unfortunate, because that is not what the public records laws were meant to do. It was meant for transparency, not to overwhelm a local government with a frivolous request. Which is unfortunate - local governments and our own state government are struggling to try to keep up, but we have to be transparent, and that's what we constantly are trying to do. [00:46:19] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and even that area is a big challenge. For the person making the request, it's always interesting, but I think there have been some instances - certainly that I can recall - where someone who disagrees with the nature of the request, or maybe it's from some political - people who disagree with decisions that they've made before, or reporters who are simply investigating what is going on - being characterized as malicious, but seemingly making some standard requests. Now, there are certainly bad actors out there, but that is not the entirety of the issue. And so for - looking at implementing records management processes across the state, assisting municipalities with that - is there anything that can be done? Is it a situation where truly - sure, we have these retention policies, we have to save this, but if we don't have the staff, then that's just it. And ultimately, then the public does not get access to information that they're entitled to. Are we really relying on allocations of funding from the Legislature and from other levels of government to be able to deliver upon this really basic entitlement that the public has? [00:47:32] Secretary Hobbs: Well, there's certainly attempts and technology changes to make this easier, but it does come down sometimes to people. And so that is a struggle. But we've done a really good job of meeting the public records requests ourselves in our own - we're a separately elected agency - but some of these small towns and cities are, they're having some challenges out there. [00:48:02] Crystal Fincher: Well, as we get close to wrapping up our time here, as voters are considering who they're going to choose in this election and trying to weigh - okay, I'm hearing arguments on one side, I'm hearing arguments from the opponent. Why should I choose you, and what am I going to see that's different, or what will I not see that's different - if they vote for you? What do you say to voters who are undecided as they consider this decision? [00:48:33] Secretary Hobbs: What I would say to them is the Office of Secretary of State has changed. It has changed across the United States and those offices as well. It's not one that it just simply works with the counties to manage, oversee, and support elections. It is now one where you have to protect democracy, you have to protect elections from threats of misinformation and cyber threats. And I am the only candidate that has the background to do that - with my background in the military, having served in the NSA, with my background of being a Public Affairs Officer, being a graduate of Department of Defense Information School, knowing how to combat misinformation and combat cyber threats. Also, the fact that I can work across the aisle and have done so in my 15 years in the State Senate - it's the one of the reasons why I have Republican endorsements and why I've been endorsed by organizations that typically oppose each other, like the Association of Washington Business and the Washington State Labor Council. Also, we need to have somebody that understands and can speak for those communities that are underserved and underrepresented. I'm a son of an Asian immigrant. I am the first API member that's ever been Secretary of State, and I'm the only statewide official who's a person of color. We need to have somebody that represents them as well. And lastly, I ask you this - because in all these elections, when you're trying to get rid of someone, is that person just not working for you? Are they not doing a good job? I've been in this office for almost a year. Are there any complaints? If the horse is getting you to the place where you need to go to, and the horse is a good horse and strong and improving, why change horses? We've done, like I said, we've handled three fairly large misinformation campaigns that - reported in NPR and NBC News. We've had two special elections in a statewide primary, and those have gone smoothly. And then you've heard in this episode here about what I want to do with other aspects of the office, such as libraries and corporations and legacy. So if you're happy with those things, there's really no need to change. And so I'm hoping that you will give me a chance to do the full term. And just to think of the improvements that I can do in the next two years. And of course, I'm always going to be there to defend democracy, defend elections, because I did it for real in Kosovo and Iraq, and I'm doing it now as your Secretary of State. [00:51:34] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you so much for joining us today, for having this conversation, and for letting the voters get to know you a little bit more. Much appreciated. Thank you so much. [00:51:42] Secretary Hobbs: Thank you. [00:51:43] Crystal Fincher: Thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler. Our assistant producer is Shannon Cheng, and our post-production assistant is Bryce Cannatelli. You can find Hacks & Wonks on Twitter @HacksWonks, and you can follow me @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered right to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave us a review wherever you listen. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

Behind The Mission
BTM91 - Jaime Chapman - Military Spouse Chamber of Commerce

Behind The Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 26:18


About Today's GuestJaime Chapman is one of the original Co-Founders and Chief Operating Officer of the Military Spouse Chamber of Commerce. Her professional background is as a Sr. Military Talent Program Manager for Amazon Web Services and as a human capital entrepreneur where she successfully placed over 1,600 jobseekers in careers, creating an economic impact totaling over $112 million. Jaime has achieved recognition for:·      #1 Military Spouse Owned Business Overall Award by Military and Veterans Choice in September 2019 at the Military Influencer Conference in DC.·      2020-2021 Armed Forces Insurance US Army Garrison Wiesbaden Military Spouse of the Year Award.·      2022 Fort Hood Local Business Person of the Year, Alignable·      Scholar, George W. Bush Stand-To Veteran Leadership Program, Class of 2021.Jaime served in the Army Reserves for 6-years, and is currently an active duty Army spouse with her family stationed in Texas. She is a proud advocate for the military community, actively working to reduce military spouse unemployment and underemployement. In addition to her work at the Military Spouse Chamber, Jaime provides professional speaking and consulting services for organizations who are looking to hire, retain, and promote military spouse and veteran talent.Links Mentioned In This EpisodeMilitary Spouse Chamber of Commerce Web SitePsychArmor Resource of the WeekThe PsychArmor Resource of the Week is the PsychArmor course Supporting Veteran-Owned Businesses: Supplier Diversity In this course, you will learn strategies and best practices to implement veteran supplier diversity in your business or organization. You can find a link to the resource here: https://learn.psycharmor.org/courses/Supporting-Veteran-Owned-BusinessesThis Episode Sponsored By: This episode is sponsored by PsychArmor, the premier education and learning ecosystem specializing in military culture content. PsychArmor offers an online e-learning laboratory with custom training options for organizations.Contact Us and Join Us on Social Media Email PsychArmorPsychArmor on TwitterPsychArmor on FacebookPsychArmor on YouTubePsychArmor on LinkedInPsychArmor on InstagramTheme MusicOur theme music Don't Kill the Messenger was written and performed by Navy Veteran Jerry Maniscalco, in cooperation with Operation Encore, a non profit committed to supporting singer/songwriter and musicians across the military and Veteran communities.Producer and Host Duane France is a retired Army Noncommissioned Officer, combat veteran, and clinical mental health counselor for service members, veterans, and their families.  You can find more about the work that he is doing at www.veteranmentalhealth.com  

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Dem Bois Podcast
Growing Beyond Insecurities and Healing from Trauma with Jay Jones

Dem Bois Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 60:06


A running theme in this first season of Dem Bois Podcast has been the importance of healing and therapy, and this episode is no different. Today, I sit down with Jay Jones, husband, father of three, fitness enthusiast, and first lieutenant in the Army Reserves. We talk about mental shifts that come with the physical transition, changing our names and celebrating rebirth, moving through the different stages in one's transition, and healing from trauma through fatherhood. We talk:Jay's transition journey - 10:13The mental and emotional parts of transitioning - 17:50A more realistic viewpoint of parenthood - 28:28How healing has helped Jay be a good partner - 38:11Advice for how to start to shift your mental - 44:05Transitioning while in the military - 50:01Read more about Jay in his bio below:My name is Jay. I am a husband, father of 3, and fitness enthusiast. I am an Officer in the Army Reserves and social content creator. I began my medical transition in July 2021. The one thing I truly live by is your mental transition is just as important as your physical transition. -IG: @iam.jaytAre you enjoying the Dem Bois Podcast? Donate today to help support the cost of production and the honorarium we pay our guests for their time. All donations are tax-deductible. Click here!

Breaking Battlegrounds
Abe Hamadeh on Securing Arizona's Border

Breaking Battlegrounds

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 61:29


This week on Breaking Battlegrounds, Chuck and Sam are joined by Abe Hamadeh, Republican candidate for Arizona Attorney General. Later in the show, award winning filmmaker Jeff Hays joins us to bring the story of the real Anthony Fauci. -Abraham is an intelligence officer in the U.S. Army Reserve and just returned from a 14 month long deployment to Saudi Arabia. On behalf of the United States Army, Abraham negotiated military sales and managed the training for Saudi Arabia's domestic security forces both in the Kingdom and in the United States. He implemented the first of its kind new enhanced security vetting in response to the 2019 Pensacola terrorist attack. His direct counterparts were generals, colonels, and lieutenant colonels in the Saudi forces as well as high ranking civilians in their respective ministries. Abraham's awards include the Meritorious Service Medal, Army Achievement Medal, Gold German Armed Forces Proficiency Badge, and Overseas Service Ribbon among others.Abraham is a former prosecutor of the Maricopa County Attorney's Office. Abraham has appeared in court to prosecute criminals, uphold victims' rights, and seek justice for the community. Abraham earned his undergraduate degree in Political Science from Arizona State University and earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Arizona College of Law. During his law studies, Abraham was awarded the Udall Fellowship by the Arizona Prosecuting Attorneys' Advisory Council which placed him at the city, county, state, and federal prosecutor offices.-Jeff Hays, an award winning filmmaker and television producer since the early nineties, gained national attention with Fahrenhype 9/11 (2004), a response to Michael Moore's Fahrenheit 9/11.  He followed that with On Native Soil (2006). Narrated by Kevin Costner and Hilary Swank, the documentary focused on the perspective of surviving family members of 9/11 victims and their efforts to create the 9/11 Commission.  The film was acquired by Lions Gate and NBC and was short-listed for an Academy Award.Hays produced a yearlong television series for Lifetime Television, and then returned to documentary film with Doctored in 2012, and Bought in 2014.In 2017, Jeff partnered with Dr. Patrick Gentempo to create Revealed Films. and together, they have released nine multi-part series covering subjects including, health and nutrition, medical issues, wealth- building, religious and political topics.  (Money Revealed, Wine Revealed, Christ Revealed, Supplements Revealed, GMOs Revealed, and Vaccines Revealed,etc.)  Revealed Films launches 3-4 series each year adding the rich stream of information they've produced in the past. Revealed is currently finishing a series on the use of  psychedelics in therapy called Mind If I Wake You Up, and filming for a new series on marriage and relationships.In addition to the Revealed projects Jeff Hays Films was the Executive Producer for The Fix, a documentary series based on Johann Hari's NY Times bestseller, Chasing the Scream. The Fix was acquired by Jeffrey Katzenberg's company, Quibi. JHF has acquired the rights to two other books to produce via film, the NY Times bestseller, Lost Connections, by Johann Hari and The Bad One, by Erin Tyler.JHF has partnered with Josh Bezoni, Gia Walsh and Brookwell McNamara entertainment to produce Woke AF, a JP Sears comedy. Additionally, JHF is producing a series with Adam Carolla on resilience, and The Millionaire Within Her with Kristi Frank.Jeff resides in the mountains of Utah with love of his life, Dori. They work out of Jeff Hays Films' soundstage and studio in Midvale UT. Together they have 11 children and many grandchildren.-Connect with us:Official website: www.breakingbattlegrounds.voteTwitter: www.twitter.com/Breaking_BattleFacebook: www.facebook.com/breakingbattlegroundsInstagram: www.instagram.com/breakingbattlegrounds This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit breakingbattlegrounds.substack.com

RealClear Defense presents Hot Wash
Jason Kander “Invisible Storm: A Soldier's Memoir of Politics and PTSD”

RealClear Defense presents Hot Wash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 40:38


On today's episode of the RealClearDefense Podcast "Hot Wash" host John Sorensen and RCD contributor Todd Carney, speak with Jason Kander, veteran, politician and most recently author of “Invisible Storm: A Soldier's Memoir of Politics and PTSD” In 2006, Kander served as a military intelligence officer in Afghanistan for the Army Reserve. After returning to civilian life, Kander entered politics serving in his home state of Missouri's House of Representatives in 2008, and then in 2012 as the Missouri Secretary of State. In 2016 he ran for Missouri's Senate seat, narrowly losing to Republican Roy Blunt by a small margin in a state where President Trump beat Hillary Clinton by more than 18 points. He became a rising star in the Democratic party with speculation about a presidential run. In 2018 he ran for mayor of Kansas City, but in a dramatic turn dropped out of the race citing symptoms of PTSD and depression.Currently, he co-Hosts with Ravi Gupta the progressive political podcast Majority 54. And is the president of national expansion at Veterans Community Project, a non-profit supporting homeless veterans.Subscribe to the RealClearDefense Podcast "Hot Wash"Subscribe to the Morning Recon newsletterfor a daily roundup of news and opinion on the issues that matter for military, defense, veteran affairs, and national security.

RealClearPolitics Takeaway
Jason Kander “Invisible Storm: A Soldier's Memoir of Politics and PTSD”

RealClearPolitics Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 40:38


On today's episode of the RealClearDefense Podcast "Hot Wash" host John Sorensen and RCD contributor Todd Carney, speak with Jason Kander, veteran, politician and most recently author of “Invisible Storm: A Soldier's Memoir of Politics and PTSD”In 2006, Kander served as a military intelligence officer in Afghanistan for the Army Reserve. After returning to civilian life, Kander entered politics serving in his home state of Missouri's House of Representatives in 2008, and then in 2012 as the Missouri Secretary of State. In 2016 he ran for Missouri's Senate seat, narrowly losing to Republican Roy Blunt by a small margin in a state where President Trump beat Hillary Clinton by more than 18 points. He became a rising star in the Democratic party with speculation about a presidential run. In 2018 he ran for mayor of Kansas City, but in a dramatic turn dropped out of the race citing symptoms of PTSD and depression.Currently, he co-Hosts with Ravi Gupta the progressive political podcast Majority 54. And is the president of national expansion at Veterans Community Project, a non-profit supporting homeless veterans.Subscribe to the RealClearDefense Podcast "Hot Wash"Subscribe to the Morning Recon newsletterfor a daily roundup of news and opinion on the issues that matter for military, defense, veteran affairs, and national security.

The FIT4PRIVACY Podcast - For those who care about privacy
US Data Privacy Act With Brandon Pugh in The Fit4Privacy Podcast S3 E070

The FIT4PRIVACY Podcast - For those who care about privacy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 34:16


US Privacy Act is in process. Named “ADPPA” or the “American Data Privacy and Protection Act”, it is still in Congress. We speak with Brandon to understand the differences between the EU GDPR and the ADDPA. Want to know more? Take a listen now. KEY CONVERSATION POINTS 00:00:00 Intro 00:01:32 GDPR in one word – “PROGRESSIVE” 00:02:20 Privacy Journey of Brandon 00:03:50 Privacy Tech or Cyber-tech Landscape in the US 00:06:08 Will ADPPA be a law in the future? 00:12:24 Challenges lie ahead in the progress of ADDPA 00:15:14 Frame Work Approach? 00:24:03 ADDPA into LAW 00:26:58 Fun Question: EU or US Regime? 00:32:59 Thank you ABOUT THE GUEST Brandon Pugh is a Senior Fellow and Policy Counsel for the R Street Institute's Cybersecurity and Emerging Threats team. He focuses on data security and privacy, local and state cyber, and military cyber, among other areas. Outside of R Street, he serves as an international law officer in the U.S. Army Reserve and on several boards, including a governor's advisory council. Prior to R Street, Brandon was legislative counsel for the NJ General Assembly Minority Office, where he handled nearly all legislation on cybersecurity, privacy, and emerging technology. He also served as a fellow with the FBI, the managing editor of the Journal of Law and Cyber Warfare, and an elected and appointed official at the local, county and state level. This includes service as a vice president of a quasi-governmental entity representing New Jersey's nearly 600 school boards. ABOUT THE HOST Punit Bhatia is one of the leading privacy experts who works independently and has worked with professionals in over 30 countries. Punit works with business and privacy leaders to create an organization culture with high privacy awareness and compliance as a business priority. Selectively, Punit is open to mentor and coach privacy professionals. Punit is the author of books “Be Ready for GDPR” which was rated as the best GDPR Book, “AI & Privacy – How To Find Balance”, “Intro To GDPR”, and “Be an Effective DPO”. Punit is a global speaker who has spoken at over 30 global events. Punit is the creator and host of the FIT4PRIVACY Podcast. This podcast has been featured amongst top GDPR and privacy podcasts. As a person, Punit is an avid thinker and believes in thinking, believing, and acting in line with one's value to have joy in life. He has developed the philosophy named ‘ABC for joy of life' which passionately shares. Punit is based out of Belgium, the heart of Europe. RESOURCES Podcast https://www.fit4privacy.com/podcast Blog https://www.fit4privacy.com/blog YouTube http://youtube.com/fit4privacy --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fit4privacy/message

Faith Health & Home
Battalion Command Sergeant Major Anthony Taylor on Inclusivity for A Stronger Nation

Faith Health & Home

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 10:21


EP. 111 - On this episode, Battalion Command Sergeant Major (CSM) Anthony L. Taylor of the U.S. Army Reserve joins me to discusses notable achievements of Hispanic Americans in the Army Reserve. He will also talk about his Peruvian heritage, his family's proud history of service and his dedication to helping Soldiers reach their potential. *Please Subscribe and Rate Our Show!

Tech Hive: The Tech Leaders Podcast
#55 Joe Baguley - Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, EMEA, VMware

Tech Hive: The Tech Leaders Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 48:30


Joe Baguley is a CTO and leader who lives and breathes technology innovation. This week, he chats to Gareth about his journey from self-confessed ‘1980s computer nerd' to CTO of Silicon Valley company VMware (...after 23 interviews).Joe's colourful life has seen him through a spell at Imperial College, the Army Reserves and - most surprisingly - a course in standup comedy. All these things have led him to where he is today: an excellent communicator with a ferocious appetite for information. And when he's not making strides at the forefront of the tech industry, he's taking on charity motorsport challenges and racing electric bikes. Tune in to get the full, fast-paced story in his own words from a man who never seems to stop!TimestampsEmpathy in leadership (1.24)Overview of background (2.45)Key milestones (6.21)Groundbreaking change (90s tech boom) (9.15)Gadgetry (11.57)Motorsport as therapy (16.44)The future of electric cars (20.39)23 interviews in 2 and a half days for VMware job (22.59)Culture at VMware (26.09)Communicating in layman's terms (29.54)How did the pandemic change things? (34.12)What is Joe most excited about? (38.00)Advice to 21-year-old Joe (40.22)Avoiding burnout (42.07)Recommendations (43.29)Outro (45.20)