Podcasts about Foreign relations

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  • 1,226PODCASTS
  • 2,462EPISODES
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  • Jul 4, 2022LATEST
Foreign relations

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Best podcasts about Foreign relations

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Latest podcast episodes about Foreign relations

The Raisina Podcast
The Doctrine of Lapse: Lessons From the UN Era | Part 1|

The Raisina Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 30:13


This year the UN celebrated its 77th Anniversary amidst an unprecedented COVID 19 pandemic, the Afghanistan political crisis and the ongoing Ukraine-Russia war. In the first part of this two-part Raisina Dialogue episode, we analyse the significance and influence of institutions like the United Nations in a multipolar world which is facing multilateral challenges. With the ongoing crises, the UN has come under serious criticism for failing to demonstrate a positive image of its role. “The UN is just a little more than the sum of the power dynamics of the most influential member states, so how they act or not is going to determine the effectiveness of the UN” states Laksmi Puri, Former Assistant Secretary-General, United Nations, India. Will the UN go the way of its predecessor, the League of Nations, and sink into the abyss of history as an irrelevant failure or will it aggressively reform and respond to the challenges of today? Speakers: Ararat Mirzoyan, Minister of Foreign Affairs, ArmeniaDaniel Carmon, Senior Research Fellow, International Institute for Counter-Terrorism, Israel; Former Ambassador of Israel to IndiaLakshmi Puri, Former Assistant Secretary General, United Nations, IndiaCharles Kupchan, Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations; Professor of International Relations, Georgetown University, United StatesJane Holl Lute, Former Deputy Secretary, Department of Homeland Security, United StatesModerator: Shashi Tharoor, Member of Parliament, IndiaThe Raisina Dialogue is a multilateral conference committed to addressing the most challenging issues facing the global community. Every year, global leaders in policy, business, media and civil society are hosted in New Delhi to discuss cooperation on a wide range of pertinent international policy matters. The conference is hosted by the Observer Research Foundation in collaboration with the Government of India, Ministry of External Affairs.

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano
Stretching for a Shot at Immortality | 7-1-22

The Other Side of Midnight with Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 225:23


On tonight's edition of the Other Side of Midnight: Frank Morano takes up yoga. Friday mornings means Ask Frank Anything! Later, Dr. Charles Kupchan, Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, joins the show to give a more balanced take on Ukraine. Even further down the line, everyone's favorite attorney and film critic, Debbie Schlussel, discusses everything from Elvis to The Black Phone. We go through this week's round of denunciations, examine Amazon's strange new feature for Alexa, and sing the praises of punctuality. Why don't you go into the long weekend with a healthy dose of TOSOM? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Frank Morano
Dr. Charles Kupchan, Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations | 7-1-22

Frank Morano

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 22:03


Frank Morano evens things out with Dr. Charles Kupchan, Professor of International Affairs in the School of Foreign Service and Government Department at Georgetown University, and Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Macroaggressions
FLASHBACK FRIDAY | #56: Mainstream Media Vs. Humanity

Macroaggressions

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 66:32


Your nightly news is lying to you. It's true, they are not being honest with their viewers, but telling the truth has never been one of their priorities. The CIA infiltrated the corporate news six decades ago through Operation Mockingbird and they have never left. Throw in the undue influence of NGOs like the Council on Foreign Relations, the Atlantic Council, the German Marshall Fund, and the United Nations and you have the makings of a disaster. Add in the passing of the Smith-Mundt Modernization Act of 2012 that legalized propaganda inside the United States and it becomes crystal clear that your nightly news is nothing more than a series of fairytales dreamed up by the intelligence agencies and a long list of NGOs designed to shape how you view the world so that they can continue to push a globalist agenda. Sponsors: Emergency Preparedness Food: www.preparewithmacroaggressions.com Chemical Free Body: https://www.chemicalfreebody.com and use promo code: MACRO C60 Purple Power: https://c60purplepower.com/ Promo Code: MACRO Wise Wolf Gold & Silver: www.Macroaggressions.gold True Hemp Science: https://truehempscience.com/ Haelan: https://haelan951.com/pages/macro Coin Bit App: https://coinbitsapp.com/?ref=0SPP0gjuI68PjGU89wUv Macroaggressions Merch Store: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/macroaggressions?ref_id=22530 LinkTree: linktr.ee/macroaggressions Books: HYPOCRAZY: https://amzn.to/3AFhfg2 Controlled Demolition on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08M21XKJ5 Purchase "The Octopus Of Global Control" Amazon: https://amzn.to/3aEFFcr Barnes & Noble: https://bit.ly/39vdKeQ Online Connection: Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/Macroaggressions Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/macroaggressions_podcast/ Discord Link:  https://discord.gg/4mGzmcFexg Website: www.theoctopusofglobalcontrol.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/theoctopusofglobalcontrol Twitter: www.twitter.com/macroaggressio3 Twitter Handle: @macroaggressio3 YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCn3GlVLKZtTkhLJkiuG7a-Q Apple Podcasts: https://apple.co/2LjTwu5 Email For Helium Miner: Email: theoctopusofglobalcontrol@protonmail.com

Government Matters
Biden's trip to Saudi Arabia, Paper shortage complicating elections, Taking down a terror fraud scheme – June 30, 2022

Government Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 26:39


President's trip to Saudi Arabia Steven Cook, senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, previews President Biden's upcoming trip to Saudi Arabia centering around oil and security   Nationwide paper shortage complicating midterm elections Matt Weil, director of the Bipartisan Policy Center's Elections Project, discusses a nationwide paper shortage and concerns about obtaining election materials in time for midterms   Government agents seize millions in cryptocurrency Kyle Armstrong, former FBI special agent, discusses how his team shut down an Islamic State scheme to raise money through a fraudulent face mask website early in the pandemic

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show
Foreign Relations Deadlift

Best of The Steve Harvey Morning Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 1:50


A UK man set a deadlift world record with his middle finger.  265 pounds to be exact. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Nessun luogo è lontano
Vertici G7 e NATO: i movimenti dei grandi del mondo

Nessun luogo è lontano

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022


Abbiamo raccontato il vertice del G7 appena chiuso, forse con uno sblocco dei carichi di grano intrappolati in Ucraina, e il vertice NATO che sta per iniziare, un summit che forse metterà nero su bianco lo status di minaccia costituito dalla Russia: ne abbiamo parlato con Sergio Nava, giornalista di Radio24, inviato al vertice di Elmau e con l'ambasciatore Stefano Stefanini, consigliere scientifico di ISPI. Abbiamo anche ascoltato il parere di Gustav Gressel(Senior Policy Fellow Wider Europe Programme dello European Council on Foreign Relations, sede di Berlino, esperto di affari militari), che ha spiegato la vulnerabilità russa alle possibili sanzioni su certi prodotti necessari alla sua industria militare. Subito dopo siamo tornati negli Stati Uniti, dove il ribaltamento della sentenza Roe vs. Wade sull'aborto sta generando fratture sempre più profonde nella politica e nella società: ne abbiamo parlato con Alexander Sanger, avvocato e attivista, presidente di International Planned Parenthood Federation.

Power Problems
The Transatlantic Divide

Power Problems

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 38:13


Jeremy Shapiro, research director at the European Council on Foreign Relations, discusses the current state of transatlantic relations, how they shifted during the Trump administration, the need for European defense autonomy, the ongoing Russian war in Ukraine, and why US foreign policy has a prioritization problem.Show NotesJeremy Shapiro bioJeremy Shapiro, “Does America Need a Foreign Policy?” in New Voices in Grand Strategy, Michael J. Zak Lecture Series (Washington, DC: Center for New American Security, 2019).Majda Ruje and Jeremy Shapiro, “The Exaggerated Death of European Sovereignty,” European Council on Foreign Relations, April 27, 2022.Majda Ruge and Jeremy Shapiro, “Don't Mention the War in Ukraine: Germany's Deteriorating Image in Washington,” European Council on Foreign Relations, February 15, 2022. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mediterranean Sustainability Partners
Interview with Julian Popov

Mediterranean Sustainability Partners

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 53:22


This episode will look at the Changing landscape of Energy security in :  Segment 1 : Ukraine and the Black Sea Segment 2 : Turkey and the Mediterranean Sea Segment 3 : Africa Bio : Julian Popov is a Fellow of the European Climate Foundation, Chairman of the Building Performance Institute Europe and Former Minister of Environment of Bulgaria. He was the good will Bulgarian Ambassador for energy and climate policy and energy security adviser to the President of Bulgaria. Julian is member of the European Council of Foreign Relations, the Advisory Board of Climate KIC and the boards of several other energy and climate related organisations. He is the founding Vice Chancellor and current Board Member of the New Bulgarian University and cofounder of the Tunisian School of Politics. Julian was voted as one of the 40 most influential voices on European energy policies (N24) and also as one of the 40 most influential voices in the European energy efficiency policies (N25) by EurActiv. His articles on European and energy policy have been published by Financial Times, Project Syndicate, NS Energy Monitor, The Independent, Al Jazeera, Huffington Post, EurActive and others. He is author of two books and co-author of the books « The European Supergrid » and « Energy and Climate Diplomacy ». He lives in London with his family. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mediterranean-sustainable/message

WDR 5 Morgenecho
Ukraine: Donbass bald unter russischer Kontrolle?

WDR 5 Morgenecho

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 7:16


Die Ukraine kämpft mit Russland um die Kontrolle über den Donbass. Für größere Gegenangriffe müssten weit mehr Waffen-Lieferungen aus dem Westen kommen, sagt Gustav Gressel, Militärexperte der Denkfabrik "European Council on Foreign Relations". Von WDR 5.

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast
Exponential Mindset - Being Exponential - Better Leaders - XMBA - Aaron Bare

Tech Pro Unicorn Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 56:49


Aaron Bare's life purpose is to create One-Million Exponential Leaders. He is the Wall Street Journal and USA Today Bestselling Author of Exponential Theory and the Creator of the XMBA (eXponential Mindsets, Beliefs, and Attitudes - Group Coaching Program), and the "XX Podcast; Two Exponentials in a Flat World." Beyond traveling to over 90 countries and all 50 States, Aaron has facilitated innovation and strategy at over 500 companies and appeared on 20 of the top 250 podcasts. He is highlighted as 10 Leaders to Watch in 2022, listed on 50 under 50 Leaders, 40 under 40 Leaders, 35 under 35 Entrepreneurs, and one of his companies has been awarded “Most Innovative Company in the U.S.” His award-winning digital strategy firm had clients such as Google, Council for Foreign Relations, Coca-Cola, Harley-Davidson, Dannon, Emerson, Comedy Central, Telemundo & Dell, where he built over 100 software projects focused on growth hacking leveraging the viral loop.  Aaron is also a Certified Big Historian, Certified Professional Philosopher, and was the creator of the Oxford Leadership Online Certified Coach, which is closing in on over One-Million participants. As a former Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Thunderbird School of Global Management at Arizona State University (Ranked #1 in Innovation, 7 years in a Row) and Singularity University at NASA Ames campus in Mountainview, California, Aaron has been exposed to some of the most repeatable, predictable, scalable, and sustainable business models. He currently focuses on helping individuals explore Ancient Wisdom, Repeating Histories, and Modern Science through his XMBA program that focuses on Unlearning, Reprogramming, and creating the Growth Mindset to ultimately create an eXponential Mindsets, Beliefs, and Attitudes. He also helps companies through customized solutions to scale their Exponential Leadership and Business Models.  Aaron Bare holds an MBA from Thunderbird School of Global Management and an MA from Indiana University. He lives in Arizona.  Learn more about Aaron Bare at http://www.aaronbare.com. Michael and Aaron had a great discussion of what being an exponential leader looks like.  An expert in leadership, consulting to many of Americas companies, Aaron share his experience and stories on how to be a better leader.#exponentialtheory #exponentialleadership

SWR2 Forum
Konfliktlöser Europa? Perspektiven für den westlichen Balkan

SWR2 Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 44:13


Wenn die Europäische Union auf ihrem heutigen Gipfel über mögliche Beitrittsperspektiven für die Westbalkanländer verhandelt, dann geht es nicht nur um Rechtsstaatsprinzipien und die Bekämpfung der Korruption. Beim Dauerkonflikt zwischen Serbien und Kosovo oder beim möglichen Zerfall Bosniens stellt sich die Frage nach Krieg und Frieden. Wie kann Europa die Nationalitätenkonflikte lösen? Gefährden instabile Demokratien die Union? Wie weit geht die EU, um den Einfluss von Russen, Chinesen und Saudis im Osten Europas zurückzudrängen? Claus Heinrich diskutiert mit Prof. Dr. Marie-Janine Calic - Osteuropahistorikerin, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Srdjan Govedarica - ARD-Studio Südosteuropa, Wien, Majda Ruge - European Council on Foreign Relations, Berlin

The Rachman Review
Can EU unity on Ukraine hold?

The Rachman Review

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 20:00


European leaders have been united in their support for Ukraine against Russia's aggression. But as costs mount they could face growing calls to compromise with Russia. Gideon talks to Ulrike Franke, senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, about how France and Germany in particular are handling the crisis. Clips: Euronews; CNN; France24More on this topic:Farewell to Russia and to the Sinatra doctrineOlaf Scholz says partnership with Putin's Russia is ‘inconceivable'Ukraine weighs up impact of EU leaders' trip to KyivSubscribe to The Rachman Review wherever you get your podcasts - please listen, rate and subscribe.Presented by Gideon Rachman. Produced by Fiona Symon. Sound design is by BreenRead a transcript of this episode on FT.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

KCRW Berlin: Common Ground
Smooth Sailing or Rocky Road? How U.S.-German relations are faring amid the global upheaval

KCRW Berlin: Common Ground

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 35:45


It's been 18 months since Donald Trump left office, but with one global crisis after another, the relationship between the United States and Germany has not had time to rebound. But does it matter? Is Germany squandering an opportunity to set its own international agenda? Host Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson discusses the state of German-U.S. relations in these precarious times with:Jeremy Shapiro, research director at the European Council on Foreign Relations and a former advisor to the State Department during the Obama administration;Joerg Lau, Die Zeit international correspondent; Laura von Daniels, head of the “Americas” research division  at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs. This show was produced by Dina Elsayed. Note: This episode was taped before Chancellor Olaf Scholz visited Ukraine on June 16th and announced Germany wants Ukraine to be admitted into the European Union. But extra steps are needed before that can happen.

PBS NewsHour - World
What European Union membership would mean for war-torn Ukraine

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 9:54


The European Union's executive arm on Friday recommended putting Ukraine on a path to membership. This comes as the U.S. and Europe pledged earlier this week to support Ukraine militarily. Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations who was on the State Department's policy planning staff during the Obama administration, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
What European Union membership would mean for war-torn Ukraine

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 9:54


The European Union's executive arm on Friday recommended putting Ukraine on a path to membership. This comes as the U.S. and Europe pledged earlier this week to support Ukraine militarily. Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations who was on the State Department's policy planning staff during the Obama administration, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Politics
What European Union membership would mean for war-torn Ukraine

PBS NewsHour - Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 9:54


The European Union's executive arm on Friday recommended putting Ukraine on a path to membership. This comes as the U.S. and Europe pledged earlier this week to support Ukraine militarily. Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations who was on the State Department's policy planning staff during the Obama administration, joins John Yang to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The afikra Podcast
JAMES ZOGBY | Arab American Institute | Conversations

The afikra Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 56:26


James Zogby talked about his work in the field of political and policy research within the Arab American community.James J. Zogby is the founder and president of the Arab American Institute (AAI), a Washington, D.C.-based organization which serves as the political and policy research arm of the Arab American community. He is also managing director of Zogby Research Services, which specializes in groundbreaking public opinion polling across the Arab world. Zogby is a lecturer and scholar in Middle Eastern affairs and a visiting professor of Social Research and Public Polling at New York University in Abu Dhabi. A lecturer and scholar on Middle East issues, U.S.-Arab relations, and the history of the Arab American community, Zogby appears frequently on television and radio. Zogby is the author of Arab Voices (Palgrave Macmillan, October 2010), among other books and publications. Zogby has testified before U.S. House and Senate committees and has addressed the United Nations and other international forums. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.Created and hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!
9/11 & The Controlled Demolition of the American Empire | with Co-author Charlie Robinson

RichardGage911:UNLEASHED!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 122:55


"From the Founding of the Federal Reserve, to 9/11, to the Corona Virus Pandemic."What is the American Empire? What are the symptoms of its demise?Why would the Deep State controllers be dismantling their own empire?How does the Fed and central banking really work?What are the roles of the multinational institutions such as the United Nations, the Council on Foreign Relations, World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Health Organization?What are the actual roles of the Mainstream Media in the American Empire?Become an RG911 member!What are the parallels of the fall of the American Empire to that of the Roman Empire?How much time do we have?Charlie's books are #1 Bestsellers for good reason.What is the Military-Information-Terror complex? Where is it taking us?What are the deep-seated triggers that will catalyze the collapse of the American Empire? What can the awakened Americans, do to stop the destruction of our country?What are the positive outcomes for America if the Deep State is stopped?Charlie's latest book is full of sweet surprises and insightsMy guest on RichardGage911UNLEASHED! is Charlie Robinson, co-author of “The Controlled Demolition of the American Empire: From the Founding of the Federal Reserve, to 9/11, to the Corona Virus Pandemic.”Charlie is a #1 Best Selling author of other books as well including The Octopus of Global Control, and his new book, Hypocrazy: Surviving in a World of Cultural Double Standards. Both are now available at Amazon and at his website, TheOctopusOfGlobalControl.com.He is the host of the Macroaggressions Podcast, as well as the co-host of the round-table podcasts The Union of the Unwanted and Day Zero.HYPOCRAZY New Book: https://amzn.to/3AFhfg2Website: http://theoctopusofglobalcontrol.com/Link Tree: https://linktr.ee/Macroaggressions

StudioTulsa
At the Tulsa Committee on Foreign Relations -- "Russia: Shunned in Europe, but Welcomed by the Rest?"

StudioTulsa

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 28:58


Our guest, Professor Charles E. Ziegler of the University of Louisville, is a specialist on the domestic, foreign, and security policies of Russia and Eurasia.

Serve to Lead | James Strock
Meenakshi Ahamed | Podcast

Serve to Lead | James Strock

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 47:46


The India-US relationship is one of the most significant and fascinating among great nations. In this episode of the Serve to Lead Podcast, historian and journalist Meenakshi Ahamed discusses her new book, A Matter of Trust: India-US Relations From Truman to Trump. Ahamed combines analytical rigor with a storyteller’s gift for narrative. The book has garnered critical acclaim, and is a finalist for the prestigious Arthur Ross Award of the Council on Foreign Relations.Seventy years of India-US relations has shown that despite the two countries being democracies, not only are they far apart culturally but the intersection of their critical interests is relatively modest. Therefore, the only time when the relationship has developed any real momentum is when one of the leaders has been willing to make a leap of faith.—Meenakshi AhamedIndia’s world role continues to evolve amid the kaleidoscopic changes underway with the rise of China and other challenges to the so-called liberal international order that has prevailed since the end of the Second World War. Ahamed illuminates current issues—such as India’s decision not to join the United States in support Ukraine’s struggle against Russian aggression in 2022—through her understanding of India’s history of non-alignment during the twentieth-century Cold War. She also has a keen understanding of the unique contributions of Indian-Americans in US business, which may continue to pull our nations ever closer in the decades ahead.Critical Acclaim'Meenakshi Ahamed has brought us a brilliant, important, sparkling and definitive study of a part of American history that is growing more crucial by the day. A Matter of Trust is essential reading at a moment when the United States and India are all the more central to each other, and when valiant democracies around the world are in danger.'—Michael Beschloss, New York Times bestselling author and NBC News Presidential Historian'Meenakshi Ahamed has given us an authentic, thoughtful and accessible account of a relationship characterized by paradox and progress. She tells the tale of the highs and lows of that relationship in all its drama, with strong and idiosyncratic personalities on both sides. Today's transformed India-US relations could determine the future not only of one-fifth of humanity but of the Asian Century. This is a book with a serious message—one to read and savor.'—Shivshankar Menon, Former National Security Advisor, Ambassador to China and Foreign Secretary'In this world of growing great power competition, the Indian-American relationship has become one of central, strategic importance to the two nations. In her history of the relationship, Meena Ahamed has given us a timely, lively and captivating account of the road India and the United States have travelled and a compelling insight into what lies ahead.'—Frank G. Wisner, Former United States Ambassador to India'Meenakshi Ahamed's labor of love is a real tour de force covering the long tortuous history of the often-troubled relationship of the world's two largest democracies since India's independence. The book is at once scholarly, deeply researched and yet down to earth. It brings to life the prickly personalities on both sides, and their sensitivities, that often bedeviled the evolving bilateral relationship. As a new era of competitive geopolitics pits West versus East, what lies ahead for this unusual relationship? To prepare ourselves this book is a must-read.'—Dr Rakesh Mohan, Former Deputy Governor Reserve Bank of IndiaAbout the AuthorMeenakshi Narula Ahamed was born in 1954 in Calcutta, India. After finishing school in India, she obtained an MA from Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies in 1978. She has had a varied career as a journalist and prior to that as a development consultant. She has worked at the World Bank in Washington D.C. as well as for the Ashoka Society. In 1989, she moved to London and became the foreign correspondent for NDTV. Among the leaders she interviewed were Nelson Mandela, John Major and Bill Clinton during his presidential campaign. She covered the race riots in London and reported on the rise of Indian entrepreneurs in the US in the mid nineties. After returning to the US in 1996, she worked as a freelance journalist. Her op-eds and articles have been published in Asian Age, Seminar, Foreign Policy, Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. She has served on the board of Doctors Without Borders, The Turquoise Mountain Foundation and Drugs for Neglected Diseases. She divides her time between the US and India.The Serve to Lead podcast has recently moved to Substack (and continues to repopulate in updated settings). It can be accessed in the usual formats, including:Apple Podcasts | Amazon Audible | Amazon Music | Google Podcasts | iHeart | Spotify | Stitcher | Podchaser | TuneIn Image credit: HarperCollins Publishers. Get full access to The Next Nationalism at jamesstrock.substack.com/subscribe

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast
“China wendet sich von der Welt ab.”

Steingarts Morning Briefing – Der Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 32:22


Im Interview: Dr. Janka Oertel, Leiter des Asien-Programms des European Council on Foreign Relations, erklärt die Weltsicht Chinas, die Abwendung der KP vom Westen und warum Europa und die USA gut beraten wären, genau zuzuhören, was die Regierung in Peking für Ziele für die Zukunft postuliert. Finanzminister haben es schwer in Zeiten der Inflation. ThePioneer-Chefredakteur Michael Bröcker über Friedrich Merz und eine CDU-Frauenquote. Anne Schwedt von der Wall Street über einen wichtigen Termin der amerikanischen FED. Börsenexpertin Annette Weisbach über die schwächelnde TUI-Aktie. Jennifer Hudson ist ganz oben im Kreis der “EGOTS”. Kate Bush und ihr Comeback dank “Stranger Things”.

Podcast: The Week Ahead In Russia - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty

President Vladimir Putin likened himself to Peter the Great and suggested that grabbing land is the main motive for his war against Ukraine. How might this affect the course of the conflict -- and how crucial are the actions of the West? Kadri Liik, a senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, joins host Steve Gutterman to discuss.

Signal Boost
Dr. Michael Osterholm!

Signal Boost

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 21:45


Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP) Dr. Michael Osterholm joins Zerlina on the show to discuss the latest in Covid-19 news and how we can keep ourselves safe as we head into the summer. Dr. Osterholm is Regents Professor, McKnight Presidential Endowed Chair in Public Health, the director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy (CIDRAP), Distinguished Teaching Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, a professor in the Technological Leadership Institute, College of Science and Engineering, and an adjunct professor in the Medical School, all at the University of Minnesota.In November 2020, Dr. Osterholm was appointed to President-elect Joe Biden's 13-member Transition COVID-19 Advisory Board. From June 2018 through May 2019, he served as a Science Envoy for Health Security on behalf of the US Department of State. He is also on the Board of Regents at Luther College in Decorah, Iowa.He is the author of the New York Times best-selling 2017 book, Deadliest Enemy: Our War Against Killer Germs, in which he not only details the most pressing infectious disease threats of our day but lays out a nine-point strategy on how to address them, with preventing a global flu pandemic at the top of the list.In addition, Dr. Osterholm is a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and the Council of Foreign Relations. In June 2005 Dr. Osterholm was appointed by Michael Leavitt, Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), to the newly established National Science Advisory Board on Biosecurity. In July 2008, he was named to the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center's Academy of Excellence in Health Research. In October 2008, he was appointed to the World Economic Forum Working Group on Pandemics.From 2001 through early 2005, Dr. Osterholm, in addition to his role at CIDRAP, served as a Special Advisor to then–HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson on issues related to bioterrorism and public health preparedness. He was also appointed to the Secretary's Advisory Council on Public Health Preparedness. On April 1, 2002, Dr. Osterholm was appointed by Thompson to be his representative on the interim management team to lead the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). With the appointment of Dr. Julie Gerberding as director of the CDC on July 3, 2002, Dr. Osterholm was asked by Thompson to assist Dr. Gerberding on his behalf during the transition period. He filled that role through January 2003.Previously, Dr. Osterholm served for 24 years (1975-1999) in various roles at the Minnesota Department of Health, the last 15 as state epidemiologist. He has led numerous investigations of outbreaks of international importance, including foodborne diseases, the association of tampons and toxic shock syndrome, and hepatitis B and HIV in healthcare settings.Dr. Osterholm was the principal investigator and director of the NIH-supported Minnesota Center of Excellence for Influenza Research and Surveillance (2007-2014) and chaired the Executive Committee of the Centers of Excellence Influenza Research and Surveillance network.Dr. Osterholm has been an international leader on the critical concern regarding our preparedness for an influenza pandemic. His invited papers in the journals Foreign Affairs, the New England Journal of Medicine, and Nature detail the threat of an influenza pandemic before the recent pandemic and the steps we must take to better prepare for such events. Dr. Osterholm has also been an international leader on the growing concern regarding the use of biological agents as catastrophic weapons targeting civilian populations. In that role, he served as a personal advisor to the late King Hussein of Jordan. Dr. Osterholm provides a comprehensive and pointed review of America's current state of preparedness for a bioterrorism attack in his New York Times best-selling book, Living Terrors: What America Needs to Know to Survive the Coming Bioterrorist Catastrophe.The author of more than 315 papers and abstracts, including 21 book chapters, Dr. Osterholm is a frequently invited guest lecturer on the topic of epidemiology of infectious diseases. He serves on the editorial boards of nine journals, including Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology and Microbial Drug Resistance: Mechanisms, Epidemiology and Disease, and he is a reviewer for 24 additional journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the AmericanMedical Association, and Science. He is past president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists (CSTE) and has served on the CDC's National Center for Infectious Diseases Board of Scientific Counselors from 1992 to 1997. Dr. Osterholm served on the IOM Forum on Microbial Threats from 1994 through 2011. He has served on the IOM Committee on Emerging Microbial Threats to Health in the 21st Century and the IOM Committee on Food Safety, Production to Consumption, and he was a reviewer for the IOM Report on Chemical and Biological Terrorism. As a member of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Dr. Osterholm has served on the Committee on Biomedical Research of the Public and Scientific Affairs Board, the Task Force on Biological Weapons, and the Task Force on Antibiotic Resistance. He is a frequent consultant to the World Health Organization (WHO), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Department of Defense, and the CDC. He is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology and the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA).Dr. Osterholm has received numerous honors for his work, including an honorary doctorate from Luther College; the Pump Handle Award, CSTE; the Charles C. Shepard Science Award, CDC; the Harvey W. Wiley Medal, FDA; the Squibb Award, IDSA; Distinguished University Teaching Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, UMN; and the Wade Hampton Frost Leadership Award, American Public Health Association. He also has been the recipient of six major research awards from the NIH and the CDC.

Current Account with Clay Lowery
Controversy and Anti-Incumbency: Looking at Latin America

Current Account with Clay Lowery

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 29:30


This week, Clay interviews Shannon O'Neil, Vice President of Studies, Nelson and David Rockefeller Senior Fellow for Latin America Studies, Council on Foreign Relations, about the Summit of the Americas, as well as the Colombian and Brazilian elections.

La Wikly
📱 ¿Son las redes sociales tan nocivas?

La Wikly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022


13 de junio | Nueva YorkLeer esta newsletter te llevará 12 minutos y 8 segundos.📬 Mantente informado con nuestras columnas de actualidad diarias. Tienes un ejemplo en este boletín que enviamos el pasado miércoles sobre la derrota del fiscal del distrito de San Francisco Chesa Boudin y lo que ello significa para el futuro del movimiento reformista del sistema de justicia criminal. Puedes suscribirte a través de este enlace:Maldito ladrón. Bienvenido a La Wikly.📱 No tan fácilLo importante: el auge de las redes sociales ha redibujado el panorama social, cultural y político de todas las sociedades del planeta, pero desde hace años impera una narrativa de casi absoluto consenso que concluye que las redes sociales tienen efectos negativos sobre las democracias.Ahí está el ascenso de los populismos, la crisis de salud mental entre jóvenes o la forma en la que el contenido de odio puede propagarse a una rapidez y escala impensables hace años.Explícamelo: en los últimos meses, dos ensayos publicados en The Atlantic y en The New Yorker han reavivado el debate acerca de si realmente las plataformas han tenido consecuencias tan nocivas.Aunque las conclusiones son dispares, los argumentos que esgrimen presentan enfoques interesantes ante el que será un debate que se seguirá dando durante años.Y además permiten desmontar algunas teorías muy establecidas sobre cómo las redes sociales han afectado al mundo real.📜 Reconstrucción históricaContexto: podría decirse que el punto culminante del optimismo tecnodemocrático sobre el aumento de popularidad de las redes sociales fue en 2011, el año que comenzó con la Primavera Árabe y terminó con el movimiento Occupy Global, según cuenta el psicólogo social Jonathan Haidt en su ensayo.También fue entonces cuando Google Translate empezó a estar disponible en prácticamente todos los teléfonos. Con la supresión de la barrera idiomática y la galopante globalización, estábamos más cerca que nunca de ser un solo pueblo.En el cambio de década, los usuarios de las redes sociales se sintieron más cómodos compartiendo detalles íntimos de sus vidas con extraños y con grandes corporaciones; se volvieron más expertos en administrar su marca personal a través de las redes —y tener éxito con esa marca personal.Es decir, los usuarios empezaban a saber qué foto tendría más me gusta o qué comentario tendría más retuits. La adaptación a ese nuevo statu quo desencadenó lo que Haidt define como la intensificación de las dinámicas virales.Llegado 2013, las redes sociales se habían convertido en un nuevo juego: si tenías habilidad o suerte, podías crear una publicación que capaz de viralizarse y hacerte famoso en Internet por unos días. Si cometías un error, podías terminar enterrado en comentarios de odio.El optimismo de 2011 empezó a decaer y empezó a encontrar conclusiones más apocalípticas conforme distintos escándalos ensombrecieron el crecimiento y las posibilidades de plataformas como Facebook, YouTube o Twitter.En la actualidad, los científicos sociales han identificado al menos tres fuerzas principales que unen colectivamente a las democracias exitosas: capital social (extensas redes de vínculos sociales con altos niveles de confianza), instituciones sólidas e historias compartidas.Según Haidt, las redes sociales habrían debilitado a las tres.🔬 El debate científicoHaidt representa el sector académico que defiende una visión pesimista de las redes sociales. Cree que las herramientas de la viralidad han corroído algorítmica e irrevocablemente la vida pública.El auge de las redes sociales ha “disuelto sin darse cuenta el mortero de la confianza, la creencia en las instituciones y las historias compartidas que habían mantenido unida a una democracia secular grande y diversa”, dice Haidt.La principal preocupación de Haidt es que el uso de las redes sociales nos ha dejado particularmente vulnerables al sesgo de confirmación. Es decir, la propensión a consumir e interiorizar el contenido que apuntala nuestras creencias previas.Esto lo llevó en 2021 a ser el coprotagonista de una iniciativa experimental de investigación colaborativa sobre el efecto de las redes sociales de internet que proponía reunir estudios sobre su impacto en la sociedad.El Google Doc “Redes sociales y disfuncionalidad política: una revisión colaborativa” se puso a disposición del público y acumuló comentarios con miles de estudios y fuentes de lo más diversas (desde artículos de revistas especializadas hasta hilos en Twitter y ensayos de Substack).El documento tiene más de 150 páginas y para cada pregunta hay estudios afirmativos y disidentes, así como algunos con resultados mixtos.La puesta en común de investigaciones específicas sobre los efectos de las redes sociales reveló, entre otras cosas, que tres de las preocupaciones más arraigadas podrían no ser tan graves como parece. El periodista Gideon Lewis-Kraus las mencionó en su artículo para The New Yorker:Las cámaras de eco, focos de sesgo de confirmación, se evidenciarían más en los vínculos que establecemos en la vida real que en las redes sociales, donde estamos expuestos a una gama más amplia de puntos de vista.Las fake news tampoco llegarían a tanta gente como se ha dicho. Es posible que un número muy pequeño de personas consuman noticias falsas de forma habitual. Y si lo hacen, suelen no creérselas.Los agujeros de conejo de plataformas como YouTube, esos por los que las recomendaciones algorítmicas habrían radicalizado a millones de personas mostrándoles contenido cada vez más extremista, se podría haber exagerado.“Estas son las tres historias: cámaras de eco, campañas de influencia extranjera y algoritmos de recomendación radicalizados. Pero, cuando miras la literatura, todas han sido exageradas”, sostiene Brendan Nyhan, politólogo de Dartmouth.Un documento de trabajo dirigido por Nyhan encontró que, contrario a lo que muchos preferirían pensar, existen razones de peso para creer que hay muchas personas buscando deliberadamente contenido de odio. Es decir, que el núcleo del problema no es la radicalización algorítmica, sino algo mucho más complejo.Nyhan pensó que asimilar estos hallazgos es crucial, aunque solo sea para ayudarnos a comprender que nuestros problemas pueden estar más allá de ajustes tecnocráticos.“Muchas de las críticas que se les hacen [a las redes sociales] están muy mal fundadas [...] La expansión del acceso a Internet coincide con otras 15 tendencias a lo largo del tiempo, y es muy difícil separarlas. La falta de buenos datos es un gran problema en la medida en que permite a las personas proyectar sus propios temores en este área”, sostiene Nyhan.🔮 ¿Y entonces?Ante esta postura más moderada sobre cuál debería ser la respuesta ante los efectos que parecen producir las redes sociales, Haidt defiende que las condiciones son demasiado terribles como para adoptar una visión realista:“La preponderancia de la evidencia es lo que usamos en salud pública. Si hay una epidemia, como cuando empezó el COVID, supongamos que todos los científicos hubieran dicho, 'No, ¿tenemos que estar seguros antes de hacer algo?'. [...] Tenemos la mayor epidemia de salud mental entre adolescentes de la historia y no hay otra explicación [que el auge de las redes sociales]. Es una epidemia de salud pública atroz, y los propios niños dicen que es cosa de Instagram, y tenemos algunas pruebas de ello, entonces, ¿es apropiado decir, 'Nah, no lo has demostrado'?".El argumento no es infundado. De hecho, como analizamos en esta entrega, investigaciones internas de Facebook revelaron datos como que el 32 por ciento de las adolescentes dicen que, si se sienten mal con sus cuerpos, Instagram hace que se sientan peor.Con el agravante de que las compañías que administran la plataforma de Meta minimizan constantemente en público sus efectos negativos entre adolescentes.El sociólogo Chris Bail, que orquestó junto a Haidt la propuesta de investigación colaborativa, rescata un apunte que contribuye a darle complejidad al fenómeno global de las redes sociales.Para ello, cita dos investigaciones que se propusieron inferir las diferencias entre un grupo A, con perfiles activos en Facebook, y un grupo B, con sus perfiles en la plataforma desactivados, durante las cuatro semanas previas a unas elecciones. Una se realizó en Estados Unidos; la otra, en Bosnia y Herzegovina.Los resultados de las investigaciones fueron diametralmente opuestos.En su newsletter Platformer, el periodista Casey Newton aboga por esperar a la publicación de más estudios antes de sacar conclusiones definitivas o legislar muy en lo concreto. Cabe pensar que una ley que pretenda regular funcionalidades como las recomendaciones algorítmicas puede no tener las consecuencias deseadas y además atente contra la innovación.Aunque bien es cierto que las redes sociales están muy poco reguladas, especialmente en países como Estados Unidos.Ni qué decir que si eres un pesimista como Haidt, entonces la lucha por el futuro de las democracias se está batallando ahora mismo, así que habría que tomar medidas cuanto antes.Quizá la mejor conclusión la dejaba el investigador Matthew Gentzkow en una cita para el artículo de The New Yorker:“Hay muchas preguntas aquí donde la cosa en la que estamos interesados como investigadores es en cómo las redes sociales afectan a la persona promedio. Hay una serie diferente de preguntas donde todo lo que necesitas es que un número pequeño de personas cambie —preguntas sobre violencia étnica en Bangladesh o Sri Lanka, gente en YouTube movilizada para llevar a cabo tiroteos masivos. Mucha de la evidencia generalmente me hacer ser escéptico con que los efectos medios sean tan grandes como la discusión pública piensa que son, pero también creo que hay casos en los que un número pequeño de personas con perspectivas muy extremistas son capaces de encontrarse entre ellos y conectar y actuar. […] Ahí es donde residen muchas de las peores cosas de las que estaría más preocupado”.Así que sí, probablemente las redes sociales han tenido consecuencias negativas sobre la sociedad y sobre las democracias. Y sí, probablemente todos hayamos exagerado los efectos nocivos de algunas particularidades muy concretas de las plataformas. Pero lo que está claro es que:Necesitamos más estudios acerca de los efectos de las redes sociales en la sociedad.Las compañías deberían dejar a los investigadores tener más acceso a sus datos.Hay daños que sí se han demostrado y tanto legisladores como plataformas deberían actuar cuanto antes para atajarlos.¿Desea saber más? Los dos ensayos son lectura muy, muy recomendada. Este otro artículo del Council of Foreign Relations indaga en una crítica habitual a Haidt y sus conclusiones pesimistas: “Las redes sociales no nos han cambiado de forma fundamental, solo nos han permitido ser nosotros mismos. Han dado forma y color a la última erupción de nuestros lados más oscuros, que siempre estuvieron ahí, esperando a venir a la superficie de nuevo tal y como han hecho repetidamente cada pocas generaciones por razones y en un calendario que sigue siendo confuso”.🎬 Una recomendaciónCon la colaboración de FilminBy Emilio DoménechFeels Good Man es una película documental estadounidense de 2020 dirigida por Arthur Jones. Cuenta los inicios de la rana Pepe, convertida ahora en uno de los mayores memes de toda la historia de internet lejos de las manos de su creador original.La película invierte gran parte de su duración en explorar el uso que la extrema derecha online hizo del meme para propagar mensajes de odio.Es difícil encontrar documentales que hablen de internet de una forma elocuente y que al mismo tiempo se sientan significativos o incluso trascendentales. Feels Good Man, pese a no ser perfecto, encapsula a la perfección muchas de las corrientes que influencian la convivencia online y el impacto que la viralidad tiene en el mundo real.Además, ilustra con inteligencia y empatía la forma en la que el arte puede ser corrompido —y pese a los esfuerzos del artista por impedirlo.No conozco ningún otro ejemplo de un documental que haga un trabajo parecido a la hora de traducir la cultura de los memes para todos los públicos, así que Feels Good Man sin duda es una buena oportunidad para espectadores algo desconectados de lo que pasa en cavernas como 4chan.Los muy leídos en el tema también encontrarán gratas recompensas acerca de la historia de Pepe, por cierto un habitual de los emojis de nuestra comunidad de Discord y de mis streams.Feels Good Man está disponible en Filmin.🤳 Una plataforma realistaBy Marina EnrichLo importante: Hace meses que BeReal se ha convertido en la app por excelencia de la generación Z. Emilio no os ha hablado de ella, y yo, que la uso diariamente, me he sentido obligada a explicaros de qué va y por qué tiene tanto éxito.Contexto: BeReal es una App fundada por el francés Alexis Barreyat y que no tiene nada que ver con ninguna red social actual. Cómo funciona. En un momento aleatorio del día te saltará una notificación al móvil diciendo: “Es la hora de BeReal” para que subas una foto. A todo el mundo le llega la notificación a la misma hora. Hasta que no subas tu foto, no puedes ver la de tus amigos. La foto se capturará a la vez con la cámara frontal y trasera. Al día siguiente, todas las fotos habrán desaparecido.Lo más importante: Es una app antipostureo. No tiene filtros. No puedes falsear la realidad. Menos yo este fin de semana, que he esperado a estar en el festival Primavera Sound para subir mi BeReal (son las dos fotos que encabezan esta sección).Eso sí, BeReal no me ha dejado engañar a mis amigos. Al lado de mi foto, ponía que la he subido 5 horas más tarde, siendo así menos real.Por lo general, las fotos que subo cada día a la aplicación son trabajando en mi ordenador, igual que la mayoría de mis amigos. Puede parecer aburrido, pero para mí es un respiro ver a gente que no se pasa el día viajando, tomando el sol y haciendo deporte.¿Pasará de moda? Pues igual. Aunque la verdad es que esta aplicación responde a una tendencia general entre la generación Z de querer compartir contenido más auténtico (lo vimos con los finstas, esos instagrams privados que creas solo para tus amigos).El interés de esta generación por TikTok tampoco es aleatorio. La aplicación china acuna contenido mucho más auténtico y natural que Instagram, y esa es la razón por la que, en general, nos gusta más.Lo mejor. BeReal no crea adicción. Mientras que Facebook, Instagram y TikTok viven de la economía de la atención, intentando retener a sus usuarios la mayor cantidad de tiempo, BeReal es todo lo contrario. Una vez subes tu foto y ves la de tus amigos, la aplicación pierde el interés. Hasta el día siguiente.Lo interesante: ver cómo monetizan la app. Han recaudado 30 millones de dólares tras una ronda de financiación de la firma de capital de riesgo Andreessen Horowitz, por lo que algún cambio tendrán que hacer.Esperamos que se mantengan reales a su premisa original, je.En otro orden de cosas, hoy vuelve Lunes por el mundo con los resultados electorales en las legislativas de Francia y la crisis de hambruna en Somalia, entre otros titulares. Anita os hablará de la Cumbre de las Américas en la entrega premium del martes.Podrás seguir el directo a partir de las 20:00 hora peninsular de España en Twitch.Feliz semana, This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit www.lawikly.com/subscribe

Fareed Zakaria GPS
A Potentially “Fatal Blow” to the Iran Nuclear Deal and Decades-high Inflation in the U.S.

Fareed Zakaria GPS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 37:59


CNN's Matthew Chance reports from Kyiv on Russia's slow and steady advances in Ukraine. As Iran moved to remove 27 cameras from monitoring its nuclear sites, the director general of the IAEA, Rafael Mariano Grossi, joins Fareed to discuss the fate of the Iran nuclear deal. Then, is the economy really that bad? Ben Bernanke, former chair of the Federal Reserve gives Fareed the economic forecast. Plus, Shannon O'Neil, a vice president and senior fellow for Latin America studies at the Council on Foreign Relations, comments on recent elections in Latin America and whether there is a populist wave from the left. And, David Gergen, presidential adviser for four presidents, on his new book "Hearts Touched with Fire." To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Trend Lines
The War in Ukraine Is Changing How We Think of Drones and UAVs

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 41:37


The war in Ukraine has led to a fundamental shift in public perceptions of the military utility of drones. Until now, most people saw drones either as a more or less harmless toy with certain implications for privacy on one hand, and as a complex military system that roams the skies searching for terrorists on the other. The proliferation of drones and the accompanying high-resolution videos of their exploits in Ukraine has blurred these borders. Modified commercial drones easily available in most electronics store across the world are dropping grenades on tanks and dismounted troops, while acting as accurate spotters for pinpoint artillery strikes. Their larger military counterparts are wreaking havoc on supply convoys and armored columns, and they allegedly even contributed to the sinking of the Russian missile cruiser Moskva, which sported one of the more capable air defense systems in Moscow's Black Sea fleet.  That has made apparent what military planners and researchers have said for a while now: The military utility of unmanned aerial vehicles is still a work in progress, and the saturation of conflict zones with these systems will require changes in tactics and doctrine. To dive into these issues and their ramifications for both military planners and policymakers, Trend Lines is joined by Ulrike Franke, a senior policy fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, where she specializes in military technology, including unmanned aerial vehicles and artificial intelligence. Relevant articles on World Politics Review:  The Future of the Global Drone Market Will Not Be ‘Made in Europe'  Anti-Drone Advocacy Just Took a Major Leap Forward  The Campaign to Ban ‘Killer Robots' Just Got a Boost  Behind the Growth Market in Counter-Drone Technology  Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie.   To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.

Brussels Sprouts
Evolving Dynamics Within The Bloc, with Pierre Morcos and Jeremy Shapiro

Brussels Sprouts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 43:53


As the war between Russia and Ukraine drags on with little progress toward a resolution, fractures are beginning to appear in the European response. While the European Union successfully came together to take swift and decisive action during the early stages of the conflict, unity has been harder to come by in recent weeks, with differing perceptions and attitudes leading to more frequent disagreements among member states. There has been particularly harsh criticism directed against Germany and France, which some have accused of taking an overly conciliatory approach toward Russia, pointing to evidence such as German hesitation to deliver weapons to Ukraine and French statements calling for the West not to “humiliate” Russia. As Berlin and Paris receive increasing pushback from other member states who advocate for a bolder policy of unreserved support for Ukraine, the prospects for continued unity appear much less certain going forward. Pierre Morcos and Jeremy Shapiro join Jim Townsend and Nick Lokker to make sense of these differing European perspectives on the Russia-Ukraine war. Pierre Morcos is a visiting fellow in the Europe, Russia, and Eurasia Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies as well as a career diplomat with the French Foreign Service. Jeremy Shapiro is the research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, where he focuses on U.S. foreign policy and transatlantic relations.

RTÉ - News at One Podcast
Ukrainian President Zelensky says country's forces are holding on in Severodonetsk

RTÉ - News at One Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 4:53


Gustav Gressel - Senior Policy Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations give his assessment on the war in Ukraine

CFR On the Record
Virtual Roundtable: 50 Years Later: What Direction for China and Its Legal System

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022


Five decades ago, China was closed off to the world. In 1972, Jerome Cohen was part of the first U.S. delegations to travel to China after Richard Nixon's historic visit. A pioneer in Chinese legal studies in the 1960s, he has been deeply involved in Sino-U.S. political, legal, and business developments in past half-century—from the hopeful early days of China's reform era in the 1980s to the far darker atmosphere of recent years. In this roundtable, Jerome Cohen, adjunct senior fellow for Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations and faculty director emeritus and founder of NYU Law School's US-Asia Law Institute, reflects on the trajectory of China and its legal system over the past five decades.

Dave and Dujanovic
2022 China Challenge Summit: What is the risk of doing business with China?

Dave and Dujanovic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 9:35


The 2022 China Challenge Summit is taking place this Thursday June 9th hosted by UVU and the World Trade Center Utah. Boyd Matheson host of Inside Sources, shares the importance of this event, then we turn to Zoe Liu, a fellow for international political economy at the Council on Foreign Relations on the risk of doing business with China See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

8:10
Pyrrusowe zwycięstwo Unii. Czy Polska dostanie pieniądze z KPO?

8:10

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 30:43


Komisja Europejska zaakceptowała przedstawiony przez Polskę Krajowy Plan Odbudowy, a Ursula von der Leyen broniła w Parlamencie Europejskim tej decyzji. Kluczowe staje się pytanie czy polski rząd porozumiał się z Komisją co do warunków, jakie musi spełnić, by środki z Funduszu Odbudowy zostały uruchomione. Jeśli Komisja pójdzie na zbyt duże ustępstwa w imię wyciszenia sporu z Polską, może to się odbić czkawką Unii. "Stawka jest dużo większa niż 'tylko' porządek prawny Unii Europejskiej. To będzie miało też bardzo negatywne polityczne konsekwencje dla Unii" - mówi Piotr Buras z warszawskiego biura European Council on Foreign Relations w rozmowie z Bartoszem Wielińskim z "Gazety Wyborczej". Więcej podcastów na https://wyborcza.pl/podcast. Piszcie do nas w każdej sprawie na listy@wyborcza.pl.

The Times Of India Podcast
How 'fringe elements' could hit India's foreign relations

The Times Of India Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 24:33


Retired diplomat Talmiz Ahmad decodes why Islamic nations have reacted to a BJP spokesperson's statements and how it could affect foreign ties, and Indians working abroad.

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk
Ep. 140: The Making of Great Leaders with David Gergen

Talking Beats with Daniel Lelchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 47:47


“The idea of national service is to get people in urban America to live in rural America, and vice versa. I think people who get exposed to that want change. People want to be proud of what their generation does. They want to be able to look back thirty or forty years later and know they made a difference while they were in power.” David Gergen joins the podcast. Advisor to four presidents in both parties, he has had a front row seat to fifty years of American politics and international affairs. He is now turning his attention to the idea of leadership with his new book Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders are Made. As he points out, when our country was founded and had a population of three million people, we produced six world-class leaders: Washington, Jefferson, Adams, Franklin, Hamilton, and Madison. Now in 2022, we have 330 million people and we do not seem to be able to produce one great, charismatic leader. What is happening? What is happening with the nature of civic life in this country? Is it time for baby boomers to step aside and pass the torch to a younger generation? If you like what we do, please support the show. By making a one-time or recurring donation, you will contribute to us being able to present the highest quality interviews with the world's most compelling people. David Gergen is a professor of public service and founding director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School. In addition, he serves as a senior political analyst for CNN and works actively with a rising generation of new leaders. In the past, he has served as a White House adviser to four U.S. presidents of both parties: Nixon, Ford, Reagan and Clinton. He wrote about those experiences in his New York Times best-seller, Eyewitness to Power: The Essence of Leadership, Nixon to Clinton (Simon & Schuster, 2001). In the 1980s, he began a career in journalism. Starting with the MacNeil-Lehrer NewsHour in 1984, he has been a regular commentator on public affairs for some 30 years. Twice he has been a member of election coverage teams that won Peabody awards, and he has contributed to two Emmy award-winning political analysis teams. In the late 1980s, he was chief editor of U.S. News & World Report, working with publisher Mort Zuckerman to achieve record gains in circulation and advertising. Over the years, he has been active on many non-profit boards, serving in the past on the boards of both Yale and Duke Universities. Among his current boards are Teach for America, The Mission Continues, The Trilateral Commission, and Elon University's School of Law. David's work as director of the Center for Public Leadership at the Kennedy School has enabled him to work closely with a rising generation of younger leaders, especially social entrepreneurs, military veterans and Young Global Leaders chosen by the World Economic Forum. Through the generosity of outside donors, the Center helps to provide scholarships to over 100 students a year, preparing them to serve as leaders for the common good. The Center also promotes scholarship at the frontiers of leadership studies. A native of North Carolina, David is a member of the D.C. Bar, a veteran of the U.S. Navy, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the U.S. executive committee for the Trilateral Commission. He is an honors graduate of Yale and the Harvard Law School. He has been awarded 27 honorary degrees.

The Current
Why Turkey is objecting to Sweden and Finland joining NATO

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 15:47


Turkey is objecting to Sweden and Finland's bid to join NATO. We talk to Steven Erlanger, the chief diplomatic correspondent in Europe for the New York Times; and Aslı Aydıntaşbaş, a senior fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations.

Doomsday Watch with Arthur Snell

Of all the countries playing a part in the Ukraine crisis, Turkey is perhaps the most difficult to read. A NATO member and supplying drones to Ukraine, but at the same time thwarting Sweden and Finland's attempts to join the alliance, and hosting Russia's foreign minister Sergey Lavrov later this week. To discuss what Turkey and its president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan are trying to achieve, Aslı Aydıntaşbaş, Senior Fellow at the European Council on Foreign Relations, dials in from Istanbul to speak to Arthur Snell. We're putting out irregular war bulletins covering different aspects of the Ukraine crisis. You can support our work on the crowdfunding app Patreon: doomsdaywatch.co.uk Resources to help the Ukrainian people can be found here: https://ukrainewar.carrd.co/  “There is a feeling within Turkey that the country is on the verge of something great.”  “I live on the Bosporus, a few months ago I saw Russian ships coming down into the Black Sea.”  DOOMSDAY WATCH was written and presented by Arthur Snell, and produced by Robin Leeburn with Jacob Archbold. Theme tune and original music by Paul Hartnoll. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. DOOMSDAY WATCH is a Podmasters production Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CFR On the Record
Coping With Deglobalization: A Conversation With the Council of Councils

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022


Richard Haass, Sergio M. Alcocer, and Yul Sohn assess the degree of deglobalization and the dynamics behind any trend, whether the COVID-19 pandemic significantly accelerated developments, and the implications for international cooperation moving forward. The Council of Councils (CoC) is an international initiative created by the Council on Foreign Relations to connect leading foreign policy institutes from around the world in a dialogue on issues of global governance and multilateral cooperation. The CoC is composed of twenty-eight major policy institutes from some of the world's most influential countries. It is designed to facilitate candid, not-for-attribution dialogue and consensus-building among influential opinion leaders from both established and emerging nations, with the ultimate purpose of injecting the conclusions of its deliberations into high-level foreign policy circles within members' countries.

Two Mikes with Michael Scheuer and Col Mike
James Perloff: America Is Controlled By An Oligarchy

Two Mikes with Michael Scheuer and Col Mike

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 51:55


Mr. James Perloff joined The Two Mikes for a discussion of his work on the long history of the nefarious Counsel on Foreign Relations (CFR) and its allies. Formed in 1923 -- with the Federal Reserve already in place since 1913 -- the CFR worked with similar organizations in Europe, as well as the U.S. and European governments, to create America's current reality. Mr. Perloff accurately describes that reality by saying that "America is controlled by an oligarchy and its agenda, never by chance." Woodrow Wilson started the ball rolling in 1917 by unnecessarily taking the United States into a European war to save the British and French empires, and then, after the war, gave authoritarian government a domestic try by unleashing the Department of Justice to squash political dissent in the United States under the cover of the so-called "Red Scare". While this was occurring major U.S. bankers were loaning money to Lenin's Bolshevik government so that it could solidify its rule in Russia. This came after Imperial Germany had made sure that Lenin returned to Russia to promote revolution and Russia's withdrawal from the war, and later the British, Canadian, and U.S. governments helped Leon Trotsky get to Russia carrying a substantial sum of money. The next step was assigned to Franklin Roosevelt, who, as president, took the United States off the gold standard and confiscated gold from everyday Americans. Roosevelt next officially recognized the Soviet Union, and then successfully connived the United States into the European and Pacific Wars. Mr. Perloff provides a clear, comprehensive, and well-documented story of the fall of America into the hands of rich authoritarians (fascists?), a story that is still rapidly unfolding before the eyes of all Americans on a daily basis. James Perloff is author of The Shadows of Power, an exposé of the Council on Foreign Relations that has sold over 100,000 copies, and two books about the evidence against Darwin's theory of evolution, including Tornado in a Junkyard.   He wrote for The New American magazine for nearly three decades. His 2013 book, Truth Is a Lonely Warrior, is a comprehensive primer on the New World Order, supplemented by his 2019 book, Thirteen Pieces of the Jigsaw.His latest book, published in 2020, is COVID-19 and the Agendas to Come, Red-Pilled.His website is jamesperloff.net and he is on Twitter as James Perloff.“Listening to Two Mikes will make you smarter!”- Gov Robert L. Ehrlich, JrSponsors
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www.TooMikes.com

Trend Lines
Turkey's Contentious Foreign Policy and Domestic Politics

Trend Lines

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 40:18


Turkey is nominally a close military and political ally of the United States and other NATO countries, as well as an important economic partner to the European Union. But reading headlines in recent months and years, one wonders how close the Turkish government really feels to its western partners. Under President Erdogan, Turkey has waged war against Kurdish allies of the United States in Syria and Iraq, and supported militias associated with al-Qaida, Hamas and other Islamic extremists. It has also developed a somewhat close relationship with Russia, even buying a Russian air defense system despite strident opposition from the United States—a decision which got it kicked out of the U.S.-led F-35 fighter jet program. In the wake of the Russian invasion of Ukraine, Turkey has, largely succesfully, tried to maintain good relations with both sides and act as a mediator, delivering weapons to Ukraine and refraining from sanctions on Russia. None of this can be understood without taking a close look at Turkey's domestic politics and especially its long-running economic crisis and the upcoming general elections in 2023 that could challenge President Erdogan's increasingly authoritarian grip on power. Steven A. Cook, senior fellow for Middle East and Africa studies at the Council on Foreign Relations joins Trend Lines from Washington to discuss Turkish foreign policy and domestic politics, and the relationship between the two. If you would like to request a full transcript of the episode, please send an email to podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com.   Relevant articles on World Politics Review: Erdogan Is Giving Turkey's ‘Zero Problems' Strategy Another Try  Sweden and Finland's NATO Bids Hit a Roadblock Named Erdogan  Can Turkey's Erdogan Rebuild the Bridges He Has Burned?  Erdogan's Engagement Finds Willing Partners in Africa  Erdogan Has a Lot Riding on the Russia-Ukraine Crisis  Erdogan's Obsession With Low Interest Rates Could Be His Downfall Trend Lines is produced and edited by Peter Dörrie, a freelance journalist and analyst focusing on security and resource politics in Africa. You can follow him on Twitter at @peterdoerrie. To send feedback or questions, email us at podcast@worldpoliticsreview.com

The World Next Week
Summit of the Americas, One Hundred Days of War in Ukraine, and More

The World Next Week

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 34:59


The United States hosts the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles, Ukraine marks one hundred days since the Russian invasion began, and the EU Foreign Affairs Council convenes in Brussels to talk trade.   Events and Speeches Mentioned on the Podcast   Antony Blinken, “The Administration's Approach to the People's Republic of China,” delivered at The George Washington University, May 26, 2022   “Russia's War in Ukraine: How Does it End?” Council on Foreign Relations, May 31, 2022

Nessun luogo è lontano
Consiglio Europeo: stop al petrolio russo, o quasi, Xi Jinping incontra il suo "sceriffo" John Lee

Nessun luogo è lontano

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022


Abbiamo provato ad analizzare le implicazioni dell'embargo dell'Unione europea sul petrolio russo insieme ad Arturo Varvelli (direttore ECFR Roma - European Council on Foreign Relations) e Maria Avdeeva (ricercatrice all'European Expert Association, think-tank ucraino su sicurezza e disinformazione). Subito dopo siamo andati in Congo, dove è in corso una guerra diplomatica con il Rwanda e dove negli ultimi due mesi il gruppo ribelle M23 ha avviato un'escalation militare: ne abbiamo parlato conCristoph N. Vogel (autore di "Conflict Minerals Inc.", tra le voci più autorevoli del mondo sul Congo e la regione dei Grandi Laghi). Infine abbiamo viaggiato tra Hong Kong e Pechino, dove il presidente Xi Jinping ha ricevuto John Lee, prossimo capo dell'esecutivo hongkonghese: ne abbiamo parlato con Ilaria Maria Sala, giornalista di "Guardian" e "Internazionale", autrice di "L'Eclissi di Hong Kong" (add editore)