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U.S. signals intelligence organization

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Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove
For the Back of the Room: Vimesh Patel, Chief Technology Advisor at World Wide Technology and Board of Directors Member at INSA.

Outspoken with Shana Cosgrove

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 45:40


Identity, Family, and Protecting the Nation.In this episode of The Outspoken Podcast, host Shana Cosgrove talks to Vimesh Patel, Chief Technology Advisor at World Wide Technology and Board of Directors Member at INSA. Vimesh and Shana discuss how they first met and what she learned from him. Vimesh details his early experience with the NSA and how he was able to secure paternity leave for the birth of each of his 3 children. Vimesh also explains how he found meaning during his career journey, realizing that service to his country gave the work that he was doing a deeper meaning. Finally, Vimesh tells us what he reads to stay informed and how his extroversion is not an endless resource. QUOTES “So many people say, ‘People are natural leaders or they're just really good at what they do.' And I say, ‘you can train yourself in anything.' I think it's learning and practicing.” - Vimesh Patel [06:18] “At 16, they're putting me on a polygraph and asking me if I've ever revealed classified information, not that I ever knew any classified information at the age of 16. And somehow I got cleared right, and I walked into the world of the intelligence community.” - Vimesh Patel [08:06]  “And I think it was something towards the end of my career that I was always conscious of - well now I'm in that senior seat right, and people are looking at me. What do I do to make it so that people are comfortable? So that we have more diversity and that people don't feel like they can't advance in the government.” - Vimesh Patel [17:02]   TIMESTAMPS  [00:04] Intro [01:31] Meeting Vimesh [05:07] Vimesh's Body Language Talk [06:45] Beginning a Career with The NSA [08:23] Vimesh's Parents [09:24] Choosing Electrical Engineering [10:28] How Vimesh Became a Senior Relatively Quickly [11:00] Advice on Finding a Mentor [13:25] Vimesh's Two Master Degrees [15:22] How Vimesh Met his Wife [16:06] Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion [23:17] Vimesh's Time at The National Counterterrorism Center [26:43] Vimesh's Location When 9/11 Occurred [28:09] After NCTC and Vimesh's Paternity Leave [31:33] Balance Within Marriage [32:49] Leaving The NSA [36:40] Intelligence and National Security Alliance (INSA) [40:35] Vimesh's Advice to Young People [42:02] What Vimesh is Reading [43:20] Vimesh's Surprising Fact [45:20] Outro     RESOURCES https://www.moogsoft.com/resources/aiops/guide/everything-aiops/ (AIOps) https://www.nsa.gov/ (National Security Agency (NSA)) https://www.howardcountymd.gov/ (Howard County) https://www.wsscwater.com/ (Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission (WSSC Water)) https://www.umd.edu/ (University of Maryland) https://www.jhu.edu/ (The Johns Hopkins University) https://www.gwu.edu/ (The George Washington University) https://dei.extension.org/ (Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI)) https://www.dni.gov/index.php/nctc-home (The National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)) https://www.dni.gov/index.php/careers/joint-duty (Joint Duty Opportunities) https://www.dni.gov/ (Office of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI)) https://9-11commission.gov/report/ (9/11 Commission Report) https://www.opm.gov/about-us/our-people-organization/support-functions/office-of-strategy-and-innovation/#:~:text=The%20Office%20of%20Strategy%20and,Group%20and%20Survey%20Analysis%20Group. (The Office of Strategy and Innovation (OSI)) https://www.optiv.com/ (Optiv Security, Inc.) https://www.insaonline.org/event/8a-national-security-showcase/ (8(a) National Security Showcase) https://hbr.org/ (Harvard Business Review)   RELEVANT LINKS https://www.linkedin.com/in/vimeshpatel-dc/ (Vimesh Patel) on LinkedIn https://www.wwt.com/ (World Wide Technology) https://www.insaonline.org/ (Intelligence and National Security Alliance (INSA)) https://nylatechnologysolutions.com/ (Nyla Technology Solutions) I'd love to hear from you -- your feedback is important to me and I read all of it. If you...

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News
The NSA pinky swears there is "No Backdoor" in their new encryption!

The Deep Dive Radio Show and Nick's Nerd News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 10:47


The NSA pinky swears there is "No Backdoor" in their new encryption! by Nick Espinosa, Chief Security Fanatic

The History of Computing
Research In Motion and the Blackberry

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 25:45


Lars Magnus Ericsson was working for the Swedish government that made telegraph equipment in the 1870s when he started a little telegraph repair shop in 1976. That was the same year the telephone was invented. After fixing other people's telegraphs and then telephones he started a company making his own telephone equipment. He started making his own equipment and by the 1890s was shipping gear to the UK. As the roaring 20s came, they sold stock to buy other companies and expanded quickly. Early mobile devices used radios to connect mobile phones to wired phone networks and following projects like ALOHANET in the 1970s they expanded to digitize communications, allowing for sending early forms of text messages, the way people might have sent those telegraphs when old Lars was still alive and kicking. At the time, the Swedish state-owned Televerket Radio was dabbling in this space and partnered with Ericsson to take first those messages then as email became a thing, email, to people wirelessly using the 400 to 450 MHz range in Europe and 900 MHz in the US. That standard went to the OSI and became a 1G wireless packet switching network we call Mobitex. Mike Lazaridis was born in Istanbul and moved to Canada in 1966 when he was five, attending the University of Waterloo in 1979. He dropped out of school to take a contract with General Motors to build a networked computer display in 1984. He took out a loan from his parents, got a grant from the Canadian government, and recruited another electrical engineering student, Doug Fregin from the University of Windsor, who designed the first circuit boards. to join him starting a company they called Research in Motion. Mike Barnstijn joined them and they were off to do research.  After a few years doing research projects, they managed to build up a dozen employees and a million in revenues. They became the first Mobitex provider in America and by 1991 shipped the first Mobitex device. They brought in James Balsillie as co-CEO, to handle corporate finance and business development in 1992, a partnership between co-CEOs that would prove fruitful for 20 years.  Some of those work-for-hire projects they'd done involved reading bar codes so they started with point-of-sale, enabling mobile payments and by 1993 shipped RIMGate, a gateway for Mobitex. Then a Mobitex point-of-sale terminal and finally with the establishment of the PCMCIA standard, a  PCMCIP Mobitex modem they called Freedom. Two-way paging had already become a thing and they were ready to venture out of PoS systems. So  in 1995, they took a $5 million investment to develop the RIM 900 OEM radio modem. They also developed a pager they called the Inter@ctive Pager 900 that was capable of  two-way messaging the next year. Then they went public on the Toronto Stock Exchange in 1997. The next year, they sold a licensing deal to IBM for the 900 for $10M dollars. That IBM mark of approval is always a sign that a company is ready to play in an enterprise market. And enterprises increasingly wanted to keep executives just a quick two-way page away. But everyone knew there was a technology convergence on the way. They worked with Ericsson to further the technology and over the next few years competed with SkyTel in the interactive pager market. Enter The Blackberry They knew there was something new coming. Just as the founders know something is coming in Quantum Computing and run a fund for that now. They hired a marketing firm called Lexicon Branding to come up with a name and after they saw the keys on the now-iconic keyboard, the marketing firm suggested BlackBerry. They'd done the research and development and they thought they had a product that was special. So they released the first BlackBerry 850 in Munich in 1999. But those were still using radio networks and more specifically the DataTAC network. The age of mobility was imminent, although we didn't call it that yet. Handspring and Palm each went public in 2000.  In 2000, Research In Motion brought its first cellular phone product in the BlackBerry 957, with push email and internet capability. But then came the dot com bubble. Some thought the Internet might have been a fad and in fact might disappear. But instead the world was actually ready for that mobile convergence. Part of that was developing a great operating system for the time when they released the BlackBerry OS the year before. And in 2000 the BlackBerry was named Product of the Year by InfoWorld.  The new devices took the market by storm and shattered the previous personal information manager market, with shares of that Palm company dropping by over 90% and Palm OS being setup as it's own corporation within a couple of years. People were increasingly glued to their email. While the BlackBerry could do web browsing and faxing over the internet, it was really the integrated email access, phone, and text messaging platform that companies like General Magic had been working on as far back as the early 1990s. The Rise of the BlackBerry The BlackBerry was finally the breakthrough mobile product everyone had been expecting and waiting for. Enterprise-level security, integration with business email like Microsoft's Exchange Server, a QWERTY keyboard that most had grown accustomed to, the option to use a stylus, and a simple menu made the product an instant smash success. And by instant we mean after five years of research and development and a massive financial investment. The Palm owned the PDA market. But the VII cost $599 and the BlackBerry cost $399 at the time (which was far less than the $675 Inter@ctive Pager had cost in the 1990s). The Palm also let us know when we had new messages using the emerging concept of push notifications. 2000 had seen the second version of the BlackBerry OS and their AOL Mobile Communicator had helped them spread the message that the wealthy could have access to their data any time. But by 2001 other carriers were signing on to support devices and BlackBerry was selling bigger and bigger contracts. 5,000 devices, 50,000 devices, 100,000 devices. And a company called Kasten Chase stepped in to develop a secure wireless interface to the Defense Messaging System in the US, which opened up another potential two million people in the defense industry They expanded the service to cover more and more geographies in 2001 and revenues doubled, jumping to 164,000 subscribers by the end of the year. That's when they added wireless downloads so could access all those MIME attachments in email and display them. Finally, reading PDFs on a phone with the help of GoAmerica Communications! And somehow they won a patent for the idea that a single email address could be used on both a mobile device and a desktop. I guess the patent office didn't understand why IMAP  was invented by Mark Crispin at Stanford in the 80s, or why Exchange allowed multiple devices access to the same mailbox. They kept inking contracts with other companies. AT&T added the BlackBerry in 2002 in the era of GSM. The 5810 was the first truly convergent BlackBerry that offered email and a phone in one device with seamless SMS communications. It shipped in the US and the 5820 in Europe and Cingular Wireless jumped on board in the US and Deutsche Telekom in Germany, as well as Vivendi in France, Telecom Italia in Italy, etc. The devices had inched back up to around $500 with service fees ranging from $40 to $100 plus pretty limited data plans. The Tree came out that year but while it was cool and provided a familiar interface to the legions of Palm users, it was clunky and had less options for securing communications. The NSA signed on and by the end of the year they were a truly global operation, raking in revenues of nearly $300 million.  The Buying Torndado They added web-based application in 2003, as well as network printing. They moved to a Java-based interface and added the 6500 series, adding a walkie-talkie function. But that 6200 series at around $200 turned out to be huge. This is when they went into that thing a lot of companies do - they started suing companies like Good and Handspring for infringing on patents they probably never should have been awarded. They eventually lost the cases and paid out tens of millions of dollars in damages. More importantly they took their eyes off innovating, a common mistake in the history of computing companies. Yet there were innovations. They released Blackberry Enterprise Server in 2004 then bolted on connectors to Exchange, Lotus Domino, and allowed for interfacing with XML-based APIs in popular enterprise toolchains of the day. They also later added support for GroupWise. That was one of the last solutions that worked with symmetric key cryptography I can remember using and initially required the devices be cradled to get the necessary keys to secure communications, which then worked over Triple-DES, common at the time. One thing we never liked was that messages did end up living at Research in Motion, even if encrypted at the time. This is one aspect that future types of push communications would resolve. And Microsoft Exchange's ActiveSync.  By 2005 there were CVEs filed for BlackBerry Enterprise Server, racking up 17 in the six years that product shipped up to 5.0 in 2010 before becoming BES 10 and much later Blackberry Enterprise Mobility Management, a cross-platform mobile device management solution. Those BES 4 and 5 support contracts, or T-Support, could cost hundreds of dollars per incident. Microsoft had Windows Mobile clients out that integrated pretty seamlessly with Exchange. But people loved their Blackberries. Other device manufacturers experimented with different modes of interactivity. Microsoft made APIs for pens and keyboards that flipped open. BlackBerry added a trackball in 2006, that was always kind of clunky. Nokia, Ericsson, Motorola, and others were experimenting with new ways to navigate devices, but people were used to menus and even styluses. And they seemed to prefer a look and feel that seemed like what they used for the menuing control systems on HVAC controls, video games, and even the iPod.  The Eye Of The Storm A new paradigm was on the way. Apple's iPhone was released in 2007 and Google's Android OS in 2008. By then the BlackBerry Pearl was shipping and it was clear which devices were better. No one saw the two biggest threats coming. Apple was a consumer company. They were slow to add ActiveSync policies, which many thought would be the corporate answer to mobile management as group policies in Active Directory had become for desktops. Apple  and Google were slow to take the market, as BlackBerry continued to dominate the smartphone industry well into 2010, especially once then-president Barack Obama strong-armed the NSA into allowing him to use a special version of the BlackBerry 8830 World Edition for official communiques. Other world leaders followed suit, as did the leaders of global companies that had previously been luddites when it came to constantly being online. Even Eric Schmidt, then chairman of google loved his Crackberry in 2013, 5 years after the arrival of Android. Looking back, we can see a steady rise in iPhone sales up to the iPhone 4, released in 2010. Many still said they loved the keyboard on their BlackBerries. Organizations had built BES into their networks and had policies dating back to NIST STIGs. Research in Motion owned the enterprise and held over half the US market and a fifth of the global market. That peaked in 2011. BlackBerry put mobility on the map. But companies like AirWatch, founded in 2003 and  MobileIron, founded in 2007, had risen to take a cross-platform approach to the device management aspect of mobile devices. We call them Unified Endpoint Protection products today and companies could suddenly support BlackBerry, Windows Mobile, and iPhones from a single console. Over 50 million Blackberries were being sold a year and the stock was soaring at over $230 a share.  Today, they hold no market share and their stock performance shows it. Even though they've pivoted to more of a device management company, given their decades of experience working with some of the biggest and most secure companies and governments in the world. The Fall Of The BlackBerry The iPhone was beautiful. It had amazing graphics and a full touch screen. It was the very symbol of innovation. The rising tide of the App Store also made it a developers playground (no pun intended). It was more expensive than the Blackberry, but while they didn't cater to the enterprise, they wedged their way in there with first executives and then anyone. Initially because of ActiveSync, which had come along in 1996 mostly to support Windows Mobile, but by Exchange Server 2003 SP 2 could do almost anything Outlook could do - provided software developers like Apple could make the clients work. So by 2011, Exchange clients could automatically locate a server based on an email address (or more to the point based on DNS records for the domain) and work just as webmail, which was open in almost every IIS implementation that worked with Exchange. And Office365 was released in 2011, paving the way to move from on-prem Exchange to what we now call “the cloud.” And Google Mail had been around for 7 years by then and people were putting it on the BlackBerry as well, blending home and office accounts on the same devices at times. In fact, Google licensed Exchange ActiveSync, or EAS in 2009 so support for Gmail was showing up on a variety of devices. BlackBerry had everything companies wanted. But people slowly moved to that new iPhone. Or Androids when decent models of phones started shipping with the OS on them. BlackBerry stuck by that keyboard, even though it was clear that people wanted full touchscreens. The BlackBerry Bold came out in 2009. BlackBerry had not just doubled down with the keyboard instead of full touchscreen, but they tripled down on it. They had released the Storm in 2008 and then the Storm in 2009 but they just had a different kind of customer. Albeit one that was slowly starting to retire. This is the hard thing about being in the buying tornado. We're so busy transacting that we can't think ahead to staying in the eye that we don't see how the world is changing outside of it.  As we saw with companies like Amdahl and Control Data, when we only focus on big customers and ignore the mass market we leave room for entrants in our industries who have more mass appeal. Since the rise of the independent software market following the IBM anti-trust cases, app developers have been a bellwether of successful platforms. And the iPhone revenue split was appealing to say the least.  Sales fell off fast. By 2012, the BlackBerry represented less than 6 percent of smartphones sold and by the start of 2013 that number dropped in half, falling to less than 1 percent in 2014. That's when the White House tested replacements for the Blackberry. There was a small bump in sales when they finally released a product that had competitive specs to the iPhone, but it was shortly lived. The Crackberry craze was officially over.  BlackBerry shot into the mainstream and brought the smartphone with them. They made the devices secure and work seamlessly in corporate environments and for those who could pay money to run BES or BIS. They proved the market and then got stuck in the Innovator's Dilemna. They became all about features that big customers wanted and needed. And so they missed the personal part of personal computing. Apple, as they did with the PC and then graphical user interfaces saw a successful technology and made people salivate over it. They saw how Windows had built a better sandbox for developers and built the best app delivery mechanism the world has seen to date. Google followed suit and managed to take a much larger piece of the market with more competitive pricing.  There is so much we didn't discuss, like the short-lived Playbook tablet from BlackBerry. Or the Priv. Because for the most part, they a device management solution today. The founders are long gone, investing in the next wave of technology: Quantum Computing. The new face of BlackBerry is chasing device management, following adjacencies into security and dabbling in IoT for healthcare and finance. Big ticket types of buys that include red teaming to automotive management to XDR. Maybe their future is in the convergence of post-quantum security, or maybe we'll see their $5.5B market cap get tasty enough for one of those billionaires who really, really, really wants their chicklet keyboard back. Who knows but part of the fun of this is it's a living history.    

The CyberWire
Dealing with Follina. SeaFlower steals cryptocurrencies. Cyber phases of a hybrid war, with some skeptical notes on Anonymous. And the war's effect on the underworld.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 26:39


Dealing with the GRU's exploitation of the Follina vulnerabilities. SeaFlower uses stolen seed phrases to rifle cryptocurrency wallets. Ukraine moves sensitive data abroad. Anonymous claims to have hacked Russia's drone suppliers and to have hit sensitive targets in Belarus. Rick Howard reports on an NSA briefing at the RSA Conference. Our guest is Ricardo Amper from Incode with a look at biometrics in sports stadiums. And the effects of war on the cyber underworld. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/114 Selected reading. Follina flaw being exploited by Russian hackers, info stealers (Computing)  Chinese Hackers Adding Backdoor to iOS, Android Web3 Wallets in 'SeaFlower' Campaign (SecurityWeek) How SeaFlower...installs backdoors in iOS/Android web3 wallets to steal your seed phrase (Medium)  Ukraine Has Begun Moving Sensitive Data Outside Its Borders (Wall Street Journal)  Anonymous claims hack on Russian drones (Computing)  How the Cybercrime Landscape has been Changed following the Russia-Ukraine War (Kela)

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael
Let's Agree to Disagree w/ Mickey Huff & Nolan Higdon/Origins: Birth of a Pandemic w/ John Duffy

Parallax Views w/ J.G. Michael

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 120:19


On this edition of Parallax Views, Project Censored's Mickey Huff and Nolan Higdon return to the program to discuss their new book, available now from Routledge, Let's Agree to Disagree A Critical Thinking Guide to Communication, Conflict Management, and Critical Media Literacy. This was recorded around the time that Mia Janowicz and the Department of Homeland Security's Disinformation Governance Board was in the news so we also delve into issues related to censorship and corporate media bias. In the course of our conversation we also touch upon critical theory and Frankfurt School thinkers like Herbert Marcuse, the abortion debate, and much, much more! In the second segment of the show, a previously unpublished conversation from early 2022 in which J.G. spoke with friend of the show and returning guest John Duffy (co-author with Ray Nowosielski of The Watchdogs Didn't Bark: The CIA, NSA, and the Crimes of the War on Terror and the investigative documentary podcast After The Uprising: The Death Of Danyé Dion Jones) to discuss Duffy's latest docu-podcast Origins: Birth of a Pandemic, which investigates the issue of COVID and the lab leak hypothesis. In the conversation we discuss a number of topics including biolabs and biodefense, Anthony Fauci, Peter Daszak and the EcoHealth Alliance, biosafety, and much, much more!

The CyberWire
A new RAT from Beijing. Muslim hacktivism in India. Ukraine reports a GRU spam campaign against media outlets. A Moscow court fines Wikimedia. And that UK cyber disaster was just a promo.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 27:00


A Chinese APT deploys a new cyberespionage tool. Hacktivism roils India after a politician's remarks about the Prophet. Ukraine reports a "massive" spam campaign against the country's media organizations. A Russian court fines Wikimedia for "disinformation." From the NSA's Cybersecurity Collaboration Center our guests are Morgan Adamski and Josh Zaritsky. Rick Howard sets the cyber sand table on Colonial Pipeline. And the Martians haven't landed, and the Right Honorable Mr. Johnson is still PM. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/113 Selected reading. CERT-UA warns of cyberattack on Ukrainian media (Interfax-Ukraine) Russian hackers start targeting Ukraine with Follina exploits (BleepingComputer) Massive cyber attack on media organizations of Ukraine using the malicious program CrescentImp (CERT-UA # 4797) (CERT-UA) Wikimedia Foundation appeals Russian fine over Ukraine war articles (The Verge) GALLIUM Expands Targeting Across Telecommunications, Government and Finance Sectors With New PingPull Tool (Unit42) Prophet remark: Slew of cyber attacks on Indian govt, private sites (The Times of India) 70 Indian government, private websites face international cyber attacks over Prophet row (The Times of India) Channel 4 faces Ofcom probe over 'emergency news' stunt to promote cyber attack drama The Undeclared War (INews)

Impressions of America: History Podcast
George W. Bush - Second Term Troubles

Impressions of America: History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 122:37


Simon, Tobi, and Vaughn conclude their series of shows on George W. Bush by looking at his second term as president. We cover a range of topics, including the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the NSA's domestic spying program, Hurricane Katrina, the 2006 mid-term elections, and the 2008 great recession. And at the end of the show we discuss Bush's legacy.

The Free Zone w/ Freeman Fly
The Rise of the Fourth Reich – Jim Marrs

The Free Zone w/ Freeman Fly

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 46:13


Jim Marrs joins Freeman for a discussion of Alien connections to the Nazi elite and the rise of the Fourth Reich in America. Also discussed are the Annunaki, ancient Sumer and Egypt. Jim is an expert on Ancient Astronauts, the NWO, Nazi UFOs, Skull and Bones, Bush Dynasty, the CIA, and NSA, Trilateral Commission, Bilderbergers, […]

The CyberWire
The cautionary example of a hybrid war. SentinelOne finds a Chinese APT operating quietly since 2012. A hardware vulnerability in Apple M1 chips. And go, Tigers.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 32:20


Looking at Russia's hybrid war as a cautionary example. Russia warns, again, that it will meet cyberattacks with appropriate retaliation. (China says "us too.") NSA and FBI warn of nation-state cyber threats. SentinelOne finds a Chinese APT that's been operating, quietly, for a decade. "Unpatchable" vulnerability in Apple chips reported. We've got more interviews from RSA Conference, including the FBI's Cyber Section Chief David Ring, ExtraHop's CEO, Patrick Dennis. And the overhead projector said, “Go Tigers.” For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/112 Selected reading. Top Senate Democrats sound the alarm about Russian interference in the 2022 midterms (Business Insider)  Russia says West risks ‘direct military clash' over cyberattacks (NBC News) Russia, China, oppose US cyber support of Ukraine (Register)  #RSAC: NSA Outlines Threats from Russia, China and Ransomware (Infosecurity Magazine)  FBI official: Chinese hackers boost recon efforts (The Record by Recorded Future)  Aoqin Dragon | Newly-Discovered Chinese-linked APT Has Been Quietly Spying On Organizations For 10 Years (SentinelOne)  MIT researchers uncover ‘unpatchable' flaw in Apple M1 chips (TechCrunch) New Jersey school district forced to cancel final exams amid ransomware recovery effort (The Record by Recorded Future)

Dead Time
UFOs & Existence

Dead Time

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 34:32


Dead Time Season 5 Episode 6 UFOs & ExistenceWith Arlequin & Translator JanniferArlequin is  a cooperative within the NSA (National Security Agency) and co-founder ofthe international movement called Q.  He is also a member of the Special Forces secret programs such as TWENTY & BACK, PEGASUS AVATAR, and LOOKING GLASS. He operates under the code names of ARLEQUIN and SOPHIA through Q and NSA correspondingly and who also identify me as #9.The messages delivered from Arlequin is to serve one large goal, which is to bring about the realization of what this world is really about. To Connect with Arlequin please visit his media below: Telegram:    https://t.me/arlequinweareoneQFacebook:  https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100079252511802y YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMTDxIL2ieYnLT-JQBf6H_QEmail:  arlequinweareone@gmail.comWebsite: https://n961986.websitebuilder.online/

The CyberWire
Updates on the hybrid war: hacktivism and hunting forward. Election security. Trends in phishing. The return of Emotet.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 28:36


Another hacked broadcast in a hybrid war. Hunting forward as an exercise in threat intelligence collection and sharing. Cyber threats to the US midterm elections. Phishing for cryptocurrency. FakeCrack delivers a malicious payload to the unwary. Vacations are back. So is travel-themed phishbait. Ann Johnson from Microsoft shares insights on the trends she's tracking here at RSA. Johannes Ullrich brings highlights from his RSA conference panel discussion. And Emotet returns, in the company of some old familiar criminal collaborators. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/111 Selected reading. Hacked Russian radio station broadcasts Ukrainian anthem (Washington Post)  Ukraine Successfully Defends Its Cyberspace While Russia Leans Heavily on Guns, Bombs (CNET) Ukraine war: US cyber chief on Kyiv's advantage over Russia (Sky News) NSA Director Confirms Cyber Command 'Hunt Forward' Approach Applies to Russia (ClearanceJobs)  Experts, NSA cyber director say ransomware could threaten campaigns in 2022 (CyberScoop) Ransomware, botnets could plague 2022 midterms, NSA cyber director says (The Record by Recorded Future) How Cyber Criminals Target Cryptocurrency (Proofpoint) Crypto stealing campaign spread via fake cracked software (Avast) Threat Actors Prepare Travel-Themed Phishing Lures for Summer Holidays (Hot for Security) Emotet Malware Returns in 2022 (Deep Instinct)

A Rational Fear
JUDITH NEILSON INSTITUTE LIVE: The Joke Is Mightier Than The Pen

A Rational Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 80:30


covid-19 god america tv love american donald trump president google australia art earth science tiktok dogs england canadian speaking club russia reading australian barack obama ideas italian berlin mars oscars modern white house abc greek comedians cbs journalists vladimir putin navy senate guardian id adolf hitler scientists journalism syria ranking secretary mark zuckerberg excellent joke prime minister globe parliament iq sovereignty nobel forced msnbc emperor boris johnson jenkins cabinet ridiculous tupac jubilee abc news boo nsa space force attorney generals boomer tasmania kim jong un canberra damascus useless roswell higgins biggie princess diana corp tao bow clive manor benji melania trump john oliver sunlight herald topical rupert prince andrew vicious sky news voltaire sbs labour party scott morrison gary busey chaser sydney morning herald australian government rupert murdoch sydney opera house governor general new clothes news corp andrew johnson celebrity apprentice little john triple j white house correspondents dinner hildebrand mightier pmo holy roman empire sps amicus lismore rabbitohs clive palmer omaha steaks penrith panthers red rooster peter cook baga manus island gordon smith tom lehrer unwittingly seto harvey norman mark mcgowan walkley channel seven andrew denton what trump unknown speaker brittany higgins new journalism sonia kruger dan ilic dan jenkins jan fran ben jenkins japes joe hildebrand david hurley supreme team paul mcdermott judith neilson institute blue dogs hello is vaxxer lewis hobba
Cyber Security Inside
101. How to Protect Against Cyber Attacks? RSA Panelists Say Collaboration

Cyber Security Inside

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 25:15


In this episode of Cyber Security Inside, panelists from the 2022 RSA Conference share their thoughts about collaboration against some of the biggest cybersecurity threats. Camille Morhardt talks with Tom Garrison (VP & GM Client Security Strategy & Initiatives at Intel Corporation), Abhilasha Bhargav-Spantzel (Partner Security Architect, Microsoft Corporation), Aanchal Gupta (VP Microsoft Security Response Center, Microsoft), and Dr. Diane Janosek (Director, Commandant , National Cryptologic School, NSA). The conversation covers: -  Why our panelists think collaboration across the private and public sectors is the only way forward in cybersecurity. -  What the panelists think about threats to the supply chain. -  Why it's true that as we develop more complex technology, protecting gets more difficult. -  What our panelists think are the most urgent things to be thinking about in the world of cybersecurity. ...and more. Don't miss it!   The views and opinions expressed are those of the guests and author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of Intel Corporation. Here are some key takeaways: - This podcast is a round robin of panelists from the 2022 RSA Cybersecurity Conference, talking with three panelists from the panel called “All Hands on Deck: A Whole-of-Society Approach for Cybersecurity.” - One of the threats on the top of the panelists' minds is supply chain security risks. A lot of reliance on third-party software is what is causing some of these risks, as is how pervasive some of these softwares are throughout the community, making a large range of software potentially vulnerable. -  The only way to really tackle this is as a full cybersecurity community. There need to be partnerships between different industries working to keep our technology safe. -  An example of these partnerships is seen in the Ukraine war. Russia is conducting a hybrid attack, and Microsoft partnered with Ukraine cybersecurity agencies to map out the threats.  -  The NOBELIUM attacks were an example of people sharing intel and insights through blogs and other means. The whole industry could come together and learn from it to see if they were getting attacked in the network. -  As our technologies get more complex, the difficulty in repairing, managing, and protecting them gets more difficult. A car from the 80s was much easier to fix than one of today's cars. This is especially true with remote work. -  Interfacing with third parties to determine if a device is safe or if technology is working and secure isn't enough anymore. The companies themselves need to be able to answer that question with confidence internally. For example, you need to be able to talk directly with Intel about the security of their products and know that they can answer that question. -  Transparency is key to this collaboration and teamwork. Knowing what is inside your device empowers customers to make good decisions around their devices, the state of those devices, and if it is trustworthy. It puts some ownership and knowledge in the hands of the user. -  What can product divisions be doing? First is investing in your own product division to focus on security research. Then it is about taking those learnings and improving your future products with that information. Constantly investing, learning, and improving. -  The two potential goals of attackers are to either make money off of someone or to cause a disruption. They are using AI to do this. The models we use to detect and respond to attacks rely on the integrity of our data. So what happens when that data is altered by adversaries? -  The NSA works to protect the US from cyber attacks. They are protecting the digital network and are watching threat factors. The guests discussed transparency between the NSA and the other sectors in the government to make sure that Americans are protected. They stressed the need to share information and partner together. -  Who is responsible for cybersecurity? Everyone. The private sector, the government, you the user. Everyone. Because cyber is personal to all of us and affects all of us, we need to make sure that we are securing it as a community.   Some interesting quotes from today's episode:   “Our dependence on this third-party software [for supply chain security] is growing and it is becoming very attractive for our threat actors to find the soft spots. They could easily convince an insider to get onto and modify some code in the supply chain, or they can inject this malicious payload into the supply chain.” - Aanchal Gupta   “The usage of this certain software is literally like salt in our pantry. And when I say salt in our pantry, when you look at different food items, and you start to look at the ingredient list, you will most likely find salt in there. And if someone were to tell you, ‘hey, salt is contaminated and you need to do something about it for the food items in your pantry,' it would be immensely difficult… That's what made Log4j such a big challenge for the entire community.” - Aanchal Gupta   “I think we have to continue to evolve this partnership globally, because that is the only way we can defend against these threats. Let's also not penalize the people for sharing a breach of their system. We need to shift the culture from blame to community support. When we support organizations to be forthcoming about their experience, they get better insights. We are able to help identify the supply chain risks sooner.” - Aanchal Gupta   “The technology is so, so, so much more complicated. And the same is true for our platforms, whether it be a client platform, a server platform, and the like. Couple that with the fact that we have devices now being used in ways that have never been envisioned before. Workers that are outside the four walls of the company are subject to a whole different kind of attacks.” - Tom Garrison   “That first step is around transparency. So what we want to do is to peel back this sort of almost secrecy that's existed around what components are used to build your device - whether it's a PC or a server or an IOT device. And we think that with that transparency comes a level now of intelligence you can have.” - Tom Garrison   “Our adversaries have two intentions in mind. That is to make as much money as they can off of you, or cause as much disruption as they can. Or two of them together. And they're using adversarial AI where they'll come together and understand where the sweet spots are to affect us and to cause the most amount of damage or harm or financial damage. So from an adversarial AI perspective, how do we respond to that?” - Dr. Diane Janosek   “What do you have to do to kind of raise the bar? It's giving the tools and the information, sharing what we know about vulnerabilities, sharing what we know about threat factors, sharing what we know about adversarial attacks and with the emerging threats that are coming down the pike. If we can share that with the other 80% in the healthcare sector, the financial sector, the energy sector, all 16 sectors… If we can share what we know, Americans as a whole can go to sleep knowing that their country is better protected.” - Dr. Diane Janosek   “It takes everybody. It takes people, patching their systems, doing the updates on their iPhone, making sure they have a password on their home network. You want to make sure that the government's doing the right thing, that they're really locking up the supply chain and that they're really securing water supply plants. The planes are safe. The hospitals are safe. At the end of the day, cyber is personal… cyber affects all of us.” - Dr. Diane Janosek

Technical Difficulties Gaming Podcast
Delta Green - Operation WINDY SEED Part 1

Technical Difficulties Gaming Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 159:19


Ben begins a two-parter Delta Green scenario he wrote! DG agents are called in on an assignment in Baxter, MO. A highway expansion project has turned up evidence that was tagged by the NSA for DG. The evidence may be connected to a serial killer who operated in Baxter in the late 90s. The agents drive down to investigate...This scenario will include themes of body mutilation and body horror. Listener discretion is advised.Ben - GMDan - Dr. Larry CarverEthan - FBI Agent Taryn Convery

No Password Required
Vice Admiral Mike McConnell BONUS Episode - the former NSA director, an elite storyteller whose life resembles a Grisham novel, and an appreciator of formaldehyde-free beer

No Password Required

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 14:51


Vice Admiral Mike McConnell is the former director of the National Security Agency (NSA) and the current Executive Director of Cyber Florida. In this two-part episode, VADM McConnell stuns the No Password Required team to silence with stories of his life, which just so happens to resemble a riveting Grisham novel. A few highlights include the reason he refuses to drink cheap beer (or formaldehyde), some iconic moments during his time at the NSA, and more. Ernie, Jack, and Pablo break down the Strengthening Cybersecurity Act and the biggest commitment one can make: cowboy boots. In the Technologue segment, Pablo discusses the importance of cloud vulnerability evolution.

No Password Required
Vice Admiral Mike McConnell - the former NSA director, an elite storyteller whose life resembles a Grisham novel, and an appreciator of formaldehyde-free beer

No Password Required

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 94:02


Vice Admiral Mike McConnell is the former director of the National Security Agency (NSA) and the current Executive Director of Cyber Florida. In this two-part episode, VADM McConnell stuns the No Password Required team to silence with stories of his life, which just so happens to resemble a riveting Grisham novel. A few highlights include the reason he refuses to drink cheap beer (or formaldehyde), some iconic moments during his time at the NSA, and more. Ernie, Jack, and Pablo break down the Strengthening Cybersecurity Act and the biggest commitment one can make: cowboy boots. In the Technologue segment, Pablo discusses the importance of cloud vulnerability evolution.

The CyberWire
Updates on the cyber phases of Russia's hybrid war, including the role of DDoS and cyber offensive operations. Ransomware, bad and sometimes bogus

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 26:55


DDoS as a weapon in a hybrid war. Resilience in the defense of critical infrastructure. Offensive cyber operations against Russia. LockBit claims to have hit Mandiant, but their claim looks baseless. Rick Howard joins us with thoughts on trends he's tracking at the RSA conference. Our guest is Dr. Diane Janosek from NSA with insights on personal resilience. Effects of ransomware on businesses. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/109 Selected reading. Ukraine at D+102: Ukraine's SSSCIP on cyber war. (The CyberWire)  Major DDoS attacks increasing after invasion of Ukraine (SearchSecurity)  The Russia–Ukraine War: Ukraine's resistance in the face of hybrid warfare (Observer Research Foundation) Ukraine Symposium - U.S. Offensive Cyber Operations in Support of Ukraine (Lieber Institute: Articles of War)  Russia ready to cooperate with all states in cyber domain (UNI India) LockBit 2.0 gang claims Mandiant as latest victim; Mandiant sees no evidence of it (CyberScoop) Mandiant: “No evidence” we were hacked by LockBit ransomware (BleepingComputer)  Cybereason Ransomware True Cost to Business Study Reveals Organizations Pay Multiple Ransom Demands (Cybereason) Average Ransom Payment Up 71% This Year, Approaches $1 Million (Palo Alto Networks Blog)

Black Hills Information Security
Talkin' About Infosec News – 5/16/2022

Black Hills Information Security

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 56:36


ORIGINALLY AIRED ON MAY 16, 2022 Articles discussed in this episode: 00:56 – Microsoft's May Patch Tuesday Updates Cause Windows AD Authentication Errors – https://threatpost.com/microsofts-may-patch-tuesday-updates-cause-windows-ad-authentication-errors/179631/ 08:56 – Update rings for Windows 10 and later policy in Intune – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/mem/intune/protect/windows-10-update-rings 09:06 – Infosec Weather Report With Bud Patches – 12:26 – FBI, CISA, and NSA warn […] The post Talkin' About Infosec News – 5/16/2022 appeared first on Black Hills Information Security.

SpyCast
SPY CHIEFS: Director-General of Security Mike Burgess - ASIO, Australia & America

SpyCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 62:53


 Summary Mike Burgess (Website; Twitter) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss his agency and the enduring strength of Australia's alliances. ASIO is the second intelligence agency he has directed. What You'll Learn Intelligence The Australian idea of “mateship” in the intelligence context The Australian intelligence landscape  The United States as its most important strategic alliance The enduring value and historical uniqueness of the FIVE EYES alliance Reflections How Man. Utd. might help us understand leadership The frustrations of watching spy fiction on TV as a practitioner  And much, much more… Episode Notes The top job: what is it like? what are the joys and pains of leadership? This is not like leading a business, though, or a soccer team, this is protecting the country and its citizens from terrorism, espionage, sabotage, and external interference. Such is the charge of the Australian Security Intelligence Organization (ASIO). To address these questions, Andrew sat down with Mike Burgess, who was formerly the Director-General of the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), comparable to GCHQ and the NSA – an agency would serve in for over 20 years. They also discussed the Australian intelligence landscape and its most important alliances, such as the U.S. and FIVE EYES and some of its important regional relationships.  And… Mike and Andrew hit it off, especially when discussing Alex Ferguson and how soccer can help us understand management and leadership. Ferguson won more titles in soccer than any other manager, at 49, and he is generally considered the GOAT or a strong contender. Of course, trophies are extremely important, but they do not capture everything. If you are looking for an example of transformational change of an entire organization and its subsequent culture, HBS could do a lot worse than draft a case study on the legendary leadership of Liverpool F.C. by Bill Shankly. He made people believe. Quote of the Week Talking about FIVE EYES, that's one of those foundational partnerships in our relationships…It's unique because…it was born through WWII. It's an interesting phenomenon because it started its life as a signals intelligence relationship…at its core, it's an intelligence relationship that really has made a difference to each of those five nations' respective national security…And we do trust each other, and we share our most intimate secrets. Resources *SpyCasts* “Keeping Secrets/Disclosing Secrets” – with Spy Chief turned DG of Australia's National Archives David Fricker (2022) “Desperately, Madly in Love” – Brett Peppler and the Australian IC (2021) Beginner Resources Australian Intelligence Community, Wikipedia [webpage] Australian Security and Intelligence Organization (ASIO) [Website] Why I Spy, M. Burgess, YouTube (n.d.) [60 second video] Intelligence Professionals FAQ, ASIO, YouTube (n.d.) [2:32 minute video] Virtual Exhibition Spy: Espionage in Australia (NAA) Books Spies & Sparrows: ASIO & the Cold War, P. Deery (2022) Between Five Eyes, A. Wells (2020) Intelligence & the Function of Government, D. Baldino & E. Crawley (2018) The Official History of ASIO – 3 Volumes, D. Horner, J. Blaxland, R. Crawley (2014/2015/2016) Report Intelligence Oversight: A Comparison of the FIVE EYES Nations, C. Baker et.al., Parliament of Australia (2017)  Primary Sources Director-General's Annual Threat Assessment (2022) Foreign Espionage: An Australian Perspective, ASIS DG (2022) ASIO Internal Message on Vietnam War (1970) Surveillance of the Aarons, Communist Party Australia (1966)  Counterespionage Film, ASIO (1963) Citizenship for former Soviet Spies, Petrovs (1956) *Wildcard Resource* Sydney vs. Melbourne: The Real Canberra Story If you've ever wondered why Canberra is the capital…

Anarchy Among Friends
Anarchy Among Friends Roundtable Discussion #182 - Backdoors and Bees Are Fish

Anarchy Among Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 117:37


Dyreka makes her triumphant return to join the Bois in talking about Marvin Heemeyer's revenge, some gun control stuff, Cali court rules bees are fish, NSA encryption, courts uphold a fine for working on his own car, Alabama stealing a family's land, MI's new 'public safety' actions, and whatever else we stumble into! Dyreka's Crochet Pattern - https://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/hungry-caterpillar-educational-toy Dyreka's book - https://www.amazon.com/Think-Yourself-Critical-Thinking-Beginners/dp/1791936172/ref=sr_1_fkmrnull_1 Andrew's YT - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYuYw7aFnaJBc8F6NCn-CKg/videos "InkedAnarchist15" for 15% off at https://www.thebeardstruggle.com/?rfsn=4064657.9a3f66&utm_source=refersion&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=4064657.9a3f66 Inkedanarchist25 at www.shopvalerio.com for 25% off RK Sppokware https://rkspookware.com?aff=11 Jeremy at The Quartering's new coffee company: https://coffeebrandcoffee.com/?ref=0juh6r1T Check out Road to Autonomy https://rtamagazine.com/ Poppins Patches - https://www.facebook.com/poppinspatches Find the homie @boogboogie79 on twitter for all your hibicus related appearal Anarchy Among Friends FB - https://www.facebook.com/AAFRTD Anarchy Among Friends Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/AnarchyAmongFr Anarchy Among Friends Odysee - https://odysee.com/@AnarchyAmongFriendsRoundtableDiscussion:5 Anarchy Among Friends Rumble - https://rumble.com/user/Valhallarchist Anarchy Among Friends MeWe - https://mewe.com/p/anarchyamongfriendsroundtablediscussion Spotify - https://open.spotify.com/show/0pqbeHBmWPN1sG0e6L28Uv Apple Podcasts - https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/anarchy-among-friends/id1459037636?ign-mpt=uo%3D4 Stitcher - https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/anchor-podcasts/anarchy-among-friends GooglePodcasts - https://podcasts.google.com/?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy9hNGZmNzQwL3BvZGNhc3QvcnNz Breaker - https://www.breaker.audio/anarchy-among-friends Overcast - https://overcast.fm/itunes1459037636/anarchy-among-friends PocketCasts - https://pca.st/CDH3 RadioPublic - https://radiopublic.com/anarchy-among-friends-Wkzzjl Brandenburg v. Ohio, 395 U.S. 444 (1969), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case, interpreting the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The Court held that government cannot punish inflammatory speech unless that speech is "directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brandenburg_v._Ohio THIS PODCAST IS COVERED BY A BipCot NoGov LICENSE. USE AND RE-USE BY ANYONE EXCEPT GOVERNMENTS OR THEIR AGENTS IS OK. MORE INFO: https://bipcot.org/ Guns - https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/how-the-gun-industry-markets-weapons-to-doomsday-preppers-and-violent-extremists/ar-AAXW9BF Killdozer - https://www.badassoftheweek.com/heemeyer Bees are fish - https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/other/california-court-rules-that-bees-are-a-type-of-fish-in-order-to-protect-them-under-the-state-s-endangered-species-act/ar-AAXYg16 NSA - https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/policy/technology/nsa-involvement-in-encryption-project-raises-suspicions Garage Fine - https://amp.sacbee.com/news/local/article261835755.html Freeway - https://reason.com/2022/06/03/an-alabama-family-is-fighting-a-losing-battle-against-eminent-domain/ Michigan - https://reason.com/2022/06/02/michigan-cops-rob-travelers-airports/

The Rutabaga
draw me like one of your surveillance subjects - The Rutabaga Season 3 Episode 60

The Rutabaga

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 28:19


A shorthanded cast tackles the tough issues: incompetence in the US government at federal and state levels (Oh, Missouri, how I love you so), senior pranks gone too far in the wrong direction, the NSA and how Hollywood could capitalize, messing with the moon's natural cycle, and Morbius (2022) starring Matt Smith and Jared Leto.

Erskine Radio
David Spring M.Ed.- Pushing WWlll and the “Texas Shooting” (ep #6-4-22)

Erskine Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 43:49


David Spring M.Ed. is a Washington State junior college teacher. He observed in 2014 a 90% increase in students unable to pass the GED exam. They examined “Common Core” and the people behind the privatization of our schools. This culminated in WEAPONS OF MASS DECEPTION. Mr. Spring's book Free yourself From Microsoft and the NSA has altered how we look at Windows. Now the future of education during the Covid pandemic. We need “common sense”. The so-called “Covid-19 vaccine” could be more danger than the virus. Topics include “pushing for WWIII”, “Texas Shooting”, and “bank with 50% using windows servers”. www.weaponsofmassdeception.org, www.learnlinexandlibreoffice.com , Www.freeyourselffrommicrosoftandthensa.org, www.commonsensebook.org

Erskine Radio
Gene Gomulka - Exposing clerical abuse in the Roman Catholic Church (ep #6-4-22)

Erskine Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 43:48


David Spring M.Ed. is a Washington State junior college teacher. He observed in 2014 a 90% increase in students unable to pass the GED exam. They examined “Common Core” and the people behind the privatization of our schools. This culminated in WEAPONS OF MASS DECEPTION. Mr. Spring's book Free yourself From Microsoft and the NSA has altered how we look at Windows. Now the future of education during the Covid pandemic. We need “common sense”. The so-called “Covid-19 vaccine” could be more danger than the virus. Topics include “pushing for WWIII”, “Texas Shooting”, and “bank with 50% using windows servers”. www.weaponsofmassdeception.org, www.learnlinexandlibreoffice.com , Www.freeyourselffrommicrosoftandthensa.org, www.commonsensebook.org

Christmas Creeps
Episode 131: Enemy of the State

Christmas Creeps

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 74:32


This Memorial Day, we're kicking off our Summer Holiday Movie Season! All summer long we'll be highlighting ridiculous summer action movies with a holiday bent! On this episode we're taking the modern surveillance state to task with Tony Scott's 1998 mistaken identity thriller Enemy of the State! Will Smith is on the run from the NSA, who believe he's in possession of a videotape with incriminating evidence on it. In a shocking twist, he actually does have the tape, but he's still completely innocent. And all this because the guy just wanted to buy some Christmas gifts for his wife... Questions/Comments? Email us at XmasCreeps@gmail.comTweet us @ChristmasCreepsVisit us on the web at ChristmasCreeps.com! Join us on our Discord channel! Intro/Outro: Happy Christmas, You Guys! (Simon Panrucker) / CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Dvacet minut Radiožurnálu
Požadavek VŠ vzdělání pro šéfa NSA nemíří proti předsedovi Neusserovi, tvrdí spoluautor novely

Dvacet minut Radiožurnálu

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 23:35


Národní sportovní agentura patří do politického odkazu Andreje Babiše. Jejím úkolem má být podpora sportu a správa sportovních dotací. Proč se skupina vládních poslanců rozhodla připravit novelu zákona, která fungování NSA podstatně mění? Co všechno by mělo být jinak? Bude to znamenat konec současného předsedy Filipa Neussera? A jak si nová koalice představuje financování sportu? Hostem Tomáše Pancíře je poslanec ODS Karel Haas, spoluautor návrhu novely.Všechny díly podcastu Dvacet minut Radiožurnálu můžete pohodlně poslouchat v mobilní aplikaci mujRozhlas pro Android a iOS nebo na webu mujRozhlas.cz.

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Using Punchlists to Stop Ransomware

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 82:36


Using Punchlists to Stop Ransomware I really appreciate all of the emails I get from you guys. And it is driving me to do something I've never done before now. I've always provided all kinds of free information. If you're on my email list, you get great stuff. But now we're talking about cyber punch lists.  [Automated transcript follows] [00:00:16] Of course, there are a number of stories here that they'll come out in the newsletter or they did, excuse me, go in the newsletters should have got on Tuesday morning. [00:00:26] And that's my insider show notes, which is all of the information that I put together for my radio appearances radio shows. And. Also, of course, I sent it off to the hosts that these various radio stations. So they know what taught because, oh, who really tracks technology, not too many people. And I get a little off-put by some of these other radio hosts, they call themselves tech people, and they're actually marketing people, but. [00:00:57] That's me. And that's why, if you are on my list, you've probably noticed I'm not hammering you trying to sell you stuff all the time. It's good. Valuable content. And I'm starting something brand new. Never done this before, but this is for you guys. Okay. You know that I do cybersecurity. As a business and I've been doing it now for more than three decades. [00:01:22] I dunno if I should admit that right there. Say never say more than 17 years. Okay. So I've been doing it for more than 17 years and I've been on the internet now for. Oh, 40 years now. Okay. Back before it was even called the internet, I helped to develop the silly thing. So over the years, we've come up with a number of different strategies. [00:01:43] We have these things that are called plan of action and milestones, and we have all kinds of other lists of things that we do and that need to be done. So what we're doing right now is we're setting up. So that you can just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. And I will go ahead and send you one of these punch lists. [00:02:09] Now the punch lists are around one specific topic. We've got these massive. Punch lists with hundreds and hundreds of things on them. And those are what we use when we go in to help clean up the cybersecurity and accompany. So we'll go in, we'll do scans. We will do red team blue team, or we're attacking. [00:02:30] We do all kinds of different types of scans using different software, trying to break in. We use the same tools that the hackers use in order to see if we can. Into your systems and if the systems are properly secured, so we do all of this stuff and then it goes into all of the paperwork that needs to be done to comply with whatever might be, it might be, they accept payment cards. It might be that they have. But information, which is healthcare information. And it might be also that they're a government contractor. So there are hundreds and hundreds of things that they have to comply with. Most of them are procedural. So we have all of this stuff. [00:03:13] We do all of this stuff. And I was talking with my wife here this last week about it and said, yes, That's so much of this could be used by small companies that can't afford to hire my team to come in and clean things up. And I don't want them to suffer. So here's what we're doing. We're starting this next week. [00:03:36] We have a punch list for you on email. So what are the things you can do should do for email? Just very narrow on email so that you can recognize a Fisher. Email, what you might want to do to lock down your outlook, if you're on windows or your Mac mail. So we're taking these massive spreadsheets that we have and we're breaking them up. [00:04:03] So the first one that's available to you guys, absolutely. A hundred percent free. Is the one on email. So just send me an email. Me M e@craigpeterson.com. Now, remember I am, my business is a business to business, but almost everything in these various. Punch lists applies to individuals as well. [00:04:27] So I got an email this last week from a guy saying, Hey, I'm 80 years old and retired and I don't know much about computers. And that's what got us thinking about. No, we need to be able to help him. We need to be able to help you out. Okay. And if you're a small business and we've dealt with a lot of them over the years, and as a small business, you just don't have the funds to bring in an expert, whether it's me or somebody else, although yeah. [00:04:56] You want the best anyways. It it is going to allow you to do it yourself. Okay. So absolutely free. All of these punch lists on all of these topics. We're probably going to end up with more than a hundred of these punch lists. And all you do is email me M e@craigpeterson.com. Just let me know in there what you're interested in. [00:05:19] So even if we haven't got that punch list broken down for you yet, we will go ahead and put that on the. To do right. We need the priorities. What kind of a priority should we have as we're putting these things together for free for people. And the only way we know is if you ask, so the first one's on email, you can certainly ask for email. [00:05:39] We've got, as I said, more than a hundred others, that we think we're going to be able to pull out of the exact. Plan of action worksheets that we use so that you can go through this yourself, whether you're a home user or you are a small business or even a big business, we were talking with a gentleman who's probably listening right now, who has a business. [00:06:06] They have three offices, they have some requirement because of the military contracts for high level. Cybersecurity. And they would work for him too. All right. So they, this is all of the punch list stuff. He probably know what a punch list is. It's used in the construction industry a lot, but in our case, it's indeed to do this. [00:06:27] You need to do this, you need to do this. Okay. So that's what that's all about. So enough rambling on that. It's going to take us some time to get them all together. I'm also. And then her do more video stuff again, training. So just like on the radio show where we're talking about what's in the news, we're going to talk about watch what's in the news. [00:06:49] When it comes to small businesses, what you should be paying attention to with of course, an emphasis on cyber security and. Putting those up on my website@craigpeterson.com. In fact, we've already got some up there already, and then we are going to also be putting them on YouTube and rumble. So if you don't like YouTube and Google, then you can certainly go to rumble. [00:07:14] You'll see them there. But if you're on the email list, Starting to put links in the bottom of the emails. So you can go and watch those videos. If you're a video type person that you know, more visual. So it's, I think all good. And it's good news for everybody. And this is what happens, I think, as you get more mature, In the business. [00:07:36] As I said, I've been on the internet for more than 40 years, helped develop some of that software that some of it's still in use today and now it's time to do more give back. And I really am trying to give back, okay, there's this isn't. This isn't a joke. No joke. So go ahead. Email me at Craig Peterson. [00:07:57] Tell me which punch list that you would like. And I can also put you on my email list so that you get my insider show notes, and you can just do that yourself by going to Craig Peterson. Calm. You'll see right up at the top of the page. If you scroll down a little bit, it'll pop up. It's a big red bar that goes across the top. [00:08:17] I try not to be too intrusive and you can sign up there for the newsletter. So you'll get some of these trainings automatically. You'll get my insider show notes, all of this stuff. It's absolutely free. Okay. This is my give back to help you out. It really is. Okay. As I mentioned at the very beginning. [00:08:37] Peeve by some of these people that represent themselves as tech experts. And in fact, all they are marketers. We've got a client that decided that I was too expensive. My team. So they went out and shopped around, tried to find the cheapest company they could. And so now the company that they're bringing in is saying, you're saying Hey so how does this work? [00:08:59] How do you do zero trust? Why do you have a firewall here? Why do you bother to have a direct fiber link between the offices? All this stuff? Because they need it. Okay. I get it. You use. Barracuda spam firewalls and Barracuda firewall holes it, yeah, this is a different league. Okay. So you're going to be getting these punch lists from me that are really going to help you understand and secure your systems. [00:09:29] This isn't your average run of the mill, managed security services provider or managed services or break fix shop. You're getting it from the guy that the FBI. InfraGuard program went to, to do their trainings. That was me. Okay. So for two years I set up the program. I ran it. And if we ever sitting down and having a coffee or a beer, sometimes I'll tell you why I left. [00:09:53] Okay. But think about FBI and I think you might have a clue as to why I decided not to do that anymore. I trained thousands of businesses, government agencies, state local. Federal, you name it. So you're getting what you really need, which is another problem. I keep hearing from people, you do a search for something on YouTube or Google and you get what a million, 5 million pages, as supposedly that it says are available and they give you, okay, then here's the top one. But what you need is an integrated, single. To do things where everything works together. And that's what I'm trying to do for you guys, because there's so many little products, different products that just don't work so well together. [00:10:46] So we'll be covering that as well in these, but you gotta be on that email list. Craig peterson.com. Craig Peterson, S O n.com/subscribe. We'll take you right to the subscription page and I'll keep you up to date. This is not my paid newsletter. All right, stick around. We'll be right back. And I promise I'll get to Russia. [00:11:12] Some of the high-tech companies and others pulled out of Russia after the Ukraine invasion, but one stayed Google. What is going on with Google? And now they're in big trouble with the Russian government. Wow  [00:11:28] here's the list of companies according to seeing that, that have. Out of Russia because you remember Russia invaded !Ukraine, February 24, we had Adobe, these are the guys that make Photoshop, Adobe reader. Airbnb has an interesting story too in Ukraine because a number of quite a number of Airbnb customers went ahead and rented rooms and homes from Ukrainians, even though they had no intention of going and they told the Ukrainians, Hey. [00:11:59] The I'm not going to show up, just take this money. I'm sure you need it. Can you imagine that? But that's fantastic. Good for them, Amazon. They suspended shipments of all retail products at customers in Russia and Bella ruse and also suspended prime video for users. Apple stopped selling its product in rushes. [00:12:21] It's halting online transactions, including limiting apple pay. It's also disabled. Some apple map features in Ukraine in order to protect civilians, Amazon web services. They don't have data centers or offices in Russia, but it stopped allowing new signups for the service in Russia. BMW for GM, huh? I have all scaled back their operations or stopped them. [00:12:49] Ford suspended its operations in Russia effective immediately until further notice. GM is suspending business in Russia. Honda has a suspended exports to Russia, Disney halted, all theatrical releases in Russia, including the new Pixar film, turning red, also pause content DJI. The drone company that has gotten in trouble here in the U S for some of its practices of sending GPS information to China while they're not doing it over there. [00:13:20] Electronic arts. They make a bunch of very popular games, epic games, and other one Erickson, FIFA body band Russia from this year's world cup formula one canceled its plan planned Russian grump, pre Fujitsu, Goldman Sachs. Now Google that's where I want to go. We'll stop at Google here for a minute. [00:13:44] Google. Suspended their ad network in Russia. And the idea was okay. We're not sure how payments are going to work because Russia of course has had this kind of this lockdown by foreign countries on their banking system. We're not sure we can get the money out. That's what they're apparently doing now. [00:14:08] They're still there. Google's YouTube it search engine on and on still running in Russia. Now that is really disturbing. If you ask me, why did they not pull out? It doesn't make sense. So Google did stop accepting new customers for Google cloud in March. YouTube said is removing videos at denier trivial trivialize, the Russian invasion, but what finally got. [00:14:42] Out of Russia, Russia seized their bank accounts. They froze them. They transferred their money out of the main bank account in Russia. We're talking about a $2 billion per year business, Google Russia, that really upsets me. So I did a little more research online about all of this, and I was really surprised to see that you crane now has given the Ukraine peace prize to Google. [00:15:12] And it says, quote, on the behalf of Ukrainian people with gratitude for the support during this pivotal moment in our nation's history. So what is it? I'm not sure. So they're one of their foreign ministers, and Karen. I think I said, thank you. From the beginning of the war, Google has sought to help power. [00:15:35] However we can through humanitarian support of our tools, we'll continue to do as long as needed. So I dug in a little more and tried to figure out what's up. Russia or Google left its Russian search engine online and YouTube online and was using it in Russia in order to. Control the narrative in Russia. [00:15:59] Now, unlike what they've done here in the U S where Google hasn't been caught, many times controlling the narrative in various elections and taking certain ads and not taking others and taking certain business and not taking others, apparently in Russia, it has been. Blocking a lot of the stuff that Russia itself has been putting out. [00:16:23] So the federal government there in Russia. Interesting. Hey, so they also have helped you crane out by providing them with mapping GPS and rumor has it satellite services. Yeah, interest in it to track Russian troop movements. All also Ukraine saying the Google news component has also been tremendously valuable. [00:16:51] Google's also helping to raise money for the cause of Ukraine. Like many companies are doing right now to help people displace due to the war and Poland. Wow. They've been doing yeoman's work and bringing. People in, by the millions, into Poland from Ukraine or reminds me when I lived in Calgary, Alberta, my Cub, one of the Cub masters Cub troop leaders was a woman who came from Poland many years ago. [00:17:18] This was back during Soviet occupation. Poland. And I remember talking to her about what was happening over there. Why did she leave? And it was just so impressive. The polls have done so much impressive stuff over the years. So they're also saying that Google has done a lot of other things in order to. [00:17:39] Help protect Ukraine, including Google's blocked domains. They've prevented phishing attacks against Ukraine. They warned targeted individuals that they are being targeted. It's really something what they've done. So my first knee jerk was why is Google? Still doing business in Russia while now it's become clear because they have a special page for Russians that gives correct information, at least, Google is claiming it's correct. [00:18:13] I don't know which fact-check teachers checkers they're using. That gives Russians real information about the war what's going on in Ukraine. What's happening with the Russian soldiers. Did you see this? Just this last week, the apparently Russia removed the age limit for volunteers for the military. [00:18:35] It used to be, I think it was 40 years old. If you were a Russian citizen and 30 years old, if you are a foreign national, now the Russian military will take any. At any age from anywhere. In other words, Russia has really getting hard up if they want people like me to fight their wars. [00:18:54] I'm sure they don't really want, I don't know. Maybe they do want me, that every war needs cannon fodder. So it is fascinating to see good job Google. I am quite impressed. I did not expect them to be doing that. They've also. Provided over $45 million in donations and grants to various groups. [00:19:18] They've done pro bono work for various organizations over there. So this is really cool. So that's it. That's what's happening over there? Yeah. Crane and Googled, you can of course, find out a lot more. Get my insider show notes. So you had all of this on Tuesday morning. You could have digested it all and be ahead of everybody else out there. [00:19:43] And then also don't forget about my new offer here. Free, absolutely free for anyone. Asks by emailing me@craigpeterson.com. I'll go ahead and send them to you, which is I think a pretty cool thing now. What am I going to send you? You got to ask first, right? You got to ask. And what we're going to be doing is taking what I have been using for years to help secure my customer. [00:20:14] And we're making available for free my cyber punch lists. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [00:20:22] Bit of a hub-bub here. Biden's infrastructure bill $1.2 trillion. And it's in there is this thing that Bob Barr's calling an automobile kill switch. I did some more research and we'll tell you the facts right now.  [00:20:39] What are you supposed to do? If you are trying to pass a bill to stop drunk driving deaths, and you've got all of the money in the world, Joe I guess 1.2 trillion, isn't all of the money in the world. What are you going to put in there? I did a search on this and I'm chuckling because this is craziness. [00:20:59] This is the AP associated press. And they've got this article claiming. President and Joe Biden signed a bill that will give law enforcement access to a kill switch that will be attached to all new cars in 2026 APS assessment false. Okay. So we've got fact checkers here while the bipartisan infrastructure bill Biden signed last year requires advanced drunk and impaired driving technology to become standard equipment in cars. [00:21:31] Experts say. Technology doesn't amount to a kill switch. Let me see. So I can't start the car. If the car's computer thinks I might be drunk or impaired in some other way, but that's not a kill switch. What is that? Then if I can't start the car, because I have a disagreement with the computer. How about these people that I don't know, maybe their eyes can't open all of the weight. [00:21:59] Maybe they have problems with eyes on nystagmus though. Eyes jittering back and forth. And then now what are they going to argue with the computer? That's a kill switch. I can't believe these crazy people that are like AP here, coming up with fact checking on things. So yeah, I'm sure there some distortions in some articles out there, but they contradicted themselves and to bear graphs, I guess they figure people are just going to see false. [00:22:30] Okay. I'm done. And they're not going to bother reading the rest of the article. Ah, Kind of crazy, isn't it? So according to an article written by member, former us representative Bob BARR in the infrastructure bill, is this kill switch. Now the big question is what is the kill switch? How far does it. [00:22:55] So I decided let's look up something I remember from years ago and that is GM has the OnStar system it's yet another reason I won't buy GM, there are a number of reasons, but this doesn't, it. OnStar system, they've got an advisors and that grade, and if your car is in a car accident, a crash that advisor can hop on and ask if you're okay. [00:23:22] And if you want emergency services coming, they'll come OnStar. We'll call them. And if you are just fine, they won't bother calling. If there's no answer at all, they'll call emergency services and let them know where the vehicle is because the vehicle has with OnStar built-in GPS. One of the features of OnStar is that it can send a signal to disable cars, engines, and gradually slow the vehicle to an idle speed to assist police in recovering the vehicle. [00:23:58] Now they will only do that at least right now for vehicles that have been reported stolen and have been confirmed by the police. So in reality, that's cool, right? It slows down. Hopefully the bad guy, if he's on the highway, makes it over to the side of the road and while the car slows down and eventually stops. [00:24:22] So all of this stuff sounds good. This kill switch. Sounds good. Doesn't it? Because we're going to keep drunk drivers off the road. Now in reality, of course, they're not going to be able to keep drunk drivers or other impaired drivers off the road. I really don't care what kind of technology they put in. [00:24:44] And they're not talking about putting in one of these blow in the tube, things that checks your blood alcohol level. They're talking about having a camera facing you as the driver and probably other occupants of the vehicles and that internally facing camera. Is going to evaluate you. It's going to look at you. [00:25:07] It's going to look at your face. If something droopy, or are you slow to respond? It might have a little test to that. It has you take right there. The law is very loosey goosey on any details. There really aren't any, so it's going to be up to the manufacturer. So they put this in the car step. [00:25:28] Just like OnStar, step one, put it in the car and they'll tell you when to turn you remember how cool that was the GPS with OnStar. And you tell ya, I want to go to this address. And then the assistant goes ahead and sends programming to your car. And now you can go. And if you lock your keys in the car, they can unlock the car for you. [00:25:51] All kinds of cool stuff. And then next up what happened. But they can stop the vehicle. So there's another technology story related to OnStar. And this is from 2009 from Kelly blue book, OnStar stolen vehicle slowed down Fort it's first carjacking. So again, doesn't that sound fantastic. And this was a Tahoe OnStar. [00:26:18] And the driver and his passenger forced out of the vehicle robbed by a shotgun wielding perp who then drove off in the SUV. And the OnStar dispatcher was able to locate the vehicle using GPS advice please, of exact location. And as soon as the police establish visual contact, the stolen vehicle slowdown system is activated available on a number of GM cars and trucks. [00:26:43] So this was over a decade. That this happened, but the technology's evolved. Yeah. So we initially have all of these car companies trying to decide, okay, so we've got this kill switch law, which AP says is not a kill switch law because they talk to experts just the, what was it? 52 people heads of intelligence. [00:27:08] Committees and agencies said that this wasn't a collusion hope, right? So they talked to experts who said no, this isn't a kill switch, but that's today you can argue, it's not a kill switch. I would completely disagree with you. Day one. It's a kill switch. Cause you can't start your car. It's a kill switch. [00:27:25] I kill switch is often something you hide somewhere on the car so you can kill the engine. So it can't be stolen. It's a kill switch. Come on. People fact checkers aside, but this could potentially allow law enforcement again, to shut down your car. Remotely track the cars, metrics, location, maybe the passenger load, because remember now cars are tracking all of this. [00:27:51] They've already been. Tickets issued by police. The did not see anyone speeding. The car was not caught on a traffic camera, but they hook up a device to your cars port that talks to its computer. And the computer says, yeah, he was doing 80 miles an hour, five minutes. And all of a sudden you got a ticket, right? [00:28:12] Massachusetts wants to go ahead now and say, ah yeah. Let's charge by the mile that you drive in mass. Because of course you're not getting enough revenue from gasoline because of the electric cars, electric cars are not paying their fair share when it comes to road taxes. So let's do it that way. [00:28:32] So how are they going to collect the information while. And they're going to hook up to your car's computer. The next thing coming down the road in it's already in most cars is wireless data connectivity, or you might've found already. If you have a Nissan, a Honda, many other cars. You have to get a major, upgrade it very 600 bucks up to a few grand for an expensive car, but the two G data network. [00:29:02] And we talked about this on the show already is being completely shut down by the end of the year. So they've got to replace it and switch you over. To the L G E data network, which of course eventually will go away as well, or at least three G what happens once it's all hooked up? The next easy step is just feed all of that information straight to the government. [00:29:26] Craig peterson.com. [00:29:30] If you've been afraid of ransomware before, I've got a good example for you where a whole country now has been ransomed. Absolutely crazy. So we'll talk about that. What is the state of ransomware? And the NSA is asking us to trust them again. [00:29:47] Of course staying up to date means that you get my insider newsletter pretty much every Tuesday morning. [00:29:54] And the only way to get that is to go to Craig Peterson.com/subscribe. And I will keep you up to date. You'll get even more insight information. The Costa Rican government has declared a state of national emergency. And to the best of my knowledge, this is the first time a government has done this because agencies of the Costa Rican government have been hit so badly by the Conti rants. [00:30:24] That the new incoming president immediately declared a state of emergency. So now the country has expanded law enforcement powers and they are trying to go after the Conti ransomware group. No between you and me. Good luck on that one. They are based in Russia. There's a number of different articles out this week. [00:30:47] This one from ADV Intel at tech target. But according to their research, the Conti ransomware groups attack on Costa Rican government was part of a rebranding effort. So this ransomware gang has seen a lot of their payments, just dry up. Because it's harder to get the money in. And what are you going to do with cryptocurrency? [00:31:11] If you're the Conti group, can you turn it into anything useful? It depends on the country you're in, but for most people, no. Okay. Absolutely. No. So we were able to knock the Conti ransomware groups website. Offline. And we talked about that before here. The U S government did that, but now this is marking a new chapter for the cybercrime landscape. [00:31:38] Interesting. Isn't it? So there are some investigations that have been going on. They've been trying to figure out what happened. What was the cause of the downfall of the Conti ransomware group? Are they really gone? Why did they pull their website offline and. They declared publicly support for Russia in its invasion of Ukraine. [00:32:02] And so now the Conti ransomware group got hacked and held ransom. They suffered major league. As a consequence. So other hackers went after Conti, which is a hacking group and they showed here from internal documents that were stolen, that the Conti ransomware gangs primary Bitcoin address, which was found in the leak, showed that they had taken in over $2 billion in cryptocurrency over the last five. [00:32:35] Isn't that just amazing and anonymous leaker has published more of the gangs communications, that can help the mass for sure. But you think with that much money, they'd be able to protect themselves right now on top of it, because of the hack of Costa Rica and the major damages, because the U S government has offered a couple of bounties here. [00:33:00] Against the Conti ransomware group. So there's $10 million available. If you can provide the feds with information about the leaders of the Conti ransomware group and $5 million that you can get leading to the arrest of anyone involved with a Conti ransomware attack. Isn't that something. So ransomware has been really out of control for years. [00:33:25] There's no signs that things are actually slowing down. Definitely been enhanced law enforcement efforts to track them down. But I'll ultimately here, the core members of these groups have been escaping these law enforcement activities. They've been using mules like 2000 mules. Have you seen that movie? [00:33:46] But the idea is they get people primarily in the U S because that's where most of the money comes from. They do rent. Of people and businesses information here. In fact, last year, it's estimated that 60%, six, 0% of small businesses were hacked, which is just crazy. No wonder has got $2 billion. Okay. [00:34:07] What are we supposed to do? What are they doing to really come after us? They're doing many of the same things. These mules will be hired saying, Hey, I just need to use your PayPal account. And all you have to do is transfer some money. 5%, 10% of the money I put in there. And they've always got these excuses, think that I, Jerry, an email scams from years past, and frankly still go around a little bit here, but large bounties are really becoming a part of the toolbox, a law enforcement's been using in the us and abroad to try and track them down. [00:34:44] And that's really what they're hoping for down in Costa Rica, because what are they going to do? Frankly, really what are they going to do? I don't know. And they obviously are relying on the United States to help them out with this. And the internal structure of the Conti group has been highly organized. [00:35:03] They've got the same type of structure of legitimate corporation would have it takes it to work that needs to be done. They hire contractors that may not even know who they're actually working for to write small pieces of a code here that gets tied. So it's not too surprising that a Conti affiliate is going to go far enough to cause a national emergency to be declared. [00:35:30] One of the things that Conti has done and some of these other ransomware companies have done companies gangs. They have ransomware as a service. So there's all of these people that are affiliated with Conti and all you have to do is get the Conti ransomware onto someone's computer and ta-da, they will pay you. [00:35:54] It's really that simple. They've got tech support for the people that are ran through there. They got ransomed to help them supposedly pay, right? How do I buy Bitcoin? And they'll walk you through. And then they will help you with restoring your files. Hopefully they can be restored. They are, they can't always be restorative. [00:36:15] I think right now the latest number I saw. How about 60% of people who have their data encrypted and ransomed are in fact able to get that data, but there's 60% of the data back. So that's not too big a deal, but Conti operates on affiliate. And this affiliate that went ahead and grandson and our friends in Costa Rica is called UNC 1 7 5 6, uncles, 7 56. [00:36:51] They're also suspected in other attacks on government servers, including a theft of intelligence materials. Peru. And this attacker has already leaked information stolen from Costa Rica and it's on the Conti ransomware dark web portal, which is online. And after the former president of the country refused to pay a $10 million ransom demand, they started leaking the data. [00:37:17] So in this case, focus has been on the national government agencies. They are potentially looking at what might you might call espionage, but these Conti ransomware affiliates have become famous for really quickly exploiting new vulnerabilities as they're published and being indiscriminate in who they attack, because $2 billion. [00:37:39] And then the other part that I think is really interesting here. W we're talking about money, we're talking about real money, obviously, Conti deals almost exclusively in Bitcoin, which can be hard to turn into hard currencies, but that our friends in Costa Rica have said, no we're not going to. [00:37:59] Knowing what has been stolen and what they no longer have access to. In fact, the president said that the company, the country Costa Rica is effectively at war. Now, they got a foothold Conti did in 27 agencies at different levels of the. And the yeah. Okay. So Conti is say, I'm looking at an article in the register here. [00:38:26] Conti is apparently has made more than 150 million from a thousand plus victims while we know it's actually 2 billion, but it depends on the timeframe that they're talking about. And the Conti says that they are determined to overthrow the government by means of a cyber attack. We've already shown you all the strength and power. [00:38:45] You have introduced an emergency. It's really quite something. Now I mentioned earlier today that I am. Taking all of the cyber security stuff that we have been using here over the years. Things like our plan of action and milestones documents and all of this stuff we use to run our projects for our customers. [00:39:11] It's the real stuff, people. And remember, I've been doing the cyber securities. Since the early nineties, so we know what we're doing, I know what I'm doing and I'm making it available for free. Okay, guys, you just have to send me an email me@craigpeterson.com. So the first cyber punch list that we have that available, and all you have to do is ask for it again. [00:39:37] Me, M e@craigpeterson.com is the. Email punch list. So with this punch list, I go through the things that you need to do. In order to secure your email and be more or less secure in your email. Now, I don't know about you. I do not like these long diatribes. I have a book behind me that is hardening windows 10 and it is in a four inch binder. [00:40:14] Cited. There are thousands of recommendations in there from Microsoft. There's a lot that needs to be done. So what I've done is boiled it down to the most important things. And as I said, it's available for absolutely. Free for you. It really is. If you're a listener, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [00:40:38] You can ask me to add you to my insider show notes and my little three minute trainings that we do every week. You can also ask for a cyber punch list that you might need. So it's just, okay, we need to do this. You need to do that. You need to do this. You need to do that. So it makes it very straightforward. [00:40:57] I'm trying to. To be, to see about any of this, but we have had amazing feedback on this from companies over the years, and now it's available to you for $0. Okay. So make sure you check it out. Craig peterson.com and you can always email me M e@gregpeterson.com as well. Thanks for taking a little time with me today and look for me online. [00:41:24] Look for my emails and if you would please. Thumbs up on your favorite podcasting platform, YouTube or rumble or subscribe. Thanks. [00:41:37] We're going to talk about the Senate bill that has big tech scared, really scared. I'll talk about a new job site problem for a number of different industries because of hackers and cloud, the cost and reliability. [00:41:53] This tech bill. It has the Senate really scared. [00:41:57] He is frankly, quite a big deal for those of you who are watching over on of course, rumble or YouTube. I'm pulling this up on this screen. This is an article. ARS Technica and they got it originally from wired it's it was out in wired earlier in the month. And it's pointing out a real big problem that this isn't just a problem. [00:42:23] This is a problem for both the legislature. In this case, we're going to talk about the Senate and a problem for our friend. In big tech. So let us define the first problem as the big tech problem. You're Amazon. You are Google. Those are the two big targets here of this particular bill. We're going to talk about, or maybe your Facebook or one of these other Facebook properties, et cetera. [00:42:50] If you are a small company that wants to compete with any of these big guys, What can you do? Obviously you can do what everyone's been telling us. Oh, you don't like the censorship, just make your own platform. And there've been a lot of places and people that are put a lot of money into trying to make their own platform. [00:43:12] And some of them have had some mild successes. So for instance, I'm on. You can watch my videos there. And there have been some successes that rumble has had and making it into kind of the competition to YouTube. But YouTube is still the 800 pound gorilla. Everybody wants to be where the cool kids are. [00:43:32] So for most people. That YouTube. They look at YouTube as being the popular place. Thus, we should be, we are obviously saw the whole thing with Elon Musk and Twitter, and the goings on there. And Twitter really is the public square, although it's died down a lot because of this censorship on Twitter. [00:43:52] Interesting. So as time goes forward, these various big companies are worried about potential competition. So how do they deal with that? This is where the real problems start coming in because we saw Amazon, for instance, in support of an internet sales tax. You remember that whole big deal. The internet had been set aside saying, Hey, no states can tax the internet and that's going to keep the internet open. [00:44:21] That's going to help keep it free. And people can start buying online. And that worked out fairly well. A lot of people are out there, why would Amazon support a sales tax on the internet? They are the biggest merchant on the internet, probably the biggest merchant period when it comes to not just consumer goods, but a lot of goods, like a staples might carry for business. [00:44:45] So they'd have to deal with what they're 9,000 different tax jurisdictions in the United States. And then of course all these other countries, we're not going to talk about them right now, but the United States 9,000 tax jurisdictions. So why would Amazon support an internet sales tax when there's 5,000 tax jurisdictions? [00:45:10] The reason is it makes life easier for them when it comes to competition. So if you are a little. And do you want to sell your widgets or your service? Whatever it might be online. You now have to deal with 9,000 tax jurisdictions. It's bad enough in the Northeast. If you are in New Hampshire, if you live in New Hampshire and you spend more than, I think it's 15% of your time south of the border and mass, then mass wants you to pay income tax for that 15% that you are spending your time there. [00:45:48] Now they do that with the. Baseball teams with football teams, hockey, you name it, right? So the big football team comes into town. The Patriots are paying the New York jets or whatever it might be. The Patriots have to pay New York state taxes, income tax now because they stepped foot in New York heaven forbid that they try and do business there and help New York state out. [00:46:12] And they now have to pay income tax. Now they only have to pay income tax for, or for the amount of time. They're more New York. Various states have various weirdnesses, but if you're only playing 1, 2, 3 dozen games a year, It isn't like your normal work here, which is 2080 hours. We're talking about their plane to New York and they're only spending maybe 10 hours working in New York, but that represents what percentage, 10, 20, 30% of their income, depending on how many games they play and how they're paying. [00:46:45] And so they got to keep track of all that and figure it out. Okay. We played in New York, we played in New Jersey. We're in mass. We were they weren't in New Hampshire, certainly the Patriots plane, but they got to figure it all out. Guess what? Those big pay. Football players, hockey, baseball. [00:47:03] They can afford to have a tax accountant, figure it all out and then battle with them. I had a booth one time at a trade show down in Connecticut. Didn't say. Thing it was terrible trade shows, man. They aren't what they used to be. And they haven't been for a long time. This is probably a decade plus ago, maybe even 20 years ago. [00:47:26] So I had a little booth, we were selling our services for cybersecurity and of course, nobody wanted to bother pain for cybersecurity who needs it. I haven't been hacked yet. Although there's an interesting article. We'll talk about next week based on a study that shows. Small businesses are going out of business at a huge rate because of the hacks because of ransomware. [00:47:49] And if you're worried about ransomware, I've got a really great little guide that you can get. Just email me, me@craigpeterson.com. I'll send it off to you, right? It's a free thing. Real information, not this cruddy stuff that you get from so many marketers, cause I'm an engineer. They'll go out of business. [00:48:10] So they figured I haven't got a business yet, not a big deal. And so no body. There's big trade show. And I was so disappointed with the number of people that even showed up for this silly thing. So what happens next while I get back to the office and about a month to two months later, I get this notice from the state of Connecticut they're tax people saying that I haven't paid my Connecticut taxes yet. [00:48:37] And because I was in connected. I should be paying my income tax for that day that I spent and wasted in Connecticut. Oh. And plus every company in Connecticut that I'm doing business with now, I need to collect their taxes and pay them the taxes that I'm collecting for those Connecticut businesses are resident. [00:48:59] I didn't sell a thing. You know what it took almost, I think it was three or maybe four years to get the state of Connecticut to finally stop sending me all of these threatening notices because I didn't get a dime from anybody in Connecticut. So I'd love the internet from that standpoint saying you don't have to collect taxes in certain cases, certain states, et cetera, unless you have a legal nexus or a legal presence there in the state. So back to Amazon, Amazon loves the idea of having everything on the internet packs. They love the fact that there's 9,000 plus tax jurisdictions. When you get right down to city, state county Lilian, either local taxes, or you look at those poor residents of New York state, or they're poor residents out in Washington state that have to worry about that, right? [00:49:52] There's county taxes, state sales tax. City sales tax, and income taxes are much the same, the, all of these crazy cities and states around the country. Yeah. The ones that are in serious trouble right now, they are those same ones. Those particular jurisdictions are hard to deal with. So from Amazon standpoint is just like the Patriots football players. [00:50:17] We've got plenty of money. We've got teams of lawyers. We have all kinds of accountant. We can handle this and you know why Amazon really loves it because it provides another obstacle for any competitors who want to enter the business. That's the real reason, so many big businesses don't go ahead and charge you serious money so that they can use that money against you. [00:50:48] Okay. You see where I'm going with this? Because if you want to start a business that competes with Amazon, if you want to have a doilies, you're making doilies. My grandmother used to make them all the time and she had them on the toilet paper in the bathroom, little doily holders. Doilies everywhere. [00:51:06] And then of course, the seashells shells on top of the toilet paper holders. If you want to do that and sell it, how are you going to deal online with 9,000 tax jurisdictions? All what you're going to do is you're going to go to Etsy, or you may be going to go to Amazon marketplace and sell your product there. [00:51:25] An Amazon marketplace. So Amazon is taking its cut out of it at is taking it's cut off. And you still ultimately have some of that tax liable. Amazon loves it. It's the same reason you see these groups forums, right? Barbers saying, oh, we've got to be regulated. Really you need to have a regulation in place for barbers. [00:51:49] You need to have licensing for barbers. Why do they do that? They do that. Not just barbers, right? It's all of these licensures and various states. They do that really to keep people. To keep their prices high. That's why they do it because someone can't just put up a sign and say, Hey, I am now a barber. [00:52:10] Come get a haircut. And if you don't like the barber, if they do a lousy job, you go elsewhere. We don't need all of the bureaucracy on top of this to enforce licensure. Anyways, when we get back, let's talk about that Senate. It's a big deal. And I am coming down in the middle of this thing. Hey, visit me online. [00:52:30] Sign up right now. Craig peterson.com and get my special report on passwords. [00:52:38] We just talked about why big business loves regulation. It helps protect them from up and coming small business, frankly, let's look at this bill, the Klobuchar and Grassley just introduced in the Senate. [00:52:54] I am coming down in the middle of this bill. And let me tell you why we really do have a problem with some of these big businesses. [00:53:04] For those of you who were watching here on rumble or YouTube, I'm going to pull this up. This is an article that was originally in wired and is in ARS Technica, great website. They got lots of good information and the title of the bill is a Senate bill that has big texts. So the question is why now are ours technical? [00:53:27] I'm going to scroll this down so you can see what they are saying. They're claiming that this is really apocalyptic that frankly the people who are pushing against this bill are obviously the wrong people and everything else. But I love this point here. This is from a senior VP of policy at Yelp. [00:53:50] You can see this on my screen. Luther Lowe. And he's talking about this bill. Actually one of two. Antitrust bills is what they're called in the us. There's voted out of committee by a very strong bi-partisan vote. And the other bill is to regulate app stores and there's issues with that too, that we won't really be talking about today, but they have to do with protecting you the consumer. [00:54:19] If you can load any app you want from any app store on the internet, on your iPhone, is your iPhone still? Versus having to get it from apple. We're not talking about that one right now. This is Congress's shot here to stop big tech companies from abusing what they're calling a gatekeeper status. [00:54:42] So we're going to talk about that. What is this gig key keeper status? What does that mean? So Luther low back to him, VP of policy at Yelp long time ago. Antagonist says it, the ball game. That's how these guys stay big and relevant. If they can't put their hand on the scale that it makes them vulnerable to small and medium-sized companies eating their market share. [00:55:11] Isn't that what I was. Protecting themselves, protecting themselves against the small startups. And if you've got government regulation on your side, you can just hammer them with the fact that, Hey, you guys aren't compliant, right? If you've got some major government regulation to just look at what happened with Elon Musk, when he said I'm going to buy Twitter, all of a sudden his. [00:55:40] And he, his Twitter account has problem. All of a sudden what w what his money has prompted. All of a sudden when Elon Musk's that I'm going to buy Twitter, the government started investigating Tesla. It's amazing. How these people work and how they think. It's just, it's absolutely amazing. [00:56:00] So they use these big companies, use government to beat other people over there. It's like my example of the barbers, right? Do we really need licensing for barbers? Do we really need to have a barber board that oversees barbers? If someone harms you, there are laws against that. No. When I was, for 10 years, I was in EMS. [00:56:26] I was a volunteer EMT. You guys know that emergency medical technician and my wife was. And if we were to cut someone's hair without their consent, that would be considered assault, even battery in some cases. So there's laws on the book to protect your hair. Okay. Need laws about barbers? We don't need laws about so many things. [00:56:52] The government sticks its fingers in. And so what is it? Stick his fingers in here. What are they trying to do? Let me pull that up on this screen for you. Senators Amy Klobuchar and Chuck Grassley, CR grassy, I should say, who were our, excuse me. So are the top Democrat and Republicans on the Senate judiciary committee are saying, Hey, we need to regulate how Amazon, how Google and these others can use their position in order to. [00:57:30] Keep their fingers off the scale. So bottom line, that, that sounds like a pretty good idea to me. And that's the thing that fits on the bumpers bumper stickers, stop Google from putting their thumb on the scale. Stop Amazon from putting the thumb on the scale because we have. [00:57:47] Actual problems with this. We have seen where people who are using Amazon marketplace to sell their stuff. Why would they do that? Obviously they've got to pay a percentage to Amazon plus depending on how your business operates, you have to pay Amazon to warehouse. You're good. Just for you. You have to pay Amazon for all the logistic services for shipping, for moving around between Amazon warehouses and then for selling it, it can get pretty darn expensive. [00:58:20] Okay. Amazon charges, that seems pretty fair to me, right? The libertarian mindset. Where's the problem. I don't see the problem, Craig. The problem is that Amazon has. Own products that they want to sell more than half of what's on the Amazon store is actually sold by third parties. And we've talked about that before. [00:58:42] We talked about problems with that before, but that means that what almost half of it is sold by Amazon. So Amazon has a number of brands. Last I checked, it was a few dozen brands that don't look like they're Amazon. There's a home services brand. There's a place that sells couches or Chesterfields depending on where you're from. [00:59:06] There's a whole bunch of different businesses, clothing, businesses, et cetera, that are actually Amazon who might've bought a company or they saw. That accompany was doing really well in their marketplace by selling item X. So what do they do? They go ahead and say, okay we're going to start making an item X, see where the problem comes in. [00:59:29] So Amazon is using these small businesses that put everything on the line, right? They might have their house leveraged to the max. They might have sold their house and living with somebody else, apartments are too expensive. The cash to get their business going. They scraped the money together. [00:59:46] Maybe they had to pay $5,000 to have a mold made injection mold, and then they have the stuff made in the U S or in China, or there they're trying to print it on a 3d printer for the. Concept. And they'd go through a number of different iterations of trying to make that product work and consumers to like it. [01:00:07] And consumers give them feedback saying, what, if this was a quarter in smaller or moved over there on the product, that would just be so much more useful. So they add that they had the engineering time, they've invested quarter million dollars. Easily to get the product off the floor to get it out there and people start buying it. [01:00:29] Where are they selling it? They got to really sell it on Amazon marketplace because who else are you going to go to for logistics, sales, support, everything else. And not to mention the tax jurisdictions that want to collect money from you. And then Amazon comes out with a competing. Is that enough to drive you crazy. [01:00:51] Now we've seen this forever in the software industry. Microsoft has done this for years. Apple does it to I'm looking at a screen right here in front of me. I hooked up to an apple mini. Some of the side card functions and stuff. They were developed by a third party that spent their blood, sweat, tears, and money on developing it. [01:01:16] And then along comes a big guy and you're out of business. We've got to finish this up. We will do that. When we get back, what's a Senate doing actually here. And what does it mean to you and me? Hey, visit me online. Craig peterson.com. Get my insider information for free. [01:01:38] We just talked about how big business uses its advantages to crush potential competition. Crush them. And it's a shame and it's happened to me and many people I know, and now the Senate's getting involved and making things worse. [01:01:55] This happened to me a number of years ago, and I will never forget it. [01:02:00] It was a really big lesson for me. I had designed and written a computer system that would take the code that it was written for a much older system. And run it for much less money. So bottom line here, this was a system called Cade computer assisted data entry that was made by Sperry way back in the day. [01:02:25] Yeah. I've been in there for that long and they had little programs, so they would not punch cards, but punch right on two tapes, those big nine track tapes and that information would then be used for processing later on then. People, big businesses grocery stores, you name it. We're using that Sperry system. [01:02:48] And I designed a system that would take their COBOL is what it was. It was a form of COBOL code from this cage system. And you could use my code to compile it and run it on a Unix system. So the cost involved here was that it would be cheaper to buy a whole new Unix computer and buy new terminals and do some slight training changes. [01:03:18] But the key punch operators would be exactly the same keystrokes as they were already used to. Okay. So you know how fast they were, so it wouldn't slow than none at all. And their cost would be. Then just the maintenance contract on the old Sperry cage. Very cool stuff. And I worked really well. [01:03:38] Then I worked with a couple of sales guys at spirit because Barry had a Unix tower system. It was a mini computer that was Unix space. And I had one, I had saved up my money. We bought this thing. It was a lot of money nowadays. It'd be about a hundred thousand dollars I spent on that system and it was really great. [01:04:00] Cool. So some grocery stores started using it. They used it to build the space shuttle to design it and send it into space. RCA, Astro space used it, my system, which is all really cool. So Sperry was interested in it saying, okay let's do this. Now. I had flown myself across the country too, because I was in California at the time to do some of this work for. [01:04:25] The for RCA Astro space for the space program and help make sure it was working and get it installed, help them configure it and everything else. So I had a lot of time, a lot of money, a lot of effort into this. It was a big venture. So Sperry invited me down to their headquarters down in blue bell, Pennsylvania to talk about this. [01:04:50] And I was so excited because their sales guys wanted to sell it. They gave me some free space in a booth in Las Vegas. So I was in the Sperry booth with them and, say, yeah, you can buy this. And you're using the Sperry, the new Sperry hardware. And I went down there and talked with them. [01:05:10] They never did anything with me, or, here's a huge investment young guy. And all of this stuff just worked and they had proof of concept. They had a couple of customers already using the system and it never materialized. And then about a year and a half later, I found out Sperry had tried to duplicate my system and had messed it up terribly. [01:05:35] It wasn't keystroke compatible. So anyone using the new Sperry system, they had to learn. Okay. So I got to hit this and I got to go over here and I got to click on this. Are you kidding me using a mouse? Aren't you not? These are data entry operators. They just go all day long, just typing and. [01:05:52] They had stolen my ideas. They messed it up. They didn't do as good a job as I did, which turns out it's pretty common. And they had stolen it. They stolen years of my life. So I've seen that before with me. I've seen Microsoft do that with friends of mine, and I've seen apple do it with various products that they've decided to release. [01:06:17] They all do it. Why do you think these businesses can not spend money on research and development, and yet at the same time, stay in business as technology's continuing to move forward? Why? The reason is. They don't have to do, or why would we do T wait a minute. Now, all we have to do is either buy the company or steal the product just re-engineer. [01:06:44] Oh. And if we want to buy the company, we can do what Microsoft has been accused of doing again and again, which is. We'll just Microsoft. Let's see here. I like that database is pretty darn cool. So here's what we're going to do. So Microsoft announces, Hey, we're going to have a competitor to that in coming out soon. [01:07:03] And then they sit there and they wait and they say, okay, how many people are going to ask about, oh wow. A lot of people asking for it. In the meantime, that company that had that great little database soft. Trying to sell it. And people are saying, wait, Microsoft is going to come up with a version of this. [01:07:18] I'm just, I'm going to wait. We can wait a few months. Let's see what Microsoft. So that poor company is now seriously struggling because this big company came out and made the announcement that they're going to do something like this. And then that small company gets a knock on the door. Hey, we're Microsoft or company X. [01:07:41] And we like your product. Wow. Okay. So we're going to do a buyout. We're going to we're just, oh, this is going to be fantastic. I might have to sign what a two year contract non-compete and help them manage it. Okay. We can deal with this. And then they find out that company X says Your company is not worth that much anymore. [01:08:02] Your sales look at their sales here, man. They've gone way down. Okay. So let me see let's do a nickel on every dollar evaluation you had a year ago. This happens every day, worldwide in America, it should never happen to anyone. And as you can tell, it upsets me. So what are Klobuchar and Grassley doing here? [01:08:30] Amy, when she was running for president, she made this big deal. I'm going to pull us up on my screen. Those of you who are watching on rumble or YouTube. And you can find all of that in my website, Craig peterson.com can see here. So they are trying to protect the American consumer, right? Yeah. [01:08:49] Yeah. That's it. They're gonna protect us. And so what they're doing is saying that. Would a rule ruin Google search results because that's what Google says. Is it going to bar apple from offering new features, useful ones on the iPhone? How about Facebook? Will it stop them from moderating content? So the legislation's core idea is we will just. [01:09:17] The marketplace take care of things. We're not going to let Amazon put their products in the product listings before third parties, but how are you possibly going to be able to regulate that stuff you can't, you can regulate it talking about a bureaucracy. You'd probably need one about as big as the federal government is right now. [01:09:41] And the federal government needs to be cut back in a major way. There's this two months. How about the 150 million Americans? This article brings that up to that are currently using Amazon prime, even though the price one hump. And they have it free to prime members. It's this is a big deal. [01:10:00] The bill doesn't mention prime. Doesn't mention Google by name, Amazon. But this is going to be a nightmare to enforce the bill is not specific enough. It should be voted down. And between you and me, I don't know what can be done about this other than to have additional marketplaces show up online. And you know what the conservative social media sites are starting to win. [01:10:29] So maybe there's hope. [01:10:32] We've got two things we're going to talk about right now. One of them is tech jobs. And man, is there a lot of scamming going on there as you might expect in the second is cloud, are you looking at cloud services? Hey, a home or business. [01:10:48] You can see this. I'm going to pull this up on my screen for those watching on rumble or on YouTube, but this is a big problem. [01:10:58] And we've seen this again and again right now, they're going after certain workers in the chemical. The sector, but it isn't just the chemical sector. What we've seen is the bad guys going after anyone that's applying for a job. So let me give you a few tips here. First of all, you should not be pain to apply for a job. [01:11:25] We see that all of the time when it comes to the head hunting firms, what. Is, they will charge the business who is looking to hire someone that makes sense to you. They'll hire they'll charge the business. So oftentimes it's a percentage of the annual salary committee where from usually 20% up to a hundred percent or more, depending on the position. [01:11:49] And boy can, they make a lot of money, but they don't necessarily place. People, but you know how it is right now, there, there can be quite a few. So people have been applying for jobs to make a lot of money and not realizing that fee that supposedly they have to pay is illegitimate. So remember that. [01:12:10] Okay. The second thing has to do with this particular scam, because what they're trying to do is. Into some of these companies. So they will send a thing out saying, Hey, on my head hunter, I'm here for you. We're going to get you this job you need to apply. Are you interested in a new job now? I've seen some stats online saying that somewhere around 30 plus percent of people are looking or at least open to. [01:12:45] Take getting a new job, which means a lot more are looking for jobs. Now I have to add to that, that the people who have jumped ship over the lockdown period really are not happy. The majority of them wish they had stayed where they were at. So keep that in mind too. But what they'll do is they'll say, Hey, listen. [01:13:07] Oh, there's this new feature on LinkedIn. By the way, you can say y'all are, I'm interested in looking for a job. I forget exactly what it says, but it goes around your picture and I have it up there because I'm a contractor, I go to businesses and I'm. To harden their cybersecurity. And we usually start slowly, especially with some of these startups we're doing work with right now where they won't, they go from a completely flat network and it's all engineers and I don't want anything hindering anything. [01:13:39] And so you got to work with them and it's just, we had a time sort of a thing. Okay. I just had this one thing this week. And then move on to one thing next week as well. So that's what I do for a living. And a lot of people are looking on LinkedIn and other places to find people who can be a chief information security officer. [01:14:01] So I'm what you call a fractional chief information security officer. I do this under contract and I've been doing contracts and contract work for. I don't know if I shouldn't be on the air, but my gosh it's been now I guess it's 40 years right now. So I've been doing this for a long time. [01:14:22] So I'm familiar with some of these scams, so they didn't take my word on some of this stuff. So what they do is they say, Hey, we've got a potential job opening. Are you in interested now? When we talk about 30 plus percent of people polled say that they're looking interested in a new job, the numbers are probably a little higher. Not that everyone's going to jump ship. Some people will, but there are a lot of people that if they get this email, they're going to open it up. And so what'll happen now is this group out of North Korea called the Lazarus group? And we've talked about them before. [01:15:00] We'll go ahead and say yeah, the here's, what's going to happen here. Let's just send you this thing. You can open it up. You can look at it and see if it's really a fit for you. I love this graphic that they have. This is from dark reading. I have it up on the screen again. Rumble and YouTube. [01:15:19] What should we do now? Should I open this up? Should I not open it up? It turns out that what's happening is that Symantec and Broadcom, both have noticed this and stated in an advisory a couple of weeks ago. Be very careful because what it's going to do is install a Trojan horse on your computer. [01:15:40] So let's think about this. You're talking about the chemicals