Podcasts about battle creek

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Best podcasts about battle creek

Latest podcast episodes about battle creek

Beyond The Fame with Jason Fraley

WTOP Entertainment Reporter Jason Fraley chats with actor Kal Penn as this week marks 15 years since "House" Season 4, which introduced Penn as Dr. Lawrence Kutner. They spoke in 2015 when Penn reunited with “House” creator David Shore for the CBS crime drama “Battle Creek,” as well as memories of “Harold & Kumar.” (Theme Music: Scott Buckley's "Clarion")

Dana & Chelsea In The Morning
Why Do People Like These Things and Inappropriate Smoke Stacks

Dana & Chelsea In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 22:39


What's something you cannot get into no matter how popular it is? Plus, the demolition of Babcock Dairy in Ohio left a NSFW message for all to see. And, it's Tiktok Tuesday! We highlight a Battle Creek area baker whipping some delicious treats. Just in time for Fall!

Behind the Mitten
Episode 37: Michigan Fall Colors Forecast (Sept. 17-18, 2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 44:50


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category.This week's Behind the Mitten talks fall color forecast, learn about a place where you can literally roll out the barrel, and talk to a Michigan restauranteur who just won a major award. We are joined by Matt Kirkwood, meteorologist for WOOD TV 8, who lays out the timeline for peak leaf color across the state. Dave Cicotte, Director of Sales and Marketing for Brew Detroit discusses their partnership with Detroit City Football Club, and the special half-time activity that involves both barrels and jorts. Yes, jorts. Then Matthew Buskard, who owns local restaurants Bobcat Bonnie's, stops by. He was recently named one of Crain's Detroit top 40 Under 40, which is awesome and amazing.This segment aired Sept. 17-18, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor*4 p.m. Saturdays on WIOS "The Bay's Best!" - 1480 AM & 106.9 FM in Tawas / East Tawas *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI
Sermon 9-18-22 "Parable of the Persistent Widow"

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 35:41


Sermon, "Parable of the Persistent Widow," by Mike Howard, Missionary with CityLinC in Battle Creek, Michigan, during the Morning Worship Service on Sunday, September 18, 2022, at Calvary Baptist Church in Battle Creek, Michigan

106.1 & 1400 WSJM Sports
St. Joseph Football Podcast – 09/16/22 vs. Battle Creek Lakeview

106.1 & 1400 WSJM Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 140:27


As heard on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM The St. Joe Bears (2-1), are back at home at Steve Upton Field at Dickinson Stadium and play host to Battle Creek Lakeview (1-1).  G.B. Richmond and Bret Witkowski have the

106.1 & 1400 WSJM Sports
Lakeshore Football Podcast: 9/16/22 vs. Battle Creek Central

106.1 & 1400 WSJM Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 189:33


As heard on 97.5 Y-County.  After picking up their first win of the season a week ago, the 1-2 Lakeshore Lancers are back at Kohn-Lehman Field at Al Stockman Stadium to host the 2-1 Battle Creek Central

The Leading Voices in Food
E180: Chris Carter and The Spirit of Soul Food

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 19:05


Soul food has played a critical role in preserving black history, community and culinary genius and has also been a response to centuries of food in justice. Today we're speaking with author, Dr. Christopher Carter about these new book entitled, "The Spirit of Soul Food." Chris Carter is a professor of theology and religious studies at the University of San Diego and also a pastor in the United Methodist church. Interview Summary Chris, I can't tell you how much a pleasure it is to talk to you again. You were a very important figure in a meeting we held at Duke University with experts from around the country on food and faith issues. It made me appreciate more than ever how much work has gone on, how rich the thinking is in this area and how important work of this type is. It's really nice of you to join us. That was an amazing conference for establishing connections. And, just as you said, seeing that there's so many people that are connecting food and faith on a broader level, it was just really exciting.   I'm glad you found it that way. So let's talk about your book. So you began your book with a really interesting statement and I'm quoting here, "I did not want to write this book." Tell us why not?   Yes, that is definitely an odd way to start a book that I have been working on for about 10 years. For me, it was really more about this particular version of the book. I had submitted a few earlier drafts throughout the review process and while they were all received well by the publisher, some of the reviews were coming back not as good as I would like them to or not as well appreciated as I thought it could be. There was something missing. I think one of the reviewers noted they felt as though I was being too critical, particularly the food ways of black culture and the ways in which I was being critical. And that wasn't my intention, as a black man I'm talking about the food my people eat. I'm from Louisiana, Mississippi and so my culture is very much steeped in the book. What I realized was that in order to do justice to my arguments and to fully explain how my reasoning has evolved, I had to be vulnerable. I had to talk about my own experience growing up impoverished, and talk about the experiences of my grandfather growing up in the Jim Crow south as a migrant farm worker. I had to talk about the experience of my paternal great-grandfather who was Spanish and was an overseer in the ways in which they had a particular kind of position of power in plantation. It required a lot more vulnerability than I initially wanted to disclose. I think the book is richer for it, and it allowed me to weave compassion in the book in a way that I think is unique. But, that's not the book I set out to write, Kelly. It definitely pushed me in ways that I anticipate and I'm grateful for it but definitely was not easy.   Well, I for one very much appreciate the fact that you took the risk and went and wrote the book. I think it is a really important contribution. So let's talk a little bit more about what you address in the book. So one of the things you do is you wrestle with a complicated relationship between food and agriculture and black culture. So what if anything did you discover in your own research for this book that changed the way you think about this intersection?   I think one of the most powerful things for me that discovered in this research was the fact that Africans were enslaved because of our agricultural acumen. That was really  world changing for me. Growing up, you know, my grandfather had a garden, but it really was like a small farm in his backyard. My family migrated from Louisiana, Mississippi, respectively, to Michigan and they lived in a tiny town called Three Rivers. He had this pretty good size backyard because everybody had lots of space on properties because we were in the country. So I grew up with a particular kind of appreciation for how to grow food but not necessarily knowing that that's a part of or associating it with my identity in any kind of positive connotation. In my research and visiting plantations down south, I was able to connect with the scholars and residents at a few of these particular plantations. What I learned were the ways in which plantation owners were very specific in the tribal affiliation of the slave they were trying to purchase to it depending on the product they were growing. That just utterly transformed my notion in understanding of agriculture and spirituality that I'll talk about in a moment, because I think I grew up with this impression that black people were enslaved because of our physical capacities. I think that's a lot of what the myth is: that we're very strong people and that we can have a high level of endurance. We can work really hard, or whatever. This idea that we were enslaved because we had a particular kind of skill set and knowledge and acumen that otherwise would have prevented the colonizers from actually being able to produce food really was in a unique way like empowering. It helped me realize the traumatic relationship we can have to agriculture and to growing food within the black community because of the history and legacy of enslavement. That enslavement in and of itself, or plantation work in and of itself, is just a part of the story, but it's not the only aspect of the history and legacy of food and agriculture for black community. That was important. It tied to spirituality in as much as what I have come to also realize, that the ways in which the particular kinds of foods we eat - many of them are distinctly West African. They are kind of celebratory practices. We have come from this kind of tradition as well and that we have inherited these and they've been passed down. There's this way in which food has been this binding agent for us to preserve parts of our culture and identity in the midst of a particular kind of marginalized existence in America. That has allowed us to, the words of my ancestors to make a way out of no way. So that really did, I think, change the way I thought about that intersection because I no longer had to think about it as purely oppressive. I could see the liberatory nature found within our ability, reclaiming our ability to connect to the land, to grow food and to be serious about our food ways. That is a way to me to do honor to my ancestors now having done the research and written the book.   That is absolutely fascinating. And, it reminds me of the book, "The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead where he talks about some similar things, about the importance of agricultural expertise among the people who are enslaved.   I absolutely love that book and you are 100% spot on. Particularly in the very beginning of the book, for those of you who haven't read, he talks about the fact that many of the enslaved had their own little gardens. The gardens were on the side of their cabins where tons of people stayed. Those were crucial for them to be able to provide food for themselves, and also some sense of identity and sustainability. So that's an excellent connection that you're drawing that I kind of whole heartedly support it.   In your book you chose to make a theological argument for food justice. So why did you decide to include religion? I know it is obviously important in your life and your profession, but why do you think religion belongs in this sort of discussion? What's the primary theological issue that prevents Christians from various backgrounds, conservative or liberal for that matter, from making food justice a central part of their ministry?   There are a couple of reasons why I decided to include religion. I think the first one really is that as a person who thinks theologically. I am an ordained United Methodist Elder, I'm currently a pastor at Westwood United Methodist Church. So it's hard for me to disentangle those identities. I think just from the way in which I interpret the world. And so one is just to be transparent about the ways in which I'm even approaching the topic. But, also talking about race in the ways in that do require me to talk about religion. So much of the construction of race in America is tied to the role religion played in not only helping to facilitate the creation of racial categories, but to assigning them a particular kind of hierarchy that grew out of a theological hierarchy. So for me, if I were going to talk about some of the moral issues and moral challenges within our current food system, I kind of had to talk about religion because religion was a big aspect or really important part of how we got to the problem in the first place. That leads naturally to the second part of your question: the kind of primary theological issue. It really is what I was just mentioning in terms of how religion was used to justify this kind of oppressive hierarchy of being. And by that I mean the ways in which we give certain forms of being human more privilege, right? So whether it be male privilege over female privilege black over white or able bodied over disabled. I mean all the other various ways that we go about being human. Among the challenges, I think we have the primary challenge with respect to taking environmental justice or food justice seriously from theology is we have a broken. The technical term is theological anthropology. That's just a fancy way of saying our understanding of what it means to be human is radically disconnected from the land. Our understanding of the relationship between God and humans, humans and humans, and humans and non-human nature is fractured. We have prioritized this way of being human that separates us from anything that's material, right? That separates us from anything that is necessarily connected to work. And so when you say what it needs to be an ideal human is to be a kind of upper middle class, white Anglo-Saxon, protestant, heterosexual male - if that's your ideal version of being human, then all other people are going to strive to model those particular kinds of ways, right? Of being in the world and seeing them as the ideal. So that doesn't allow for the plurality of the human experience. Really my argument tries to take seriously the Eucharistic call that's in Christian theology - this idea that either male or female, June or Greek or slavery or free - we're all created in the body of Christ. And to exclude someone from the body of Christ by putting these boundaries on the ways in which they have to be human is an affront to the idea of Eucharistic solidarity, the idea that we are all part of the same body of Christ. The challenge that I try to cross in the book is, how do we understand and develop a new way of being human as modeling our lives after Christ? I talk about this idea of being human as practice or in Methodist terms, as I said I'm a Methodist pastor, we call this sanctification or Christian perfection. It is this idea of being human as a process, a goal, something we're always striving towards rather than it's just assumption that it's just the way we are, right. So it's really about preserving and aiming towards particular kinds of ideals of solidarity, ideals of love and ideals of interconnectedness that I believe can transform the ways in which we engage the world particularly from ecological and food perspective.   It is my impression you're speaking about this mainly from a Christian point of view. And one thing that was interesting from that conference that we both attended on food and faith several years back was how there were pretty distinct similarities across religious traditions and the way food, helping people in need with food and things like that existed. Those similarities were really fascinating. It seems to me, but I want to see what your opinion on this, that more and more people are aware of this. They are more aware of the connections between food and faith in general, but specifically how it applies in the different religious traditions. Do you see that interest and awareness increasing as I do?   I do. I will tell you probably my second most popular class at the University of San Diego is my introductory course called Religion and Food. Now on one hand, it's popular because it's probably the only class where you're going to get to do a lot of cooking. Some students really love to cook. So for them they are like, "hey, this is great. Part of the class is going to be eating food, sign me up, you know." So that's one part of it. But, I think underneath that what students realize, I have students multiple religious traditions, and I talk about how we use food to make meaning. How eating food is a meaning making practice, right. Through their food, they are able to then explain and construct their own identities and where they come from, with their particular stories, their ethics and their values around what they are eating or what they are not eating and why they eat in these particular ways and how it's tied to their traditions. I think there is a growing appreciation for food in American culture and particularly the spiritual dimensions when it's made explicit to people. They understand it almost immediately because we all have certain things we eat every holiday, right. We all have certain things that we eat because this is how grandma used to make it. And that is sacred, righ?. There's something sacred about that. So it's helping them tease that out a little bit so they can begin to understand how it connects with their broader sense of self. It's a really exciting course. And to your point, Kelly, I think people are really starting to understand how this connection is spiritual in regardless of our religious traditions.   It's good to hear your perspective on that. So back to your book, so you end your book by suggesting three theologically grounded principles for eating in ways that align with values of love, justice, solidarity, and interconnectedness. Can you share a little bit more about those principles?   This for me is kind of the culmination of the whole project. I try to identify as a practical theologian and obviously that is just a fancy way of saying, I don't want to disconnect my academic work to the realities of what's happening on the ground with people. I think it's part of the reason I still am a pastor. So, I try to make arguments and suggestions that I think people actually can apply. The first principle that I talk about is what I call soulful eating. That is really eating in a way that recognizes and takes seriously the kind of theological, moral commitments we are to have with non-human animals and non-human nature. So that means taking this kind of assessment of where do we procure our food from? Like where does it come from? Who is growing it? Are these people being paid fair wages? Are they being treated humanely? Taking seriously as the fact that if you look at factory farms and where those plants are located, how they just do so much ecological harm, particularly to communities of color and poor and rural communities. What I suggest as soulful eating really is a way that tries to eat in a way that does no harm, right. I argue for, at its best, that for me this is a kind of practical veganism, right? This is a way of trying to opt out of systems that we know cause harm not only to our planet, but to people, right. That the people that either work in these places or the people impacted in those environments who live by those factory farms are disproportionately harmed. How can we opt out of those systems? I recognize that is not possible for everyone. Again, I grew up impoverished, so that wasn't possible for me. And so I talk about trying to, in the second part, give justice for food workers. How people who are of privilege work towards creating the kind of capacities and spaces to provide means for people who are low income and poor, to access food in ways that does justice not only for them, but also to those who grow the food. So by this, I mean things like what Heber Brown is doing at the Black Church Food Security Network is a perfect example of the work I think religious organizations can be doing, where they connect with farmers to basically have more or less these kind of food hubs, right. The church literally becomes a hub where people can come and purchase food where there is low overhead because the point isn't to make a bunch of money, the point is to provide a service. So that they're getting more than selling their food to just a grocery store. You want to make sure that you're compensating the employees that run the business, right, the drivers and whoever, and other than that, that that's really it. It is really about keeping things low cost as possible because you are keeping the dollar, it's staying within that community that's marginalized quite honestly. Whether it's doing that, whether it's stopping at a CSA or a Co-op, those are some of the ways in which we can talk about eating in ways that addressed justice for food workers. The last one is caring for the earth. That ties together with the other two, in as much as again how might, particularly if you're looking at churches for instance, how might we turn church land into farmland. Like again, I grew up in semi-rural West Michigan. Our church had literally has acres of grass that we mowed. What could we also do with that land? Even if we didn't necessarily want to farm it, you know, we could have hired someone or let someone actually do something with that to actually grow food and provide food for the community. It doesn't necessarily have to be food for people. It could be a cash crop. I mean, there are multiple ways in which we could use our land more efficiently. I think this needs to be thought and taught in schools of theology, especially, so clergy can make this connection. Understanding the ways in which again this is kind of a spiritual practice. All this to me is bound together through the lens of cooking. I talked in the previous answer about the importance of cooking for me. I think it has a spiritual practice for us to really tell our stories, to demonstrate our values, so that people can begin to understand who we are and whose we are by the things that we eat and kind of reclaiming the kitchen as a sacred space rather than thinking about cooking as a kind of chore, which often I think in American culture we're taught to move so fast and get things done really quickly. If we slow down, I mean, I do this with my three-year-old son. I include him in the kitchen when I'm cooking probably three to four days a week. I talk to him about his great-grandmother he would never have a chance to meet when I'm making something that she taught me how to make because I want him to know her through this meal and to carry on that particular kind of tradition. Those are the three practices, probably the thing that always gets people jumped out is the veganism stuff. I try to do a good job of explaining in the book that it is much more of a practical veganism that doesn't recognize that everybody can't do it. It is much more about a goal of trying to eat in ways that do no harm. That really puts the burden on organizations and people like myself to provide the framework so people can eat in ways that align with their values so they can actually have access to good healthy food. Bio: Christopher Carter is an assistant professor of theology and religious studies at the University of San Diego. He is also a pastor within the United Methodist Church and has served churches in Battle Creek, Michigan, and in Torrance and Compton, California.

Front Office Features
The FoF Wives Tell All...

Front Office Features

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 70:56


Happy 3 Year Anniversary! FoF turns 3 and we have our most special guests to date as the wives of Front Office Features join the guys to celebrate the milestone. Prior to Amy and Rachel jumping on, we discuss 2 quick topics around surrounding yourself with smarter people and Rob's fear of social posting. We take a trip down memory lane and hear the wive's take on the start of FoF and their initial thoughts when they first heard about the idea of it. We finally hear Amy's side of the story on her time spent in Battle Creek which of course has a must hear story regarding a hotel stay that would make the most comfortable person squirm. Rachel shares her thoughts on their stop in Albany and the ultimatum that sent them back to Boston. This is a must hear podcast for anyone looking to learn how NOT to communicate with their significant others. And of course learning about Rob's concert going experience as we attended Buno Mars this past weekend at the new MGM Music Hall. THANKS TO EVERYONE FOR A GREAT 3 YEARS! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
Walter Woolnough: The First Newspaper Publisher in Battle Creek

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 17:45


Walter Woolnough was born in Bungay, Suffolk County, England in 1821. He moved with his parents to America when he was just eleven years old. He would grow up in New York and become an apprentice for a printing company. He would eventually move west to Ohio, and work for the Ashtabula Ohio Sentinel, a Whig newspaper in 1842. A decade later he would move even father west, and settle in Battle Creek, Michigan and establish the first newspaper in the city. Over the years he was an outspoken abolitionist, and became very active in politics. His fascinating story is the subject of this episode. For more information Michael Delaware, or to reach out to him, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com To see the YouTube video that features the life of Walter Woolnough, visit: https://youtu.be/1MTs1YZYqBA --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI
Sermon 9-11-22 "Becoming a People"

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 47:34


Sermon, "Becoming a People," by Preston Hoxworth during the Morning Worship Service on Sunday, September 11, 2022, at Calvary Baptist Church in Battle Creek, Michigan

Behind the Mitten
Episode 36: Edmore Potato, Fallasburg Art Festival, Lakeshore Harvest Ride and more (Sept. 10-11, 2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 44:49


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category.Every community in Michigan has something to celebrate, and throwing a festival is a tradition for many towns around the state. We discuss some of the interesting and unique ones you can experience this fall, including the Edmore Potato Festival. Festival president Nicole Hadley joins us to speak about all things spud-tacular at this event that is held each September. Then, Erin Murphy from the West Michigan Tourist Association gives us a run down of a few of her favorites, including the 2022 Fallasburg Art Festival in Lowell, the Michigan Irish Music Festival in Muskegon, the Lakeshore Harvest Ride in Southwest Michigan and the Fenn Valley Vine Wine'd Run in Fennville. We close out the show with a few Oktoberfests, because there is probably one every single weekend this fall, so you are never to far from some delicious German beer and food right here in Michigan.This segment aired Sept. 10-11, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor*4 p.m. Saturdays on WIOS "The Bay's Best!" - 1480 AM & 106.9 FM in Tawas / East Tawas *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
An Interview with Doug Sturdivant, President of the Battle Creek Regional History Museum

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 25:27


The Battle Creek Regional History Museum is located at 307 W Jackson St, in Battle Creek Michigan. In this episode I interview Doug Sturdivant, the President of the museum. We discuss the exhibits, coming events at the museum and also some of his favorite local history. We also talk about some of the past and present projects at the museum. For more information on the Battle Creek Regional History Museum, visit: https://www.bcrhm.org To see the details of the History Education Center Project and to contribute, visit: https://www.patronicity.com/history For more information or to contact Michael Delaware, visit: https://www.michaeldelaware.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

The Black Pants Legion Podcast
Podcast No. 113 Detroit, Wisconsin, and Transhumanism

The Black Pants Legion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 71:38 Very Popular


We discuss things like: Buddy's Pizza, how irresponsibly good the Lux Cafe is in Battle Creek, and then we discuss the mysteries of Wisconsin. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/blackpantslegion/message

Atomic Hobo
Getting Frustrated In Battle Creek

Atomic Hobo

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 30:47


Back into the archives, looking at the instructions for Shelter Managers in Battle Creek, Michigan. Handling frustration, misery and bed-hopping. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Dana & Chelsea In The Morning
Your Texts Are Sending You to Jail (but not really)

Dana & Chelsea In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 26:14


Our question of the day: your last text is the reason you went to jail. What's the reason. Yeah...this got a little weird. Why was everyone honking at Dana over the weekend? And, we talk about a Battle Creek crochetier for Tiktok Tuesday!

Behind the Mitten
Apple Season in Michigan: Everything you need to know (Episode 35, Sept. 3-4, 2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 44:50


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category.This week show is all about Michigan apples! Freshly harvested apples are coming in off the trees from all over the state, and popping up in Michigan farmers markets and stores. With over 24 BILLION bushels of apples harvested each year, Michigan is an apple powerhouse. We talk with Diane Smith, executive director of the Michigan Apple Committee, about this year's harvest, our race to beat New York every year, and just what makes Honeycrisp apples not just delicious, but also a little bit more expensive. Then, our buddy Scott Newman-Bale, CEO of Short's Brewing and Starcut Ciders, joins us to talk about hard cider. Amy and Gonzo share a few of their favorite orchards, and what they are looking forward to this fall. Learn more about Michigan Apples at https://www.michiganapples.com/. This segment aired Sept. 3-4, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor*4 p.m. Saturdays on WIOS "The Bay's Best!" - 1480 AM & 106.9 FM in Tawas / East Tawas *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI
Sermon 9-4-22 "1 Peter 2:1-3"

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 45:45


Sermon, "1 Peter 2:1-3," by Pastor John Lippard during the Morning Worship Service on Sunday, September 4, 2022, at Calvary Baptist Church in Battle Creek, Michigan

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
A History of the Funeral Business in Michigan: An Interview with T.R. Shaw

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 34:33


T.R. Shaw and his family operated the Shaw Funeral Home in Battle Creek, Michigan for four generations. The company was founded just after the close of the Civil War, and was in continuous operation until the family sold it in 2015. T.R. tells stories from the business going back to the late 1800's, including stories from Battle Creek, Bellevue, Detroit as well as his experiences growing up in the funeral business. He is also the author of the book: Defy the Immediate. To get a copy of T.R. Shaw's book Defy the Immediate, visit: https://amzn.to/3pGijwr To read more about, and support the History Education Center Project mentioned in this episode, visit: https://www.patronicity.com/history To contact Michael Delaware, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

The Richard Piet Show
The Barn Theatre's Penelope Alex on the Past, the Present and the Future

The Richard Piet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 8:16


Locals consider The Barn Theatre outside Battle Creek and Kalamazoo, Michigan as a community gem. They enjoy an intense schedule of summer and fall shows, along with an end-of-season holiday show tradition. Along with The Barn's out-in-the-country, local flavor are much farther-reaching influences that have help shape the careers of actors whose names you know - some of whom keep coming back because they just love it. Penelope Alex visits with TRPS about how they slogged through the pandemic closure, then rebounded in 2021 and 2022 to full schedules of comedies, musicals and thrillers - and how her family ended up in a movie.Episode ResourcesBarn Theatre School websiteRaunch and Roll moviePenelope Alex on IMDBFamous BarniesMore Barn-related episodes:From Genoa City to Kalamazoo: Robert Newman Returns to the Stage After Y&RGuiding Light Reunion: Kim Zimmer and Robert NewmanThe Richard Piet Show is a Livemic Communications podcast. 

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
The Story of Brother Against Brother: Cornelius and Samuel Byington in the Civil War

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 42:49


The American Civil War has often been referred to as a war which placed brother against brother. In Southwest Michigan, I uncovered a story of two brothers, the Byingtons, who fought on opposite sides of this conflict. They were both originally born in New York, but one moved with his family to Battle Creek, Michigan many years before the start of the war, and the other moved to Montgomery, Alabama. When the Civil War erupted, Cornelius enlisted with Battle Creek Artillery Company in the rank of Captain in 1861, and Samuel would enlist in Alabama in 1862 as a seargent. They came within one week of meeting each other on the battlefield near Knoxville, TN in 1863. This is their story. To see a YouTube video on Cornelius Byington, click here: https://youtu.be/w-3ADl2nBv0 To find out more about Michael Delaware, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

Behind the Mitten
Ice Cream Shops, Mackinac Bridge Walk, Marshall Historic Homes, S.S. Badger (Episode 34, Aug. 27-28, 2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 44:51


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category.We start off this week with Gonzo and Amy going over the details for the 2022 Mackinac Bridge Walk, which takes place on Labor Day. From what to bring, what not to bring, and a few tips on transportation, BTM will help you be ready to knock this off your Michigan bucket list. Then, we revisit our segment with Shelby from the S.S. Badger and share their fall schedule. Our friends from Marshall stop by to talk about a few upcoming festivals, and the myriad of museums you can check out in this charming Michigan town. To close out the show, we discuss a few of our favorite ice cream spots from around the state that we've been visiting this summer. Let us know your top spot for ice cream and we'll be sure to add it to our list! Learn more about the Mackinac Bridge Walk at https://www.mackinacbridge.org/events/walk/.Learn more about the Marshall Historical Society 57th annual Home Tour at http://www.marshallhistoricalsociety.org/.Learn more about the S.S. Badger Car Ferry Boat in Ludington at https://www.ssbadger.com/. This segment aired Aug. 27-28, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor*4 p.m. Saturdays on WIOS "The Bay's Best!" - 1480 AM & 106.9 FM in Tawas / East Tawas *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI
Sermon 8-28-22 "Psalm 67 - A Missionary Psalm"

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 26:57


Sermon, "Psalm 67 - A Missionary Psalm," by Roger Steele during the Morning Worship Service on Sunday, August 28, 2022, at Calvary Baptist Church in Battle Creek, Michigan

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
The Story of Ambrose Minty & the Cigar Factory that Fell into the Mill Race

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 28:24


This is the story of Ambrose Minty and his cigar factory that fell into the mill race in downtown Battle Creek in 1899. It is an unusual story of the early pioneer period, but is also offers a very interesting insight into the moral fiber of the community during this time period in history. Donate to The History Education Project: https://www.patronicity.com/history For more information on Michael Delaware, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com Here is the video on Ambrose Minty & the Cigar Factory: https://youtu.be/dad55VEltjU --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI
Sermon 8-21-22 "Pass On The Good News With Your Influence"

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 24:20


Sermon, "Pass On The Good News With Your Influence," by Brian Hecht during the Morning Worship Service on Sunday, August 21, 2022, at Calvary Baptist Church in Battle Creek, Michigan

Super Cool Radio
Hanging Out with The Coursing at Michigan Metal Fest

Super Cool Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 7:39


Michigan Metal Fest was the season 4 opener for Super Cool Radio! We had a great time hanging out with everyone in Battle Creek. Big thank you to Steve Maple, Jesse Dibble, and the organizers for the great opportunity. Matthew chats with The Coursing! They discuss connecting with Heartsick, favorite song to perform live, the wrestler Sting, and much more! Please check out, stream, support, and give a like to The Coursing. Make sure to see them live! SCR and Matthew Thomas would like to thank The Coursing for the great interview. This interview was filmed live on location at Michigan Metal Fest in Battle Creek, Michigan on August 13th, 2022. Special thanks to Michigan Metal Fest for allowing us to film this episode and for being so accommodating while at the festival. Promo pictures courtesy of The Coursing Intro and outro music composed by Jonny Neville If you like this video, please consider heading over to our merch store and supporting us. Your support means so much! Link: Super Cool Radio's Artist Shop | Featuring custom t-shirts, prints, and more (threadless.com) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/supercoolradio/support

Behind the Mitten
Episode 33: Burning Foot in Muskegon, GR Beer Tours, Things to Do in Port Huron & More (Aug. 21, 2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2022 44:50


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category.On this week's show, we kick off with Caleb Gordon, the program manager of 1380 WPHM, one of Behind the Mitten's proud radio partners. Caleb was born and raised in Blue Water Country, which you might know by its alias, The Thumb. He shares some things you must see and do when you visit and gives us the scoop on some pretty great freebies in the area to take advantage of. Then, get ready for Michigan's premiere beach beer fest, Burning Foot, which takes place on August 27 in Muskegon. Founder Allen Serio gives us the scoop on what to expect at this awesome event. Brain Haik from Grand Rapids Beer Tours joins us to discuss what it's like to employ Amy and John, why these beer tours are so much fun, and also shares some of his musical side projects with us. Caleb comes back to finish the show. Learn more about WPHM at https://www.wphm.net/.Learn more about Burning Foot at https://burningfoot.beer/.Learn more about GR Beer Tours at https://www.grbeertours.com/.This segment aired Aug. 20-21, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

Super Cool Radio
Hanging Out with Andrew W. Boss at Michigan Metal Fest

Super Cool Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 9:54


Michigan Metal Fest was the season 4 opener for Super Cool Radio! We had a great time hanging out with everyone in Battle Creek. Big thank you to Steve Maple, Jesse Dibble, and the organizers for the great opportunity. Matthew chats with Andrew W. Boss! Hear Andrew W. Boss discuss their favorite song to perform live, bands they want to tour with, and much more! Please check out, stream, support, and give a like to Andrew W. Boss. SCR and Matthew Thomas would like to thank Andrew W. Boss for the great interview. This interview was filmed live on location at Michigan Metal Fest in Battle Creek, Michigan on August 13th, 2022. Special thanks to Michigan Metal Fest for allowing us to film this episode and for being so accommodating while at the festival. Promo pictures courtesy of Andrew W. Boss Intro and outro music composed by Jonny Neville If you like this video, please consider heading over to our merch store and supporting us. Your support means so much! Link: Super Cool Radio's Artist Shop | Featuring custom t-shirts, prints, and more (threadless.com) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/supercoolradio/support

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
The Life (and Afterlife) of Dr. James Martin Peebles

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 26:56


Dr. James Martin Peebles graduated from the University of Medicine & Surgery at Philadelphia, PA in 1876. His life journey took him around the world four times, and he established medical institutions in Texas, California and Battle Creek, Michigan. He was also selected by President Ulysses S. Grant to serve in the role of an Amassador to Turkey for two years. He held many positions in government and in the private sector over his 99 years of life, including writing several world reknowned publications during his time. He was most known for his book 'How to Live a Century and Grow Old Gracefully'. He died 40 days short of achieving the status of Centurian. He was also active in the Spiritualist movement, and told his friends that if he died before his 100th birthday that they should proceed with the celebration, and he would speak to them through a medium. Newspapers across the nation after his passing were a mix of celebration of his life achievements, combined with stories of him sending messages from the grave. For more information on Michael Delaware, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com For a copy of Dr. James Martin Peebles book, How to Live a Century and Grow Old Gracefully, click here: https://amzn.to/3bA2PXk --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

Super Cool Radio
Redefining Music with Jordan Caparell from REdEFIND at Michigan Metal Fest

Super Cool Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 14:12


Michigan Metal Fest was the season 4 opener for Super Cool Radio! We had a great time hanging out with everyone in Battle Creek. Big thank you to Steve Maple, Jesse Dibble, and the organizers for the great opportunity. Matthew had the opportunity to chat with Jordan Caparell of REdEFIND! Matthew and Jordan discuss joining REdEFIND in 2020, their unique style of music, his favorite song to perform live, and much more! Please check out, stream, support, and give a like to REdEFIND. Make sure to see them live! SCR and Matthew Thomas would like to thank Jordan for the great interview. This interview was filmed live on location at Michigan Metal Fest in Battle Creek, Michigan on August 13th, 2022. Special thanks to Michigan Metal Fest for allowing us to film this episode and for being so accommodating while at the festival. Promo pictures courtesy of REdEFIND Intro and outro music composed by Jonny Neville of Elsie Binx If you like this video, please consider heading over to our merch store and supporting us. Your support means so much! Link: Super Cool Radio's Artist Shop | Featuring custom t-shirts, prints, and more (threadless.com) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/supercoolradio/support

Super Cool Radio
Chatting with Megan from Casket Robbery at Michigan Metal Fest

Super Cool Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 10:28


Michigan Metal Fest was the season 4 opener for Super Cool Radio! We had a great time hanging out with everyone in Battle Creek. Big thank you to Steve Maple, Jesse Dibble, and the organizers for the great opportunity. For this interview, Matthew chats with Megan from Casket Robbery! Matthew and Megan discuss Tennessee Metal Devastation Music Fest, the reaction of some of the residents, the video for Bone Mother, the plans for the rest of 2022, and so much more! Please check out, stream, support, and give a like to Casket Robbery. SCR and Matthew Thomas would like to thank Megan for the great interview. This interview was filmed live on location at Michigan Metal Fest in Battle Creek, Michigan on August 13th, 2022. Special thanks to Michigan Metal Fest for allowing us to film this episode and for being so accommodating while at the festival. Promo pictures courtesy of Casket Robbery Intro and outro music composed by Jonny Neville Link for Metal Devastation Radio: Metal Radio Louder Than Anything Else! | Metal Devastation Radio If you like this video, please consider heading over to our merch store and supporting us. Your support means so much! Link: Super Cool Radio's Artist Shop | Featuring custom t-shirts, prints, and more (threadless.com) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/supercoolradio/support

DWMOD
DWMOD - 32 hard knocks, shitty ice cream, and Saban Crying

DWMOD

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 56:21


on this episode we talk Detroit Lions on Hard Knocks, a high school in Battle Creek that has lost 30 players in 22 years to street violence, we expose a phony ice cream shop in Detroit thats exploiting police and community relationships, Saban crying like a baby, B1G and SEC breaking away from everybody else, Brittany grenier according to Lebron, "Quick hits" and "Knock it off"

Behind the Mitten
Learn more about the Inland Seas Education Association in Suttons Bay (2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 8:47


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category. On this podcast, John talks to Fred Sitkins of the Inland Seas Education Association, which is offering public sail opportunities on their 77-foot Inland Seas Schooner on Aug. 17-19 and Aug. 25-27 in Suttons Bay. They are known mainly for their educational opportunities for school-age children.Their motto: "Inspiring a lifetime of Great Lakes curiosity, stewardship, and passion in people of all ages."Learn more at https://schoolship.org/.This segment aired Aug. 13-14, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

Super Cool Radio
Hanging Out with Alfonso Civile from Heartsick at Michigan Metal Fest

Super Cool Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 18:45


Michigan Metal Fest was the season 4 opener for Super Cool Radio! We had a great time hanging out with everyone in Battle Creek. Big thank you to Steve Maple, Jesse Dibble, and the organizers for the great opportunity. Matthew chats with a good friend of the show, Alfonso Civile of Heartsick! It has been over a year and a half since Alfonso has been on the show. Matthew and Alfonso discuss perceived competition in the music industry, becoming a father, the culture in Miami, and much more! Please check out, stream, support, and give a like to Heartsick. Make sure to see them live! SCR and Matthew Thomas would like to thank Alfonso for the great interview. This interview was filmed live on location at Michigan Metal Fest in Battle Creek, Michigan on August 13th, 2022. Special thanks to Michigan Metal Fest for allowing us to film this episode and for being so accommodating while at the festival. Promo pictures courtesy of Heartsick Intro and outro music composed by Jonny Neville If you like this video, please consider heading over to our merch store and supporting us. Your support means so much! Link: Super Cool Radio's Artist Shop | Featuring custom t-shirts, prints, and more (threadless.com) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/supercoolradio/support

Behind the Mitten
2022 Great Lakes Beer Festival in Midland features 70-plus craft breweries & cideries

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 9:00


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category. On this podcast, John and Amy take you behind the scenes to the very first Great Lakes Beer Festival taking place Aug. 20 at Dow Diamond Stadium in Midland. They talk with festival planner Edward Fritz about what to expect at this new festival. They can reveal that there will be over 70 breweries taking part, lots of house-made stadium food specialties to taste, and one heck of a corn-hole tournament taking place out on the baseball field. Learn more at https://www.greatlakesbeerfestival.com/.This show aired Aug. 6-7, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

All the Books Show
Mike Vosburg on She-Hulk and Beyond!

All the Books Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 45:30


This week Nic sits down with artist Mike Vosburg to discuss his long career in comics, film and animation. They talk in depth about his legendary run on the Savage She-Hulk and bond over their shared history in Battle Creek, Michigan!

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI
Sermon 8-14-22 "1 Peter 1:13-25"

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 43:23


Sermon, "1 Peter 1:13-25," by Preston Hoxworth during the Morning Worship Service on Sunday, August 14, 2022, at Calvary Baptist Church in Battle Creek, Michigan

Behind the Mitten
Sarett Nature Center, Inland Seas Education Association, Visit Muskegon, new Mackinac Island book (Episode 32, Aug. 13-14, 2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 44:51


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category. This week's show is presented by the Great Lakes Beer Festival in Midland, which is Aug. 20 at Dow Diamond. More info at https://www.greatlakesbeerfestival.com/.Segment 1 - Nate Fuller, executive director of the Sarett Nature Center in Benton Harbor tells us what to expect when you visit, as well as why you want to explore the popular butterfly house. A Fall Festival is planned for Aug. 27. Learn more at https://sarett.org/.Segment 2 - Muskegon CVB's Bob Lukens tells more about why people love to visit the Lakeshore, especially later this month for the annual Shoreline Jazz Fest, Aug 26-28. Learn more at https://visitmuskegon.org/.Segment 3 - We learn more about the Inland Seas Education Foundation, which is offering public sail opportunities on their 77-foot Inland Seas Schooner on Aug. 17-19 and Aug. 25-27 in Suttons Bay. Our guest is executive director Fred Sitkins. Learn more at https://schoolship.org/.Above the Mitten: John and Amy talk about the 2022 U.P. State Fair, which is Aug. 15-22 at the U.P. State Fairgrounds in Escanaba. Learn more at https://www.upstatefair.net/.Segment 4 - Little Luxuries business owner Nicole Doud joins the show to talk about her debut book, which is perfectly suited for the little ones - "ABC's of Mackinac Island." It's available at her store, as well as her husband's store, Doud's Market. It's available online at https://littleluxuriesofmackinac.com/products/abcs-of-michigan-6-5.This show aired Aug. 13-14, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

GovLove - A Podcast About Local Government
#531 Communication & Sharing the Work of Local Government with Jessica VanderKolk, Battle Creek, MI

GovLove - A Podcast About Local Government

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 44:29


Being a liaison between local government and the community. Jessica VanderKolk, Communications Manager for the City of Battle Creek, Michigan, joined the podcast to talk about local government communications. She shared how staff can help share their stories with the community and highlight the work of their organization. She also talked about her career path into local government from journalism and her new role on the ELGL Board of Directors.   Host: Toney Thompson

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
The Unsolved 1917 Murder of Guiseppi Aiello in Battle Creek

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 32:47


The year 1917 in Battle Creek, Michigan was a time of great change. President Wilson had signed a declaration of War passed by Congress in April, and a military base which would become Camp Custer was under construction west of the city by June. Thousand of new people were in town, and arriving on trains, and from August to September, arrests by the police had increased by 900%. It was in late September of 1917 when one of the most brutal murders of an Italian immigrant named Guiseppi Aiello, who was known locally as Joseph Ellen, occurred on the southern end of town. The coroner's inquiry would later declare it to be an assassination, and the police believed at one point that it may have been terrorists who committed the crime. The murder was never solved. For more information on Michael Delaware, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

Everything Is Marketing
ESTO 2022 - Linda Freybler

Everything Is Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 14:00


In this episode, Linda Freybler from Battle Creek stops by during ESTO 2022 to talk about the work a CEO does to connect with their team and potential travelers and the magic of being an incredible strategic planner.

Behind the Mitten
Michigan Irish Music Festival returns Sept. 15-18: What you need to know (2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 10:04


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category. On this podcast, John and Amy talk to reps of the Michigan Irish Music Festival, which is Sept. 15-18 at Heritage Landing in downtown Muskegon.Marketing Director Laura Holmes and Board President Chris Zahrt share their excitement for this year's event, which is considered one of the top Irish music festival's in the country and features more than 25 bands on multiple stages. The festival also features Irish food, culture and beverages.This year MIMF will offer discounted pricing on single-day tickets, four-day passes, and kids, 12 and under remain free. Patrons can save $5 – $10 on any single-day ticket when they purchase online. New this year, Sunday will be our Discount Day: GET IN FREE 10:30 am – Noon and stay through 6 pm. Learn more at https://michiganirish.org/.Learn more about Muskegon at https://visitmuskegon.org/. This show aired Aug. 6-7, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

Behind the Mitten
Episode 31: Michigan Irish Music Festival, Great Lakes Beer Festival, Bad Axe film, Visit Muskegon (Aug. 6-7, 2022)

Behind the Mitten

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 44:49


“Behind the Mitten” is Michigan's premiere travel radio show and Podcast, and it has more than 430 episodes. It is co-hosted by veteran journalist John Gonzalez and former chef/beer expert Amy Sherman. The show has been recognized by the Michigan Association of Broadcasters as Best in Category. This week's show is presented by the Great Lakes Beer Festival in Midland, which is Aug. 20 at Dow Diamond. More info at https://www.greatlakesbeerfestival.com/.00:30 - The show opens with an interview with reps from the Michigan Irish Music Festival in Muskegon, which is Sept. 15-18 at Heritage Landing. Learn more at https://michiganirish.org/.11:00 - Learn about the Inland Seas Education Foundation, which is offering public sail opportunities on their 77-foot Inland Seas Schooner on Aug. 17-19 and Aug. 25-27. Learn more at https://schoolship.org/.12:22 - We talk to Ed Fritz of the Great Lakes Beer Festival in Midland.22:39 - John interviews the Siev family from Bad Axe, which stars in the documentary film "Bad Axe," which won the Audience Award at the recent Traverse City Film Festival. The film's director, David Siev, filmed his family's story through Covid and how they kept their restaurant together during a tumultuous time in our country's history. The film will be released in November by IFC Films. 33:53 - Bob Lukens of Visit Muskegon joins the show to talk about the things to do in the area, including how to enjoy their 26 miles of beach on Lake Michigan. Learn more at https://visitmuskegon.org/. This show aired Aug. 6-7, 2022.Stations: *8 a.m. Saturdays on WBRN - 1460 AM and 107.7 FM in Big Rapids *8 a.m. Saturdays on Kalamazoo Talk Radio 1360 WKMI *8 a.m. Saturdays on WILS-1320 AM in Lansing *10 a.m. Saturdays 95.3 WBCK-FM in Battle Creek *10 a.m. Saturdays on News/Talk/Sports 94.9 WSJM in Benton Harbor *Noon Sundays on News, Talk and Sports - 1380-AM WPHM in Port Huron *1 p.m. Sundays on WSGW-AM (790) and FM (100.5) in Saginaw *6 p.m. Sundays on WOOD-AM (1300) and (106.9) in Grand Rapids Follow John and Amy on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/behindthemitten orTwitter at @BehindTheMitten and Instagram at @BehindTheMitten_.

The Richard Piet Show
From Genoa City to Kalamazoo: Robert Newman Returns to the Stage After Y&R

The Richard Piet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 15:11


Actor Robert Newman is no stranger to daytime drama, after spending 28 years on Guiding Light and short stints on General Hospital and Santa Barbara. You have also seen him in guest starring roles on television and in movies. Theatre-goers also know Robert well from his frequent appearances all around the country.In Robert's new visit to TRPS, he speaks candidly about his six-month return to daytime as Ashland Locke on The Young and the Restless - and what he really would love to do next in his career. He visited with TRPS while in rehearsals at The Barn Theatre in Augusta, Michigan (near Kalamazoo and Battle Creek) for a production of Rock of Ages.Watch for Robert in the feature-length film Raunch and Roll (partially filmed in Kalamazoo, starring his Barn Theatre co-star Penelope Alex) and the Apple TV+ anthology series Extrapolations.Episode ResourcesRobert's last visit to TRPS in 2020 - with GL co-star Kim ZimmerRichard chats with Robert Newman and Kim Zimmer on the radio in 2017—-Could your organization or business use purposeful exposure like this in order to share your story? Check out Livemic Communications for more information.The Richard Piet Show  is a Livemic Communications podcast.

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI
Sermon 8-7-22 "The Battle of Rephidim"

Calvary Baptist Church Battle Creek, MI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 33:58


Sermon, "The Battle of Rephidim," by Paul Spotts, Missionary with RBM Ministries, during the Morning Worship Service on Sunday, August 7, 2022, at Calvary Baptist Church in Battle Creek, Michigan

Midnight Train Podcast
”Hell's Belle” Gunness, aka Lady Bluebeard, aka ”The La Porte Ghoul”

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 97:45


www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com  www.patreon.com/accidentaldads Belle Sorenson Gunness was initially born as Brynhild Paulsdatter Størseth; November 11, 1859, Selbu, Norway – April 28, 1908?, Lwas a Norwegian-Americ Standing six feet tall (183 cm) and weighing over 200 pounds (91 kg), she was a massive, physically strong woman.   Early years   Gunness' origins are a matter of some debate. Most of her biographers state that she was born on November 11, 1859, near the lake of Selbu, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway, and christened Brynhild Paulsdatter Størset. Her parents were Paul Pedersen Størset (a stonemason) and Berit Olsdatter. She was the youngest of their eight children. They lived at Størsetgjerdet, a very small cotter's farm in Innbygda, 60 km southeast of Trondheim, the largest city in central Norway (Trøndelag).   An Irish TV documentary by Anne Berit Vestby aired on September 4, 2006, tells a common, but the unverified story about Gunness' early life. The story holds that, in 1877, Gunness attended a country dance while pregnant. There she was attacked by a man who kicked her in the abdomen, causing her to miscarry the child. The man, who came from a wealthy family, was never prosecuted by the Norwegian authorities. According to people who knew her, her personality changed substantially. The man who attacked her died shortly afterward. His cause of death was said to be stomach cancer. Growing up in poverty, Gunness took to milking and herding cattle the following year on a large, wealthy farm and served there for three years to pay for a trip across the Atlantic.   Following the example of a sister, Nellie Larson, who had emigrated to America earlier, Gunness moved to the United States in 1881 and assumed a more American-style name. Initially, In Chicago, while living with her sister and brother-in-law, she worked as a domestic servant, then got a job at a butcher's shop cutting up animal carcasses until her first marriage in 1884.   First Victim   In 1884, Gunness married Mads Ditlev Anton Sorenson in Chicago, Illinois, where, two years later, they opened a candy store. The business was unsuccessful, and the shop mysteriously burned down within a year. They collected the insurance, which paid for another home.   Some researchers tend to believe that the marriage to Sorenson produced no offspring. However, Neighbors gossiped about the babies since Belle never appeared to be pregnant. Other investigators report that the couple had four children: Caroline, Axel, Myrtle, and Lucy. Caroline and Axel died in infancy, allegedly of acute colitis. The symptoms of acute colitis — nausea, fever, diarrhea, and lower abdominal pain and cramping — are also symptoms of many forms of poisoning. Caroline's and Axel's lives were reportedly insured, and the insurance company paid.   A May 7, 1908 article in The New York Times states that two children belonging to Gunness and her husband Mads Sorensen were interred in her plot in Forest Home cemetery.   On June 13, 1900, Gunness and her family were counted on the United States Census in Chicago. The census recorded her as the mother of four children; only two were living: Myrtle A., 3, and Lucy B., 1. An adopted 10-year-old girl, possibly identified as Morgan Couch but later known as Jennie Olsen, was also counted in the household.   Sorenson died on July 30, 1900, reportedly the only day on which two life insurance policies on him overlapped. Both policies were active simultaneously, as one would expire that day, and the other would begin. The first doctor to see him thought he was suffering from strychnine poisoning. However, the Sorensons' family doctor had been treating him for an enlarged heart, and he concluded that heart failure caused death. An autopsy was considered unnecessary because the death was not thought suspicious. Sorenson died of cerebral hemorrhage that day. Gunness explained he had come home with a headache, and she provided him with quinine powder for the pain; she later checked on him, and he was dead.   She applied for the insurance money the day after her husband's funeral. Sorenson's relatives claimed Gunness had poisoned her husband to collect on the insurance. Surviving records suggest that an inquest was ordered. It is unclear, however, whether that investigation actually occurred or Sorenson's body was ever exhumed to check for arsenic, as his relatives demanded. The insurance companies awarded her $8,500 (about $299,838.51 in today's dollars), with which she bought a pig farm on the outskirts of La Porte, Indiana.   Suspicion of murder   In 1901, Gunness purchased a house on McClung Road. It's been reported that both the boat and carriage houses burned to the ground shortly after she acquired the property.   As she was preparing to move from Chicago to LaPorte, she became re-acquainted with a recent widower, Peter Gunness, also Norwegian-born. They were married in LaPorte on April 1, 1902; just one week after the ceremony, Peter's infant daughter died (of uncertain causes) while alone in the house with Belle. In December 1902, Peter himself met with a "tragic accident.” According to Belle, he reached for his slippers next to the kitchen stove when he was scalded with brine. She later declared that part of a sausage-grinding machine fell from a high shelf, causing a fatal head injury. A year later, Peter's brother, Gust, took Peter's older daughter, Swanhilde, to Wisconsin. She is the only child to have survived living with Belle.   Her husband's death netted Gunness another $3,000 (some sources say $4,000). Local people refused to believe that her husband could be so clumsy; he had run a hog farm on the property and was known to be an experienced butcher; the district coroner reviewed the case and unequivocally announced that he had been murdered. He convened a coroner's jury to look into the matter. Meanwhile, Jennie Olsen, then 14, was overheard confessing to a classmate: "My mama killed my papa. She hit him with a meat cleaver and he died. Don't tell a soul."   Jennie was brought before the coroner's jury but denied having said anything. Gunness, meanwhile, convinced the coroner that she was innocent of any wrongdoing. She did not mention that she was pregnant, which would have inspired sympathy, but in May 1903, a baby boy, Phillip, joined the family. In late 1906 Belle told neighbors that her foster daughter, Jennie Olsen, had gone away to a Lutheran College in Los Angeles (some neighbors were informed that it was a finishing school for young ladies). Jennie's body would later be recovered, buried on her adoptive mother's property.   Between 1903 and 1906, Belle continued to run her farm. In 1907 Gunness employed a single farm hand, Ray Lamphere, to help with chores.   The Suitors   Around the same time, Gunness inserted the following advertisement in the matrimonial columns of all the Chicago daily newspapers and those of other large midwestern cities:   “Personal — comely widow who owns a large farm in one of the finest districts in La Porte County, Indiana, desires to make the acquaintance of a gentleman equally well provided, with view of joining fortunes. No replies by letter considered unless sender is willing to follow answer with personal visit. Triflers need not apply.”   Several middle-aged men of means responded to Gunness' ads. One of her ads was answered by a Wisconsin farmhand, Henry Gurholt. After traveling to La Porte, Gurholt wrote his family, saying that he liked the farm, was in good health, and requested that they send him seed potatoes. When they failed to hear from him, the family contacted Gunness. She told them Gurholt had gone off with horse traders to Chicago. She kept his trunk and fur overcoat.   Another one was John Moe, who arrived from Elbow Lake, Minnesota. He had brought more than $1,000 with him to pay off her mortgage, or so he told neighbors, whom Gunness introduced him to as her cousin. He disappeared from her farm within a week of his arrival.  Although no one ever saw Moe again, a carpenter who did occasional work for Gunness observed that Moe's trunk remained in her house, along with more than a dozen others.   Next came George Anderson from Tarkio, Missouri, who, like Peter Gunness and John Moe, was an immigrant from Norway.   During dinner with Anderson, she raised the issue of her mortgage. Anderson agreed that he would pay the debt off if they decided to get hitched. Late that night, Anderson awoke to see her standing over him, holding a burning, almost spent candle in her hand and with a strange, sinister expression on her face. Without uttering a word, she ran from the room. Anderson fled from the house, soon taking a train to Missouri.   The suitors kept coming, but none of them, except for Anderson, ever left the Gunness farm. By this time, she had begun ordering massive trunks to be delivered to her home. Hack driver Clyde Sturgis delivered many of these trunks to her from La Porte. He later remarked how the heavyset woman would lift these enormous trunks "like boxes of marshmallows,” tossing them onto her broad shoulders and carrying them into the house. She kept the shutters of her house closed day and night; farmers traveling past the dwelling at night saw her digging in the hog pen.   Ole B. Budsberg, an elderly widower from Iola, Wisconsin, showed up next. He was last seen alive at the La Porte Savings Bank on April 6, 1907, when he mortgaged his Wisconsin land, signing a deed and obtaining several thousand dollars in cash. Ole B. Budsberg's sons, Oscar and Mathew Budsberg, had no idea that their father had gone off to visit Gunness. When they finally discovered his destination, they wrote to her; she promptly responded, saying she had never seen their father.   Several other middle-aged men appeared and disappeared in brief visits to the Gunness farm throughout 1907. Then, in December 1907, Andrew Helgelien, a bachelor farmer from Aberdeen, South Dakota, wrote to her and Belle was all about it. The pair exchanged many letters until a letter came that overwhelmed Helgelien, written in Gunness' careful handwriting and dated January 13, 1908. This letter was later found at the Helgelien farm. It read:   “To the Dearest Friend in the World: No woman in the world is happier than I am. I know that you are now to come to me and be my own. I can tell from your letters that you are the man I want. It does not take one long to tell when to like a person, and you I like better than anyone in the world, I know. Think how we will enjoy each other's company. You, the sweetest man in the whole world. We will be all alone with each other. Can you conceive of anything nicer? I think of you constantly. When I hear your name mentioned, and this is when one of the dear children speaks of you, or I hear myself humming it with the words of an old love song, it is beautiful music to my ears. My heart beats in wild rapture for you, My Andrew, I love you. Come prepared to stay forever.”   Yikes….   In response to her letter, Helgelien flew to her side in January 1908. He arrived with a check for $2,900, the entire savings he had drawn from his local bank. A few days after Helgelien arrived, he and Gunness appeared at the Savings Bank in La Porte and deposited the check. Helgelien vanished a few days later, but Gunness appeared at the Savings Bank to make a $500 deposit and another deposit of $700 in the State Bank. At this time, she started to have problems with her farmhand, Ray Lamphere.   In March 1908, Gunness sent several letters to a farmer and horse dealer in Topeka, Kansas named Lon Townsend, inviting him to visit her; he decided to put off the visit until spring and thus did not see her before a fire at her farm. Gunness was also in correspondence with a man from Arkansas and sent him a letter dated May 4, 1908. He would have visited her, but didn't because of the fire at her farm. Gunness allegedly promised marriage to a suitor Bert Albert, which did not go through because of his lack of wealth.   Turning Point   The hired hand Ray Lamphere was deeply in love with Gunness; he performed any chore for her, no matter how gruesome. He became jealous of the many men who arrived to court his employer and began making scenes. She fired him on February 3, 1908. Shortly after dispensing with Lamphere, she presented herself at the La Porte courthouse. She declared that her former employee was not in his right mind and was a menace to the public. She somehow convinced local authorities to hold a sanity hearing. Lamphere was pronounced sane and released. Gunness was back a few days later to complain to the sheriff that Lamphere had visited her farm and argued with her. She contended that he threatened her family and had Lamphere arrested for trespassing.   Lamphere returned again and again to see her, but she told him to kick rocks each time. Lamphere made thinly disguised threats. Like on one occasion, he confided to farmer William Slater, "Helgelien won't bother me no more. We fixed him for keeps." Helgelien had long since disappeared from the area, or so it was believed. However, his brother, Asle Helgelien, was disturbed when Andrew failed to return home and he wrote to Belle in Indiana, asking her about his sibling's whereabouts. Gunness wrote back, telling Asle Helgelien that his brother was not at her farm and probably went to Norway to visit relatives. Asle Helgelien said he did not believe his brother would do that. He believed his brother was still in the La Porte area, the last place he was seen or heard from. Gunness, being the ballsy bitch she was, told him that if he wanted to come and look for his brother, she would help conduct a search, but she cautioned him that searching for missing persons was an expensive proposition. If she were to be involved in such a manhunt, she stated, Asle Helgelien should be prepared to pay her for her efforts. Asle Helgelien did come to La Porte, but not until May.   Ray Lamphere represented an unresolved danger to Belle, and now Asle Helgelien was making inquiries that could very well send her to the gallows. She told a lawyer in La Porte, M.E. Leliter, that she feared for her life and her children's. Ray Lamphere, she said, had threatened to kill her and burn her house down. She wanted to make out a will just in case Lamphere followed through with his threats. Leliter, the attorney, complied and drew up her will. She left her entire estate to her children and left Leliter's office. She went to one of the La Porte banks holding the mortgage for her property and, not suspiciously at all, paid it off. However, she did not go to the police to tell them about Lamphere's allegedly life-threatening conduct. The reason for this, most historical, true crime nerds agree, was that there hadn't been any threats; she was merely setting the stage for her own arson. Joe Maxson, who had been hired to replace Ray Lamphere in February 1908, awoke in the early hours of April 28, 1908, smelling smoke in his room on the second floor of the Gunness house. He opened the hall door to a shit load of flames. Maxson screamed Gunness' name and those of her children but got no response. He slammed the door and then, in his tighty whiteys, leaped from the second-story window of his room, barely surviving the fire that was closing in around him. He raced to town to get help, but by the time the old-fashioned hook and ladder firetruck arrived at the farm at early dawn, the farmhouse was a big ol' pile of smoking ruins. Four bodies were found inside the house. One of the bodies was that of a woman who could not immediately be identified as Gunness, since she had been decapitated. The head was never found. The bodies of her children were found still in their beds. County Sheriff Smutzer had somehow heard about Lamphere's alleged threats, so he took one look at the carnage and quickly went after the former handyman. Attorney Leliter came forward to recount his tale about Gunness' will and how she feared Lamphere would kill her and her family and, coincidentally, burn her house down.   Lamphere reeeeeally didn't help his own cause. The moment Sheriff Smutzer confronted him and before the lawman uttered a word, Lamphere exclaimed, "Did Widow Gunness and the kids get out all right?" He was then told about the fire, but he denied having anything to do with it, claiming that he was not near the farm when the blaze occurred. A young lil dude, John Solyem, was brought forward. He said he was watching the Gunness place and saw Lamphere running down the road from the Gunness house just before the structure erupted in flames. Lamphere snorted to the boy: "You wouldn't look me in the eye and say that!"   "Yes, I will,” replied Solyem. "You found me hiding behind the bushes and you told me you'd kill me if I didn't get out of there." Lamphere was arrested and charged with murder and arson. Then scores of investigators, sheriff's deputies, coroner's men, and many volunteers began to search the ruins for evidence.   The headless woman's body was a massive concern to La Porte residents. C. Christofferson, a neighboring farmer, looked at the charred remains of this body and said that it was not the remains of Belle Gunness. As did another farmer, L. Nicholson, and so did Mrs. Austin Cutler, an old friend of Gunness. More of Gunness' old friends, Mrs. May Olander and Mr. Sigward Olsen, arrived from Chicago. They examined the remains of the headless woman and said it was't Belle Gunness.   Doctors then measured the remains and, making allowances for the body's missing neck and head, stated the corpse was that of a woman who stood five feet three inches tall and weighed no more than 150 pounds. Friends and neighbors, as well as the La Porte dressmakers who made her dresses and other garments, swore that Gunness was taller than 5'8" and weighed between 180 and 200 pounds. Remember, she was a large woman who could toss around clothing trunks like they were frisbees. Detailed measurements of the body were compared with those on file with several La Porte stores where she purchased her apparel.   When the two sets of measurements were compared, the authorities concluded that the headless woman could not possibly have been Belle Gunness, even when the ravages of the fire on the body were considered. (The flesh was severely burned but intact). Moreover, Dr. J. Meyers examined the internal organs of the dead woman. He sent the stomach contents of the victims to a pathologist in Chicago, who reported months later that the organs contained lethal doses of (dun dun dunnnn)...strychnine. Gunness' dentist, Dr. Ira P. Norton, said that if the teeth/dental work of the headless corpse had been located, he could definitely ascertain if it was, for sure, Belle Gunness. Enter Louis "Klondike" Schultz, a former miner, who was hired to build a sluice and begin sifting the debris (as more bodies were unearthed, the sluice was used to isolate human remains on a larger scale). What the flying FUCK is a sluice you may be asking your obviously intelligent self. Well, it's a sliding gate or other devices for controlling the flow of water, especially one in a locked gate. On May 19, 1908, a piece of bridgework was found consisting of two human, canine teeth, their roots still attached, porcelain teeth and gold crown work in between. Norton, her dentists, identified them as work done for Gunness. As a result, Coroner Charles Mack officially concluded that the adult female body discovered in the burned debris was Belle Gunness. Even though NOTHING ELSE LINES UP.   Asle Helgelien arrived in La Porte and told Sheriff Smutzer that he believed his brother had met with foul play at Gunness' hands. Then, the new farmhand, Joe Maxson came forward with information that could not be ignored: He told the Sheriff that Gunness had ordered him to bring loads of dirt by wheelbarrow to a large area surrounded by a high wire fence where the hogs were fed. Maxson said that there were many deep depressions in the ground that had been covered by dirt. These filled-in holes, Gunness had told Maxson, were nothing but garbage. She wanted the ground made level, so he filled in the depressions.   Sheriff Smutzer took a dozen men back to the farm and began to dig. On May 3, 1908, the diggers unearthed the body of Belle's stepdaughter, Jennie Olson (who vanished in December 1906). Then they found the small bodies of two unidentified children. Subsequently, the body of Andrew Helgelien was unearthed (his overcoat was found to be worn by Ray Lamphere). As days progressed and the gruesome work continued, one body after another was discovered in Gunness' hog pen:    So, let's run through these poor, unfortunate souls.   Ole B. Budsberg of Iola, Wisconsin, (vanished May 1907);   Thomas Lindboe, who had left Chicago and had gone to work as a hired man for Gunness three years earlier;   Henry Gurholdt of Scandinavia, Wisconsin, who had gone to wed her a year earlier, taking $1,500 to her; a watch corresponding to one belonging to Gurholdt was found with a body;   Olaf Svenherud, from Chicago;   John Moe of Elbow Lake, Minnesota; his watch was found in Lamphere's possession;   Olaf Lindbloom, age 35 from Wisconsin.   Reports of other possible victims began to come in:   William Mingay, a coachman of New York City, who had left that city on April 1, 1904;   Herman Konitzer of Chicago who disappeared in January 1906;   Charles Edman of New Carlisle, Indiana;   George Berry of Tuscola, Illinois;   Christie Hilkven of Dovre, Barron County, Wisconsin, who sold his farm and came to La Porte in 1906;   Chares Neiburg, a 28-year-old Scandinavian immigrant who lived in Philadelphia, told friends that he was going to visit Gunness in June 1906 and never came back — he had been working for a saloon keeper and took $500 with him;   John H. McJunkin of Coraopolis (near Pittsburgh) left his wife in December 1906 after corresponding with a La Porte woman;   Olaf Jensen, a Norwegian immigrant of Carroll, Indiana, wrote his relatives in 1906 he was going to marry a wealthy widow at La Porte;   Henry Bizge of La Porte who disappeared June 1906 and his hired man named Edward Canary of Pink Lake Ill who also vanished 1906;   Bert Chase of Mishawaka, Indiana sold his butcher shop and told friends of a wealthy widow and that he was going to look her up; his brother received a telegram supposedly from Aberdeen, South Dakota claiming Bert had been killed in a train wreck; his brother investigated and found the telegram was fictitious;   Tonnes Peterson Lien of Rushford, Minnesota, is alleged to have disappeared April 2, 1907;   A gold ring marked "S.B. May 28, 1907" was found in the ruins;   A hired man named George Bradley of Tuscola, Illinois is alleged to have gone to La Porte to meet a widow and three children in October 1907;   T.J. Tiefland of Minneapolis is alleged to have come to see Gunness in 1907;   Frank Riedinger a farmer of Waukesha, Wisconsin, came to Indiana in 1907 to marry and never returned;   Emil Tell, a Swede from Kansas City, Missouri, is alleged to have gone in 1907 to La Porte;   Lee Porter of Bartonville, Oklahoma separated from his wife and told his brother he was going to marry a wealthy widow at La Porte;   John E. Hunter left Duquesne, Pennsylvania, on November 25, 1907 after telling his daughters he was going to marry a wealthy widow in Northern Indiana.   Two other Pennsylvanians — George Williams of Wapawallopen and Ludwig Stoll of Mount Yeager — also left their homes to marry in the West.   Abraham Phillips, a railway man of Burlington, West Virginia, left in the winter of 1907 to go to Northern Indiana and marry a rich widow — a railway watch was found in the debris of the house.   Benjamin Carling of Chicago, Illinois, was last seen by his wife in 1907 after telling her that he was going to La Porte to secure an investment with a wealthy widow; he brought $1,000 from an insurance company and borrowed money from several investors as well; in June 1908 his widow was able to identify his remains from La Porte's Pauper's cemetery by the contour of his skull and three missing teeth; $1000 at that time is approximately $31,522.45 today.   Aug. Gunderson of Green Lake, Wisconsin;   Ole Oleson of Battle Creek, Michigan;   Lindner Nikkelsen of Huron, South Dakota;   Andrew Anderson of Lawrence, Kansas;   Johann Sorensen of St. Joseph, Missouri;   A possible victim was a man named Hinkley;   Reported unnamed victims were:   a daughter of Mrs. H. Whitzer of Toledo, Ohio, who had attended Indiana University near La Porte in 1902;   an unknown man and woman are alleged to have disappeared in September 1906, the same night Jennie Olson went missing. Gunness claimed they were a Los Angeles "professor" and his wife who had taken Jennie to California;   a brother of Miss Jennie Graham of Waukesha, Wisconsin, who had left her to marry a rich widow in La Porte but vanished;   a hired man from Ohio age 50 name unknown is alleged to have disappeared and Gunness became the "heir" to his horse and buggy;   an unnamed man from Montana told people at a resort he was going to sell Gunness his horse and buggy, which were found with several other horses and buggies at the farm.   Most of the remains found on the property could not be identified. Because of the crude recovery methods, the number of individuals unearthed on the Gunness farm is unknown but is believed to be approximately twelve. On May 19, 1908, the remains of approximately seven unknown victims were buried in two coffins in unmarked graves in the pauper's section of LaPorte's Pine Lake Cemetery. Andrew Helgelien and Jennie Olson are buried in La Porte's Patton Cemetery, near Peter Gunness.   So, here's the even MORE fucked up part… if it's possible.   Ray Lamphere was arrested on May 22, 1908, and tried for murder and arson. He denied the charges of arson and murder that were filed against him. His defense hinged on the assertion that the body was not that of that big ol' girl, Belle Gunness.   Lamphere's lawyer, Wirt Worden, developed evidence that contradicted Norton's identification of the teeth and bridgework. A local jeweler testified that though the gold in the bridgework had emerged from the fire almost undamaged, the fierce heat of the fire had melted the gold plating on several watches and items of gold jewelry. Local doctors replicated the fire conditions by attaching a similar dental bridgework to a human jawbone and placing it in a blacksmith's forge. The natural teeth crumbled and disintegrated; the porcelain teeth came out pocked and pitted, and the gold parts melted (both the artificial elements were damaged to a greater degree than those in the bridgework offered as evidence of Gunness' identity). The hired hand Joe Maxson and another man also testified that they'd seen "Klondike" Schultz take the bridgework out of his pocket and plant it just before it was "discovered.” Lamphere was found guilty of arson but acquitted of murder. On November 26, 1908, he was sentenced to 20 years in State Prison (in Michigan City). He died of tuberculosis the next year on December 30, 1909.   On January 14, 1910, the Rev. E. A. Schell came forward with a confession that Lamphere was said to have made to him while the clergyman was comforting the dying man. In it, Lamphere revealed Gunness' crimes and swore that she was still alive. Lamphere had stated to the Reverend Schell and a fellow convict, Harry Meyers, shortly before his death that he had not murdered anyone but had helped Gunness bury many of her victims. When a victim arrived, she made him comfortable, charming him and cooking a large meal. She then drugged his coffee, and when the man was all fucked up, she split his head with a meat chopper. Sometimes she would simply wait for the suitor to go to bed and then enter the bedroom by candlelight and chloroform the hapless sap. A powerful woman, Gunness would then carry the body to the basement, place it on a table, and dissect it. She then bundled the remains and buried these in the hog pen and on the grounds around the house. Thanks to her second husband's instruction, Peter Gunness, the butcher, Belle had become an expert at dissection. To save time, she sometimes poisoned her victims' coffee with strychnine. (Um… the first husband) She also varied her disposal methods, sometimes dumping the corpse into the hog-scalding vat and covering the remains with quicklime. Lamphere even stated that if Belle was overly tired after murdering one of her victims, she merely chopped up the remains and, in the middle of the night, stepped into her hog pen and fed the remains to the hogs.   Lamphere also cleared up the mysterious question of the headless female corpse found in Gunness's home's smoking remains. Gunness had lured this woman from Chicago on the pretense of hiring her as a housekeeper only days before she decided to make her permanent escape from La Porte. Gunness, according to Lamphere, had drugged the woman, then bashed in her head and decapitated the body, taking the head, which had weights tied to it, to a swamp where she threw it into deep water. Then, she chloroformed her children, smothered them to death, and dragged their small bodies, along with the headless corpse, to the basement.   She dressed the female corpse in her old clothing, and removed her false teeth, placing these beside the headless corpse to assure it being identified as Belle Gunness. She then torched the house and fled. Lamphere had helped her, he admitted, but she didn't take off by the road where he waited for her after the fire had been set. She had betrayed her one-time partner in crime in the end by cutting across open fields and then disappearing into the woods. Some accounts suggest that Lamphere admitted that he took her to Stillwell (a town about nine miles from La Porte) and saw her off on a train to Chicago.   Lamphere said that Gunness was a rich woman, that she had murdered 42 men by his count, and maybe more, and had taken amounts from them ranging from $1,000 to $32,000. She had allegedly accumulated more than $250,000 through her murder schemes over the years—a considerable fortune for those days (about 10 million dollars, today). She had a small amount remaining in one of her savings accounts, but local banks later admitted that she had withdrawn most of her money shortly before the fire. Gunness withdrawing most of her money suggested that she was planning to evade the law. Gunness was, for several decades, allegedly seen or sighted in cities and towns throughout the United States. Friends, acquaintances, and amateur detectives apparently spotted her on the streets of Chicago, San Francisco, New York, and Los Angeles. As late as 1931, Gunness was reported alive and living in a Mississippi town, where she supposedly owned a great deal of property and lived the life of a respected woman. Sheriff Smutzer, for more than 20 years, received an average of two reports a month. She became part of American criminal folklore, a female Sasquatch, if you will.   Gunness's three children's bodies were found in the home's wreckage, but the headless adult female corpse found with them was never positively identified. Gunness' true fate is unknown; La Porte residents were divided between believing that Lamphere killed her and that she had faked her own death. In 1931, a woman known as "Esther Carlson" was arrested in Los Angeles for poisoning August Lindstrom for money. Two people who had known Gunness claimed to recognize her from photographs, but the identification was never proved. Carlson died while awaiting trial.   So, what the fuck happened to “Hell's Belle”??   The body believed to be that of Belle Gunness was buried next to her first husband at Forest Home Cemetery in Forest Park, Illinois.   On November 5, 2007, with the permission of descendants of Belle's sister, the headless body was exhumed from Gunness' grave in Forest Home Cemetery by a team of forensic anthropologists and graduate students from the University of Indianapolis to learn her true identity. It was initially hoped that a sealed envelope flap on a letter found at the victim's farm would contain enough DNA to be compared to that of the body. Unfortunately, there was not enough DNA, so efforts continue to find a reliable source for comparison purposes, including the disinterment of other bodies and contact with known living relatives.   As far as we know… Belle Gunness, the wicked Norwegian bitch… got away with So. Many. Murders… including her own.   Movies   https://deluxevideoonline.org/our-tens-list-faked-deaths-in-movies/

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
German POW's in Michigan during World War II

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 25:58


During World War II there were German POW camps in Michigan that were all directed by Fort Custer in Battle Creek. The main camp was at Fort Custer, and between 1943 to 1946, there were approximately 19 different branch camps set up across the state to alleviate critical labor shortages in agriculture during the war. A tragedy happened at one of the branch camps where 16 of the prisoners were killed in an accident. The history is one that is still remembered at Fort Custer National Cemetery. For more information on Michael Delaware, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com/ To see the video on Fort Custer National Cemetery: https://youtu.be/rs1hVuhYYRc --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

Michigan AF Podcast
Sunlight Gardens

Michigan AF Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 30:58


Devon Wilson is on a mission to make food and agriculture accessible to young people! He started Sunlight Garden in the heart of Battle Creek so he could connect people to their food in a meaningful way. Hear how he does this by connecting his community to local food. We're also joined by Michigan GROWN, Michigan GREAT ambassador, Angie Jackson!Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sunlightgardens1 

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past
The Story of Alonzo Noble

Tales of Southwest Michigan's Past

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 18:10


Alonzo Noble was one of the early pioneers of the village of Battle Creek, arriving in 1836 with his wife. He established the second store in the village history, on the central corner of downtown. He built the first home with a chimney in the history of the area, and he would go onto become a stable and successful dry goods store in the community. He later became the second Mayor of the City of Battle Creek, and also served as postmaster for seven years. His story is an interesting one from the pioneer history of the region. For more information on Michael Delaware, visit: https://michaeldelaware.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michael-delaware/support

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network
* Mark Behnke, Mayor of Battle Creek

SPOTLIGHT Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 7:31


Drew and Mike Show
Drew And Mike – July 4, 2022

Drew and Mike Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 156:24 Very Popular


Happy 4th of July, Kwame Kilpatrick's fundraising, 6 dead in mass shooting in Illinois, protest at Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest, Airmageddon 2022, Alec Baldwin v. "Mike", Drew Crime features bad acting on a 911 call, Marc's off the grid weekend, and we interrupt swimming Maz.Happy Independence Day! In your face, England. Enjoy these USA themed songs.Kaitlin Armstrong got plastic surgery while on the lam in Costa Rica. SIST: does her new nose look better or worse? You decide!Marc went without the internet for 30 hours.48 Hours covered the murder of Quee Choo Chadwick and her jerk husband, Peter Chadwick.Detroit Tigers: Stephen Gabbara assaulted the buffet. Trudi and Dee assaulted the bar. Riley Greene's first career homer was a walk off. The Tigers broadcaster-less game sucked.Tom Mazawey is NOT included in the Woodward Sports 4th of July photo. SNUBBED.Kamala Harris compares the Roe v. Wade ruling to slavery.Airmageddon 2022. Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg has it under control by believing whatever the airlines tell him.Ann Marie LaFlamme is amazing, looks amazing, and you listeners out there need to be more respectful.Jim Kiertzner is retiring after 49 years in TV news.This dog was the star in Ryan Ermanni's Fox 2 interview.A very attractive woman was shamed while breastfeeding in a restaurant without a cover. To repeat- a very attractive woman was shamed.Crosby, Stills and Nash are back on Spotify after asking to be removed because of Joe Rogan. David Crosby says it's because the people that he sold his music to only care about money.George Shea is the Michael Buffer of hot dog eating contests. Joey Chestnut was attacked but still managed to win again.Tom Mazawey joins us to explain being SNUBBED, recap Joey Chestnut's victory, explain USC & UCLA to the Big Ten, discuss the Miles Bridges felony arrest, dress down Chris Ilitch and lament the former Tigers that are better than the current Tigers.Grab your EXCLUSIVE NordVPN Deal by going to nordvpn.com/dams or use the code dams to get a HUGE Discount off your NordVPN Plan + 1 additional month for free + a bonus gift! It's completely risk free with Nord's 30-day money-back guarantee!Love: Taylor Swift is engaged. Lindsay Lohan is married. Brian Austin Green has a new brat with his new girlfriend. Britney Spears remains married and continues to pop off on social media.Yet another mass shooting in America. This time it's in Highland Park, Illinois during the 4th of July parade.Akron is in chaos following the police shooting of Jayland Walker. LeBron is praying for "his city"."The Week That Was" covers America's Guest, Kwame Kilpatrick, and Michael Bullotta is the only person who is talking truth.Read ML Elrick tear into Brian Banks.A 40-year-old man dies at the Battle Creek air show when his truck blows up while performing a stunt.Michigan schools are given grants to change their school mascots. Needless to say, the comment sections doesn't stay on topic.Music: Bret Michaels hospitalized. Tommy Lee is back to doing full shows. Adele has no regrets. Halsey lectures her fans about abortion. Elliot Page's transition had to be updated in The Umbrella Academy.Hammerin' Hank Goldberg has died... ON HIS BIRTHDAY!Ilhan Omar was booed off stage in her own district.Alec Baldwin is mad at Mike and vows to find Mike.Social media is dumb, but we're on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter (Drew and Mike Show, Marc Fellhauer, Trudi Daniels and BranDon).