Podcasts about Addiction

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Compulsive engagement in rewarding stimuli despite adverse consequences

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Best podcasts about Addiction

Show all podcasts related to addiction

Latest podcast episodes about Addiction

Sober is Dope
Gabor Maté on Trauma and Addiction - THE ROOT CAUSE OF ADDICTION

Sober is Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 3:24


Gabor Maté Addiction | Trauma and Addiction - Gabor Mate | THE ROOT CAUSE OF ADDICTION This is taken from the Q&A part of TJ Dawe's show - "Medicine". https://drgabormate.com/ LIFE TRANSFORMATION Podcast: by SOBER IS DOPE PODCAST LINK: https://linktr.ee/Soberisdope Video Produced by POP Buchanan For the Recovery Community. #DrGaborMate #GaborMate #Addiction Cool #MotivationalMusic Hi Everyone. I am POP Buchanan, the host of the Sober is Dope Podcast. I am excited to share some reflections on my journey and mindset. The Sober is Dope Podcast highlights the transformative qualities of Recovery. I am your host, POP Buchanan. I have been sober for 9 years. Sobriety gave me back my life. I quit cigarettes, negative thinking, improved my spirituality, and reversed pre-diabetes. Sobriety helped me to find true happiness and purpose. I transformed my health, mental health, and mindset. I am now at peace. This Podcast is about healing and redemption. I am fully recovered from the darkness of addiction. I aim to inspire others to find healing and hope through my story. Thanks be to God. Welcome to Sober is Dope! FREE Transformational Podcast: https://linktr.ee/Soberisdope Thanks a lot For Checking Out Sober is Dope! Audio Source Below #Fearless #Motivationalspeech, copyright free Motivational Speech, Sober motivation speech, Recovery motivation music, fitness motivation music 2020 Thank you https://youtu.be/66cYcSak6nE ============================================= *Copyright Waiver Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, the grant is made for the "fair use" For purposes such as criticisms, comments, news reports, teaching, scholarships, and research. Equitable use is a use permitted by copyright law that you may otherwise be infringing on. Nonprofit, Educational or personal use tilts the balance in favor of fair use. 1) This video has no negative impact on the original works (would be really positive for them) 2) This video is also for teaching purposes. 3) It is not a transformer in nature. 4) I only use bits and pieces of videos to get the point through where it is needed. Sober is Dope (No CopyRight) do not have the rights to these video clips. They have, according to fair use, Been reused with the intention of educating and inspiring others. However, if any content owner I would like your images removed, please contact us: -the private message here (Youtube) or my email address: soberisdope@gmail.com ============================================= Give me like and subscribe ... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soberisdope/message

The Hartmann Report
IS AMERICA HOOKED ON DOPAMINE? DR. ANNA LEMBKE REVEALS THE DANGERS OF THE PLEASURE PRINCIPLE

The Hartmann Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 58:18


Could Vice President Harris follow Richard Nixon and challenge the filibuster? Stanford University Professor of Psychiatry Dr. Anna Lembke joins the show on her new book, Dopamine Nation: Finding Balance in the Age of Indulgence. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Top Hill Recording
Teddy Joe - Songs About Mental Health and Addiction

Top Hill Recording

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 57:15


Teddy Joe is a folk/blues artist from Louisville, KY. He writes songs about mental illness and addiction. Teddy hopes his music increases awareness and helps those struggling realize that they are not alone. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tophillrecording/support

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City
159 - Major Milestones: Surprise Edition

Seltzer Squad - Staying Sober In The City

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 22:07


In this episode Kate let's Jes in on a secret; a milestone for the Seltzer Squad pod!

InsideTheBoards for the USMLE, COMLEX & Medical School
Addiction 101: Doctoring in the Realm of Hungry Ghosts with Dr. Gabor Mate

InsideTheBoards for the USMLE, COMLEX & Medical School

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 50:30


Sections from today's episode Why the term "hungry ghost"? How did you get interested in addiction medicine? How stress impacts students' empathy levels Is treating addiction replacing one substance with another? Today's guest A renowned speaker, and bestselling author, Dr. Gabor Maté is highly sought after for his expertise on a range of topics including addiction, stress and childhood development. After 20 years of family practice and palliative care experience, Dr. Maté worked for over a decade in Vancouver's Downtown East Side with patients challenged by drug addiction and mental illness. The bestselling author of four books published in over twenty-five languages, Gabor is an internationally renowned speaker highly sought after for his expertise on addiction, trauma, childhood development, and the relationship of stress and illness. His book on addiction received the Hubert Evans Prize for literary non-fiction. For his groundbreaking medical work and writing he has been awarded the Order of Canada, his country's highest civilian distinction, and the Civic Merit Award from his hometown, Vancouver.  Gabor is also co-developer of a therapeutic approach, Compassionate Inquiry, now studied by hundreds of therapists, physicians, counselors, and others internationally. He is currently writing his next book, The Myth of Normal: Illness and Health in an Insane Culture, out in late 2021. His books include In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters With Addiction When the Body Says No: The Cost of Hidden Stress Scattered Minds: The Origins and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder Hold on to Your Kids: Why Parents Need to Matter More Than Peers.  Watch Dr. Mate's TedTalk The Power of Addiction and The Addiction of Power Check out his son's project, Lyrics to Go If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, there is help available. SAMHSA National Helpline Confidential free help, from public health agencies, to find substance use treatment and information. www.samhsa.gov 1-800-662-4357 Shatterproof Browse addiction resources from treatment finders to recovery groups to grief support. www.shatterproof.org/ National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255 Further Learning National Institute on Drug Abuse The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) supports and conducts research across a broad range of disciplines and leads the nation in scientific research on the health aspects of drug abuse and addiction. www.drugabuse.gov Health Management Associates Helping Communities Improve Care for People with Complex Health and Social Needs www.HMAedu.com Study on the go with the ITB Audio QBank app Download for free on iOS or Android. If you want to upgrade, you can save money on a premium subscription by customizing your plan until your test date on our website! Our other podcasts: Crush Step 1 Step 2 Secrets Physiology by Physeo Step 1 Success Stories The InsideTheBoards Study Smarter Podcast The InsideTheBoards Podcast Beyond the Pearls Produced by Ars Longa Media To learn more about us and this podcast, visit arslonga.media. You can leave feedback or suggestions at arslonga.media/contact or by emailing info@arslonga.media. Produced by: Christopher Breitigan Executive Producer: Patrick C. Beeman, MD Legal Stuff InsideTheBoards is not affiliated with the NBME, USMLE, COMLEX, or any professional licensing body. InsideTheBoards and its partners fully adhere to the policies on irregular conduct outlined by the aforementioned credentialing bodies. The information presented in this podcast is intended for educational purposes only and should not be construed as professional or medical advice. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Choose Your Struggle
From Heartbreak to Helping Others With Laurie Singer

Choose Your Struggle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 54:23


Season 2, Episode 81From Heartbreak to Helping Others With Laurie SingerThis week, Jay chats with California-based therapist Laurie Singer. After overcoming a traumatic childhood and losing a child to cancer, Laurie dedicated her life to helping others. She's written a fantastic book, You're Not Crazy: Living with Anxiety, Obsessions and Fetishes and is the founder of a nonprofit.To learn more about Laurie, check out her website https://lauriesingerbehavioral.com/ and find her book at Bookshop! We're doing an end of season giveaway! At Thanksgiving, Jay will put all the names of everyone who has left a review into a generator and three people will receive a prize pack. One is Choose Your Struggle merch, one is a gift pack from my partners Road Runner and Bookshop, and one is a Youdgee muscle massager. If you haven't left a review yet, scroll down in these show notes and find the review link or, if you listen on i-Tunes, review it there!Today's Good Egg: Leave a review and be entered into the end of season giveaway drawing! Looking for someone to wow your audience now that the world is reopening? My speaking calendar is booking up fast! But if you're interested in bringing me to your campus, your community group, your organization or any other location to speak about Mental Health, Substance Misuse & Recovery, or Drug Use & Policy, reach out to my strategist Ryan Holzhauer at ryan@jayshifman.com.Tank Tops are in! You can see what they look like on the website (thanks to Jay's wife for modeling the women's cut). Reach out through the website to order. If you're looking for something a little less expensive, magnets are in too! Check them out on the website or Instagram. Patreon supporters get a discount so join Patreon!But that's not all! You can now buy even more merch! Check out our store on Teepublic at https://www.teepublic.com/stores/choose-your-struggle?ref_id=24308 for shirts, mugs, stickers, phone cases, and much, much more!Support the Podcast on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/ChooseYourStruggle Leave us an audio message to share feedback and have a chance to be played on the show: https://podinbox.com/CYS Review the Podcast: https://ReviewThisPodcast.com/Choose-Your-Struggle.Support the Podcast, a different way: https://podhero.com/401017-ikv.Learn more about the Shameless Podcast Network: https://www.shamelessnetwork.com/ Our Partner Bookshop (Support Local Book Stores and the Podcast in the Process!): https://bookshop.org/shop/CYS Our Partner Road Runner (Use Code CYS for 10% off): www.roadrunnercbd.com/ref/CYS As always, you can find more at our links: https://jay.campsite.bio ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Coming Clean Podcast
Preserving Family Wealth with Jamie & Jim Sheils - 18 Summers/Founders, Ep #105

Coming Clean Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 43:54


It's time to integrate the family unit into your life and business. We know that the family is disintegrating at a rapid pace, and this is going to unravel society if we don't change it. Enter the family board meeting. When 18 Summers founders Jim and Jamie Sheils first met, they faced a whole new challenge. Suddenly, they were a blended family, with the challenges of disconnection and time scarcity that all families face. It was Family Board Meetings that bridged the gap, helping a new family connect, and helping the kids find a sure footing on uncertain ground.Now, through 18 Summers, Jim and Jamie reach families and organizations around the world, helping them discover the benefits of quality time and enduring relationships.You will want to hear this episode if you are interested in...Why Jamie & Jim were inspired to create a family-centered business (1:29)How having a one-on-one day once a quarter with your children can be a game changer (8:26)How to bridge the gap with your child in the tech era (12:37)Why the worst cases can transform (20:41)How children and parents read signs from each other and can come together (26:51)How to initiate that type of communication (31:20)How to open up what you talk about with your children (36:18)The programs available with 18 Summers (19:25)Resources & People MentionedThe Family Board Meeting the bookConnect with Jamie & JimTheir websiteOn InstagramOn TwitterOn LinkedInOn FacebookOn YouTubeConnect With Peter O. Estévezwww.peteroestevezshow.com Follow on Facebook Follow Peter O. Estevéz Show on InstagramFollow Peter on Instagram

New Books in Sociology
Willi Braun, "Jesus and Addiction to Origins: Toward an Anthropocentric Study of Religion" (Equinox, 2020)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 41:57


Willi Braun's Jesus and Addiction to Origins: Towards an Anthropocentric Study of Religion (Equinox, 2020)  constitutes an extended argument for an anthropocentric, human-focused study of religious practices. Part I presents the basic premise of the argument, which is that there is nothing special or extraordinary about human behaviors and constructs that are claimed to have uniquely religious status and authority. Instead, they are fundamentally human, and so the scholar of religion is engaged in nothing more or less than studying humans across time and place in all their complex existence-which includes creating more-than-human beings and realities. As an extended and detailed example of such an approach, Part II addresses practices, rhetoric, and other data in early Christianities within Greco-Roman cultures and religions. The underlying aim is to insert studies of the New Testament and non-canonical texts, most often presented as "biblical studies," into the anthropocentric study of religion proposed in Part I. How might we approach the study of "sacred texts" if they are nothing more or less than human documents deriving from situations that were themselves all too human? Braun's Jesus and Addiction to Origins addresses that question with clarity and insight. Tiatemsu Longkumer is a Ph.D. scholar working on ‘Anthropology of Religion' at North-Eastern Hill University, Shillong, India Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

Sober is Dope
Foods That Heal The Liver from Addiction

Sober is Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 0:55


Medical Disclaimer: Sober is Dope! Podcast aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. Foods That Heal The Liver Some of the best foods and drinks that are good for the liver include: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323915#12-best-foods 1. Coffee. Share on Pinterest Drinking coffee offers protection against fatty liver disease. ... 2. Oatmeal. Consuming oatmeal is an easy way to add fiber to the diet. ... 3. Green tea. ... 4. Garlic. ... 5. Berries. ... 6. Grapes. ... 7. Grapefruit. ... 9. Prickly pear. 10. Fatty Fish 11. Nuts 12. Olive oil 13. Plant Based Foods 14. Milk Thistle Foods to avoid Foods to avoid In general, finding balance in the diet will keep the liver healthy. However, there are also some foods and food groups that the liver finds harder to process. These include: * Fatty foods: These include fried foods, fast food, and takeout from many restaurants. Packaged snacks, chips, and nuts may also be surprisingly high in fats. * Starchy foods: These include breads, pasta, and cakes or baked goods. * Sugar: Cutting back on sugar and sugary foods such as cereals, baked goods, and candies may help reduce the stress on the liver. * Salt: Simple ways to reduce salt intake include eating out less, avoiding canned meats or vegetables, and reducing or avoiding salted deli meats and bacon. * Alcohol: Anyone looking to give their liver a break should consider reducing their intake of alcohol or eliminating it from the diet completely. Each time your liver filters alcohol, some of the liver cells die. The liver can develop new cells, but prolonged alcohol misuse (drinking too much) over many years can reduce its ability to regenerate. This can result in serious and permanent damage to your liver. Medical Disclaimer: Sober is Dope! Podcast aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. Episode analytics --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soberisdope/message

Sober is Dope
Dopamine Diet- How to Boost Dopamine Levels Naturally In Recovery

Sober is Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 1:14


Dopamine is an important brain chemical that influences your mood and feelings of reward and motivation. It helps regulate body movements as well. Levels are generally well regulated by the body, but there are a few diet and lifestyle changes you can make to boost your levels naturally. A balanced diet that contains adequate protein, vitamins and minerals, probiotics and a moderate amount of saturated fat can help your body produce the dopamine it needs. For people with dopamine deficiency diseases, such as Parkinson's, eating natural food sources of L-dopa like fava beans or Mucuna pruriens may help restore dopamine levels. Lifestyle choices are also important. Getting enough sleep, exercising, listening to music, meditating and spending time in the sun can all boost dopamine levels. Overall, a balanced diet and lifestyle can go a long way in increasing your body's natural production of dopamine and helping your brain function at its best. Full Article: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-to-increase-dopamine Medical Disclaimer: Sober is Dope! Podcast aims to improve the quality of life for people struggling with a substance use or mental health disorder with fact-based content about the nature of behavioral health conditions, treatment options and their related outcomes. We publish material that is researched, cited, edited and reviewed by licensed medical professionals. The information we provide is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. It should not be used in place of the advice of your physician or other qualified healthcare provider. My name is POP Buchanan. I am the founder of the Sober is Dope Podcast and company. I am speaker, sobriety activist, and businessman. I am a recovering alcoholic with 8 years sobriety. I devoted my life to sharing my story and to excite healing in others. I started Sober is Dope to highlight the benefits of living a sober life, and to provide tools for personal life transformation. Without Detox to Rehab my Alcohol Addiction would have killed me. Sobriety and Sobriety motivation came from complete Rock bottom and Darkness. My Addiction Recovery was a miracle. Sober life gave me a second chance. I was not Sober curious until I was facing death. Recovery from addiction was my blessing. I share my recovery stories from addiction and how detox and rehab saved my life. My name is POP Buchanan. I am the Founder of the Sober is Doper podcast. Sobriety podcast and Addiction podcast centered in transparency and healing. This post is dedicated to anyone struggling with drugs and alcohol addiction and addicts world wide. The Sober is Dope Podcast is an honest podcast that covers all aspects of recovery from addiction, trauma, and life. We put a huge emphasis on self development, mental health, sobriety, motivation, and life transformation. We cover topics like addiction science, meditation, health, nutrition, therapy, mindfulness, Love, Process Addictions, and spirituality. The podcast is for anyone seeking help with addiction, depression, toxic lifestyles, and finding purpose through abstinence. #soberupfast #soberisdope #soberpodcast Here is the link to the Podcast, Shop, and FREE Personal Transformation E-BOOK. Highest Blessings. Sober is Doper ➡️ https://bit.ly/2Dh67xi “It's never too late to be amazing!” - POP Buchanan

Mikey Likes You with Mike Catherwood
We want the Funk with Funk Roberts

Mikey Likes You with Mike Catherwood

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 58:03


Funk Roberts is an awesome fellow. At age 52, Funk looks better than most of us could only dream of looking at any age. Of course there is discipline and hard work that leads to his amazing physique, but to me, the most impressive aspect of his success is his attitude. He's very well respected in the world of fitness and sports conditioning and he is an invariably authentic and positive force of energy. We chop it up about training as we age, self respect, addiction, recovery, long term health and why Canadians are so darn nice. I really liked this conversation and I hope you will too. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Bryony Gordon's Mad World
Professor Dame Carol Black

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:08


Today's guest is on a mission to transform the way we view people addicted to drugs. This year, Professor Dame Carol Black led a government review into the way we handle drug addiction in this country - be that treatment and recovery, or even prevention. She called for a more health-based approach and more than £500 million investment over five years.This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Dame Carol tells Bryony why alcohol is "just as dangerous" as other drugs, why she feels addiction should be treated as a chronic health condition, and explains why the current system is "broken".You can read Professor Dame Carol Black's review here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/independent-review-of-drugs-by-professor-dame-carol-black |Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode.Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

B•INSPIRED Podcast
B•INSPIRED Podcast - DEFYING GRAVITY WITH PAUL WICHANSKY

B•INSPIRED Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:34


B•Inspired Podcast is excited to bring you season one, episode four featuring world-renowned motivational speaker on disability acceptance and overcoming adversity, Dr. Paul Wichansky. Dr. Paul was born with cerebral palsy and was told that he would not be able to walk. As life has it, everyday Dr. Paul Wichanksy has defyed gravity and continued to inspire people around the world with his never give up attitute and commitment to inspiring others. Dr. Paul Wichansky has spoken to over 1 million people, 20 countries and was honored with community service awards both in 1988 and 2020 by two NJ State Senators. Dr. Paul has also spoken at United Nations and Special Olympics. B•INSPIRED is a audio/video Podcast where we bring you real stories from folks just like you and I who share stories of love and loss, struggles and perserverance, laughter and tears and overcoming adversity! 

Lillian McDermott
John Giordano, Ending the Cycle of Addiction, Holistically

Lillian McDermott

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 54:45


Could there be an addiction gene? John Giordano knows firsthand what it is like to love someone with an addiction. Fear overcomes the senses as to how to best support the one who can no longer make good decisions for themselves. John dedicated his life to learning ways to end the cycle of addiction, holistically. […] The post John Giordano, Ending the Cycle of Addiction, Holistically appeared first on LillianMcDermott.com.

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast
OC182 - Dr. Judith Grisel Author of Never Enough: The Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction

Alcohol Recovery Podcast | The ODAAT Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 61:26


Please Subscribe For More Episodes!  Be sure to follow me on Instagram for daily inspiration: @odaatpodcast and @arlinaallen iTunes: https://apple.co/30g6ALF Spotify: https://odaatchat.libsyn.com/spotify Stitcher: https://bit.ly/3n0taNQ YouTube Channel: https://bit.ly/2UpR5Lo   Link to Judy's Book:  https://amzn.to/3DTeXet     Hello Loves, Thank you for downloading the podcast, my name is Arlina, and I'll be your host.   In case we haven't met yet, I am a certified Recovery Coach and Hypnotist. I am obsessed with all things recovery, including neuroscience, reprogramming the subconscious mind, law of attraction, all forms of personal growth and spirituality. I have been practicing abstinence from drugs and alcohol since 4/23/94, and that just goes to show, if I can do it, you can too.   Today I'm talking with Judith Grisel. She holds a PhD in Neuroscience, she's a professor at Bucknell University and author of the highly impactful book “Never Enough: the Neuroscience and Experience of Addiction”   What is so interesting about her is that once she got sober, like a lot of us, she wanted to help others suffering from addiction, but she took it to a whole other level! She got her Phd in neuroscience to try to cure addiction! I'm so in awe of her.    This book is full of the mechanics and mechanisms of addiction which really takes the shame out of having mental illness because it demonstrates that anyone could fall prey to addiction. I listened to the audio version of the book, which, btw, I loved  because her voice is so soothing, but I also got the paperback because I wanted to really study some of the concepts she goes into. Plus there's a few pictures in it so there's that.   I hope you enjoy this conversation as much as I did! With that, please enjoy this episode with Judy.   Transcript: Arlina Allen  0:08   Let's see. Judy, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast. I'm really happy to be here. Arlina is it okay to call you, Judy? Oh, yes. Dr. Chris. No, please. Thank you. Well, listen, I am so excited to talk to you. I have your book. I posted on social media, I was like, I have a big announcement. And I'm talking to the author of never enough the neuroscience and experience of addiction. those that know me know that I'm completely obsessed with the mind the brain. I know sometimes people think of those as two different things, but we can kind of get into it. But what I thought was so good about this book, right? And what I love about science in general, is that it has a way when we you understand sort of the mechanics of it, it kind of depersonalized us and helps us to answer or resolve the things like guilt and shame which she which seemed to me to be a block or a barrier to healing. So I thought maybe we could start first with your a little bit of your story. Like what is I know you've been sober for 35 years? Congratulations.   Unknown Speaker  1:29   It is long time. Yeah. really grateful. Yeah, I it's funny that you mentioned guilt and shame, because I, I could see in my own life, how initially, drugs end up including alcohol were sort of the self or guilt and shame that was just it is still sort of deep in my bones. I'm not sure if it's genetic, or environmental or what, but I am, well acquainted with self criticism, and just, I guess, feelings of unworthiness. And I almost didn't realize that until I had my first drink, which was right about the time of my 13th birthday. And I was a good drink. I mean, I had little sips here and there, but I got loaded for the first time at that age. And more than anything else, it was this great relief, because I suddenly either didn't care or was made, you know, kind of transiently whole in a way that was so profound, so people talk about it all the time. But it did literally feel as if that absence was running over and you know, with fullness, I guess and so, I because I was off to the races pretty pretty dramatically. I grew up in a I guess there's no such thing as a typical home, but I was certainly fairly advantaged and you know, had no big traumas. I guess that's also kind of a funny thing to say. But you know, in light of how hard it is to grow up, I think I was fairly on the easy half anyway. And, but I got this alcohol, I spent 10 years taking as much of every single mind altering drug I could find. I remember one time I found some pills and I just, you know, took them, I was kind of, and I still am, I guess a little bit all or none so I, I was definitely I went from none to all. And as a result, I was kicked out of my first school in 10th grade. It was a, you know, girls Catholic school, so they didn't go for the kind of thing I was up to. And then to colleges I was expelled from and I was homeless intermittently, often, I contracted hepatitis C sharing dirty needles. And I hated myself really, I did hate myself that was probably my bottom was as kind of self loathing, so that I was just a teeny bit unwilling even though at the time, right around the time my 23rd birthday, I thought, drugs and alcohol were the solution to my problems of the cause. I was sort of willing to go to what I thought was going to be like a spa, an educational spa, which they was treatment. This was in the 80s so I had no idea about drug treatment at all. I just heard the word treatment and it seemed to be something I deserved. So anyhow, I ended up in what was more like a hospital for crazy adolescence and, and there without drugs in my body for a few weeks, I got kind of scared at the disaster of my life. And, and I guess I wasn't you know, it's an interesting thing as we talk about how we have to sort of see it and be willing to change. I was barely willing, I feel like I was kind of plucked out of my situation. And I had just enough grace or openness. I am sort of an experimentalist at heart. And I, I think I figured they were all saying to me from going on too much, by the way. Arlina But anyway, I was saying, you know, if you want to live, you're gonna have to quit using and I thought, No way. There's got to be another way work around. Yeah, work around, there's a backdoor somewhere. So I figured I would cure my addiction was going to take me seven years, I was going to stay clean for that seven years. Well, I solved the disease of addiction, which is what everybody was saying. And then I would use and so I was open minded and totally, you know, arrogant ignorance, naive, I don't know. But I, I was willing to do seven years, I guess,   Arlina Allen  6:26   what was the seven years to get your degree? You know,   Unknown Speaker  6:28   no, I think I wasn't thinking that clearly. I figured that I started when I was 13, I was 23, I decided I wasn't really in terrible shape, you know. So it was like seven years of intense addiction. Somehow it seemed balanced to me, if I could clear it up in seven years, and then there was just no way you were gonna tell me, I was going to spend the rest of my life without drugs, which is what my life is completely about by that time. So yeah, I was scared enough to be willing enough to be open enough to try a different way temporarily. And I remember when seven years came, by the way, and went and I looked around my life was a zillion times better. It wasn't, you know, easy, by any means. But it was definitely better. And my curiosity had kind of come back. And so I, you know, kind of a data time is, you know, stuck it out. And so here I am, 35 years clean and sober, still have not cured addiction, still very interested in the role of science in understanding and treating and preventing addiction, but also recognize that there's a lot that science doesn't know. And so, yeah, I think, yeah, it's been a it's been a fun, rich trip.   Arlina Allen  8:07   It's fun. That's, that's awesome. I mean, we were people who insist on having a time that's for sure. I think that's so amazing that so so you became abstinent at 23. From then on, he became abstinent.   Unknown Speaker  8:22   I mean, I smoked a few cigarettes and I'm completely addicted to coffee, but I don't think that his account had other than nicotine, any mind altering chemicals, and I've been tempted many times, so it's not like I just said, you know, that's it for me, I guess. Yeah, just a long, long time.   Arlina Allen  8:46   You know, I knew that you and I were going to be friends when you talked in your book about like, the your love of weed. Oh, my gosh, if I there was a period of time that if I was awake, I was high. Right? I grew up in the church and the preacher's daughter. The pastor's daughter once told me she's like, I'm high. So often that not being high was as my altered reality. And I was like, Oh, my God, you're my hero. I want to be just like you. And I was. But in your book, you talk about how I see after I got sober. It took me a little over a year to go a single day without wishing for a drink. That is rough. But it was more than nine years before my craving to get high abated during that, and I think I'm so glad that you've mentioned that because I think a lot of people especially those who are 12, step oriented, are you know, they hear stories about like, the obsession to use is lifted, or they're on this pink cloud. And I think for people who don't have that experience, they feel They're doing something wrong. Right. But   Unknown Speaker  10:02   I think for Bill Wilson, right, it was just an overnight thing. And for many of us, it's sometimes slowly and for I was definitely have a slow variety. I, I really, and when I say, you know, for the craving to abate, I really seriously wish to get high for most days, those nine years. Yeah. And I, you know, the more time that went by the more, I could see what was at risk. So when I first got clean, you know, there's nothing to lose, because you're at rock bottom. But, you know, as a result of putting one foot in front of the other things got much better. So, you know, then I could kind of see that, and then I remember so well, I can almost taste it the experience of not wanting to smoke, and I can remember how all the sudden, I was okay to be in concerts that were indoors with good weed around me. Or, you know, I was sort of indifferent. Like I was like, I had been to alcohol. You know, I'm, I have served alcohol to friends. And I was kind of in that position, like, I don't care if you smoke or not. And then it got I had the craving come back. I was, I was joke about this, but right around menopause. I just knew that, for me, an antidote to the anxiety and just sort of the brittle angst of hormonal changes, I guess was going, you know, could be smoking. And, you know, anxiety is so epidemic, and I hadn't really had a ton of it until, and there was other things going on in the world, we can just say at that. But, anyhow, oh my gosh, and I think I say this in the book, too. But I, I, at the time, I was thinking maybe I'll get cancer and my doctors make me smoke. And then little I do you know, I mean, I was wishing for, you know, some kind of serious illness. So   Arlina Allen  12:23   our minds play funny tricks on us, it doesn't matter how long you're sober. It's just weird layer. If that was ever a solution in your mind. I've heard that dopamine is like the Save button. Right? I don't know if you've ever heard of Dr. Andrew Haberman, he talks about how in nature like a deer that will find water, they get like dopamine is released. And that's how they remember where the water is. And it's almost similar for us. Like when we do something that makes us feel good. Dopamine is then released. And it helps us to remember what made us feel good. And I feel like it's burned in my psyche that if I take a bomb hat that I'm going to feel good. And I have other solutions, but it's all it's I don't think that idea is ever gonna leave me, you know, 27 years sober. I was telling you earlier that my younger son went to rehab. And this all was predicated because we found a Bag of Weed in his room and duty, I had not held a bag of marijuana for almost 30 years. And when it was in my hand, this plastic baggie, it was like I was a teenager again. And my inner drug addict was like, well, maybe we should, maybe we could maybe maybe. And I was like, I was actually a little alarmed almost a little bit of shame. Like seriously, after all this time, after all the work I've done. It's still there. I mean, it's just so engrained in my brain, I guess.   Unknown Speaker  14:00   Absolutely. And I think the one of the interesting things about the story, you just told us that the ability of a drug to make to release dopamine is different across the population. So for some people, that marijuana let's say, or alcohol doesn't do much to that for me, and for other people. It's really a potent signal. And I think that is part of the reason some of us are more at risk than others and and also the reason why it's not a really reasonable argument to say, you know, why don't they just put it down because it is like a thirsty person finding water as opposed to somebody who's completely satisfied finding water, you know, you can take it or leave it. So I think that's true. And also the brain. You know, learning is absolutely persistent. So Pretty sure we will both be I guess subject to those kinds of, you know, triggers through our until we die.   Arlina Allen  15:11   Yeah, maybe, maybe this is a good time to ask you, you know, what is what's different in that? So you're you have your PhD in neuroscience. And you know, he got sober and went on this quest to cure addiction. What have you found that's different about the brain of people who get addicted so quickly?   Unknown Speaker  15:34   Mm hmm. Well, I guess the, what I want to say first is that it's not simple, I thought I was gonna be a little switch that we were going to discover, and I wasn't alone in this, I think this was scientific understanding in the 80s, we'll find that, you know, broken switch or molecule or circuit and fix it. It's definitely not that way. So the causes of addiction are very complex and intersectional. They involve differences in dopamine and other genetic liabilities, or protective factors that make the the initial sensitivity to a drug, different across different people. So some try a drug for the first time and absolutely love it. About a third of people, for instance, try opiates and don't like them at all. And they usually try them in the doctor's office, but they find them aversive. So obviously, that's a good protective,   Arlina Allen  16:40   meaning, meaning they don't like the way they feel. Yeah, so weird to me,   Unknown Speaker  16:45   largely genetic. I know. Right? So very big individual differences. And then there are sex differences. So women tend to appreciate drugs that provide relief. And then justice is overgeneralizing a little bit Sure, overall, tend to appreciate drugs that make them feel good. And so women don't want to feel bad, and drugs help with that, certainly, especially and men like to feel good. Another big factor, and probably the largest factor more than genetic liability is adolescent exposure. So kids, like your son and my daughter are tuned into Well, they have, they have a particular kind of brain that is the adolescent brain that is really prone to trying new things, really prone to not worrying is certainly abstractly worrying about consequences. So they're less cautious. And they, they want to buck against whatever they're told, they shouldn't do. And those three traits like novelty seeking, and risk taking, and not really caring about consequences are ones that help them to become adults, if they just listened to their parents until they were 35. No one would really like that. So they they're designed to kind of say, not this, you know, I'm making my own way, which would be good if there wasn't so many high potency, dangerous ways of escaping at their fingertips. So I think through most of our evolutionary history, these you know, kids having that tendency is is no problem. The other thing that kids have in their brains are different about is that, and we all know this, they are terrific at learning. I'm teacher, and it's crazy, because and you probably noticed this with your own children, but they don't seem to even be paying attention. yet. They are like sponges information really goes in. And if they were learning French, or if they're learning addiction, both ways, their brain is really quick to take the experience and build it into the structures so that it's lasting, and I can learn French, or addiction, but your chances are so much lower. So if you start using any addictive drug, before you're 18 you have about a 25% chance of developing a substance use disorder. And the earlier you start using, the higher the chance, I started 13 so you know it was basically more likely than not. And that's because 13 year olds are great at picking up new information, much better than 33 year olds. So they if you if you Wait, on the other hand till you're 21, your chances are one in 25.   Arlina Allen  20:06   Wow, I told   Unknown Speaker  20:07   my kids that and I tell my students that and they all ignore me. Why? Because they're high novelty seeking high risk taking, and they don't really want to listen to the, you know, concerns or worries. I mean, that's not how they're designed. So we're in a kind of a perfect storm for them. And that, that is the best predictor of developing a problem starting early is starting or like,   Arlina Allen  20:30   you know what terrifies me nowadays I have a nephew who's 26 years old. And he's had four friends died from accidental fentanyl overdose, because for whatever reason, drug dealers are putting fentanyl and everything. And you know, these are pretty well adjusted kids. I don't think it's I know that there's a certain percentage of the population who indulge a little bit who don't have a disorder. Or maybe that's Yeah, is that is that true?   Unknown Speaker  21:02   Well, it's, it's more true if you start at 26. And if you start at 16, as I just said, but I think the reason that nose and everything is because it is so is it a traffic, it's so so potent, that a tiny bit can get the whole town high. So it's really advantageous to traffickers. And also, because people are having access to more and more chemicals. And when they start early, especially their reward pathway, the dopamine pathway we've been talking about is kind of desensitized, so they can't, you know, have a cup of wine coolers that doesn't do the trick at all anymore, they need something a little more, because they're sort of immune to the that dopamine, squirt? So yeah, unfortunately, I think that's another reason it's not gonna. We, I think focus, we've also noticed lately that there's more and more overdoses from methamphetamine, and then from somebody who's been looking at the trends for a long time, it's always be something and there's always going to be more potent, whatever. So it's not the drug itself, as much as this very narrow ledge that more and more of us are on trying to, I guess, medicate reality. And and so, you know, I think, I don't know how that is for your nephew. But it's a terrible lesson to have to learn for all of us.   Arlina Allen  22:51   It's just, it just makes me sick. I mean, I think there was a report that was released, I think it was at the end of March, there was a 12 year period that they were measuring overdoses that ended in March, and I think they track like 80,000 deaths. And, and I just think about all the families like all the mothers, all the all the fathers and siblings, and just everybody that's affected by so many deaths, and   Unknown Speaker  23:19   and I think a 40% increase in those deaths over the last year with COVID. So the isolation as Alicia is, has made, and also the the higher, you know, the more likely you are to find fentanyl, and whatever it is you're taking at, which is just hard to prepare for I think, biologically. Yeah. Yeah, I think it's, it's tragic. It's so tragic.   Arlina Allen  23:50   And then and then so my mind naturally goes, Well, what can we do about it? You know, it's like, we can understand, I love how, you know, science will sort of break down the mechanics. And once we understand, you know, alcohol is addictive drugs are addictive. I mean, there's a reason why they're illegal, right? It's because they're so harmful. But, you know, and then we can get into the causes, right? Like you mentioned, it's a very complex issue, you know, we you mentioned, do you that you didn't have any big trauma growing up, but I feel like, you know, we were sort of in that generation where we were not like things like ADHD and anxiety and depression weren't really talked about a whole lot. And we really didn't know how to treat those. And so our parents handled us with a lot of tough love. I got a lot of tough love and you know, from reading your book and listening to your interviews, it sounds like you were raised with that as well. And then your Can we just talk a little bit about your dad, like I wonder what it was. We talk a lot about science and it sort of leaves God out a little bit. But in my experience, it feels like there are things that are sort of serendipitous or magical about the unusual things that happen that lead us to a life of recovery. Like, what was your dad's role and your recovery?   Unknown Speaker  25:23   Um, yeah. So, so much in that question, especially, I guess I want to start by saying that I agree that we did not recognize trauma, and anxiety and all mental illnesses, wait, their response was, was so different, I think. And in my house, it was to push through both my father's parents were immigrants. And he dealt with life by controlling everything he could. And that worked great until he, you know, met 13 year old me. And I was absolutely out of control, by definition, and   Arlina Allen  26:11   he would have been terrifying to me.   Unknown Speaker  26:13   I was terrified. And I was I was, like, determinately, out of control. I mean, that was my goal to be absolutely out of control. And the more both my parents tried to kind of constrain me, the less manageable I was, and I guess I, I don't think I'm unique in this. I mean, I've raised three children. And so it's something built into the teenage neurobiology. And I had it probably in spades. So his way of life because   Arlina Allen  26:45   you're smart, smart kids are harder to race.   Unknown Speaker  26:48   I don't know. I'm also, one thing I like about myself more than if I have any smartness is, is that I'm, I guess, strong willed. And so I don't know if that actually goes with intelligence or not, but I'm not the one who's following so much. And so I wasn't named, I wasn't influenced really by too much of what people, you know, just like you said, you know, you try to get the information out. Drugs are dangerous, but it doesn't really have an impact my kids have grown up with man, they've been sort of forced to look at graphs and things. And, you know, they'll say to me, my daughter said to me the other day, you know, I know all this. But and that is sort of how I was, and I didn't know that much. My mother was giving me a reader's digest reprints you know, of how lead would damage your ovaries and stuff. But anyway, you're like,   Arlina Allen  27:49   Oh, good, I will get pregnant.   Unknown Speaker  27:51   No, I didn't. Yeah, wasn't on my radar at all. But anyhow, my father, because I think it was so painful to be around me. And to watch me his strategy, which is kind of in our family, I guess, was just denial that he even had a daughter. So during a period, after they kicked me out of the house, right about my 10th birthday. He, he would, and he would say that he had two sons. It was just too much for him. And this is kind of the way he is. So it's, and I think it's fragile. That's what he was. And he was raised to be fragile, because it was a lot to worry about, because they were poor immigrants and you know, a million ways to not make it and I think that's common for a lot of people today. So my father was just able to block it out. And we have a family friend who I dedicated the book to father, Marty Devereaux, who is this kind of an unbelievable, interesting person. He's in his 80s. Now, we're still good friends, but he is a psychologist, and has a lot of experience with addiction and also a Catholic priest. And he told my father, and don't my father's not really Catholic. I mean, he was raised Catholic, but that doesn't mean too much these days. So anyway, he   Arlina Allen  29:19   Where was he from? Marty Devereaux?   No, I'm sorry. Your said Your father was an immigrant. Oh,   Unknown Speaker  29:24   he was born in Atlantic City. But his mother was from Slovenia, and his father from Switzerland. And they met in Central Park. They were both, you know, one was a baker one was a housecleaner. And they sent two sons to college and wow. Yeah, I mean, you know, I think it's a pretty typical American story. Yeah, yeah. But um, anyway, Marty said take her out to dinner and bring her flowers like on a date. Well, I have No idea what how my father did this because he's, he's just not the type to waste any money on flowers, or two. And I was when I say I think I tried to convey this in the book. But when I imagined myself now at that moment, I was pretty deplorable. I was probably quite smelly and dirty. I was, at this point, sort of living in a one bedroom apartment with many people. And I was pretty gross. So anyway, this is when you were 23. I was not quite 23. So his takeaway? Yeah, so we he picked me up and you know, so not only was I gross, I was completely belligerent. I, I thought that my parents were terrible. And I didn't want any part of their fascist, you know, existence. And yet, I deserved a nice dinner, of course. So my big dilemma, I will not I really can still almost feel this was how we were going for early bird dinner, because it's my dad. And I'm very frugal. Yeah, he is wealthy and frugal. And   Arlina Allen  31:27   that's how I get wealthy.   Unknown Speaker  31:28   Yeah, I mean, this is sort of the first thing I guess. But anyway,   Arlina Allen  31:32   and that was a dad begged my dad, maybe it is a dead   Unknown Speaker  31:35   thing. He was also an airline pilot, so just not extremely cautious. He still is. And he's, he's in his 80s today, and we have a great relationship. But anyway, I was so stuck, because when he was picking me up, maybe quarter to five, but I had to figure out between 11 when I woke up and six hours later, how to be not too high when he came, you know, high enough, but not too high. And of course, this is harder and harder to achieve at this point in my life, because I could either be passed out or getting ready to be I mean, it was just hard to find that place. So anyway, he picks me up, he takes me out. And he said, and we talked about this still. Dude, I just wanting you to be happy. And I guess I should say, he doesn't remember saying that. But I know he said it. Because it was the most unlikely words that could ever come. And this is sort of what you were getting at, I guess where did those words come from? They're not my dad. My dad was worried about my teeth and the way you know, a lot of things but not my happiness ever. No, probably it's hard for him. And I had of course, no. No adequate response to that because I was absolutely miserable. And it went right into my heart. I fell apart. Yeah, it was a funny like tears   Arlina Allen  33:10   in my eyes. Just to think that the hard ass dad was so sweet, right? When you needed it the most. I know,   Unknown Speaker  33:17   you know what he tells me now it's funny. He, I was so out of it. I guess I don't remember the flowers. But he took me in his very clean car and my friends I guess to the beach to go for a swim that same day, that same after dinner. And we got to fill the sand. And that's what he remembers as his biggest stretch. And what I remember as his biggest stretch is him reaching across the table with his heart and saying, I want you to live basically. I mean, he sent me how I think he he met a lot by that. And my mother was not invited to the dinner. I hadn't spoken with her in a long time either. But she had been researching treatment centers for years she had had a court order actually in Florida, there's an act where you can commit somebody because of their addictions. And they thought over that a lot. But anyway, next thing I knew they flew me to a treatment center, which of course I had no idea what I was getting into and saved my life really. That place did. So I feel really fortunate that I had that opportunity to wake up a little bit as I think for the chances are that my father wouldn't have said that my mother wouldn't have had the resources to know what to do and I would have died on the streets probably not too much longer.   Arlina Allen  34:52   I feel like that really speaks to you know, people just didn't have solutions, right and they get so far straighted that their only choice is to disown right. Like I had that same experience with my mom, she disowned me on a regular basis, like she was an immigrant from Mexico. And although my father was, you know, his, his people have been here a long time. Like, they didn't know what to do with me either. And, you know, my dad was always the sweet and nurturing one, but he was, you know, he's former Marine, he was a government guy, he was kind of a hard ass, and in a lot of respects, but, you know, our parents, you know, just, it's just speaks to the love of a parent, you know, you want to save your kids. You know, you see your kids are suffering and like, my mother just didn't know how she was so frustrated that she would disown me on a regular basis. But I think when I think it's the contrast between like, a little bit of sweetness goes a long way, because it's not what we're used to. It's so shocking. Like, shocking to the system,   Unknown Speaker  36:00   let's thought about it a lot, because I do think there's a, I had a boyfriend at the time who died. Oh, overdose. And his parents were extremely sweet. So it's hard. And you could say they sweeted him into his last big use, but um, I don't know that there's a recipe I think if if there was one thing that, that I tried to do with is to show up and be honest, and I think it was so painful for my parents, both of my parents to just grapple with what happened to their little girl, that their tendency was to not show up. And I don't blame them. I mean, it's it's tough. It's tough raising teenagers sometimes because they're not that it's almost unrecognizable, you know, from the sweet nine year olds, or the 99 might become, but I think what we're called to do for each other is to tell the truth, not their truth. You know, I don't you know, you're speaking from him first himself. He said, Yeah, I was. I mean, I think this was true for him, I think, really at the core, and somehow he had the grace to find it. What all he really wants and all, probably any parent wants their kid to be well, and whatever well looks like for us. And I think the fact that he could say that was kind of miraculous.   Arlina Allen  37:42   Very, yeah, that was absolutely. sneak up for Marty, right?   Unknown Speaker  37:47   Yeah, yeah. Exactly. No, I   Arlina Allen  37:50   think yeah, it's, it's just, yeah, my mom was, she was really tough. And I remember growing up, she's going through her second divorce. And all my hair started falling out, like a lot I was under, and nobody knew what was going on. And you know, when it ended is one day, she let me curl up in her lap and cry. I had a good cry. And then my hair stopped falling out after that. Wow. Yeah. And I think it was like, there needs to be this balance. Like I feel like as a parent I attend like we tell our kids that we love them all the time. And I almost feel like maybe we maybe it's a little too much sweetness. You know, I have I have the the hard ass edge me because I think I inherited that from my mom. But you know it when you get something different from your parent, it is kind of jolting. It is kind of healing, it can be life changing, if it's different. So if you're sweet all the time, when you show up with boundaries that can be jolting. When you're a hard ass your whole life and you show up with a little bit of sweetness. It can be start, it's like a pattern interrupt, you know that. It's just kind of interesting. And I wanted to ask you a little bit   Unknown Speaker  39:09   of a story, by the way. But your mother obviously was disappointed, you know, and her own struggles, but that she was able to be with you. And warning I think that is really a bridge.   Arlina Allen  39:28   That was it made me feel you know, like the talk about original wounds, like I don't matter, or I'm unlovable because I'm either too much or not good enough. Right. Or maybe that I'm alone, you know, those original wounds, and I feel like I had all those but my mom, you know, in that moment, it's like those, like that moment that your dad had like they were willing to do something different. Like they had a glimmer of hope, like somebody gave them hope and they decided to do something different. And that's kind of what But you said your dad reached across the table with his heart, you know, and it was like, there is something that's transmitted, like when people are really vulnerable and honest and coming from their heart. That's so healing. Right? And I feel like that's a lot of what recovery has been about for me is that just that willing to be vulnerable and have a degree of humility, it's a lot of times kind of, like forced humility. It's like, like, I have to get honest about what what's really going on, so that I can get the solution. But you know, as a parent, you know, we're talking about our kids, and how do we reach our kids, because I think that's, you know, in this day and age, a lot of us that have had addiction issues, you know, we're worried about passing it down to our kids. And we thought we were talking earlier about leading by example, right, we need to lead by example for our kids, and it's so hard to know, I felt like we're walking this fine line. Because, you know, kids commit suicide all the time, like, you know, and the, there's all these ideas, like kids are like, a very aware of anxiety and depression, and being socially awkward, and there seems to be, you know, and as a parent, it's like, you want to encourage them to get help and take responsibility for their feelings at the same time, you don't want to push them too hard, because that is the ultimate threat is that they will commit suicide. Right. And it's, and I know that they're taking drugs to medicate, I took drugs to medicate. And I used to say that, you know, drugs, drugs, were my savior for a long time. If, if I had to feel, you know, especially those young years 1415 if I had to feel all the feelings, because I didn't have any coping skills, I don't know that I would have survived. So, you know, I know you've been trying to cure addiction, and what are some of the things that, you know, besides leading by example, for our kids, how can we, how do we, how do we fix this duty? How do we,   Unknown Speaker  42:08   I think we show up for each other is to start I don't know. But I, I do feel, and everybody says this, I guess every generation notices this, but I do think it is an inordinately challenging time to be growing up. I was saying to a student in my office, not too long ago, you know, if you're not anxious, you're crazy. Because and crazy is probably not the right word for Psychology at it. You know, and here I am a psychologist, I'm not all that correct times. But I think that you at least if you're not anxious, and you're growing up right now, you're somehow blind and deaf, or in denial, yeah, or in a massive denial, which I don't even know, I think that I think what's different, and what shifted for my dad, and what continues to be something that I work on, is to respond to all this pain, the natural response is to sort of curl up and close in, and to hide, and to take ourselves away. And as addicts you know, I still have a great capacity for denial that I have to check all the time. But I also found many tools to use. And that's why drugs are so compelling, because it was like, boom, you know, you've got a 10 foot wall now, between you and any realities, are safe and cozy, and delightful. And I think kids find drugs, you know, to do the same thing, but they also are stuck in a way because face it, that it's a tear, it's a hard time for any of us to be on the planet. And there's not a lot of great models of going through that awake and an honest and I guess, you know, I just try to put myself in the position of a nine year old, knowing, you know, probably on Instagram and every other thing, you know, how much suffering there is or is about to be. And then seeing the many ways, drugs and other ways that adults around are medicating and escaping. And even though you and I have been able to put down drugs, I think, at least for me, I guess I can still do want I naturally want to distance myself. And I don't I think that is a way to kind of abandon the nine year olds. I don't know how old you were when you're here was five out but I think as about maybe than nine or 10 Yeah, the metaphor is put our heads on each other's laps and, and just cry, you know, cry or or whimper or hope or try or touch each other I think in touch each other in the in the true spot where there is anxiety and depression and fear because if we can't do that and there's so many opportunities to escape I you know we're in a kind of a vortex going down the drain here because the more we escaped the worst things grow around us because we don't have to deal with them. And then the young people see oh my gosh, it's, you know, this is a crazy house. This being Earth. So I, I think or your family, I suppose but I, I guess we're both your mother and my father were able to do was recognize, you know, the truest piece of themselves and their children and respond honestly. Yeah. And that sometimes that might be kindness, sometimes that might not be kindness. But I think it's honesty, that's the, the, the thing we're really lacking or, or, you know, maybe the, the lifesaver would be Yeah,   Arlina Allen  46:44   I think in that moment, there was, you know, a high degree of empathy. Bernie Brown is a shame researcher, she talks about empathy is the antidote to shame. Right? I've heard people say that, you know, this is a disease of isolation and connection is the cure. And you know, I really feel like connection is one of those one of those solutions to all this, like, we need to connect with each other. We're, you know, as human beings, we actually really need each other.   Unknown Speaker  47:15   Oh, my goodness, yeah.   Arlina Allen  47:17   Yeah, I need to be around easily cope with stress   Unknown Speaker  47:20   is by social support. And there's tons of evidence that social support, not only mitigates, but also reverses the effects of stress. And it is, you know, surely a big part of, of getting better as individuals and also as communities and families, I think, recognizing that and it's tough because my parents kicked me out your your mother disowned you. And partly for me that facing the consequences of my decisions was helpful. But I do think that's harder because fentanyl wasn't around. You know, you you don't want to face them in the ultimate, you know, right, way too early. So I guess as parents we, we try to block a very tough line these weird. Yeah, it is hard.   Arlina Allen  48:23   Yeah. But I'm glad to hear that there's evidence that shows that social support mitigates and reverses stress, that's amazing. It kind of confirms everything that we knew, right? Like, we got sober we got social support, we, you know, had lots of people who had done it before us so learning by example, I hear that hope I've heard hope is hearing other people's experiences, which is why I do the podcast right? You know, people that listen, go Okay, you know, we can talk about the mechanics how, how the brain works, and all that and how it's affected by alcohol. And you know why it's a bad idea. But then hearing about like the turning point, like when your dad reached out to you, and you were at that place where I'm sure you had you were sick and tired of being sick and tired. Ready, just ready enough, you talk about just having just a tiny bit of willingness. It's a little chink in the armor. How long were you in that? That rehab in the 80s   Unknown Speaker  49:29   I was in for 20 days, which seemed like nine years and then I was in a halfway house for three months, which I calculated at the time so I know this is true was 1/27 of my life or something. I forget how I did that or something like that. I had some kind of crazy mula totally a rip off. I was so furious. But I, I was, like I say at the turning point, and there's been so many times, you know, I know where things are. Lena, we're talking about openness. And I think one way I could be honest, is to say, even after setting addiction for 35 years, and having all this personal and scientific experience, I still need to be open to all I don't know. And certainty is a lie, you know, certainty is the biggest illusion. And so here we are kind of trying to get through. And I think that is what I first had in my I was very certain until I'm in the treatment center. And I'm asked to try a different way. And I was troubled, because on one way I went, and I could see my way was not going great. Like it was really not going well. And I could see that without the drugs, you know, for a few weeks. But to do an another way that was extremely vague and chancy, and, you know, just seemed really crazy. To me. I was just stuck. And that, like you say this, just a tiny bit willing to say, I don't know. And, okay, you know, and this is a still, I think where I am I one of the things I love about recovery the most is that it is always different. And, you know, I thought that drugs were gonna give me this great, you know, every day is a big surprise, you know, who knows if it's the cops or that whatever. It just turned out to be adrenaline, but it was a grind, it was not really novel or interesting. And in fact, 35 years later, I'm I'm just astounded by how much mystery there is, in any day. It's just breathtaking. So I guess that I have to show up for that, you know, I have to not buy into the lie that I know exactly what I'm doing. Right?   Arlina Allen  52:20   I think the more we learn, the more we realize we don't know, a lot. You know, yeah, that is a I do love that about recovery is that every day is kind of new again, you know, and that we don't have to, and there's so much interesting research going on. Now I know that, you know, and I didn't I feel like we're running out of time, but that there is so much research now on helping people with chronic addiction through things like psychedelics. It's just like, you know, I I practice abstinence. So that's, let's face it, my life is fine. Like I don't, you know, need that. But for the chronic alcoholic who meets some criteria of like, you know, post traumatic stress disorder, and things like that. I know, Johns Hopkins is doing some interesting studies about that. That Yeah, there's still so much to learn about, about the brain and addiction and how to help people. Where do you see the focus of your work in the next, I don't know, five to 10 years?   Unknown Speaker  53:28   Well, can I just respond to this thing about the psychedelic so   Arlina Allen  53:33   Oh, sure. Yeah, cuz Yeah, you wrote a lot about it, and you're But well, I read some about   Unknown Speaker  53:36   And I think it's congruent with what other people are writing to that it may be those drugs may be a useful tool. But it reminds me that they go back to what you were saying earlier, the the benefit of those drugs is in their ability to help us connect with something bigger than ourselves, you know, which could be the love of other people. And I think that it reminds me that every drug is only doing nothing new, it's a total we have the capacity to do ourselves. So the way the pharmacology goes is that drugs work by exploiting pathways we already have. So in a way, this opportunity for transcending ourselves to connection with others, maybe helped by psychedelics, but those are not the answer. The answer is transcending ourselves by connecting with ourselves in something bigger than ourselves. So I would say that what I'm working on now Well, I there's so much that I am excited to do I wish I could stay up later, but I've got my research lab going. I'm studying sex differences in addiction. I'm also studying initial responses. to drugs and I'm interested in the genetic difference, individual differences that are mediated by an interaction of genes and say stress or other kinds of environmental influences. But I'm also hoping to write another book and I have this is funny because I'm, I don't really consider myself the book writing type, I'm kind of like the short, quick, get it done thing. And the first book took 10 years. So I don't have that a 10 years. I know so sad. Because I was busy, I was raising children and I was trying to get grants and we're, you know, grade papers and all that. So I can't do that, again, I don't, I have three books, so I'm probably not going to live long enough. So three books I want to write and I have a sabbatical coming up. And I'm hoping that I will have an opportunity to spend the year getting at least one of those out either on the adolescent vulnerability to addiction or on sex differences in the causes and consequences of addictive drugs, or just a kind of more philosophical take on. Because so a response to the opportunity that everybody alive on the planet has today to take substances and just as you were saying, sometimes for some people, those and some substances might be beneficial, and sometimes not. And I think that understanding and sort of finding your way to a personal ethic of how, what drugs in my life requires and appreciation of science, but also of you know, our honest assessment of who and where we are our development and what drugs are doing for instance, I this is just a little thing, but I read the other day that the marijuana industry is really exacerbating the droughts on the west coast. And that is a sort of a dilemma for this idea. And I mean, I I think there may be benefits also, but you know, it's not that our choices, if we know anything in October of 2021, we realize that our individual choices have impact on others, and so and on ourselves. So I guess I want to just consider that and not in a you know, there's a lot that can be said about it. So anyway, I'm excited about all those things. Who knows what tomorrow will bring, but I'm hoping to take a break from teaching it's been a tough year and a half with COVID Yeah, routines and yeah, yeah, I think we're all kind of hobbling through   Arlina Allen  58:03   Yeah, my heart goes out to all the teachers I know it's just been it's we're living in through unprecedented time so I really so grateful to all the teachers who've been able to hack it out and help our kids right it's it's really important work. You know, they I think they need as many people in their corner as they can get. So thank you for hanging it out and being available to all these kids. But I am so excited about your your book projects. I will personally be rooting for the one about adolescence.   Unknown Speaker  58:38   Me too, that one almost could write itself the data, you know, in the last 1520 years are overwhelming. And so it's really a good time to get that out. And, and adolescents are like sitting ducks today. And that is not their problem. That's all of our problem.   Arlina Allen  59:00   Oh yeah, they're our future. Right? I remember people saying that about us. Listen, thank you so much for your time today. When you get done with that book. You come on back and we'll talk about that one too.   Unknown Speaker  59:13   Okay. Arlina Thank you for having me. It's been really nice. Yeah, such   Arlina Allen  59:16   a pleasure. We'll talk soon thanks. Bye bye.

Collective Light
Episode 32: Our Favorite Yoga Pants Warrior

Collective Light

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:40


It really does take a great friend to help us sift through life.  I feel lucky to know Elizabeth Anne Kilpatrick.  She's the friend who's been there and done that and offers all the perspective under the sun that comes with that journey.  Now, combine that with the fact that she is a brilliant mother, wife, professor, editor, business(es) owner, and a very loving friend, and that makes her the perfect person to help us digest all we've discussed this season! Today, we're just two friends talking, so come and hang out with us! Get to know Elizabeth Anne more @yogapantswarrior on Instagram.And click here to listen to her last visit with us on Episode 12: Silent Battles of the Yoga Pants Warrior. And my DMs are open! Come find me @amykathleen.ak. And, visit your personal hub for everything we talk about here on the podcast +more at www.insidethecollective.com. Take care,AK

Bible Reading Podcast
Life From the Word When We are Sucking Dust. Reading Psalm 119:25-56 #294 10 Bible Verses to Help You Overcome Sin and Resist Temptation:

Bible Reading Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:19


Are you in a difficult place right now - your nose buried in the metaphorical dust of some difficult trial or terrible time? If so - today's pod discusses how you can be rescued and intensely invigorated by God. Check it out!

Bible Questions Podcast
Life From the Word When We are Sucking Dust. Reading Psalm 119:25-56 #294 10 Bible Verses to Help You Overcome Sin and Resist Temptation:

Bible Questions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 12:19


Are you in a difficult place right now - your nose buried in the metaphorical dust of some difficult trial or terrible time? If so - today's pod discusses how you can be rescued and intensely invigorated by God. Check it out!

Hopestream for parenting kids through drug use and addiction
Recovering From COVID, Podcast Changes, Healing Power of Community, Documentaries and Books; The Casserole Episode

Hopestream for parenting kids through drug use and addiction

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 19:31


Host: Brenda Zane, www.brendazane.comShow notes: www.brendazane.com/hopestream/84Free e-book: www.brendazane.com/hindsightThe Stream, a community for moms: www.thestreamcommunity.comGet my Wednesday email: www.brendazane.com/emailWhat to call an episode that covers lots of ground and has a variety of things included? The casserole episode!This short, solo episode will give you some personal updates, exciting changes coming for Hopestream, a bit about the healing power of community, book and documentary info, and more - basically a podcast casserole.It's short and sweet so grab your dog, hop in the car, or flop on the couch with a cup of something for a few minutes and exhale with me.

Tell Me Something True with Laura McKowen
Jane Clapp on Escaping the Social Media Labyrinth

Tell Me Something True with Laura McKowen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 63:20


What if social media scrolling was the latest version of the mythical Labyrinth? An elaborate, confusing structure intended to keep the Minotaur (you) from escaping. Jane Clapp is a Toronto-based Jungian Somatics teacher who left social media because she knew it was making her sick. Her answer to the question “WHY is it making me sick?” tapped the deep wisdom of concepts like archetypes, complexes, and the collective unconscious. That twitchy anxiety we feel from all the FOMO and YOLO isn't an accident. It's proof that technologists and advertisers are succeeding in tapping our deepest desires to keep us trapped in the labyrinthine scroll. This one went to places we weren't expecting and we can't wait to hear what you think! You can find Jane here: https://www.janeclapp.com/ Jane has a pre-recorded webinar “Social Media: Your Body and Your Psyche:” https://www.janeclapp.com/products/socialmedia Spotify playlist for this episode: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/0Dzi40SHcEcFobVrw3ZPBe Tell Me Something True is a 100% independent podcast. There are no corporations or advertisers backing this community. We are 100% funded by the TMST community. Support TMST today so you can hear the uncut interviews, attend private events with Laura and help keep TMST ad-free: https://tmst.supercast.com/

Mid-Riff
044 / JJ Gonson on Photo FOMO and Venues During Covid

Mid-Riff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 71:21


Co-writing a song with Elliot Smith, Nirvana crashing at your house, documenting the early hardcore scene (without getting killed), and running a safer venue during a pandemic are all on the table as Hilary talks with photographer and venue owner, JJ Gonson. Huge thanks to this episode's sponsors! http://earthquakerdevices.com (EarthQuaker Devices)- extra special effects pedals made by hand in Akron, OH! http://stompboxsonic.com (Stompbox Sonic)- personalized pedal curation and sales in Somerville, MA! http://holcombguitars.com (Holcomb Guitars)- custom guitars and mobile guitar repair in RI/MA! JJ's BIO JJ Gonson began photographing bands in the ‘80s hardcore scene on the East Coast and later in the early ‘90s music scene in the Northwest. She is known especially for her photography of Elliot Smith, including the cover of his self-titled album and "Roman Candle." She has documented bands such as: Nirvana, the Descendants, Jane's Addiction, Black Flag, Pussy Galore, Motorhead, and 7 Seconds. She managed Elliot Smith's earlier band, Heatmiser and booked and managed other bands, as well, which, in addition to her time as a chef and experience catering, led her to open the music venue ONCE in Somerville, Massachusetts. JJ'S LINKS https://jj-gonson-photography.myshopify.com/ (JJ's Photography) http://instagram.com/jj_gonson_photo (JJ's Instagram) https://oncesomerville.com/ (ONCE Somerville's Website) http://instagram.com/oncesomerville (ONCE Somerville's Instagram) MID-RIFF LINKS https://www.mightycause.com/story/06kzof (Donate to RIOT RI)! http://hilarybjones.com/midriffpodcast (Website) http://instagram.com/midriffpodcast (Instagram) http://facebook.com/midriffpodcast (Facebook) https://hilarybjones.us20.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=43bb95b305fb0c7d53fbc8d3a&id=146b44f072 (Newsletter) https://www.hilarybjones.com/blog (Blog)  Thanks for rating/reviewing on https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/mid-riff/id1494997227 (Apple Podcasts)! CREDITS Theme Music: "Hedonism" by https://towanda.bandcamp.com/ (Towanda) Artwork by https://www.juliagualtieri.com/ (Julia Gualtieri)

Kratom Science
62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom

Kratom Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 59:52


Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz is a senior toxicologist from Germany and an outspoken advocate for harm reduction and science-based, rational drug policy. On October 11, 2021, representing the European Coalition for Just and Effective Drug Policies, Dr. Steinmetz testified against kratom prohibition for the World Health Organization’s 44th Expert Committee on Drug Dependence . Dr. … 62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom Read More » The post 62. Dr. Fabian Pitter Steinmetz, Toxicologist Who Testified at the WHO Hearing on Kratom first appeared on Kratom Science.

Why Intervention Podcast
The 3 Tier Approach to Intervene On Your Loved One's Addiction - Episode 57

Why Intervention Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 46:30


As a family member, what can you do to help someone go through the road of recovery? Christopher and Danny discuss the different approaches that family members can do to help push a loved one to the road of recovery. They also shared the different enemies that most people trying to stay sober face. According to Christopher and Danny, as a family member and loved one: You can change aspects of this that can make monumental changes for the future. The Why Intervention Podcast is aimed at helping family and friends feel supported and encouraged that recovery from addiction is possible, for themselves as well as their loved ones. You'll hear how to affect positive change in their life and help your loved one begin a successful recovery. Host Christopher Doyle shares his insights, talks with experts, and interviews people who have gone through recovery. Links and Resources from this Episode Bridge of Spies https://whyintervention.com/ https://twitter.com/whyintervention https://www.facebook.com/whyintervention/?ref=br_rs  Show Notes How Christopher acted when he was still not sober. - 2:06 Danny's biggest enemy during recovery. - 5:58 Recovery involves patience and tolerance. - 7:58 Life-changing moment: The Bridge of Spy reference. - 8:56 For family members, the initial thing that needs to happen is to get to a place where I can accept the things that I can't change. - 13:16 You can develop courage so that you can take action on the things that you can change. The things that you can influence. - 18:48 You can be done and not try to fix it and not try to control it and also find the courage to change the things that you can in this situation. - 24:11 The soft intervention or slow play. - 32:52 As a loved one, what's the best approach? - 37:17 A person's recovery from addiction begins when someone close to them says, “That's it, I'm done. I have had enough. You have to do something about this or else..” - 44:16 Review, Subscribe and Share If you like what you hear please leave a review by clicking here Make sure you're subscribed to the podcast so you get the latest episodes. Subscribe with Apple Podcasts Follow on Spotify Subscribe with Stitcher Subscribe with RSS

Book Shambles with Robin and Josie

On today's episode Robin is joined by the writer, editor and broadcaster Liz Frazer to talk about her new book, and bestseller, Coming Clean: A True Story of Love, Addiction and Recovery. They chat about the different faces and perception of alcoholism in individuals and society, mental health, the importance of diaries and how recovery applies to both an addict and the partner of an addict. Please note this episode contains discussions around topics that may be upsetting to some listeners.To support the show, and get extended episodes, subscribe at patreon.com/bookshambles

Bryony Gordon's Mad World

Arsenal and England legend Tony Adams has done as much in his career to challenge the stigma around addiction as he has to make footballing history. From becoming sober very publicly back in the 90s, to setting up Sporting Chance, a charity that provides mental health support to current and former professional athletes, he's made it his mission to help others by sharing his story. This Addiction Awareness Week, Bryony has teamed up with Action on Addiction and the Forward Trust to bring you a conversation each day tackling a different element of addiction. Because even though we are slowly breaking down the stigma around discussing mental health, addiction - sadly - remains a taboo, even though we will all know someone touched by it.Tony tells Bryony how following a 12-step programme changed his life, how the new generation of footballers is battling a very different addiction, and why he's heading back to Chelmsford prison, three decades after serving time there.Action on Addiction is a UK charity providing support to people who need rehab, as well as a wealth of resources for those battling addiction issues: https://www.actiononaddiction.org.uk |Tony's charity, Sporting Chance, can be found here: https://www.sportingchanceclinic.com/ |You can find more information about organisations that offer free and confidential support at the end of this episode.Read Bryony's columns: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/authors/bryony-gordon/ |For 30 days' free access to The Telegraph: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/madworld |Follow Bryony on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/bryonygordon/ |See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

2 Spicy
Take Me to the Cookie Throne

2 Spicy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 53:05


Coree and Elsa are back, with an all new episode that's too hot for the Albanian Board of Tourism! Hear all about the shady side of Europe, as experienced by a queer person of color! And if that's not enough, listen as two very stoned people try to unpack the sociopolitical history of North Korea! It's a show so jam-packed with content, we didn't even have time to talk about hemorrhoids! Our show is a production of Cinder Block Comedy, in association with your town is next. Media. This episode was engineered and produced by Alexander Scott. Special thanks to Morgan Pielli for our show artwork and Intellectual Dark Wave for our theme song, from his album Labor Songs.For more content, check us out on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram at @YoureFinePod. Buy Coree's book, I'm Not Ok You're Not Ok, available at your local bookstore.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/cinderblock)

Trust Your Intuition: The Podcast
Interview with Author and Addictions Counselor Richard Capriola

Trust Your Intuition: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 30:14


Licensed mental health counselor and author Jill Sylvester discusses strategies and tips, along with trusting your own inner voice, to live your very best life.   Today's discussion: Interview with Author and Therapist Richard Capriola

Out Of The Blank
#948 - Just Good Advertising (Karla Dayhoff)

Out Of The Blank

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 86:46


Karla works by day as an Admissions Coordinator helping with drugs and alcohol rehabilitation and through our conversations we have gone all over the board. Addiction is littered all through society from gambling to drinking even eating and it seems everyone has some form of it and with the amount of media influence of help it still raises the question if they might be the cause through ads and marketing.

Celebrate Jesus Ministry - Greg
#661 A Power Greater Than Addiction - Jewelie Shukla 10/20/21

Celebrate Jesus Ministry - Greg

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 11:12


Heartland POD
Surviving The Cycle: A True Story Of Murder, Addiction, & Mental Health w/ Author, Betty Jane Frizzell

Heartland POD

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 52:18


Adam Sommer is joined by former law enforcement officer turned reformer, professor, investigator, and author - Betty Jane Frizzell - to discuss her recent book "If You Can't Quit Cryin' You Can't Come Here No More." The book follows Betty's experience of getting the phone call that her sister, Vicky, is in prison for murdering her husband, Chris Isaac, in 800 person Puxico, MO. Betty's book recalls a childhood of abuse, poverty, and violence stretching generations and the failures of every part of the system leading to this tragedy.

Adult Child
Dr. Tian Dayton on Adult Child Recovery

Adult Child

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 54:26


Returning guest Dr. Tian Dayton joins us to discuss her recently released "Adult Children of Alcoholics Workbook", in which she answers the question "What am I feeling the pain of my childhood, as an adult, when I am no longer even living at home?" Tian is a pioneer of the Adult Child movement, a senior fellow at The Meadows and author of 15 books including, "The ACOA Trauma Syndrome" and "Emotional Sobriety." Adult Children of Alcoholics Workbook: For Children of Addiction, Dysfunction and Adverse Childhood ExperiencesTian's WebsiteSupport the Podcast -https://www.patreon.com/adultchildwww.buymeacoffee.com/adultchildFollow Andrea on social -www.instagram.com/adultchildpodwww.tiktok.com/@adultchildpodSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/adultchild)

The Truth with Hany Rambod
The Truth™ Podcast Episode 46: Derek Lunsford "212 Olympia Champ"

The Truth with Hany Rambod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 64:39


In this episode, Hany has a special guest, The NEW 212 Mr. Olympia Champion Derek Lunsford!Winning is no easy task, Hany and Derek dive into the mental struggles during the 2021 Olympia prep. Addictions, social media and expectations can distract anyone focusing on their goals,Tune in on this historic episode and comment to let us know your thoughts.If you enjoy this podcast please like, subscribe, comment below what you would like to see next and who you would like to see on this podcast!Be sure to hit the bell on the notification to be first to know about the latest episode. INTERACT WITH Derek:INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/dereklunsford_/YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjwOzMemaGoKI3L745Asd8QINTERACT WITH MEINSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/hanyrambod/  FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/hanyrambodTWITTER: https://twitter.com/hanyrambod 

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul
Don't Stop Asking Why - Dr. Michael Meaney

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 144:11


To support the show go here https://donorbox.org/nico-barrazaJust two high school mates having a deep conversation on this one. Dr. Michael Meaney has a long history in academia. He just finished his PhD in Education from the University of Cambridge and currently resides in the Bay Area with his fiancée. I've know Mike since we were both 14 years old and reconnecting with him during the pandemic has been a treat. He is a deep thinker and a caring soul. This is a long one, but I assure you it is worth your ears. Huge thanks to Dr. Meaney for coming on the show and sharing some time with me!Best,n 

Someone You Know: Facing the Opioid Crisis Together
Facing the Opioid Crisis Together: Putting it to the Test (Angela Smith & Kristen Harootunian)

Someone You Know: Facing the Opioid Crisis Together

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:05


Angela Smith is the Head of School at The Bridge Way School, Philadelphia's first recovery high school. Kristen Harootunian is a Bridge Way School alumni and public speaker in active recovery. In this episode, we discuss the challenges young people face when overcoming addiction, the impact of recovery resources in high schools, and how The Bridge Way School creates a learning environment that helps students succeed in their recovery journey. For more information on The Bridge Way School, visit www.thebridgewayschool.org. Hosted by Heather Major, Executive Director, Independence Blue Cross Foundation. Recovery is possible, and help is available. Please visit our website for more information, resources and inspiration: www.ibxfoundation.org/SYK TM 2021 Someone You Know®. All Rights Reserved. Disclaimers This podcast contains opinionated content and may not reflect the opinions of any organizations this podcast is affiliated with. This podcast discusses opioid use, opioid treatment, and physical and psychological trauma, which may be triggering for some listeners. Listener discretion is advised. This podcast is solely for informational purposes. Listeners are advised to do their own diligence when it comes to making decisions that may affect their health. Patients in need of medical advice should consult their personal health care provider. The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. It is not a substitute for professional care by a doctor or other qualified medical professional.

Recovery to Recovered with Caleb McCall
Generational Curses and Addiction (56)

Recovery to Recovered with Caleb McCall

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 22:24


Join pastor Caleb McCall in this impactful episode as he discusses addiction and how generational curses can be tied to it.

Pod Bash
The Pornography Pandemic

Pod Bash

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:51


*Due to the sensitive material discussed in today's podcast, listener discretion is advised* On this episode of the Addict II Athlete podcast, Coach Blu takes a deep dive into another episode targeting pornography. Listen as he goes into detail on how to identify, process, support needed to overcome this addiction. Pornography addiction is a very difficult situation to find yourself in, the more you know, the more communication that can exist the better you will be in overcoming it. Listen to aspects of how pornography addiction can destroy an intimate relationship with your significant other and how it can absolutely ruin your own self-worth because of the trauma, guilt, and depression that follows. Follow the steps that coach blue outlines and the real communication that you can have with your significant other by answering the questions at the end of the podcast. No one has to recover alone. Please join Addict to Athlete's Patreon support page and help us turn the mess of addiction into the message of sobriety! https://www.patreon.com/addicttoathlete For more information on Team Addict to Athlete and Addiction Recovery Podcasts please visit our website. https://www.AddictToAthlete.org Additional material can be found through the book discussed in today's podcast entitled The Porn Pandemic, a simple guy to understanding and ending pornography addiction for men.

Addict II Athlete's podcast
The Pornography Pandemic

Addict II Athlete's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:51


*Due to the sensitive material discussed in today's podcast, listener discretion is advised* On this episode of the Addict II Athlete podcast, Coach Blu takes a deep dive into another episode targeting pornography. Listen as he goes into detail on how to identify, process, support needed to overcome this addiction. Pornography addiction is a very difficult situation to find yourself in, the more you know, the more communication that can exist the better you will be in overcoming it. Listen to aspects of how pornography addiction can destroy an intimate relationship with your significant other and how it can absolutely ruin your own self-worth because of the trauma, guilt, and depression that follows. Follow the steps that coach blue outlines and the real communication that you can have with your significant other by answering the questions at the end of the podcast. No one has to recover alone. Please join Addict to Athlete's Patreon support page and help us turn the mess of addiction into the message of sobriety! https://www.patreon.com/addicttoathlete For more information on Team Addict to Athlete and Addiction Recovery Podcasts please visit our website. https://www.AddictToAthlete.org Additional material can be found through the book discussed in today's podcast entitled The Porn Pandemic, a simple guy to understanding and ending pornography addiction for men.

Married to Safety
10/20/2021 I want to Start Meditating, but...

Married to Safety

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 32:51


I always wondered what the big deal was about meditation. Why were so many people so fascinated with it, and what benefit could it provide me? There were so many roadblocks that I could not free my mind long enough to even give meditation a chance. And then... everything changed!!! Find out more about how to get started, and how to get comfortable with meditation on this episode of Married to Safety with Josh and Kayla. Watch till the end for a special announcement!

Out of the Dark with Mandisa & Laura Williams
Ep 23 - It's the most wonderful time of the year, or is it?

Out of the Dark with Mandisa & Laura Williams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 27:38


Visiting family during the holidays might be one of the top stressors people experience. For some it is tolerable and mildly fun, but for many people it is miserable. In this episode, we will discuss some resources to help make traveling to visit family more enjoyable.

Director's Club
Episode 193: Abel Ferrara (feat. Bill Ackerman)

Director's Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 182:57


One of the best guests you can have on any movie podcast would be Supporting Characters host Bill Ackerman, who returns for a yearly visit, this time to talk about the down & dirty gritty auteur Abel Ferrara. Usually for October, we try our best to talk about a horror director and though Ferrara isn't classified as one, you can certainly look at his films as being disturbing with some horrific scenes and well, THE ADDICTION does have vampires after all. Bill saw probably three times as much as I did though I managed to comment on about ten titles throughout the conversation. The ones everyone has likely seen are what we talk about at length including MS. 45, KING OF NEW YORK, BAD LIEUTENANT, TOMMASO and more! In addition, for the what we watched segment, Bill reviews WHEEL OF FORTUNE AND FANTASY and I bring up I bring up Mia Hansen-Love's BERGMAN ISLAND. 00:00 - 08:22 - Introduction 08:23 - 31:59 - What We Watched Recently 32:00 - 02:00:14 - Early Ferrara (up to The Addiction) 02:00:15 - 02:56:44 - Middle To Recent Ferrara 02:56:45 - 03:02:57 - Top Ferrara Films / Outro Check out Bill's podcast: https://nowplayingnetwork.net/supportingcharacters Follow Bill on Letterboxd: https://letterboxd.com/billackerman Ranked Letterboxd List For This Episode: https://letterboxd.com/jimlaczkowski/list/episode-193-abel-ferrara  

Behind the Mike: Conversations of Hope
#050 - Todd Morrison | A Profound Mercy: Finding Redemption in the Despair of Our Own Doing - Part 1

Behind the Mike: Conversations of Hope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 58:15


Todd grew up in a Christian family as a missionary kid. Then one day, his father told Todd that he was gay. His parents divorced and abandoned him. Todd became a high-end cocaine dealer until Jesus met him right were he was.We talk to Todd about his life and how he now sees that God was pursuing him every step of the way. Maybe you can relate to some of Todd's story; maybe you can't. Regardless, we are all in the same boat--we are all sinners who desperately need a Savior.  Listen to Todd's story and hear how there is hope for every one of us, regardless of what our past looks like.You can order Todd's book, "A Profound Mercy:  Finding Redemption in the Despair of our Own Doing" by visiting Todd's website or ordering directly on Amazon.Visit Todd's WebsiteSupport the show (https://buy.stripe.com/eVa02sdh33nU62s288)

Road to Resilience
Coming Home

Road to Resilience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 33:50


A ballet dancer's life spirals out of control—to addiction, homelessness, and prison. But with the help of somebody who's walked the road before, he's finding his way home.Iris Bowen is a social worker at the Coming Home Program at Mount Sinai Morningside, which provides re-entry support to people returning from incarceration.Dino Rivera is a patient at the program. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.The Coming Home Program is part of the Mount Sinai Institute for Advanced Medicine.https://www.mountsinai.org/patient-care/iam

WhyMe with Vera-Lee - Why Me?
I Just Dont Care with Vera-Lee

WhyMe with Vera-Lee - Why Me?

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 13:25


Vera-Lee brings the conversation around to that sometimes sticky, sometimes wonderful topic of emotions and how the rollercoaster ups and downs can be just as difficult to navigate as the apathetic "I just don't care about anything" often indicating other things that you really do care about that are causing this mood state.Do you know the difference between and dream and a goal? Spoiler alert! It's the movement! The action you take. That's the big secret. That's where the WhyMeMovement is all about the actions we take including the decisions we make - discovering the opportunities to grow and learn through adversity. Vera-Lee has a special interest in helping people on a weight loss  journey, particularly those who relate to morbid obesity, former/forever athletes, pre or post weight loss surgery, chronic illness and disability. Vera-Lee understands how to help you with the emotional and mental side of weight loss and conditioning, using a combination of techniques and allied professionals to best support your unique needs.She is a forever athlete who applies techniques for calm yet powerful coaching/mentoring sessions to help you achieve goals and improve your personal and professional confidence in every area of your life.If you really want to achieve results in your life and you are ready to commit to the process with Vera-Lee, who understands what it is like to overcome adversity, time and time again, you can book your discovery call now by clicking this link  to find out how she can help you overcome your obstacles and rediscover passion and confidence to set and achieve those goals you desire. Vera-Lee has a specific interest in helping others with discovering a new approach to weight loss for people with disabilities, chronic illness, and who have been and are forever athletes and now dealing with unfamiliar territory of weight issues after a competitive career.Vera-Lee provides one to one and group coaching Click here to start the conversation on social media with Vera-Lee and experience her unique ability to help guide you through to your optimal state of living. Vera-Lee is from Australia and has an extensive background in Education, Sports Coaching and Business Administration and Leadership with Management Consulting. If you thought of someone who might find value in this podcast episode today, you can share the link and use it as an opportunity to let this person know you are thinking of them today, continuing the connection and relationships that foster hope and togetherness.Support the podcast and movement with a small donation here or contact Vera-Lee to discuss a sponsorship for the show to help our impact reach even further and inspire, connect and empower more people who want to life life to their fullest capacity. We appreciate your support to help the ongoing costs involved with producing this show for people in over 20 countries (at the time of this release).Vera-Lee launched in the top 30 iTunes charts in multiple countries after her training and has a loyal and growing audience who love the content being produced. #whymemovement #wtflab #weightloss #adversityistheniche #whymegirl #chewtheflab #flabtalks #flabbyfriday #weightloss #theadversityqueen #mentalhealthwarriors #foreverathlete #whymewednesday #whymepodcast #embrace #inspire #empower #connect

You Are Not Alone - A Recovery Podcast
Traditions 10, 11 and 12

You Are Not Alone - A Recovery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 58:09


The 12 Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous are the framework for how the groups work.  According to the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous, "The '12 Traditions' of Alcoholics Anonymous are, we A.A.'s believe, the best answers to that our experience has yet given to those ever-urgent questions, 'How can A.A. best function?' and, 'How can A.A. best stay whole and so survive?'"As alcoholics, our person ambition and "good intentions," could turn this fellowship away from it's primary purpose, which is for us to stay sober.Tradition 10 - Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the AA name ought never be drawn into public controversyTradition 11 - Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, and films. Tradition 12 - Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles above personalities. John I and Steve C join to talk about the guardrails that help AA operate.Please help support the show by giving it a review and rating in Apple Podcasts.  Find Recovery Links, access to social media and email at https://notalonerecovery.com/Please share with friends and family.

Becoming Ultra
My First Ultra: 16 Catra Corbett

Becoming Ultra

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 73:23


Before Catra Corbett aka Dirt Diva was an ultrarunner, she was a drug addict.  The drugs led her to dropping out of school , developing an eating disorder, damaging relationships and eventually in jail.  Catra hit her rock bottom and decided she was going to turn her life around.  In 1996, two years after being clean and sober, she started lifting weights and walking.  One day she just started running and never stopped.  Catra has completed more than one-hundred 100-mile races, the Moab 240 multiple times, Bigfoot 200 and Badwater 135 and holds the fastest known time for the 425-mile-long John Muir Trail.  Through Catra's desire to help people by sharing her story she wrote a detailed bestselling book about her life, struggles and triumphs called Reborn on the Run; My Journey from Addiction to Ultramarathons.   Authentic!  That is the best word to describe Catra.  We could have talked to Catra for hours, she has a lot of life experience and wisdom to share.  On this episode Catra talks about her many running adventures and most recent experience at the Bigfoot 200.  The ultra-running world is lucky to have such a selfless runner out there.  This is a woman who really cares about the community and lifting people up.  We also discuss Catra's book and being vulnerable.  Of course, we had to talk about the one and only Truman.  Catra is someone that has a lot to offer and is finding new ways to help people who struggle with addiction.  We are big supporters and can't wait to see what she does.  I hope you enjoy this talk as much as we did. https://catracorbett.com/ IG: @dirtdiva333

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace
Addiction, Dependency, & Trauma

Illuminated with Jennifer Wallace

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 48:02


My lovely Co-Host, Elisabeth Kristof, is back with us again this week. We will be talking about our personal stories that we haven't expressed or talked about yet. That is our addictions and dependencies on substances other than our food habits. We will talk about the trauma and neurological components to addiction and give some helpful tools you can use for staying connected to your body.   In this episode, we share:  How compulsions are an adaptive response to providing relief The difference between dependence and addiction Physiological dependence vs. mental obsession Our struggle and recovery with addiction Understanding the neurology to better understand what is driving your addiction How substances can blanket your emotions Emotional dysregulation and flashbacks Always creating safety in yourself as well as your environment Ways to stay connected to your body using applied neurology and somatic practices Self compassion Don't go at it alone CPTSD    Work with Jennifer 25% Off a Private Coaching Session  Sign-up for the Newsletter  Become a Member & Support the Illuminated Podcast Athletic Greens ~ Exclusive Discount    Work with Elisabeth Get in on Elisabeth's exclusive Free Video Training - her proven step-by-step system to ZAP stress, RESOLVE anxiety, STOP pain, DROP unwanted behaviors and MAGNIFY clarity and focus.  It's easier than you think. If you can watch a video, you can heal your nervous system.  Go here to get your free videos now:  https://brainbased-wellness.com/register/free-subscription/   Resources From This Episode: Dr. Gabor Mate. In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts                            Wisdom of Trauma - Film    Connect with Jennifer Website Patreon YouTube Facebook Instagram   Connect with Elisabeth Website Instagram Facebook

Rooted by the Stream with Dr. Pam Morrison
The Healing of Lives Ravaged by Addiction with Jessica Stovall (80)

Rooted by the Stream with Dr. Pam Morrison

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 41:31


What is it really like to suffer with addiction? What are the spiritual and emotional needs? And how do we present Jesus to a resistant 12 step crowd? Church leader Jessica Stovall provides direction and wisdom. https://www.pammorrisonministries.com

Mayim Bialik's Breakdown
David Poses: Get to the Root of Addiction

Mayim Bialik's Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 55:59


David Poses (speaker, expert, activist, author of The Weight of Air) discusses the intersection of addiction and mental health. He opens up about becoming addicted to heroin in an attempt to treat his depression after learning about it in a school drug education program, and how he was able to function on and effectively hide his addiction to the drug. Mayim and David debate the benefits and disadvantages of 12-step programs and consider how society's need for instant gratification may contribute to the ongoing opioid epidemic. They discuss the need to change our perceptions about those with substance abuse issues and restructure the way we view mental illness in general. Mayim explains the effects of marijuana on depression in another installment of Ask Mayim Anything.David Poses' Book: https://davidposes.com/the-weight-of-airBialikBreakdown.comYouTube.com/mayimbialik

Heart of the Matter
Cheryl Burke of “Dancing with the Stars” on therapeutic honesty, addiction in the family and life in the spotlight

Heart of the Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 43:26


To the fans who watch her on their TV screens, Cheryl Burke leads the picture-perfect life, dancing her way across countless stages and starring on national broadcasts. However, there is more to the “Dancing with the Stars” competitor than may meet the eye: Beneath the impressive veneer is someone who is unafraid to open up about her struggles with alcohol, mental health and abuse. As a competitor, Cheryl was taught that showing emotions is a sign of weakness, and turned to alcohol as a way to soothe anxiety and uncertainty. Tune in as Elizabeth and Cheryl talk about the ways drinking fosters emotional disconnection, growing up with addiction in the family, the events that led Cheryl to put down alcohol for good and how she has come to find strength in vulnerability. Explore more on topics and themes discussed in this episode: When Addiction is in Your Family Tree Substance Use + Mental Health: Your Guide to Addressing Co-occurring Disorders I Know I Need to Take Care of Myself Too, but How? 

Sober is Dope
For The Love of Dogs and Sobriety with Zach Skow Founder of Marley's Mutts

Sober is Dope

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 59:15


Welcome to the Sober is Dope Podcast with your host, POP Buchanan. In this episode we cover topics on Sobriety, Rock Bottom, Recovery, Addiction, Service, 12 Steps, Love, Acceptance, and going back to the basics in recovery. Our special guest and sober superhero is the one and only Zach Skow; Founder of Marley's Mutts. https://www.marleysmutts.org/themanbehindthemutts/ Zach Skow was diagnosed with end stage liver disease in July of 2008. At this point, he didn't care much what that meant, only that he could continue living day to day as he had been-constantly drunk, constantly numb. Zach explains in hindsight that his inebriated state was his baseline-this was his normal, and a necessity to his everyday life. He needed to be drunk to drive, to work, and certainly to interact with other people, especially if those other people were new faces. Without alcohol, he was vulnerable and scared-much like the dogs he now rescues from shelters daily. When Zach walks into a shelter, he sees himself in the destitute dogs, and they in him. He knows intimately what it is like to feel worthless and unwanted. He felt like a "throwaway human", and to most people, the dogs in the most hard-knock shelters are throwaway dogs. He tells that he had begun a life dedicated to transformation, and the dogs were a parallel existence in which he could find meaning and progress that he often didn't find in himself. And now, these dogs and Zach work together, creating magic out of fear and rejection, lifting each other up and infusing an infinite amount of love into their surroundings wherever they may be. Zach's ultimate wakeup call came in October 2008, when he resolved to take on life without the crutch of alcohol. The inception of Marley's Mutts coincided with this decision. Through working with the Humane Society, Zach knew that he had a connection with rescue dogs and had fostered several, but he saw a hole in the world of rescue-no one was taking on the really tough cases. The giant Mastiffs, the mangled and mangy mutts, the aggressive and the scared. . . Marley's Mutts would be a home (albeit a temporary one) for these "undesirables." What happened in the process though is that Zach and the Marley's Mutts crew has begun to change the conversation surrounding these types of dogs. They relentlessly educate and inform their followers and fans (350,000 and growing!) to let them know that the dogs are not the problem, but the training and circumstance. The crew at Marley's Mutts provides training resources to dog owners too, to help prevent new problems from arising. The holistic approach to dog rescue extends even to the community and to their ambitious future goals. Marley's Mutts has plans to expand their human/ canine programs in which rescued dogs will help to rehabilitate people-prisoners, addicts, the mentally challenged. Zach calls the symbiotic relationship between the people and the dogs a "benevolent mechanism" which he experienced first hand, and plans to focus on and fully utilize in the future of the rescue. Today, Zach is healthy-he has worked hard to create a lifestyle in which his liver can heal, and his focus on a work of pure service keeps him grounded and connected to a purpose. Zach knows that he owes his life to the dogs, and through Marley's Mutts, he makes good on a daily debt of gratitude that is truly a labor of love and his life's highest calling. - IMDb Mini Biography By: Amy Klein Full Bio: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm6979155/bio Intro Zooland: https://youtu.be/ecUYguN2168 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/soberisdope/message