Podcasts about fort wayne

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City in Indiana

  • 609PODCASTS
  • 2,525EPISODES
  • 31mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 24, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about fort wayne

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Latest podcast episodes about fort wayne

South Bend's Own Words
David Healey and Les Lamon

South Bend's Own Words

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:27


Dr. Les Lamon was a long-time history Professor at IU South Bend. In 2000, he started the Freedom Summer class that brought students on a bus tour through the civil rights movement in the U.S. South. David Healey was a student in that class. Inspired by his experience, he became an early founding member of the Civil Rights Heritage Center on campus and led the early Oral History program. His efforts preserved the life stories of dozens of local people— the very stories we've shared on this podcast. David passed away in March 2010—two months too soon to see the results of his research and organizing to transform the former Engman Public Natatorium. In May 2009, Les and David were on a road trip to Fort Wayne—and Les turned on the tape recorder. He and David talked about their inspirations as white men to study the African American civil rights movement, and about forming and leading the early days of the Civil Rights Heritage Center. This episode was produced by Jweetu Pangani from the Ernestine M. Raclin School of the Arts at IU South Bend, and by George Garner from the Civil Rights Heritage Center. Full transcript of this episode available here. We're going to take a two-month break from releasing episodes so our IU South Bend student producers can concentrate on finishing their semester's classes. Look for a new year of local stories beginning January 26, 2022, with longtime firefighter, police officer, and Mayoral staffer Jack Reed. Want to learn more about South Bend's history? View the photographs and documents that helped create it. Visit Michiana Memory at http://michianamemory.sjcpl.org/. Title music, “History Explains Itself,” from Josh Spacek. Visit his page on the Free Music Archive, http://www.freemusicarchive.org/.

Bananas
Bananas Live in Fort Wayne!

Bananas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 78:44


It's Bananas live in Fort Wayne, Indiana! Kurt and Scotty talk about a man who declared his love using Rubik's Cubes, a man who ejaculates from his anus and urinates feces, a chicken who lived for months without a head and a Texas football coach's stripper girlfriend's monkey that bit a child! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1
INTERVIEW: Samuel Harness "The Voice"

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 6:29


How often do celebs text Samuel? Where can you see and hear him in Fort Wayne? Will he tour with John Legend?

PMI Validation Calls Podcast
Validation Call with Joe Atha of PMI Indianapolis in Indianapolis, Indiana

PMI Validation Calls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 63:13


In this validation call, Joe Atha of PMI Indianapolis and PMI Fort Wayne in Indianapolis, Indiana and Fort Wayne, Indiana shares his story about how he got started with property management with PMI after being in retail for twenty years and answers questions about his experience with PMI.

The Honestly Adoption Podcast
What Are Post-Adoption Services And Why Do Parents Need Them?

The Honestly Adoption Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 29:20


What happens after you adopt? Where (and how) do you find support? What about resources and training? In our latest episode of The Honestly Adoption Podcast, we discuss all of this. Besides finding a community of like-minded parents and caregivers, there is no greater need than post-adoption services after you finalize your child's adoption. But where do you find these services. We are excited to welcome Shalesta Peterson from SAFY to the show to talk about the great importance of post-adoption services! A little more about Shalesta and SAFY... Shalesta Peterson is the Adoption Services Coordinator for SAFY. Based in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Shalesta works with families to navigate the process of adopting youth from foster care. Strong families are the foundation of strong communities, but all families encounter storms. SAFY is there to help weather these disruptions of life. They provide the tools needed to support the well-being of families ensuring everyone can reach their potential and fully participate in their communities. During the episode we discussed... The process of adoption through foster care versus traditional adoption The unique needs of older youth and sibling groups eligible for adoption through the foster care system Why families considering adoption should consider adopting through foster care as they embark on their adoption journey. How to connect with Shalesta and SAFY... Visit the SAFY website Follow SAFY on Instagram Connect with SAFY on Facebook Visit the SAFY blog Also on the show... Want More AMAZING Honestly Adoption Podcast Content? Become a VIP Member! When you're a VIP Member you get access to exclusive bonuses NOT available to the general audience. Click Here to learn more. AND...the first 1000 listeners who sign up will receive All Access to our entire Honestly Adoption University library (100 hours+ of training content and certificates) Thanks for stopping by this week ;-)

Not Without My Sister
REVISITED: Ghosted and Gaslit – It's the Online Dating Episode, Straight from the Archives

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 57:33


We're taking another short stroll down memory lane as we count down to our grand return on December 6th. This is the eighth ever episode of Not Without My Sister, in which we revisit some of our most heartbreaking and humiliating online dating moments (oh, there are many more than we can recount).Not Without My Sister is still uploading NEW content on Patreon each and every Friday, so if you miss us terribly and wish to support us throughout this short sojourn, head over there and sign up for €4.50/month: http://www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister***Beatrice and Rosemary sat down to chat through their experiences online dating: Beatrice was an early adopter, starting out when she lived in Paris, using an online dating site called Meetic, while Rosemary has more recent experience getting ghosted (and then gaslit) by a friend of a friend back home in Dublin.Not Without My Sister is now on Facebook! Sort of. Search 'Not Without My Sister' to join our Facebook group where we will hopefully be discussing topics that come up on the show, giving advice, getting advice and sharing things that we love on the internet. We would LOVE to hear your online dating stories! Share on Facebook, Instagram, tweet Rosemary or email notwithoutmysis@gmail.com!Be sure to head to our Instagram @notwithoutmysister for regular competitions, updates and more.Follow Rosemary on Twitter and Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is on Instagram @beatricemaccabe.***Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The podcast is produced by Liam Geraghty. Sound editing and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. Not Without My Sister is a production of The Warren. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dental Digest
94. Dr. Jay Platt - Analgesics, Antibiotics, MRONJ and Oral Sugery

Dental Digest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 57:16


In this episode, board certified oral maxillofacial surgeon Dr. Jay Platt will discuss analgesics, how to prescribe antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, new guidelines related to antibiotics, MRONJ, oral pathology and more.  Jay Platt, DDS is originally from Fort Wayne, graduating from high school in 1979. From there he spent three years at Indiana University in Bloomington and entered Indiana University School of Dentistry in 1983. After graduating from IUSD in 1986 he did a one-year general practice residency at the Indiana University Medical Center. From 1987-1990 he did an Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeon Residency at the IU Medical Center, gaining his certificate in 1990. In 1992, Dr. Platt became Board Certified by the American Board of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and has maintained it since.  He was awarded fellowship in the American College of Dentists and he is a member of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Dental Association, Indiana Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Northwest Indiana Dental Society, he is a diplomate of the National Dental Board of Anesthesiology, and a member of the International College of Oral Implantologists. He is a past member of the Board of the Northwest Indiana Dental Society and past President of the Indiana Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. He is on faculty at Spear Education and speaks regularly at the AAOMS annual meeting in addition to the AAOMS Dental Implant Conference.  Dr. Platt practices all phases of oral and maxillofacial surgery concentrating on all types of extractions, placement of dental implants, exposure of impacted teeth, pathology and corrective jaw surgery. He has great interest and experience in intraoral bone grafts and placement of dental implants. As the founder of the Northwest Indiana Dental Implant Study Club he has been a leader in the area of dental implants for many years. He maintains two Spear Study clubs as well. The use of Nitrous Oxide and IV anesthetics in the office to allow for maximum patient comfort is a big part of his practice. Dr. Platt currently resides in Munster with his wife Bobbie.

Not Without My Sister
REVISITED: You Better Work, B – The Inside Track on Beatrice's Career (Thus Far)

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 46:46


On this, the sixth episode of Not Without My Sister EVER, Beatrice talked about how she got to where she is now in her career as a fashion designer – and what she learned along the way! We're on our mini maternity leave until December, so thank you for bearing with us as we stroll down memory lane and give a little glimpse into what people get over on Patreon! Because we're still uploading NEW content there each and every Friday, so if you miss us terribly and wish to support us throughout this transition, head over there and sign up for €4.50/month: http://www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister**Ever wanted a little more insight into Beatrice's career? Here's your opportunity to trace the route she took on her career in fashion design.Beatrice graduated from her joint course in History of Art and Fashion Design at NCAD in the very early 2000s. From there she's been almost all the way around the world, from Milan to Paris, New York to Dallas and finally (we hope!) ending up in Fort Wayne, Indiana. She recounts her journey through the fashion world.Things we mention:Here's a piece on Marni from the Business of FashionAn example of some of the high theatre Bea worked on at John Galliano (menswear AW 2008/2009)One of Bea's proudest moments: her 'Stephanie' bag design worn by fashion royaltyer, MTV's "reality" TV show, The City***Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The podcast is produced by Liam Geraghty. Sound editing and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. Not Without My Sister is a production of The Warren. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Binder Boneyard Podcast
Harvester Homecoming Recap

The Binder Boneyard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 24:42


Dan talks about his recent trip to Fort Wayne, Indiana for Harvester Homecoming. The Binder Boneyard Podcast is hosted by Dan Hayes and produced by Brad Parsons. Music by Bradley Parsons
Support the show on Patreon:
www.patreon.com/thebinderboneyardpodcast
Follow The Binder Boneyard on social media:
Instagram: @thebinderboneyard
Facebook: The Binder Boneyard
www.thebinderboneyard.com
www.trainsoundstudio.com

Can't Beat Kylie
Cody from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 4:53


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Can't Beat Kylie
Nathan from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 4:17


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

State Champs! Network
Previewing Section Semifinals | Indiana Extra Point

State Champs! Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 16:48


Greg Rakestraw and Bob Stambazze are back again to talk about high school football in the Hoosier state on the STATE CHAMPS! Indiana Extra Point Podcast. Who is hot and who is not, from the circle city to Fort Wayne and everything in-between, Greg and Bob recap the first round sectionals and preview the sectional semis of the 2021 fall football postseason. Presented by Lawrence Technological University

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Hymns of the Green Season (Rebroadcast)

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 12:09


Matt Machemer, Associate Kantor with Concordia Theological Seminary in Fort Wayne, Indiana, joins Andy and Sarah to talk about just a few of the hymns we sing in the "Green Season" of the church and why they are great ones to sing, including Lutheran Service Book 536, 541, and 552. This is a rebroadcast from August 1, 2019.

Can't Beat Kylie
Tyler from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 4:15


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Gottesdienst Crowd
TGC 144 — On Observing the Reformation

The Gottesdienst Crowd

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 69:59


In this Gottescast, The Gottesdienst Crowd discusses how one is to understand the Lutheran Reformation and how we thus observe it liturgically. David Petersen (pastor of Redeemer Lutheran Church, Fort Wayne, IN, and author of the recurring column "Commentary on the War" in the Gottesdienst Journal) joins us for the discussion. You can read Bugenhagen's sermon for Luther's funeral here: http://luther.digitalscholarship.emory.edu/luther/luther_site/luther_frame.html You can read Hamann's essay here: http://mercyjourney.blogspot.com/2012/12/the-false-antithesis-not-lutheran-but.html You can read Stuckwisch's LSB Core Hymnody post here: http://sword-in-hat.blogspot.com/2007/08/lsb-core-hymnody-kernlieder.html You can subscribe to the Journal here: https://www.gottesdienst.org/subscribe/ You can read the Gottesblog here: https://www.gottesdienst.org/gottesblog/ You can support Gottesdienst here: https://www.gottesdienst.org/make-a-donation/ As always, we, at The Gottesdienst Crowd, would be honored if you would Subscribe, Rate, and Review. Thanks for listening and thanks for your support. 

Not Without My Sister
BONUS! From the Patreon: This Old Thing?!

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 36:06


We promised to share some until-now exclusive-to-Patreon content while we're on our little maternity leave, so please enjoy this super extra bonus episode where we talk about just how brilliant we are at taking compliments – and how you, too, can be brilliant like us! If you'd like to support the podcast, you can do so over on Patreon where it's business (almost) as usual and our patrons are getting a brand spanking new episode each and every Friday for the months of October and November. http://www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysisterHow good are you at taking compliments? And, more importantly, how good are you at giving them?We're talking about the age-old dilemma of how to take a compliment in this week's Patreon-only episode of Not Without My Sister, which we hope will leave you feeling confident enough to graciously accept any and all compliments that come your way.***Things we mention include:the concept of "dressing up for one's husband"what kind of compliments qualify as compliments? Is being told your dress is lovely as complimentary as being told you're funny, or smart, or a great hugger?Here's a piece from VICE on what it means if you struggle to take a compliment We mention negging, and in case you're not sure what that means… here's Healthline on just that Rosemary's rave thread on Tattle Red Sparrow, Jennifer Laurence's second best movie (after The Hunger Games) which, despite what Rosemary says, does not star Jeremy Renner. It's Joel EdgertonRobin Hood: Prince of Thieves (in which Kevin Costner was 35 years old)the concept of the compliment sandwich Leandra Medine's interview on The Cutting Room Floor If you are one of those elusive people that accepts a compliment like a pro, please, share your secrets with us! ***You can follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is at facebook.com/notwithoutmysister!For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. This episode was edited by Tall Tales, talltales.ie. Sound and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

2 Dads 1 Dutt: The Hot Takes Podcast
Episode 5-- One Thing From the Government, How Much to Off Someone, the Deer Park St Patricks Day Tent Ticket Conundrum, Top 3 Back to the Future, Hot Take of the Week

2 Dads 1 Dutt: The Hot Takes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 70:45


On this episode we discuss if you could learn one thing from the government, how much you would pay to off someone, Fort Wayne staples, the deer park st pattys day tent ticket situation, will phones become mechanical robot people, Top 3 if you could time travel with Doc and Marty in the DeLorean, Dutt and Sker have the worst take on changing 9/11, Mortal locks, and Hot Take of the Week: Abercrombie, Hollister, American Eagle, Aeropostle takeover

Scarlet Raven from Fort Wayne IN, Dayseye from Apple Valley CA, Eowyn from Reston VA

" Reluctant Radio syndicated radio show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 30:00


Filmmakers On
The Weekly Reid - How Does J. Horton Make Movies that Make Money?

Filmmakers On

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 56:11


Sean Reid, filmmaker (producer, director, writer) talks to a new guest in the world of independent cinema and content creation every week. This week's inaugural guest is our very own J. Horton.Sean Reid is a veteran Producer/Director/Writer of feature films, television programming, news and music specials. His television experience includes management roles at E! NEWS LIVE (E!), as well as, producer positions on the THE ROB NELSON SHOW (Fox), and SQUARE OFF (TV Guide Channel) and CENTRAL AVE (Fox).In addition to running his own production company New Cinema Tribe and a new streaming network WORLD ONE TV, he and J. Horton have produced several features together, including DEATHDAY, BAD EYES, BROWN VIBES: THE STORY OF REDEMPTION, RYHMECOLOGY: WRITE BETTER RHYMES and several upcoming features.THE WEEKLY REID is a live stream, filmmaking interview show. New Cinema Tribe - www.newcinematribe.comWorld One TV - www.worldonetv.com***CORRECTION - I was way off on Fort Wayne's Population. i think I said a few million in the interview. 'Fort Wayne's 2021 population is now estimated at 341,428. In 1950, the population of Fort Wayne was 141,179. Fort Wayne has grown by 1,807 since 2015, which represents a 0.53% annual change.'0:00 The Weekly Reid0:45 Alec Baldwin Shooting Tragedy2:20 becoming a filmmaker5:10 most important lesson from Film School7:30 from Film School to Professional Filmmaker12:55 importance of doing diverse work15:40 budget ranges and shoot lengths18:45 striking out on your own as a producer21:56 getting into documentaries23:25 rereleasing older movies27:20 why i like documentary filmmaking29:30 documentary collaborations32:13 how bad amazon has hurt35:31 distribution strategy in 202238:05 getting back into narrative films39:40 desert island tv series40:22 why did you start a youtube channel43:00 what has youtube taught you45:10 Five questions48:00 best part of being a pro filmmaker48:35 coming up on this channel51:10 netflix and dave chappellSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/thejhorton)

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
History of the Book of Concord

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 26:20


The Rev. Dr. Cameron MacKenzie, Forest E. and Frances H. Ellis Professor of Historical Theology at Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, Indiana joins Andy to share some insights on the history of the Lutheran Confessions that make up the Book of Concord and reflects on how these confessions are still very important to the Church today. Read his article, “Unity in the Church by Confessing Together God's Truth, A History of the Book of Concord” in the October 2021 issue of The Lutheran Witness. Find LW online and subscribe at witness.lcms.org.

Can't Beat Kylie
Brandi from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 5:28


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Grounded with Jim Banks
Episode 32 - City Councilman Tom Didier

Grounded with Jim Banks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 43:57


This week on “Grounded with Jim Banks,” Mr. Fort Wayne, a.k.a. longtime Fort Wayne City Councilman Tom Didier shares stories with Congressman Jim Banks about growing up in Northeast Indiana. They also discuss how a city on the rise can keep growing while improving the lives of its residents.  

State Champs! Network
Regular Season Finale | Extra Point Indiana

State Champs! Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 19:03


Greg Rakestraw and Bob Stambazze are back again to talk about high school football in the Hoosier state on the STATE CHAMPS! Indiana Extra Point Podcast. Who is hot and who is not, from the circle city to Fort Wayne and everything in-between, Greg and Bob recap week 9 and preview the first round sectionals of the 2021 fall football postseason. Presented by Lawrence Technological University

Can't Beat Kylie
Judy from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 4:15


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1
Where's Kat's Halloween Costume & Andy Wants The Sweetwater Hotel

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 23:04


Halloween Costume Bet Update: Where is Kat's "Squid Game" Halloween Costume? Will It Arrive in Time? Bosses Day Follow Up, Stats about those who admit to sleeping/flirting with their boss. Which professions do it the most? Andy's story about couples who have secret bank accounts...one guy won the lottery and never told his wife so that she wouldn't spend the earnings. Plus, Andy was sad to see the Ramada Hotel closed in Fort Wayne...Should that be a new Sweetwater Hotel?

Can't Beat Kylie
Jill from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 3:45


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1
Bonus Interview: "100 Things To Do In Fort Wayne Before You Die" - Terri Richardson

Andy In The Morning - Majic 95.1

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 5:19


Local Fort Wayne author Terri Richardson authors "100 Things To Do In Fort Wayne Before You Die". How many do you think you will know?  Amazon Link: https://www.amazon.com/100-Things-Fort-Wayne-Before/dp/1681063182/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=100+things+to+do+in+fort+wayne&qid=1634313029&sr=8-1#detailBullets_feature_div

Can't Beat Kylie
Tiffany from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 4:48


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Can't Beat Kylie
Alex from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 4:07


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Not Without My Sister
BONUS! From the Patreon: A Book Recommendations Bonanza!

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 40:28


We promised to share some until-now-exclusive-to-Patreon content while on maternity leave, so please enjoy this episode where we detail a few of the books we've read and loved of late! If you'd like to support the podcast, you can do so over on Patreon where it's business (almost) as usual and our patrons are getting a brand new episode every Friday. patreon.com/notwithoutmysisterWe received a DM this week that read, and I quote: "Could you and/or Bea PLEEEAAAASSSSEEEE SHARE SOME BOOKS ♥️♥️" It strikes me (Rosemary) now that I may have misquoted this person but sure look here we are now with a WHOPPER list of books we'd recommend. In case you don't have a pen to hand, we have even listed all of the books we mention below. Enjoy!***Mary Beth Keane, Ask Again YesJonathan Franzen, The CorrectionsRichard RussoTana French, The Wych ElmJohn Irving, A Prayer for Owen MeanyRichard Yates, Revolutionary RoadJames Baldwin, Giovanni's RoomSarah Turnbull, Almost FrenchMaggie O'Farrell, HamnetThe Twilight trilogyFifty Shades of GreyJim Butcher's Dresden Files seriesAll of Louise Bagshawe's sexy romancesFrank Herbert, DuneLee Child's Jack Reacher series (don't mention Tom Cruise)Michael Connelly's Bosch seriesJohn ConnollyJulia Keller's Bell Elkins seriesJo NesboHenning Mankell's Kurt Wallander seriesJM Coetzee, DisgraceJanet Evanovich's Stephanie Plum seriesFirefly Lane (the TV show, but it's based on the novel by Kristin Hannah!)Colum McCann, Let the Great World SpinJohn BanvilleColm TóibínRaven Leilani, LusterRebecca Roanhorse, Trail of Lightning and Storm of LocustsBrit Bennett, The Vanishing HalfDelia Owens, Where the Crawdads SingGlennon Doyle, UntamedYoko Ogawa, The Memory PoliceKazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the DayColm Tóibín, The MasterSophie White, Filter This and UnfilteredRichard Russo, Empire FallsPhilipp Meyer, American RustArt Spiegelman, MausBrian K Vaughan and Pia Guerra's Y: The Last ManBizarrely, the trailer for The Matrix 4 Jane AustenEdith WhartonThe 1995 mini-series, The Buccaneers starring Carla GuginoEnid BlytonLouise Lawrence, Children of the Dust***Follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is at facebook.com/notwithoutmysister!For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. This episode was edited by Tall Tales, talltales.ie. Sound and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Can't Beat Kylie
Ali from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 4:21


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Can't Beat Kylie
Cody from Fort Wayne

Can't Beat Kylie

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 4:38


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Face the Fear Podcast
Episode #27 - Cash Value Life Insurance with Austin Ash and Thomas Losher

Face the Fear Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 55:31


Thomas Losher and Austin Ash are two innovative experts in the cash value life insurance space and young leaders within their organization. From growing up together as kids in Fort Wayne, IN to pioneering the future of insurance as colleagues, Thomas and Austin have developed a steadfast friendship centered on challenging one another to become their best selves. In this episode, they share their unique perspective on the value of life insurance and its importance in an overall financial plan for people of all ages.   We cover topics like:  What exactly is cash value life insurance? How does it work and why would someone want to consider it as a part of their financial plan?  Are there downsides to having cash value life insurance?  Can you access funds in a cash value life insurance policy? What does that look like, and how does it affect the policy long-term?   What is tax diversification and why is it important, specifically as it applies to our generation – Millennials and Gen Z?  Connect with Thomas Losher: LinkedIn  Connect with Austin Ash: LinkedIn  Face The Fear:  Instagram  Facebook  Twitter  Website   P.S. Kaitlyn Duchien, Austin Ash, and Thomas Losher are registered representatives of First Palladium, LLC, Member FINRA and a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ash Brokerage, LLC. Supervising office located at 888 S. Harrison Street, Suite 900, Fort Wayne, IN 46802. 800-589-3000. Content provided is for informational use only and is not to be constituted as financial advice. 

Hello, World! Podcast
Hello World Wed 10-6-21

Hello, World! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:30


Hello World! Join us as our host, Dr. Greg Patten, brings us news and comment again today. Dr. Patten is pastor of The Cross Church in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and brings us Hello World each weekday. Do you have questions for Greg about the program? Please visit his website for more at www.GregPatten.com. Thank you for listening! Support the show: http://www.whcbradio.org See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hello, World! Podcast
Hello World Tues 10-5-21

Hello, World! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:28


Hello World! Join us as our host, Dr. Greg Patten, brings us news and comment again today. Dr. Patten is pastor of The Cross Church in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and brings us Hello World each weekday. Do you have questions for Greg about the program? Please visit his website for more at www.GregPatten.com. Thank you for listening! Support the show: http://www.whcbradio.org See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Not Without My Sister
REVISITED: Santa, his ceramics and THOSE Pucci pants!

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 55:51


We're on maternity leave – but we still wanted to give you a little reminder that Not Without My Sister exists! So here's our number one episode of all time, as voted for by YOU: episode 12, Sense & Stupidity, with a new intro tacked on to the old (but much beloved) episode! Thank you so much for bearing with us over these few weeks as we take a little time off and readjust to the newest Mac Cabe on the block. We're still uploading NEW content to our Patreon each and every Friday, so if you miss us terribly and wish to support us throughout this transition, head over there and sign up for €4.50/month: http://www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister***How many times have you thought to yourself, Jesus, I'm lucky I survived that? If you're anything like us, it's more times than you can count on two hands.Beatrice and Rosemary Mac Cabe chat about what could have been near-death experiences: moments of idiocy and, frankly, complete disregard for our own personal safety that ended well – but possibly should have ended very, very badly.***Cultural (ish) mentions in this episode include:The Joe Rogan Experience (podcast)Spencer & VogueGlennon Doyle's Untamed (follow Rosemary on Goodreads here)Coyote Ugly, the formative film of Rosemary's teenage years***You can follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is here! For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Our producer is Liam Geraghty. Sound editing and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. Not Without My Sister is a member of The Warren, the home of great Irish podcasts. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Know the faith.  Defend the faith.
Growing In Faith With Exodus 90 | With Nathaniel Binversie

Know the faith. Defend the faith.

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 20:54


What is #exodus90 and how does it assist men in growing in #faith. Exodus 90 is a 90-day Catholic #spiritualexercise for men that offers a challenging journey through the book of Exodus based on three pillars: prayer, asceticism, and fraternity. The men's movement continues to expand — reaching more than 50,000 men of all generations and stages of their faith journey. Exodus 90 summons men back to the foundations of their faith in order for them to experience freedom from worldly addictions to better love those entrusted to their care. Learn more on their website at www.exodus90.com. About Nathaniel Binversie: Nathaniel Binversie serves as the Director of Content for Exodus. Nathaniel graduated from the University of St. Thomas in Saint Paul, Minnesota where he spent two years in formation at St. John Vianney Seminary. Nathaniel began his career serving one year as Campus Minister at the University of Utah. Leading up to his time with Exodus 90, he has spent the past three years serving as a missionary with FOCUS, the Fellowship of Catholic University Students. Nathaniel joins Exodus with a master's degree in Theology from the Augustine Institute. Nathaniel lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana with his wife Sherry, their daughters Lucia and Annie. They attend St. John the Baptist Parish.

The We Can't Wrestle Podcast
Episode 147: On Location

The We Can't Wrestle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 61:05


This week, we are on location at the Heroes and Legends Wrestling convention in Fort Wayne, Indiana. We discuss "legends" of the business and much more. Enjoy wrestling fans!! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Hello, World! Podcast
Hello World 10/1/21

Hello, World! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 25:04


Hello World! Join us as our host, Dr. Greg Patten, brings us news and comment again today. Dr. Patten is pastor of The Cross Church in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and brings us Hello World each weekday. Do you have questions for Greg about the program? Please visit his website for more at www.GregPatten.com. Thank you for listening! Support the show: http://www.whcbradio.org See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Unfound
Episode 270: Kevin Nguyen: The Telephone Game

Unfound

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 139:28


Kevin Nguyen was a 25 year old from Fort Wayne, IN. He was a college student and avid gamer. In the early morning of Dec. 9, 2018, Kevin got kicked out of a bar after acting strangely and getting into fights with the bouncers allegedly. Kevin was then seen on video walking in the direction of his house. He was never seen again.Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/groups/1634656216833940https://www.facebook.com/AznPursuationCharley Project:https://charleyproject.org/case/kevin-n-nguyenNAMUS:https://www.namus.gov/MissingPersons/Case#/54509?navYouTube Map Analysis:https://youtu.be/X7nox5rwHeUArticle:https://www.wane.com/top-stories/nearly-2-and-a-half-later-missing-fort-wayne-mans-family-still-seeking-answers/If you have any information regarding the disappearance of Kevin Nguyen, please contact the Fort Wayne Police Department at (260) 427-1201.Unfound supports accounts on Pandora, Audible, Podomatic, iTunes, Spotify, iHeart, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Deezer, and YouTube.--speaking of YouTube, on Wednesday nights at 9pm ET, please join us for the Unfound Live Show. All of you can talk with me and I can answer your questions.--Contribute to Unfound at Patreon.com/unfounpodcast.--You can also contribute at Paypal: paypal.me/unfoundpodcast--I also need to give a shout out to all the people who have monetarily contributed usingSuperChat during the Live Show on Wednesday nights.--thank you for watching and thank you for donating.--the email address: unfoundpodcast@gmail.com.--Merchandise:--The books at Amazon.com in both ebook and print form.--do not forget the reviews.--shirts at unfound-podcast.myshopify.com--or you can track down my assistant Heather in the Facebook Group.--playing cards at makeplayingcards.com/sell/unfoundpodcast--the website: the unfoundpodcast.com--And please mention Unfound at all true crime websites and forums. Thank you

A Walk Back To Self-Love with Amber Huyghe
Women in politics: A seat at the table with Stephanie Crandall

A Walk Back To Self-Love with Amber Huyghe

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 48:57


I had the pleasure of sitting down and chatting with the City of Fort Wayne's Director of Intergovernmental Affairs, Stephanie Crandall. She has spent the last 8 years providing strategic counsel regarding how the city works with all levels of government- local, state, and federal. Stephanie is also a passionate advocate for good governing and policies that make her community a better place. She loves to help women realize the value they add through public service. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/awalkbacktoselflove/support

Not Without My Sister
61 – The Art of the Navigator

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 41:56


How good are you at navigating? You know, with a map – or Google Maps, more commonly – from the passenger seat of the car. Can you stay calm? Can you elicit calm in the driver? Do you regularly f*ck up and have to apologise for meandering down country roads? You'll be shocked to know that one of us thinks we're a great navigator! And one of us knows we're not. One of us likes to navigate themselves. (One of us likes to direct everyone else.) One of us, too (bizarrely) seems to be advocating for the return of the paper map (serious Boomer vibes). Plus, some serious throwing under the bus of one of our parents (probably not the one you think).If you like the podcast, please consider supporting us on Patreon! For the price of a fancy coffee (€4.50/month) you'll get an exclusive weekly bonus episode each and every Friday, along with our main feed Tuesday episodes EARLY and absolutely ad-free! www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister***You can follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is at facebook.com/notwithoutmysister!For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. This episode was edited by Tall Tales, talltales.ie. Sound and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Breaking the Ice
Following Her Dreams with Stephanie Jones

Breaking the Ice

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 70:16


Stephanie Jones, wife of Connor Jones, who plays for the Fort Wayne Komets in the ECHL, joins us on the podcast today. Stephanie and her husband have been together since 2017 and she has never moved with him for the hockey season. He's been with the Islanders, Bridgeport Sound Tigers, HC Thurgau in Switzerland and Vasterviks, IK in Sweden. Stephanie is passionate to share with other women in our community about the possibilities of making long distance work and sharing her experience of having the power + drive to build her career in NYC. Stephanie is a producer for ABC on a show called Nightline. Her and Connor are expecting their first baby in February, while she is living in New York + he is in Fort Wayne.   On top of it all, her husband has an identical twin and they have played together on almost every team. In this episode, we all agree that whichever path you take in this hockey life, whether you go with or hang back, trust yourself and your decisions!   www.instagram.com/breakingtheicepod www.instagram.com/stephanie.df.jones 

Raw Data By P3
Jeff Sagarin

Raw Data By P3

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 86:06


There's a place where sports and data meet, and it's as powerful a collision as on any football field!  Jeff Sagarin has been a figurehead in the sports analytics realm for decades, and we're thrilled to have had the chance to have him on to talk about his data journey!  There's a fair mix of math AND sports geek out time in this episode.  And, did we mention that Dr. Wayne Winston is sitting in on this episode as well? References in this Episode: 2 Frictionless Colliding Boxes Video Scorigami Episode Transcript: Rob Collie (00:00:00): Hello, friends. Today's guest is Jeff Sagarin. Is that name familiar to you? It's very familiar to me. In my life, Jeff's work might very well be my first brush with the concept of using data for any sort of advantage. His Power Ranking Columns, first appeared in USA Today in 1985, when I was 11 years old. And what a fascinating concept that was. Rob Collie (00:00:29): It probably won't surprise you if I confess that 11-year-old me was not particularly good at sports, but I was still fascinated and captivated by them. 11-year-old kids in my neighborhood were especially prone to associating sports with their tribal identity. Everyone had their favorite teams, their favorite sports stars. And invariably, this led to arguments about which sports star was better than the other sports star, who was going to win this game coming up and who would win a tournament amongst all of these teams and things of that sort. Rob Collie (00:01:01): Now that I've explained it that way though, I guess being an adult sports fan isn't too terribly different, is it? Those arguments, of course, aren't the sorts of arguments where there's anything resembling a clear winner. But in practice, the person who won was usually the one with the loudest voice or the sickest burn that they could deliver to their friends. And then in 1985, the idea was planted in my head by Jeff Sagarin's column in USA Today, that there actually was a relatively objective way to evaluate teams that had never played against one another and likely never would. Rob Collie (00:01:33): I wasn't into computers at the time. I certainly wasn't into the concept of data. I didn't know what a database was. I didn't know what a spreadsheet was. And yet, this was still an incredibly captivating and powerful idea. So in my life, Jeff Sagarin is the first public figure that I encountered in the sports analytics industry long before it was cool. And because it was sports, a topic that was relevant to 11-year-old me, he's really also my first brush with analytics at all. Rob Collie (00:02:07): It's not surprising then, that to me, Jeff is absolutely a celebrity. As a guest, in insider podcasting lingo, Jeff is what we call a good get. We owe that pleasure, of course, to him being close friends with Wayne Winston, a former guest on the show, who also joined us today as co-guest. Rob Collie (00:02:28): Now, if none of that speaks to you, let's try this alternate description. He's probably also the world's most famous active FORTRAN programmer. I admit that I was so starstruck by this that I didn't even really push as hard as I normally would, in terms of getting into the techniques that he uses. I didn't want to run afoul of asking him for trade secrets. At times, this conversation did devolve into four dudes sitting around talking about sports. Rob Collie (00:02:59): But setting that aside, there are some really, really interesting and heartwarming things happening in this conversation as well. Again, the accidental path to where he is today, the intersection of persistence and good fortune that's required really for success in anything. Bottom line, this is the story of a national and highly influential figure at the intersection of the sports industry and the analytics industry for more than three decades. It's not every day you get to hear that story. So let's get into it. Announcer (00:03:34): Ladies and gentlemen, may I have your attention, please? Announcer (00:03:39): This is the Raw Data by P3 Adaptive podcast with your host, Rob Colley and your co-host, Thomas LaRock. Find out what the experts at P3 Adaptive can do for your business. Just go to p3adaptive.com. Raw Data by P3 Adaptive is data with the human element. Rob Collie (00:04:02): Welcome to the show, Jeff Sagarin. And welcome back to the show. Wayne Winston. So thrilled to have the two of you with us today. This is awesome. We've been looking forward to this for a long time. So thank you very much gentlemen, for being here. Jeff Sagarin (00:04:16): You're welcome. Rob Collie (00:04:18): Jeff, usually we kick these things off with, "Hey, tell us a little about yourself, your background, blah, blah, blah." Let's start off with me telling you about you. It's a story about you that you wouldn't know. I remember for a very long time being aware of you. Rob Collie (00:04:35): So I'm 47 years old, born in 1974. My father had participated for many years in this shady off-the-books college football pick'em pool that was run out of the high school in a small town in Florida. Like the sheets with everybody's entries would show up. They were run on ditto paper, like that blue ink. It was done in the school ditto room and he did this every year. This was like the most fascinating thing that happened in the entire year to me. Like these things showing up at our house, this packet of all these picks, believe it or not, they were handwritten. These grids were handwritten with everyone's picks. It was ridiculous. Rob Collie (00:05:17): He got eliminated every year. There were a couple of hundred entries every year and he just got his butt kicked every year. But then one year, he did his homework. He researched common opponents and things like that or that kind of stuff. I seem to recall this having something to do timing wise with you. So I looked it up. Your column first appeared in USA Today in 1985. Is that correct? Jeff Sagarin (00:05:40): Yeah. Tuesday, January 8th 1985. Rob Collie (00:05:44): I remember my dad winning this pool that year and using the funds to buy a telescope to look at Halley's Comet when it showed up. And so I looked up Halley's Comet. What do you know? '86. So it would have been like the January ballgames of 1986, where he won this pool. And in '85, were you power ranking college football teams or was that other sports? Jeff Sagarin (00:06:11): Yes. Rob Collie (00:06:12): Okay. So when my dad said that he did his research that year, what he really did was read your stuff. You bought my dad a telescope in 1986 so that we could go have one of the worst family vacations of all time. It was just awful. Thank you. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:31): You're very welcome. Rob Collie (00:06:39): I kind of think of you as the first publicly known figure in sports analytics. You probably weren't the first person to apply math and computers to sports analytics, but you're the first person I heard of. Jeff Sagarin (00:06:51): There is a guy that people don't even talk about very much. Now a guy named Earnshaw Cook, who first inspired me when I was a sophomore in high school in the '63-'64 school year, there was an article by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated about Earnshaw Cook publishing a book called Percentage Baseball. So I convinced my mom to let me have $10 to order it by mail and I got it. I started playing around with his various ideas in it. He was the first guy I ever heard of and that was in March of 1964. Rob Collie (00:07:28): All right, so everyone's got an origin story. Jeff Sagarin (00:07:31): The Dunkel family started doing the Dunkel ratings back I believe in 1929. Then there was a professor, I think he was at Vanderbilt, named [Lipkin House 00:07:41], he was I think at Vanderbilt. And for years, he did the high school ratings in states like maybe Tennessee and Kentucky. I think he gave Kentucky that Louisville courier his methodology before he died. But I don't know if they continue his work or not. But there were people way before me. Rob Collie (00:08:03): But they weren't in USA Today. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:04): That's true. Rob Collie (00:08:06): They weren't nationally distributed, like on a very regular basis. I've been hearing your name longer than I've even been working with computers. That's pretty crazy. How did you even get hooked up with USA Today? Jeff Sagarin (00:08:23): People might say, "You got lucky." My answer, as you'll see as well, I'd worked for 12 years to be in a position to get lucky. I started getting paid for doing this in September of 1972 with an in-house publication of pro football weekly called Insider's Pro Football Newsletter. Jeff Sagarin (00:08:45): In the Spring of '72, I'd written letters to like 100 newspapers saying because I had started by hand doing my own rating system for pro football in the fall of 1971. Just by hand, every Sunday night, I'd get the scores and add in the Monday night. I did it as a hobby. I wasn't doing it for a living. I did it week by week and charted the teams. It was all done with some charts I'd made up with a normal distribution and a slide rule. So I sent out letters in the spring of '72 to about 100 papers saying, "Hey, would you be interested in running my stuff?" Jeff Sagarin (00:09:19): They either didn't answer me or all said, "No, not interested." But I got a call right before I left to go to California when an old college friend that spring. It was from William Wallace, who was a big time football correspondent for The New York Times. That anecdote may be in that article by Andy Glockner. He called me up, he was at the New York Times, but he said also, "I write articles for extra money for pro football weekly. I wanted to just kind of talk to you." Jeff Sagarin (00:09:49): He wrote an article that appeared in Pro Quarterback magazine in September of '72. But during the middle of that summer, I got a phone call from Pro Football weekly, the publisher, a guy named [inaudible 00:10:04] said, "Hey Jeff. Have you seen our ad in street and Smith's?" It didn't matter. It could have been their pro magazine or college. I said, "Yeah, I did." And he said, "Do you notice it said we've got a world famous handicapper to do our predictions for us?" I said, "Yeah, I did see that." He said, "How would you like to be that world famous handicapper? We don't have anybody." Jeff Sagarin (00:10:25): We just said that because he said William Wallace told us to call you. So I said, "Okay, I'll be your world famous handicapper." I didn't start off that well and they had this customer, it was a paid newsletter and there was a customer from Hawaii. He had a great name, Charles Fujiwara. He'd send letters every week saying, "Sagarin's terrible, but he's winning a fortune for me. I just reverse his picks every week." So finally, finally, my numbers turn the tide and I had this one great week, where I went 8-0. He sent another letter saying, "I'm bankrupt. The kid destroyed me." Because he was reversing all my picks. That's a true story. Rob Collie (00:11:07): At least he had a sense of humor. It sounds like a pretty interesting fellow on the other end of that letter. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:13): He sounds like he could have been like the guy, if you've ever seen reruns of the old show, '77 Sunset Strip. In it, there this guy who's kind of a racetrack trout gambler named Roscoe. He sounds like he could have been Roscoe. Rob Collie (00:11:26): We have to look that one up. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:11:27): It's before your time. Rob Collie (00:11:28): I don't think I saw that show. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:29): Yeah. Wayne's seen it though. Rob Collie (00:11:31): Yes. I love that. There are things that are both before my time and I have like old man knees. So I've heard this kind of thing before, by the way. It's called the 10-year overnight success. Jeff Sagarin (00:11:47): I forgot. How did I get with USA Today? I started with Pro Football weekly and continued with them. I was with them until actually why don't we say sometime in the fall of '82. I ended up in other newspapers, little by little: The Boston Globe, Louisville Courier Journal. And then in the spring of '81, I got into a conversation over the phone with Jim van Valkenburg, who is the stat guy at the NCAA. I happened to mention that going into the tournament, I had Indiana to win the tournament. They were rated like 10th in the conventional polls. Jeff Sagarin (00:12:23): And so he remembered that and he kept talking behind the scenes to people in the NCAA about that. And so years later, in 1988, they called me out to talk to them. But anyhow, I had developed a good reputation and I gave him as a reference. Wayne called me up excitedly in let's say, early September of 1984. He said, "Hey, Jeff. You've got to buy a copy of today's USA Today and turn to the end of the sports section. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:12:53): I said, "Really? Okay." So I opened to where he said and I was sick. They had computer ratings by some guy. He was a good guy named Thomas Jech, J-E-C-H. And I said, "Damn, that should be me. I've been doing this for all these years and I didn't even know they were looking for this." So I call up on the phone. Sometimes there's a lot of luck involved. I got to talk to a guy named Bob Barbara who I believe is retired now there. He had on the phone this gruff sounding voice out of like a Grade B movie from the film, The War. "What's going on Kitty?" It sounds like he had a cigar in his mouth. Jeff Sagarin (00:13:30): I said, "Well, I do these computer ratings." [inaudible 00:13:33] Said "Well, really? That's interesting. We've already got somebody." He said, "But how would you even send it to us?" I said, "Well, I dictate over the phone." He said, "Dictate? We don't take dictation at USA Today, kid. Have you ever heard of personal computers and a modem?" I said, "Well, I have but I just do it on a mainframe at IU and I dictate over the phone to the Louisville Courier and the local..." Jeff Sagarin (00:13:58): Well, the local paper here, I gave them a printout. He said, "Kid, you need to buy yourself a PC and learn how to use a modem." So I kind of was embarrassed. I said, "Well, I'll see." So about 10 days later, I called him up and said, "Hey, what's the phone number for your modem?" He said, "Crap. You again, kid? I thought I got rid of you." He says, "All right. I'll give you the phone number." So I sent him a sample printout. He says, "Yeah, yeah, we got it. Keep in touch. We're not going to change for football. But this other guy, he may not want to do basketball. So keep in touch. Who knows what will happen for basketball?" Jeff Sagarin (00:14:31): So every month I'd call up saying, "It's me again, keeping touch." He said, "I can't get rid of you. You're like a bad penny that keeps turning up." So finally he says look, after about five of these calls, spreading out until maybe late November, "Look kid, why don't you wait... Call me up the first Sunday of the new year," which would have been like Sunday, January 6 of 1985 I believe. So I waited. I called him up. Sure enough, he said, "You again?" I said, "You told me you wanted to do college basketball." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:04): He said, "Yeah, you're kind of right. The other guy doesn't want to do it." So he said, "Well, do you mind if we call it the USA Today computer ratings? We kind of like to put our own name on everything." I said, "Well, wait a minute. During the World Series, you had Pete Rose as your guest columnist, you want not only gave his name, but you had a picture of him." He said, "God damn it." He said, "I can't..." He said, "You win again kid. Give us a bio." Jeff Sagarin (00:15:32): An old friend of both me and Wayne was on a business trip. He lived in California, but one of the companies he did work for was Magnavox, which at the time had a presence in Fort Wayne. So he had stopped off in Bloomington so we could say hi. We hadn't seen each other for many years. So he wrote my bio for me, which is still used in the agate in the USA Today. So it's the same bio all these years. Jeff Sagarin (00:15:56): So they started printing me on Tuesday, January 8 of 1985. On the front page that day and I got my editor of a couple years ago, he found an old physical copy of that paper and sent it to me and I thought that's pretty cool. And on the front page, they said, "Well, this would be the 50th birthday of Elvis Presley." I get, they did not have a banner headline at the top, "Turn to the sports and see Jeff Sagarin's debut." That was not what they did. It was all about Elvis Presley. And so people will tell me, "Wow! You got really lucky." Jeff Sagarin (00:16:30): Yeah, but I was in a position. I'd worked for 12 years since the fall of '72 to get in position to then get lucky. They told me I had some good recommendations from people. Rob Collie (00:16:42): Well, even that persistence to keep calling in the face of relatively discouraging feedback. So that conversation took place, and then two days later, you're in the paper. Jeff Sagarin (00:16:54): Well, yeah. He said, "Send us the ratings." They might have needed a time lag. So if I sent the ratings in on a Sunday night or Monday morning, they'd print them on Tuesday. They're not as instant. Now, I update every day on their website. For the paper, they take whatever the most recent ones they can access off their website, depending on I've sent it in, which is I always send them in early in the morning like when I get up. So they print on a Tuesday there'll be taking the ratings that they would have had in their hands Monday, which would be through Sunday's games. Rob Collie (00:17:26): That Tuesday, was that just college basketball? Jeff Sagarin (00:17:28): Then it was. Then in the fall of 85. They began using me for college football, not that they thought I was better or worse one way or the other than Thomas Jech who was a smart guy, he was a math professor at the time at Penn State. He just got tired of doing it. He had more important things to do. Serious, I don't mean that sarcastically. That was just like a fun hobby for him from what I understand. Rob Collie (00:17:50): I was going to ask you if you hadn't already gone and answered the question ahead of time. I was going to ask you well, what happened to the other guy? Did you go like all Tonya Harding on him or whatever? Did you take out your rival? No, sounds like Nancy Kerrigan just went ahead and retired. Although I hate to make you Tonya Harding in this analogy and I just realized I just Hardinged you. Jeff Sagarin (00:18:10): He was just evidently a really good math professor. It was just something he did for fun to do the ratings. Rob Collie (00:18:17): Opportunity and preparation right where they intersect. That's "luck". Jeff Sagarin (00:18:22): It would be as if Wally Pipp had retired and Lou Gehrig got to replace him in the analogy, Lou Gehrig gets the first base job but actually Wally Pipp in real life did not retire. He had the bad luck to get a cold or something or an injury and he never got back in the starting lineup after that. Rob Collie (00:18:38): What about Drew Bledsoe? I think he did get hurt. Did we ever see him again? Thomas LaRock (00:18:43): The very next season, he was in Buffalo and then he went to Dallas. Rob Collie (00:18:46): I don't remember this at all. Thomas LaRock (00:18:47): And not only that, but when he went to Dallas, he got hurt again and Tony Romo came on to take over. Rob Collie (00:18:53): Oh my god! So Drew Bledsoe is Wally Pipp X2. Thomas LaRock (00:18:58): Yeah, X2. Rob Collie (00:19:02): I just need to go find wherever Drew Bledsoe is right now and go get in line behind him. Thomas LaRock (00:19:08): He's making wine in Walla Walla, Washington. I know exactly where he is. Rob Collie (00:19:12): I'm about to inherit a vineyard gentlemen. Okay, so Wayne's already factored into this story. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:23): A little bit. Rob Collie (00:19:23): A bit part but an important one. We would call you Mr. Narrative Hook in the movie. Like you'd be the guy that's like, "Jeff, you've got to get a copy of USA Today and turn to page 10. You're going to be sick." Jeff Sagarin (00:19:37): Well, I was I'm glad Wayne told me to do it. If I'd never known that, who knows what I'd be doing right now? Rob Collie (00:19:44): Yeah. So you guys are longtime friends, right? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:19:47): Yeah. Jeff, should take this. Jeff Sagarin (00:19:49): September 1967 in the TV room at Ashdown Graduate's House across from the dorm we lived, because the graduate students there had rigged up, we call it a full screen TV that was actually quite huge. It's simply projected from a regular TV onto a maybe a 10 foot by 10 foot old fashioned movie projector screen. We'd go there to watch ballgames. Okay, because better than watching on a 10 inch diagonal black and white TV in the dorm. And it turned out we both had a love for baseball and football games. Thomas LaRock (00:20:26): So just to be clear, though, this was no ordinary school. This is MIT. Because this is what people at MIT would do is take some weird tech thing and go, "We can make this even better, make a big screen TV." Jeff Sagarin (00:20:38): We didn't know how to do it, which leads into Wayne's favorite story about our joint science escapades at MIT. If Wayne wants to start it off, you might like this. I was a junior and Wayne was a sophomore at the time. I'll set Wayne up for it, there was a requirement that MIT no matter what your major, one of the sort of distribution courses you had to take was a laboratory class. Why don't we let Wayne take the ball for a while on this? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:21:05): I'm not very mechanically inclined. I got a D in wood shop and a D in metal shop. Jeff's not very mechanically inclined either. We took this lab class and we were trying to figure out identifying a coin based on the sound waves it would produce under the Scylla scope. And so the first week, we couldn't get the machine to work. And the professor said, "Turn it on." And so we figured that step out and the next week, the machine didn't work. He said, "Plug it in." Jeff can take it from there. Jeff Sagarin (00:21:46): It didn't really fit the mathematical narrative exactly of what metals we knew were in the coin. But then I noticed, nowadays we'd probably figure out this a reason. If we multiplied our answers by something like 100 pi, we got the right numbers. So they were correctly proportional. So we just multiplied our answers by 100 pi and said, "As you can see, it's perfectly deducible." Rob Collie (00:22:14): There's a YouTube video that we should probably link that is crazy. It shows that two boxes on a frictionless surface a simulation and the number of times that they collide, when you slide them towards a wall together, when they're like at 10X ratio of mass, the number of times that they impact each other starts to become the digits of pi. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:34): Wow. Rob Collie (00:22:35): Before they separate. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:36): That's interesting. Rob Collie (00:22:36): It's just bizarre. And then they go through explaining like why it is pi and you understand it while the video is playing. And then the video ends and you've completely lost it. Jeff Sagarin (00:22:49): I'm just asking now, are they saying if you do that experiment an infinite amount of times, the average number of times they collide will be pi? Rob Collie (00:22:57): That's a really good question. I think it's like the number of collisions as you increase the ratios of the weight or something like that start to become. It's like you'll get 314 collisions, for instance, in a certain weight ratio, because that's the only three digits of pi that I remember. It's 3.14. It's a fascinating little watch. So the 100 pi thing, you said that, I'm like, "Yeah, that just... Of course it's 100 pi." Even boxes colliding on a frictionless surface do pi things apparently. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:29): Maybe it's a universal constant in everything we do. Rob Collie (00:23:29): You just don't expect pi to surface itself. It has nothing to do with waves, no wavelength, no arcs of circles, nothing like that. But that sneaky video, they do show you that it actually has something to do with circles and angles and stuff. Jeff Sagarin (00:23:44): Mutual friend of me and Wayne, this guy named Robin. He loves Fibonacci. And so every time I see a particular game end by a certain score, I'll just say, "Hey, Robin. Research the score of..." I think it was blooming to North against some other team. And he did. It turned out Bloomington North had won 155-34, which are the two adjacent Fibonacci, the two particular adjacent Fibonacci. Robin loves that stuff. You'll find a lot of that actually. It's hard to double Fibonacci a team though. That would be like 89-34. Rob Collie (00:24:18): I know about the Fibonacci sequence. But I can't pick Fibonacci sequence numbers out of the wild. Are you familiar with Scorigami? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:26): Who? I'd never heard of it obviously. Rob Collie (00:24:29): I think a Scorigami is a score in the NFL that's never happened. Jeff Sagarin (00:24:32): There was one like that about 10 years ago, 11-10, I believe. Pittsburgh was involved in the game or 12-11, something like that. Rob Collie (00:24:40): I think there was a Scorigami in last season. With scoring going up, the chances of Scorigami is increasing. There's just more variance at the higher end of the spectrum of numbers, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:24:50): I've always thought about this. In Canada, Canadian football, they have this extra rule that I think is kind of cool because it would probably make more scores happen. If a punter kicks the ball into the end zone, it can't roll there. Like if he kicks it on the fly into the end zone and the other team can't run it out, it's called a rouge and the kicking team gets one point for it. That's kind of cool. Because once you add the concept of scoring one point, you make a lot more scores more probable of happening. Rob Collie (00:25:21): Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah, totally. You can win 1-0. Thomas LaRock (00:25:25): So the end zone is also... It's 20 yards deep. So the field's longer, it's 110 yards. But the end zone's deeper and part of it is that it's too far to kick for a field goal. But you know what? If I can punt it into the end zone and if I get a cover team down there, we can get one point out. I'm in favor of it. I think that'd be great. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:43): I think you have to kick out on the fly into the end zone. It's not like if it rolls into it. Thomas LaRock (00:25:47): No, no, no. It's like a pop flop. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:50): Yeah. Okay. Rob Collie (00:25:50): If you punt it out of the end zone, is it also a point? Thomas LaRock (00:25:52): It's a touch back. No, touch back. Jeff Sagarin (00:25:54): That'd be too easy of a way to get a point. Rob Collie (00:25:57): You've had a 20 yard deep target to land in. In Canadian fantasy football, if there was such a thing, maybe there is, punters, you actually could have punters as a position because they can score points. That would be a really sad and un-fun way to play. Rob Collie (00:26:14): But so we're amateur sports analytics people here on the show. We're not professionals. We're probably not even very good at it. But that doesn't mean that we aren't fascinated by it. We're business analytics people here for sure. Business and sports, they might share some techniques, but it's just very, very, very different, the things that are valuable in the two spaces. I mean, they're sort of spiritually linked but they're not really tools or methods that provide value. Rob Collie (00:26:39): Not that you would give them. But we're not looking for any of your secrets here today. But you're not just writing for USA Today, there's a number of places where your skills are used these days, right? Jeff Sagarin (00:26:51): Well, not as much as that. But I want to make a favorable analogy for Wayne. In the world of sports analytics, whatever the phrases are, I consider myself to be maybe an experimental applied physicist. Wayne is an advanced theoretical physicist. I do the grunt work of collecting data and doing stuff with it. But Wayne has a large over-viewing of things. He's like a theoretical physicist. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:27:17): Jeff is too modest because he's experimented for years on the best parameters for his models. Rob Collie (00:27:27): It's again that 10-year, 20-year overnight success type of thing. You've just got to keep grinding at it. Do the two of you collaborate at all? Jeff Sagarin (00:27:35): Well, we did on two things, the Hoops computer game and Win Val. I forgot. How could I forget? It was actually my favorite thing that we did even though we've made no money doing the randomization using Game Theory of play calling for football. And we based it actually and it turned out that I got great numerical results that jive with empirical stuff that Virgil Carter had gotten and our economist, named Romer, had gotten and we had more detailed results than them. Jeff Sagarin (00:28:06): But in the areas that we intersected, we had the same as them. We used a game called Pro Quarterback and we modeled it. We had actually, a fellow, I wasn't a professor but a fellow professor of Wayne's, a great guy, just a great guy named Vic Cabot, who wrote a particular routine to insert the FORTRAN program that solved that particular linear programming problem that would constantly reoccur or else we couldn't do it. That was the favorite thing and we got to show it once to Sam White, who we really liked. And White said, "I like this guy. I may have played this particular game," we told him what we based it on, "when I was a teenager." Jeff Sagarin (00:28:46): He said, "I know exactly what you want to do." You don't make the same call in the same situation all the time. You have a random, but there's an optimal mix Game Theory, as you probably know for both offense and defense. White said, "The problem is this is my first year here. It was the summer of '83." And he said, "I don't really have the security." Said, "Imagine it's third and one, we're on our own 15 yard line. And it's third and one. And the random number generator says, 'Throw the bomb on this play with a 10% chance of calling up but it'll still be in the mix. And it happens to come up.'" Jeff Sagarin (00:29:23): He said, "It was my eight year here. I used to play these games myself. I know exactly." But then he patted his hip. He said, "It's mine on the line this first year." He said, "It's kind of nerve wracking to do that when you're a rookie coach somewhere, to call the bomb when it's third and one on your own 15. If it's incomplete, you'll be booed out of the stadium." Rob Collie (00:29:46): Yeah, I mean, it's similar to there's the general reluctance in coaches for so long to go for it on fourth and one. When the analytics were very, very, very clear that this was a plus expected value, +EV, move to go for it on fourth and one. But the thing is, you've got to consider the bigger picture. Right? The incentives, the coaches number one goal is actually don't get fired. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:14): You were right. That's what White was telling us. Rob Collie (00:30:14): Yeah. Winning a Super Bowl is a great thing to do. Because it helps you not get fired. It's actually weird. Like, if your goal is to win as many games as possible, yes, go for it on fourth and one. But if your goal is to not get fired, maybe. So it takes a bit more courage even to follow the numbers. And for good reason, because the incentives aren't really aligned the way that we think they are when you first glance at a situation. Jeff Sagarin (00:30:41): Well, there's a human factor that there's no way unless you're making a guess how to take it into account. It may be demoralizing to your defense if you go for it on fourth and one and you're on your own 15. I've seen the numbers, we used to do this. It's a good mathematical move to go for it. Because you could say, "Well, if you're forced to punt, the other team is going to start on the 50. So what's so good about that? But psychologically, your defense may be kind of pissed off and demoralized when they have to come out on the field and defend from their own 15 after you've not made it and the numbers don't take that into account. Rob Collie (00:31:19): Again, it's that judgment thing. Like the coach hung out to dry. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:22): Can I say a word about Vic Cabot, that Jeff mentioned? Jeff Sagarin (00:31:26): Yeah, He's great. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:27): Yeah. So Vic was the greatest guy any of us in the business school ever knew. He was a fantastic person. He died of throat cancer in 1994, actually 27 years ago this week or last week. Jeff Sagarin (00:31:43): Last week. It was right around Labor Day. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:31:46): Right. But I want to mention, basically, when he died, his daughter was working in the NYU housing office. After he died, she wrote a little book called The Princess Diaries. She's worth how many millions of dollars now? But he never got to see it. Jeff Sagarin (00:32:06): He had a son, a big kid named Matt Cabot, who played at Bloomington South High School. I got a nice story about Matthew. I believe the last time I know of him, he was a state trooper in the state of Colorado. I used to tell him when I was still young enough and Spry enough, we'd play a little pickup or something. I'd say, "Matthew, forget about points. The most important thing, a real man gets rebounds." Jeff Sagarin (00:32:32): They played in the semi state is when it was just one class. In '88, me and Wayne and a couple of Wayne's professor buddies, we all... Of course, Vic would have been there but we didn't go in the same car. It was me, Wayne and maybe [inaudible 00:32:48] and somebody else, Wayne? Jeff Sagarin (00:32:49): They played against Chandler Thompson's great team from Muncie Central. In the first three minutes, Chris Lawson, who was the star of the team went up for his patented turn around jumper from six feet away in the lane and Chandler Thompson spiked it like a volleyball and on the run of Muncie Central player took it with no one near him and laid it in and the game essentially ended but Matt Cabot had the game of his life. Jeff Sagarin (00:33:21): I think he may have led the game of anyone, the most rebounds in the game. I compliment him. He was proud of that. And he's played, he said many a pickup game with Chandler Thompson, he said the greatest jumper he's ever been on the court within his entire life. You guys look up because I don't know if you know who Chandler Thompson. Is he played at Ball State. Look up on YouTube his put back dunk against UNLV in the 90 tournaments, the year UNLV won it at all. Look up Chandler Thompson's put back dunk. Rob Collie (00:33:52): Yeah, I was just getting into basketball then, I think. Like in the Loyola Marymount days. Yeah, Jerry Tarkanian. Does college basketball have the same amount of personalities it used to like in the coaching figures. I kind of doubt that it does. Rob Collie (00:34:06): With Tark gone, and of course, Bob Knight, it'll be hard to replace personalities like that. I don't know. I don't really watch college basketball anymore, so I wouldn't really know. But I get invited into those pick'em pools for the tournament March Madness every year and I never had the stamina to fill them out. And they offer those sheets where they'll fill it out for you. But why would I do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:34:28): I've got to tell you a story involving Wayne and I. Rob Collie (00:34:31): Okay. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:31): In the 80 tournament, I had gotten a program running that would to simulate the tournament if you fed in the power ratings. It understood who'd play who and you simulate it a zillion times, come up with the odds. So going into the tournament, we had Purdue maybe the true odds against him should have been let's say, I'll make it up seven to one. Purdue and Iowa, they had Ronnie Lester, I remember. Jeff Sagarin (00:34:57): The true odds against them should have been about 7-1. The bookmakers were giving odds of 40-1. So Wayne and I looked at each other and said, "That seems like a big edge." In theory, well, odds are still against them. Let's bet $25 apiece on both Purdue and Iowa. The two of them made the final four. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:20): In Indianapolis, I'll put it this way, their consolation game gave us no consolation. Rob Collie (00:35:30): Man. Jeff Sagarin (00:35:31): And then one of the games, Joe Barry Carroll of Purdue, they're down by one they UCLA. I'm sure he was being contested. I don't mean he was all by himself. It's always easy for the fan who can't play to mock the player. I don't mean... He was being fiercely contested by UCLA. The net result was he missed with fierce contesting one foot layup that would have won the game for Purdue, that would have put them into the championship game and Iowa could have beaten Louisville, except their best player, Ronnie Lester had to leave the game because he had aggravated a bad knee injury that he just couldn't play well on. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:11): But as I said, no consolation, right Wayne? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:36:14): Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:36:15): That was the next to the last year they ever had a consolation game. The last one was in '81 between LSU and Virginia. Rob Collie (00:36:23): Was it the '81 tournament that you said that you liked Indiana to win it? Jeff Sagarin (00:36:28): Wait, I'm going to show you how you get punished for hubris. I learned my lesson. The next year in '82, I had gotten a lot of notoriety, good kind of notoriety for having them to win in '81. People thought, "Wow! This is like the Oracle." So now as the tournament's about to begin in '82, I started getting a lot of calls, which I never used to do like from the media, "Who do you got Jeff?" I said confidently, "Oregon State." I had them number one, I think they'd only lost one game the whole year and they had a guy named Charlie Sitting, a 6'8 guy who was there all American forward. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:06): He was the star and I was pretty confident and to be honest, probably obnoxious when I'd be talking to the press. So they make the regional final against Georgetown and it was being held out west. I'm sort of confidently waiting for the game to be played and I'm sure there'll be advancing to the final four. And they were playing against freshmen, Patrick Ewing. Jeff Sagarin (00:37:29): In the first 10 seconds of the game, maybe you can find the video, there was a lob pass into Ewing, his back was to the basket, he's like three feet from the basket without even looking, he dunks backwards over his head over Charlie Sitton. And you should see the expression on Charlie Sitton's face. I said, "Oh my god! This game is over." The final score was 68-43 in Georgetown's favor. It was a massacre. It taught me the lesson, never be cocky, at least in public because you get slapped down, you get slapped down when you do that. Rob Collie (00:38:05): I don't want to get into this yet again on this show. But you should call up Nate Silver and maybe talk to him a little bit about the same sort of thing. Makes very big public calls that haven't been necessarily so great lately. Just for everyone's benefit, because even though I'd live in the state of Indiana, I didn't grow up here. Let's just be clear. Who won the NCAA tournament in 1981? Jeff Sagarin (00:38:29): Indiana. Rob Collie (00:38:30): Okay. All right, so there you go. Right. Jeff Sagarin (00:38:33): But who didn't win it in 1982? Oregon State. Rob Collie (00:38:38): Yeah. Did you see The Hunt for Red October where Jack Ryan's character, there's a point where he guesses. He says, "Ramy, as always, goes to port in the bottom half of the hour with his crazy Ivan maneuvers and he turns out to be right." And that's how he ends up getting the captain of the American sub to trust him as Jack Ryan knew this Captain so well, even knew which direction he would turn in the crazy Ivan. But it turns out he was just bluffing. He knew he needed a break and it was 50/50. Rob Collie (00:39:08): So it's a good thing that they were talking to you in the Indiana year, originally. Not the Oregon State year. That wouldn't be a good first impression. If you had to have it go one way or the other in those two years, the order in which it happened was the right order. Jeff Sagarin (00:39:22): Yeah, nobody would have listened to me. They would have said, "You got lucky." They said, "You still were terrible in the Oregon State year." Rob Collie (00:39:28): But you just pick the 10th rated team and be right. The chances of that being just luck are pretty low. I like it. That's a good story. So the two of you have never collaborated like on the Mark Cuban stuff? On the Mavs or any of that? Jeff Sagarin (00:39:43): We've done three things together. The Hoops computer game, which we did from '86-'95. And then we did the Game Theory thing for football, but we never got a client. But we did get White to kind of follow it. There's an interesting anecdote, I won't I mentioned the guy who kind of screwed it up. But he assigned a particular grad assistant to fill and we needed a matrix filled in each week with a bunch of numbers with regarding various things like turnovers. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:13): If play A is called against defense B, what would happen type of thing? The grad assistant hated doing it. And one week, he gave us numbers such that the computer came back with when Indiana had the ball, it should quick kick on first down every time it got the ball. We figured it out what was going on, the guy had given Indiana a 15% chance of a turnover, no matter what play they called in any situation against any defense. Jeff Sagarin (00:40:44): So the computer correctly surmised it were better to punt the ball. This is like playing Russian roulette with the ball. Let's just kick it away. So we ended up losing the game in real life 10-0. White told us then when we next saw him, we used to see him on Monday or Tuesday mornings, real early in the day, like seven o'clock, but that's when you could catch him. And he kind of looked at us and said, "You know what? We couldn't have done any worse said had we kicked [inaudible 00:41:14]." Rob Collie (00:41:13): That's nice. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:14): And then we did Mark Cuban. That was the last thing. We did that with Cuban from basically 2000-2011 with a couple of random projects in the summer for him, but really on a day to day basis during a season from 2000-2011. Rob Collie (00:41:30): And during that era is when I met Wayne at Microsoft. That was very much an active, ongoing project when Wayne was there in Redmond a couple of times that we crossed paths. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:41:43): And we worked for the Knicks one year, and they won 54 games. Jeff Sagarin (00:41:47): Here with Glen Grunwald. So they won more games than they'd ever won in a whole bunch of years. And like three weeks before the season starts or so in mid September, the next fire, Glen Grunwald. Let's put it this way, it didn't bother us that the Knicks never made the playoffs again until this past season. Rob Collie (00:42:10): That's great. You were doing, was it lineup optimization for those teams? Jeff Sagarin (00:42:15): Wayne knows more about this than I do. Because I would create the raw data, well, I call it output, but it needed refinement. That was Wayne's department. So you do all the talking now, Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:42:26): Yeah. Jeff wrote an amazing FORTRAN program. So basically, Jeff rated teams and we figured out we could rate players based on how the score of the game moved during the game. We could evaluate lineups and figure out head to head how certain players did against each other. Now, every team does this stuff and ESPN has Real Plus-Minus and Nate Silver has Raptor. But we started this. Jeff Sagarin (00:42:58): I mean, everybody years ago knew about Plus-Minus. Well, intuitively, let's say you're a gym rat, you first come to a gym, you don't know anyone there and you start getting in the crowd of guys that show up every afternoon to play pickup. You start sensing, you don't even have to know their names. Hey, when that guy is on the court, no matter who his teammates are, they seem to win. Jeff Sagarin (00:43:20): Or when this guy's on the court, they always seem to lose. Intuitively since it matters, who's on the court with you and who your opponents are. Like to make an example for Rob, let's say you happen to be in a pickup game. You've snuck into Pauley Pavilion during the summer and you end up with like four NBA current playing professionals on your team and let's say an aging Michael Jordan now shows up. He ends up with four guys who are graduate students in philosophy because they have to exercise. You're going to have a better plus-minus than Michael Jordan. But when you take into account who your teammates were and who's his were, if you knew enough about the players, he'd have a better rating than you, new Michael Jordan would. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:08): But you'd have a better raw plus-minus than he would. You have to know who the people on the court were. That was Wayne's insight. Tell them how it all started, how you met ran into Mark Cuban, Wayne, when you were in Dallas? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:20): Well, Mark was in my class in 1981, statistics class and I guess the year 1999, we went to a Pacers Maverick game in Dallas. Jeff Sagarin (00:44:31): March of 2000. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:44:33): March of 2000, because our son really liked the Pacers. Mark saw me in the stands. He said, "I remember you from class and I remember you for being on Jeopardy." He had just bought the team. And he said, "If you can do anything to help the Mavericks, let me know." And then I was swimming in the pool one day and I said, "If Jeff rates teams, we should rate players." And so we worked on this and Jeff wrote this amazing FORTRAN program, which I'm sure he could not rewrite today. Jeff Sagarin (00:45:04): Oh, God. Well, I was motivated then. Willingness to work hard for many hours at a time, for days at a time to get something to work when you could use the money that would result from it. I don't have that in me anymore. I'm amazed when I look at the source code. I say, "Man, I couldn't do that now." I like to think I could. Necessity is the mother of invention. Rob Collie (00:45:28): I've many, many, many times said and this is still true to this day, like a previous version of me that made something amazing like built a model or something like that, I look back and go, "Whoo, I was really smart back then." Well, at the same time I know I'm improving. I know that I'm more capable today than I was a year ago. Even just accrued wisdom makes a big difference. When you really get lasered in on something and are very, very focused on it, you're suddenly able to execute at just a higher level than what you're typically used to. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:01): As time went on, we realized what Cuban wanted and other teams like the next would want. Nobody really wanted to wade through the monster set of files that the FORTRAN would create. I call that the raw output that nobody wanted to read, but it was needed. Wayne wrote these amazing routines in Excel that became understandable and usable by the clients. Jeff Sagarin (00:46:26): The way Wayne wrote the Excel, they could basically say, "Tell us what happens when these three guys are in the lineup, but these two guys are not in the lineup." It was amazing the stuff that he wrote. Wayne doesn't give himself the credit that otherwise after a while, nobody would have wanted what we were doing because what I did was this sort of monstrous and to some extent boring. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:46:48): This is what Rob's company does basically. They try and distill data into understandable form that basically helps the company make decisions. Rob Collie (00:46:58): It is a heck of a discipline, right? Because if you have the technical and sort of mental skills to execute on something that's that complex, and it starts down in the weeds and just raw inputs, it's actually really, really, really easy to hand it off in a form that isn't yet quite actionable for the intended audience. It's really fascinating to you, the person that created it. Rob Collie (00:47:23): It's not digestible or actionable yet for the consumer crowd, whoever the target consumer is. I've been there. I've handed off a lot of things back in the day and said, "The professional equivalent of..." And it turned out to not be... It turned out to be, "Go back and actually make it useful, Rob." So I'm familiar with that. For sure. I think I've gotten better at that over the years. As a journey, you're never really complete with. Something I wanted to throw in here before I forget, which is, Jeff, you have an amazing command of certain dates. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:47:56): Oh, yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:47:57): Give me some date that you know the answer about what day of the week it was, and I'll tell you, but I'll tell you how I did it. Rob Collie (00:48:04): Okay, how about June 6, 1974? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:08): That'd be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:10): Holy cow. Okay. How do you do that? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:11): June 11th of 1974 would be a Tuesday, so five days earlier would be a Thursday. Rob Collie (00:48:19): How do you know June 11? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:19): I just do. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:23): It's his birthday. Rob Collie (00:48:24): No, it's not. He wasn't born in '74. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:48:27): No, but June 11th. Jeff Sagarin (00:48:29): I happen to know that June 11 was a Tuesday in 1974, that's all. Rob Collie (00:48:34): I'm still sitting here waiting what passes for an explanation. Is one coming? Jeff Sagarin (00:48:39): I'll tell you another way I could have done it, but I didn't. In 1963, John Kennedy gave his famous speech in Berlin, Ich bin ein Berliner, on Wednesday, June 26th. That means that three weeks earlier was June 5, the Wednesday. So Thursday would have been June 6th. You're going to say, "Well, why is that relevant?" Well, 1963 is congruent to 1974 days of the week was. Rob Collie (00:49:07): Okay. This is really, really impressive. Jeff, you seem so normal up until now. Thomas LaRock (00:49:16): You want throw him off? Just ask for any date before 1759? Jeff Sagarin (00:49:20): No, I can do that. It'll take me a little longer though. Thomas LaRock (00:49:22): Because once they switch from Gregorian- Jeff Sagarin (00:49:25): No, well, I'll give it a Gregorian style, all right. I'm assuming that it's a Gregorian date. The calendar totally, totally repeats every possible cycle every 400 years. For example, if you happen to say, "What was September 10, of 1621?" I would quickly say, "It's a Friday." Because 1621 is exactly the same as 2021 says. Rob Collie (00:49:52): Does this translate into other domains as well? Do you have sort of other things that you can sort of get this quick, intuitive mastery over or is it very, very specific to this date arithmetic? Jeff Sagarin (00:50:02): Probably specific. In other words, I think Wayne's a bit quicker than me. I'm certain does mental arithmetic stuff, but to put everybody in their place, I don't think you ever met him, Wayne. Remember the soccer player, John Swan? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:50:14): Yeah. Jeff Sagarin (00:50:15): He had a friend from high school, they went to Brownsburg High School. I forgot the kid's name. He was like a regular student at IU. He was not a well scholar, but he was a smart kid. I'd say he was slightly faster than me at most mental arithmetic things. So you should never get cocky and think that other people, "Oh, they don't have the pedigree." Some people are really good at stuff you don't expect them to be good at, really good. This kid was really good. Rob Collie (00:50:45): As humans, we need to hyper simplify things in order to have a mental model we can use to navigate a very, very complicated world. That's a bit of a strength. But it's also a weakness in many ways. We tend to try to reduce intelligence down to this single linear number line, when it's really like a vast multi dimensional coordinate space. There are so many dimensions of intelligence. Rob Collie (00:51:11): I grew up with the trope in my head that athletes weren't very bright. Until the first time that I had to try to run a pick and roll versus pick and pop. I discovered that my brain has a clock speed that's too slow to run the pick and roll versus pick and pop. It's not that I'm not smart enough to know if this, than that. I can't process it fast enough to react. You look at like an NFL receiver or an NFL linebacker or whatever, has to process on every single snap. Rob Collie (00:51:45): It's amazing how much information they have the processor. Set aside the physical skill that they have, which I also don't have and never did. On top of that, I don't have the brain at all to do these sorts of things. It's crazy. Jeff Sagarin (00:52:00): With the first few years, I was in Bloomington from, let's say, '77 to '81, I needed the money, so I tutored for the athletic department. They tutored math. And I remember once I was given an assignment, it was a defensive end, real nice kid. He was having trouble with the kind of math we would find really easy. But you could tell he had a mental block. These guys had had bad experiences and they just, "I can't do this. I can't do this." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:25): I asked this defensive end, "Tell me what happens when the ball snap, what do you have to do?" I said, "In real time, you're being physically pulverized, the other guy's putting a forearm or more right into your face. And your brain has to be checking about five different things going on in the backfield, other linemen." I said, "What you're doing with somebody else trying to hurt you physically is much more intellectually difficult, at least to my mind than this problem in the book in front of you and the book is not punching you in the face." Jeff Sagarin (00:52:57): He relaxed and he can do the problems in the room. I'd make sure. I picked not a problem that I had solved. I'd give him another one that I hadn't solved and he could do it. I realized, my God, what these guys they're doing takes actually very quick reacting brainpower and my own personal experience in elementary school, let's say in sixth grade after school, we'd be playing street football, just touch football. When I'd be quarterback, I'd start running towards the line of scrimmage. Jeff Sagarin (00:53:26): If the other team came after me, they'd leave a receiver wide open. I said, "This is easy." So I throw for touchdown. Well, in seventh grade, we go to junior high. We have squads in gym class, and on a particular day, I got to be quarterback. Now, instead of guys sort of leisurely counting one Mississippi, two Mississippi, they are pouring in. It's not that you're going to get hurt, but you're going to get tagged and the play would be over. It says touch football, and I'd be frantically looking for receivers to get open. Let's just say it was not a good experience. I realized there's a lot more to be in quarterback than playing in the street. It's so simple. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:08): They come after you and they leave the receivers wide open. That's what evidently sets apart. Let's say the Tom Brady's from the guys who don't even make it after one year in the NFL. If you gave them a contest throwing the ball, seeing who could throw it through a tire at 50 yards, maybe the young kid is better than Tom Brady but his brain can't process what's happening on the field fast enough. Thomas LaRock (00:54:32): As someone who likes to you know, test things thoroughly, that student of yours who was having trouble on the test, you said the book wasn't hitting him physically. Did you try possibly? Jeff Sagarin (00:54:45): I should have shoved it in his face. Thomas LaRock (00:54:49): Physically, just [crosstalk 00:54:50]. Rob Collie (00:54:50): Just throw things at him. Yeah. Thomas LaRock (00:54:52): Throw an eraser, a piece of chalk. Just something. Jeff Sagarin (00:54:56): I'll tell you now, I don't want to name him. He's a real nice guy. I'll tell you a funny anecdote about him. I had hurt my knuckle in a pickup basketball game. I had a cast on it and I was talking to my friend. And he had just missed making a pro football team the previous summer and he was on the last cut. He'd made it to the final four guys. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:18): He was trying to become a linebacker I think. They told him, "You're just not mean enough." That was in my mind. I thought, "Well, I don't know about that." He said, "Yeah, I had the same kind of fractured knuckle you got." I said, "How'd you get it?" "Pick up [inaudible 00:55:32]. Punching a guy in the face." But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. And I heard a story from a friend of mine who I witnessed it, this guy was at one point working security at a local holiday inn that would have these dances. Jeff Sagarin (00:55:47): There was some guy who was like from the Hells Angels who was causing trouble. He's a big guy, 6'5, 300 whatever. And he actually got into an argument with my friend who was the security guy. Angel guy throws a punch at this guy who's not mean enough for the NFL. With one punch the Jeff Sagarin tutoree knocked the Hell's Angels guy flat unconscious. He was a comatose on the floor. But he wasn't mean enough for the NFL. Rob Collie (00:56:17): Tom if I told my plus minus story about my 1992 dream team on this show, I think maybe I have. I don't remember. Thomas LaRock (00:56:24): You might have but this seems like a perfect episode for that. Rob Collie (00:56:27): I think Jeff and Wayne, if I have told it before, it was probably with Wayne. Dr. Wayne Winston (00:56:31): I don't remember. Rob Collie (00:56:32): Perfect. It'll be new to everyone that matters. Tom remembers. So, in 1992, the Orlando Magic were a recent expansion team in the NBA. Sometime in that summer, the same summer where the 1992 Dream Team Olympic team went and dominated, there was a friend of our family who ran a like a luxury automotive accessories store downtown and he basically hit the jackpot. He'd been there forever. There was like right next to like the magic practice facility. Rob Collie (00:57:09): And so all the magic players started frequenting his shop. That was where they tricked out all their cars and added all the... So his business was just booming as a result of magic coming to town. I don't know this guy ever had ever been necessarily terribly athletic at any point in his life. He had this bright idea to assemble a YMCA team that would play in the local YMCA league in Orlando, the city league. Rob Collie (00:57:35): He had secured the commitment of multiple magic players to be on our team as well as like Jack Givens, who was the radio commentator for The Magic and had been a longtime NBA star with his loaded team. And then it was like, this guy, we'll call this guy Bill. It's not his real name. So it was Bill and the NBA players and me and my dad, a couple of younger guys that actually I didn't know, but were pretty good but they weren't even like college level players. Rob Collie (00:58:07): And so we signed up for the A league, the most competitive league that Orlando had to offer. And then none of the NBA players ever showed up. I said never, but they did show up one time. But we were getting blown out. Some of the people who were playing against us were clearly ex college players. We couldn't even get the ball across half court. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:33): Wayne, does this sound familiar to you? Dr. Wayne Winston (00:58:35): Yes, tell this story. Jeff Sagarin (00:58:38): Wayne, when he was a grad student at Yale, and I'm living in the White Irish neighborhood called Dorchester in Boston, I was young and spry. At that time, I would think I could play. Wayne as a grad student at Yale had entered a team with a really intimidating name of administration science in the New Haven City League, which was played I believe at Hill House high school at night. So Wayne said, "Hey Jeff, why don't you take a Greyhound bus down. We're going to play against this team called the New Haven All Stars. It ought to be interesting." Rob Collie (00:59:14): Wayne's voice in that story sound a little bit like the guy at USA Today for a moment. It was the same voice, the cigar chomping. Anyway, continue. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:25): They edged this out 75-31. I thought I was lined up against the guy... I thought it was Paul Silas who was may be sort of having a bus man's holiday playing for the New Haven all-stars. So a couple weeks later, Paul Silas was my favorite player on the Celtics. He could rebound, that's all I could do. I was pitiful at anything else. But I worked at that and I was pretty strong and I worked at jumping, etc. Jeff Sagarin (00:59:53): So a few weeks later, Wayne calls me up and says, "Hey Jeff, we're playing the New Haven All-Stars again. Why don't you come down again and we'll get revenge against them this time?" Let's just say it didn't work out that way. And I remember one time I had Paul Silas completely boxed out. It was perfect textbook and I could jump. If my hands were maybe at rim level and I could see a pair of pants a foot over mine from behind, he didn't tell me and he got the rebound and I'm at rim level. Jeff Sagarin (01:00:24): We were edged out by a score so monstrous, I won't repeat it here. I'm not a guard at all. But I ended up with the ball... They full court pressed the whole game. Rob Collie (01:00:34): Of course, once they figure out- Jeff Sagarin (01:00:36): That we can't play and I'm not even a guard. It was ludicrous. My four teammates left me in terror. They just said, "We're going down court." So I'm all alone, they have four guys on me and my computer like my thought, "Well, they've got four guys on me. That must mean my four teammates are being guarded by one guy down court. This should be easy." I look, I look. They didn't steal the ball out of my hands or nothing. I'm still holding on to it. They're pecking away but they didn't foul me. I give them credit for that. I was like, "Where the hell are my teammates?" Jeff Sagarin (01:01:08): They were in terror hiding in single file behind the one guy and I basically... I don't care if you bleeping or not, I said, "Fuck it." And I just threw the ball. Good two overhand pass, long pass. I had my four teammates down there and they had one guy and you can guess who got the ball. After the game I asked them, I said, "You guys seem fairly good. Are you anybody?" The guy said, "Yeah, we're the former Fairfield varsity we were in the NIT about two years ago." Jeff Sagarin (01:01:39): I looked it up once. Fairfield did make the NIT, I think in '72. And this took place in like February of '74. It taught me a lesson because I looked up what my computer rating for Fairfield would have been compared that to, let's say, UCLA and NC State and figured at a minimum, we'd be at least a 100-200 point underdog against them in a real game, but it would have been worse because we would never get the ball pass mid-court. Rob Collie (01:02:10): Yeah, I mean, those games that I'm talking about in that YMCA League, I mean, the scores were far worse. We were losing like 130-11. Jeff Sagarin (01:02:19): Hey, good that's worse than New Haven all-stars beat us but not quite that bad. Rob Collie (01:02:24): I remember one time actually managing to get the ball across half court and pulling up for a three-point shot off of the break. And then having the guy that had assembled the team, take me aside at the next time out and tell me that I needed to pass that. I'm just like, "No. You got us into this embarrassment. If I get to the point where like, there's actually a shot we can take like a shot, we could take a shot. I'm not going to dump it off to you." Thomas LaRock (01:02:57): Not just a shot, but the shot of gold. Rob Collie (01:03:00): The one time we did get those guys to show up, we were still kind of losing because those guys didn't want to get hurt. It didn't make any sense for them to be there. There was no upside for them to be in this game. I'm sure that they just sort of been guilted into showing up. But then this Christian Laettner lookalike on the other team. He was as big as Laettner. Rob Collie (01:03:25): This is the kind of teams we were playing against. There was a long rebound and that Laettner lookalike got that long rebound and basically launched from the free throw line and dunked over Terry Catledge, the power forward for the Magic at the time. And at that moment, Terry Catledge scored the next 45 points in the game himself. That was all it was. Rob Collie (01:03:50): He'd just be standing there waiting for me to inbound the ball to him, he would take it coast to coast and score. He'd backpedal on defense and he would somehow steal the ball and he'd go down and score again. He just sent a message. And if that guy hadn't dunked over Catledge, we would have never seen what Catledge was capable of. So remember, this is a team th

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Not Without My Sister
60 – How Do YOU Handle YOUR Stress?

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 36:00


And how do we handle ours? Beatrice doesn't think she has particularly high stress levels, except, oh yes, for the fact that she hasn't slept the night through in almost a decade. So we talk about things like sleep hygiene, to-do lists, how Rosemary's therapist thinks she might have ADHD (but Rosemary thinks she's just got some bad habits a la Ed Sheeran) and whether or not Mammy Mac Cabe has ever experienced true stress in her life. (And if you are someone who masturbates to relieve stress, we want to know how, exactly, you get yourself in the mood. Let us know anonymously by emailing notwithoutmysis@gmail.com toot sweet!)If you like the podcast, please consider supporting us on Patreon! For the price of a fancy coffee (€4.50/month) you'll get an exclusive weekly bonus episode each and every Friday, along with our main feed Tuesday episodes EARLY and absolutely ad-free! www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister***You can follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is at facebook.com/notwithoutmysister!For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. This episode was edited by Tall Tales, talltales.ie. Sound and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bringin' it Backwards
Interview with P.O.D

Bringin' it Backwards

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 37:01


We had the pleasure of interviewing Marcos Curiel of P.O.D. over Zoom video! P.O.D. — Sonny Sandoval [vocals], Marcos Curiel [guitar], Traa Daniels [bass], and Wuv Bernardo [drums] — have announced their upcoming summer and fall tour plans. The band will embark on a headline tour of the U.S., celebrating the 20th anniversary of their landmark, multi-platinum album Satellite.The tour kicks off August 14 and runs through October 7 in their native San Diego. From Ashes to New, All Good Things, and Sleep Signals will also appear. All dates are below. Tickets are available here."We've been touring and working hard for almost 30 years now," Sandoval says. "It's all we know. This past year has really made me realize how much I love what I do and how much I appreciate that I am still able to make music and play live for all of those who are still listening. Thank you to all of you who still love live music and can't wait to be a part of the P.O.D. experience. We can't wait to see all of your beautiful faces out on the road."Curiel shares the sentiment, saying, "It's been way too long. We are beyond excited to get back to the stage — where we provide the rock and you provide the roll. From familiar faces to new ones, let's get back to what we've all been waiting for. We are ready as a band to create new memories with you all. Let's do this! Peace, love, light, and rock 'n' roll."From Ashes to New's Matt Brandyberry weighed in about the tour, saying, "In 2001, we were literally 'The Youth of the Nation' and P.O.D.'s hit was an anthem to so many of us. Satellite was an album that helped shape a genre and will go down as one of the greatest records of that era. We are honored to join them on this U.S. tour to help celebrate 20 years of an absolute masterpiece." Additionally, P.O.D. will drop the SATELLITE: 20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION as a double-CD and digitally on September 3 for $24.98 through Rhino. It is available for pre-order now. Releasing a few days before the album's official anniversary on September 11, the 27-song collection introduces a newly remastered version of the original album, plus a selection of rarities, remixes, and four previously unreleased demos, including "Alive (Semi-Acoustic Version)," available today. A few weeks later, on October 8, SATELLITE: 20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION will be released on vinyl as a double-LP as a part of Rhino's Rocktober campaign.  After debuting at #6 on the Billboard 200, SATELLITE went on to sell more than seven million copies worldwide, including three million in the U.S. The record generated four singles: the title track, "Alive," "Youth of the Nation," and "Boom." In addition to its commercial success, Satellite also earned P.O.D. three Grammy nominations for: "Alive" (Best Hard Rock Performance, 2002), "Portrait" (Best Metal Performance, 2003), and "Youth of the Nation" (Best Hard Rock Performance, 2003).  SATELLITE: 20TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION has a bonus disc that includes b-sides like "Critic" and "Sabbath" that were initially released in Europe, plus remixes for "Boom" by The Crystal Method and "Youth of the Nation" by Mike$ki.  P.O.D. ON TOUR:WITH FROM ASHES TO NEW, ALL GOOD THINGS, + SLEEP SIGNALS:8/14 — Sturgis, SD – Buffalo Chip*8/16 — Denver, CO — Gothic Theatre8/17 — Omaha, NE — The Waiting Room8/19 — Sioux Falls, SD — The District8/20 — Des Moines, IA — Wooly's8/21 — Glen Flora, WI – Northwoods Rock Rally^8/22 — Minneapolis, MN — First Ave8/25 — Louisville, KY – KY State Fair#8/26 — Fort Wayne, IN — Piere's8/27 — Belvidere, IL — The Apollo Theater8/28 — Joliet, IL — The Forge8/29 — Detroit, MI — St. Andrew's Hall8/31 — Pittsburgh, PA — Roxian Theater9/4 —   Houston, TX – BuzzFest (Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion – KBTZ Show)~9/5 —   Dallas, TX – BFD21 (Dos Equis Pavilion – KEGL Show)~9/9 —   Danville, VA – Blue Ridge Rock Festival^9/10 — New Haven, CT — Toad's Place9/11 — Laconia, NH — Granite State Music Hall9/12 — Worcester, MA — The Palladium9/14 — New York, NY — The Gramercy Theatre9/15 — Huntington, NY — The Paramount9/16 — Baltimore, MD — Ram's Head Live9/18 — Atlanta, GA — Center Stage9/19 — Mobile, AL — Soul Kitchen9/21 — Birmingham, AL — Zydeco9/22 — Savannah, GA — Victory North9/23 — Orlando, FL – Rebel Rock Fest (Pre—Party)~9/25 — Columbia, SC — The Senate9/28 — Cleveland, OH — House of Blues9/29 — St. Louis, MO — Pop's10/1 — Tulsa, OK — Tulsa State Fair10/2 — San Antonio, TX — The Rock Box10/3 — Lubbock, TX — Jake's Backroom10/6 — Santa Ana, CA — The Observatory10/7 — San Diego, CA — House of Blues *With From Ashes to New^With From Ashes to New & All Good Things#With All Good Things~P.O.D. OnlyWe want to hear from you! Please email Tera@BringinitBackwards.com.www.BringinitBackwards.com#podcast #interview #bringinbackpod #POD #PayableOnDeath #SanDiego #20Years #Satellite #zoom #TwentyYears Listen & Subscribe to BiBFollow our podcast on Instagram and Twitter! 

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio
Leviticus 2 — Be holy as the LORD is holy: What are grain offerings?

Thy Strong Word from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 56:28


Rev. Dr. Adam Koontz, Assistant Professor of Exegetical Theology at Concordia Theological Seminary, Fort Wayne, IN joins host Rev. Brady Finnern to study Leviticus 2. God's depth of care for his people is evident with the grain offering. He provides the simple gifts of grain, oil, frankincense, and salt so that His people would, in faith, offer a sacrifice to serve the priests and give thanks to Him. He asks the Israelites to give their firstfruits of their grain and in the same way the LORD asks us to give firstfruits for the sake of the ministry of the Word (2 Corinthians 8 & 9). Everything that we have is a gift from the LORD and we give back to Him boldly confessing that the Lord will provide. “Lord God, help us to be living sacrifices and offer to You our offerings in thanksgiving. As the Israelites gave their hard earned grain, oil, frankincense, and salt back to You, grant us a generous heart, looking to Jesus and His sacrifice to us. In Him we pray, Amen”

Not Without My Sister
59 – Don't Ever Put a Bowl of Nuts out for Arriving Guests

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 32:34


Why does bad luck keep hampering our every holiday attempt?! Why will Beatrice never again provide nuts for guests? Did Travis really steal Philip Mac Cabe's broken tooth? And has Philip kept up his pointe practice? We answer NONE of these questions in today's episode of Not Without My Sister!If you like the podcast, please consider supporting us on Patreon! For the price of a fancy coffee (€4.50/month) you'll get an exclusive weekly bonus episode each and every Friday, along with our main feed Tuesday episodes EARLY and absolutely ad-free! www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister***You can follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is at facebook.com/notwithoutmysister!For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. This episode was edited by Tall Tales, talltales.ie. Sound and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Ex-Man with Doc Coyle
Sahaj Ticotin (Ra, Meytal)

The Ex-Man with Doc Coyle

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 115:01


Doc welcomes producer, songwriter, and singer/guitarist for the band Ra, Sahaj Ticotin, back to the show for the 2nd time, and they talk about Sahaj's move to Fort Wayne, Indiana, what he didn't like about LA, his tendency to over-schedule himself, how he came to do lead vocals for the 2nd Meytal album, getting comfortable with touring again on the Meytal tour, how that inspired him to revive his original band, Ra, what his creative process is like with his very busy schedule producing and writing with so many artists, and his thoughts on the current state of modern rock and pop. This episode features the songs "Lifeline" by Bad Wolves, "Drug Dealer" by In The Whale, and "Interconnected" by Ra. Follow Sahaj on Instagram @Sahaj_Ticotin and Twitter @SahajTic Follow Doc on Instagram and Twitter @DocCoyle Please support this episode's sponsor In The Whale at https://www.inthewhalesucks.com/ Listen to more great podcasts like this at soundtalentmedia.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Not Without My Sister
Summer Jobbin' (Had Us a Blast)

Not Without My Sister

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 39:14


Ah, another glorious walk down memory lane as we recount the summer jobs we had in our not-even-remotely-misspent youths (when you live in the country you really have to try to get into trouble): from potting teeny tiny saplings in teeny tiny pots to serving Sunday dinners to middle-aged golfers, we go deep into the cultural and personal ramifications of being put to work at far too young an age.LOL, no we don't, we just talk about how much money we earned, the day one of us got fired from her part-time job in a jeans emporium and how the other one of us was given the keys to the school (but was not teacher's pet, she swears) over the summer months.If you like the podcast, please consider supporting us on Patreon! For the price of a fancy coffee (€4.50/month) you'll get an exclusive weekly bonus episode each and every Friday, along with our main feed Tuesday episodes EARLY and absolutely ad-free! www.patreon.com/notwithoutmysister***You can follow Rosemary on Instagram @rosemarymaccabe; Beatrice is @beatricemaccabe and you'll find us both on the podcast Instagram @notwithoutmysister. Our Facebook page is at facebook.com/notwithoutmysister!For show notes, sporadic blog posts and assorted random things associated with the podcast, check out our website, notwithoutmysis.com. Want to get in touch? Email us on notwithoutmysis@gmail.com.Not Without My Sister is presented by sisters Beatrice Mac Cabe and Rosemary Mac Cabe, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Our producer is Liam Geraghty. Sound editing and original music by Don Kirkland. Original illustration by Lindsay Neilson. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.