Podcasts about borrowed

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Best podcasts about borrowed

Latest podcast episodes about borrowed

MPR News with Kerri Miller
From the archives: Anatoly Liberman on familial language

MPR News with Kerri Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 31, 2023 49:53


Is there a word or phrase that you grew up with, something you felt was unique to your family? Maybe it was an expression your parents or grandparents used to show affection or describe frustration, only to eventually discover it had foreign origins? Or perhaps you still wonder where it came from? Borrowed words have flooded most languages, including English. In August 2021, Anatoly Liberman, beloved etymologist and professor of languages at the University of Minnesota, joined MPR News host Kerri Miller to explore the roots of familial words. In that interview, he mentioned he had just finished a dictionary of idioms. That book finally published in January 2023. This Friday on Big Books and Bold Ideas, Liberman is back with Miller to discuss it. In the meantime, enjoy this joyous conversation about familiar words from our archives. Guest:  Anatoly Liberman is a linguist and professor of languages at the University of Minnesota.  To listen to the full conversation you can use the audio player above.  Subscribe to the MPR News with Kerri Miller podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts or RSS. Subscribe to the Thread newsletter for the latest book and author news and must-read recommendations. 

The Secret Thoughts of CEO's Podcast
Building Trust By Balancing Experience and Innovation in Family Business Leadership with Dennis Jaffe, Ph.D.

The Secret Thoughts of CEO's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 54:00


Dr. Jaffe, a San Francisco-based advisor to families about family business, governance, wealth, and philanthropy, is Senior Research Fellow at BanyanGlobal Family Business Advisors. He is author of Borrowed from Your Grandchildren: The Evolution of 100-Year Family Enterprises; Finding Her Voice and Leaving a Legacy; Cross Cultures: How Global Families Negotiate Change Across Generations; Stewardship in your Family Enterprise: Developing Responsible Family Leadership Across Generations and Working with the Ones You Love. His global insights have led to teaching or consulting engagements in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Latin America.    What You'll Learn:   How clarity on your personal values and your business values builds trust with the people around you, both in and outside of your organization The benefit of having values defined over just policies and procedures How to create dialogue on how your values are applied in your organization The necessity of evolution in values in a family business How to integrate the voices and ideas of younger generations with the formal power of the older generation of leaders A story of how disconnect between generations in leadership style can be managed in a healthy way How to identify when it's time to pass the torch Why Dennis believes that leading the family business should be a mid-life position The opportunity for a “bonus-career” after passing the torch Separating past conflict from making future decisions Creating a code of conduct for your family How to recognize when it's time to diversify the family business A look at whether or not spirituality belongs in business Resources:   Borrowed from Your Grandchildren: The Evolution of 100-Year Family Enterprises

GUIDE Culture® Podcast
The Time Macy Borrowed $100K for the Business (with 9% interest rate)

GUIDE Culture® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 20:34


What's the biggest investment you can make in your business + life?An investment in yourself.As Macy + Kat have had conversations with students this week, 9/10 times the one thing holding them back is the willingness to make an investment in themselves because of self doubt.In today's episode, we cover: what that self doubt feels like when you truly sit in itthe time that Macy borrowed $100K for her business (and you'll never guess who loaned it to her!)the one non-negotiable line item in Macy + Kat's annual budgetidentifying as someone who makes things work for youIf you're feeling the pull to join School of Sales but fear is holding you back, this episode is for you! If you have questions about if you're the right fit, drop Macy + Kat a DM at @theguideculture. Enroll in School of Sales (deadline to enroll is January 27, 2023).Connect with us: https://www.instagram.com/theguideculture/

Last Call With Jamion Christian
29) Greg Berge (Principal/Coach/Author/Speaker) - Powered by SpeakeasyForSports - Last Call Podcast

Last Call With Jamion Christian

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 18:52


In Episode 29 of Last Call, Jamion Christian is joined by Principal/Coach/Author/Speaker Greg Berge to discuss: -Defining culture -Borrowed experiences -Routines And much more. Please make sure to Subscribe to Last Call, give our show a five-star rating, and follow @JamionChristian and @SpeakeasyFor on Twitter! yWant exclusive access to content and direct connections with the top names in basketball? Join the Speakeasy today at speakeasyforsports.com. More ways to listen, follow, and interact with SpeakeasyForSports: linktr.ee/SpeakeasyFor ------------------------------------- This podcast is produced by Three Two Strategies.

No New Friends Podcast
Use a borrowed Shaft instead of your own!: Adulting Tip #134

No New Friends Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 67:19


Scott experienced more awkward encounters at work. Chris goes on a rant about shafts and balls. Adulting question of the week, Jersey Man Vs Florida Man, Chris' Cliff Notes and much more! #awkwardencounters #shafts #Balls #topgolf #ShaftgoopTo connect with us, check out our sweetmerch or join our Clubhouse and become a friend with benefits, visit ourwebsite www.nonewfriendspodcast.com. Please support our sponsors. Kaufman andLynd www.whenyouneedus.com, Sandpiper Vacations (tell them that the No NewFriends Podcast Sent you) www.sandpipervacations.com, i Believe Serviceswww.ibelieveservice.us, Night Watchman Ghost Tours use Promo Code NNF for 25%discount.. www.manscaped.com use thepromo code NNF for 20% off. www.seeamericatours.net. https://newsly.me/ and the promo code N0NEWFR1ENDS.

SoonerNation: Oklahoma Sooners
Is The Oklahoma Softball Non-Conference Schedule More Difficult Than Playing The Big 12?

SoonerNation: Oklahoma Sooners

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 46:28


The door to the transfer portal closing this week means that spring sports are about to take center stage. We'll spend some time discussing Oklahoma Softball in this episode but we've got some other things on tap as well....like Oklahoma getting beat down in Bedlam Basketball. Episode Talking Points Discussing The Bedlam Beatdown Oklahoma Softball dominates the preseason rankings Is the non-conference portion of Oklahoma's schedule more difficult than what they'll face in the Big 12? True or False? Spencer Sanders lost in the transfer portal Porter Moser is not the guy Jeff Lebby is on Borrowed time at OU Big 12 scheduling debacle is just another reason OU needs to get out the door Blake Smith is good for depth but won't be a solid contributor Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ben Davis & Kelly K Show
Feel Good: Borrowed Wedding Dress

Ben Davis & Kelly K Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 1:51


It's become the sisterhood of the traveling wedding dress! A woman lends her wedding dress to a bride across the globe, who is a complete stranger! And it FITS. SOURCE: https://www.wdjx.com/bride-lends-her-pricey-gown-to-stranger-across-the-world/

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Wednesday 11/1 - Biden's Borrowed Documents, The FAA, & Katie Porter

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 37:54


An FAA system failure prompted massive flight delays Wednesday morning. All domestic departures were grounded until 9 a.m. ET, though the Federal Aviation Administration. The White House announced Wednesday that President Biden has been briefed on the massive FAA outage, though asserting that there's no evidence it was caused by any cyberattack.  Fresno Fire has opened an arson investigation on the recent strip mall fire that destroyed several businesses in Fresno.  There will be a reward through Valley Crime Stoppers. If you have any information, call the Fresno Fire Arson Tip Line at 559-621-2776.  Katie Porter, California Congresswoman, Is Running for Senate Ms. Porter is the first announced challenger to Fellow Dem - Senator Dianne Feinstein, 89, who has yet to declare her 2024 plans but is widely expected to not seek re-election. Ms. Feinstein, said she would “make an announcement concerning my plans for 2024 at the appropriate time.” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Doug Collins Podcast
Rumsfeld's Rules: What we can learn from Borrowed Wisdom

The Doug Collins Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 28:40


Today on The Doug Collins Podcast, I take a look back at a book by Former Sec of Defense Donald Rumsfeld that looks at his collection of life rules that he accumulated over the years.  A great podcast to set the tone for the new year.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

OCB Podcast
OCB Podcast #162 - The Fruit & Flowers Anniversary

OCB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 34:42


Neil & Scott celebrate the 4th anniversary of the O.C. Bombers podcast by discussing the Rolling Stone Top 200 Singers list, there's a pop up MART of NFL play by play announcers, and Big Sister Jodi reveals her Something Old, New, Borrowed, & Blue music selections. Enjoy!

Mike Crispi Unafraid
MCCARTHY BEGGED, BORROWED AND STOLE

Mike Crispi Unafraid

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 51:30


The inside story of how McCarthy won, NOW WHAT DO WE DO as true conservatives?- Brazil has their own version of January 6th and nobody covered it, that's strange!- Hakeem Jeffries represents a new breed of Democrat leader- Biden visits..the border, kind of, not really- MikeCrispi.com for more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Harvest Sarasota Podcast
Borrowed Breathe

The Harvest Sarasota Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 43:00


Text to Give:(941) 999-3531Give online:http://harvestsarasota.com/giveWebsite:http://www.harvestsarasota.com

Rule Breaker Investing
Old, New, Borrowed & Blue, Vol. 6

Rule Breaker Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 38:05


We're kicking off 2023 looking back, looking forward, looking outward, and looking past the same old blues. It's a new year, Fools — let's make it ever better! (3:18) Old: Tesla beats Ford (12:32) New: Cool stuff (23:29) Borrowed: Completing Capitalism (29:38) Blue: Reaching past peak polarization Stocks mentioned: TSLA, F, DUO Host: David Gardner Producer: Rick Engdahl

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Paige Onweller - Lifetime Grand Prix Gravel Racer

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 50:27


This week we sit down with Michigan based, professional gravel racer, Paige Onweller. Paige, a former runner, had her ups and downs throughout the 2022 season, but ended it with a bang with a victory at Big Sugar Gravel in October. She is looking forward to doubling down on her efforts for the 2023 season. Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the broadcast. We welcome page on Weller. Uh, gravel racer from grand rapids, Michigan. Paige participated in the inaugural lifetime grand Prix in 2022. And has been selected for the grand Prix. Again in 2023, she finished the season with a big victory at big sugar gravel in Bentonville, Arkansas this year, and is really excited to be able to dedicate more time to the sport. Pages and other one of those amazing female athletes who discovered the sport after a career, as a runner. Only a few years ago, she was riding a trainer and figuring out how to ride a bike outdoors. Pedro we'll get into how she got into the sport of cycling, what our journey's been over the last couple of years. And what our experience has been joining the lifetime grand Prix and racing throughout the year with all the best female athletes in the gravel cycling world. With that said let's jump right into my conversation with Paige. Paige, welcome to the show. [00:01:26] Paige Onweller: Thanks, Craig. Glad I'm here [00:01:28] Craig Dalton: Good to see you. Yeah, it sounded like you had a busy day in the er, so I'm pleased you're making time for us this evening, [00:01:34] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. I was a little, a little late to this meeting, so thank you for being flexible. The ER is a little busy these days. [00:01:40] Craig Dalton: Yeah, no, of course. My pleasure. Hey, I always love to start off Paige by getting to know you a little bit about your background, like where did you grow up? [00:01:48] Paige Onweller: So I grew up in kind of a smaller town called Lapeer. Uh, it's in Michigan, kind of in the thumb area. Uh, maybe like an hour north of Ann Arbor, uh, if people know that as a reference point. Um, yeah. And then I went to undergrad at Fair State University up in Big Rapids, also in Michigan, and then, uh, grad school in Grand Rapids. And I've been settled in Grand Rapids for the last, about 10. [00:02:11] Craig Dalton: Got it. And were you a, were you a sporty young lady? [00:02:14] Paige Onweller: Uh, kind of, my parents kind of made us get into sports. Like I think they wanted to keep us out of trouble and keep us busy. And so, um, yeah, I did like, uh, swimming and diving and softball, volleyball track, cross country. Um, I was a big runner. Uh, I actually got a scholarship to, to run at Ferris and that's, you know, cross country and track. So I did running. Many years of my life and was a very dedicated runner, even after college on some post collegiate elite teams. Um, that's kind of where most of my athletic background was. [00:02:46] Craig Dalton: what was that journey like as a, as a runner would, did you sort of materialize in high school that you had a good endurance endurance engine or. Wear of a sprinter at that point. [00:02:55] Paige Onweller: I was more middle distance. To be honest. I never really, I kind of wasn't all around her. Like I, I definitely wasn't a sprinter, but I kind of excelled at. 400 meters and anything up to two mile, uh, at least in high school. Uh, but more focused on like the mile and 800. And then in college was similar. I was more middle distance, uh, 1500 meter, um, was kind of my specialty in, in track. And then in cross country it's just a six K for uh, ncaa. Um, so that was kind of my specialty overall. Um, but I got injured a lot and. , I think, you know, I could have done much better, like in the 10 K or 5k, I think would've suited me more. Um, but I think I was just always injured that we kind of kept doing the middle distance, shorter volume, you know, or, or less volume. Uh, but then after college is kind of when I started to hit my stride a bit in the endurance events, um, like I did at Ultra-Marathon in Grand Canyon. and that was like 55 miles, um, like rim to rim, to rim it's called. Um, and started doing like more half marathons and those longer distance events. And that's when I, like, I was beating all of my college times and just really excelling. So I think after college, once I was healthy and not getting injured as much, I was able to kind of, you know, consistency really helps with endurance . So if you're not getting injured and you can keep running, then you're gonna do. [00:04:15] Craig Dalton: That's quite a huge journey from where you started out as a runner to doing ultra-marathons, as you progressively grabbed hold of longer distance events. Was that, did it feel sort of more comfortable and more what you were built for? [00:04:30] Paige Onweller: I don't know. I, I mean, I was still running similar mileage throughout the week, but a lot of it was like power hiking up hills and like getting used to like the vertical gain because in running, like. Ultra-marathons are very, um, there's a lot more climbing and descending, and you have to get your quads ready for like that descending load, um, and the, the EENT changes that occur. And so I feel like. It was similar but yet very different. The volume was similar, but the intensity was much lower. Um, and I think that probably helped. Um, but honestly, like I just love being outside and being outdoors and I just like working out . And so, um, yeah, I mean, I think the little longer stuff was. Was fun to me and obviously more challenging just in a different way though, like, you know, a half marathon and 10 miles, like what I loved. And those are like, you know, hour, hour and 20 minute all out efforts, um, relative to like an endurance ultra marathon, which is like the whole day. So just kind of a different type of pain, I guess, , but I enjoyed the process for both and, and how you train for. [00:05:38] Craig Dalton: Yeah. They're so distinctly different as running disciplines. I've done a little bit of ultra marathoning myself and I I hear you like it's this descending that really adds up. But for me, the interesting thing was it was a complete mentality shift, right? Because you'll, you're running in the woods, you come up to a big hill and the 10 K in, you wants to run hard over everything. But every ultra-marathon and coach or colleague or friend is gonna tell. Just shift into another gear and walk up this hill. Yeah, to power hike up the [00:06:08] Paige Onweller: yeah, no, for sure. And it's, it's funny you say that, like the, the mental change is, you know, more than anything, and I've been a coach for many years and when I was coaching ultra marathoners, like one of the primary focus, you know, in, in the season was focusing and developing why they wanted to do that race. And cuz there was studies and research to show. Having an emotional bond to those longer events gets you through it versus like, you know, an hour and a half. So that's like a whole different way to train and it's like more mental training than the shorter distances. And I always thought that was fun. And you know, my medical background kind of makes me a little bit more intrigued into that as well. [00:06:45] Craig Dalton: Yeah, a hundred percent. Like you just have to believe and you have to always put a foot forward. And I think, I'm sure we'll get into this later, just how the, the parallels with gravel racing, particularly the long stuff, you just, you gotta keep going and know that your body's capable of much more than you probably think it is capable of. [00:07:02] Paige Onweller: Yeah, for sure. [00:07:03] Craig Dalton: So did you discover cycling at any point in that journey so far? [00:07:08] Paige Onweller: Um, I mean, you know, I would hop on a spin bike when I was injured, right? But it was always dreadful. I'm like, oh, I'd rather be running and I'm here in spin class. This is lame. Um, but you know, it was like, I didn't know any of the numbers meant, and it was always kind of a punishment for me. So, I had no idea what, you know, it was always like, What I had to do to stay in shape for running. Every time I was injured, I'd go on the bike. Um, and it was usually a stationary bike or a spin bike, but it wasn't until the pandemic, uh, so about two years ago is when I started biking outside. Um, and that was terrifying, like the clipping in for the first time. And I was like, what am I doing? You know, I'm like, this is horrendous. I'm gonna a crash. Um, let's see my, see my colleagues at the medical clinic. Um, but yeah, I think. For me, that's kind of when I first started, but it was still because I wanted to get better at running. So what I was doing is I was running like 40 to 50 miles a week, and then I would be trying to hit like, five to six hours on the bike a week as well. Um, and then I started biking more and realizing like, well, this is actually a lot of fun. And I started, you know, getting Strava kms and I was like, oh, well I'm beating these cyclists like maybe I'm, you know, pretty good at it. And I just think I started to enjoy it. But it wasn't a competitive, um, component for me. It was like just simply to get in more of. Aerobic training and cardiovascular training did benefit my running. And I did the ultra-marathon that fall. Um, and that was, so that would've been 2020 and did the ultra-marathon. So I kind of stopped biking for a little while to help with the legs. And then that, that winter I was like, okay, I'm gonna get whiffed and I'm gonna have an indoor setup because I liked biking this summer and I can do that throughout the winter. So I signed up for Zift and then, you know, a couple of local friends were like, you should do this with Community League. And I was like, oh, that sounds fun. do the community races. So I do started doing those first. When I signed up, it was like all out from the gate, um, swift, I think I dropped hard, like finished near the back and I was like, well, this is hard Um, and I was like, what am I doing? And eventually I just kept showing up and learning, you know, the tactics within thew world and then started winning the community events and that, that's kind of how I got recruited to my first pro team, um, was for eSports on Zift because of you. Essentially my raw power. Um, yeah. And that's when I first started to realize like, I'm just a competitive person and so you put me in a situation where I have the potential to win. I'm like, oh yeah, I wanna do that again, . So, uh, that's when I was like, oh, maybe I should race bikes, you know, like that, that could be fun. Um, so that's when that transition. Transition started, um, and I actually did sign up for a triathlon. I did, um, St. George, uh, 70.3 as my first, uh, triathlon. And then that was the last one I ever did, , cuz I realized biking is way better, [00:10:00] Craig Dalton: I don't wanna glance over something that I think every athlete goes through. You were also building a, another career in the background post-college. So do you wanna talk about what you've been doing professionally that has been effectively financing some of your racing endeavors in the running world, at least to date? [00:10:17] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. Well, I end up finding a lot of my cycling stuff too. Um, which, you know, I don't, we, it's a whole nother topic right there, but I don't think people understand that as much, you know, when you race pro, like they assume you have all the support. Uh, but we can get into that later. But yeah, so I work as a physician assistant. Uh, I've been a PA now eight years, and I've. Worked and practice all in acute care. Uh, so either urgent care or emergency medicine. Um, and I work for an emergency medicine group right now. Um, and I've had various roles, uh, very career driven, you know, I'm just an eager, motivated person, and so I've had. department lead roles where I'm help managing and more of an administrative role in the department. Um, so yeah, I've been a PA eight years and just a very busy person. Um, and it's, it's a great job, but medicine has changed a lot. If you talk to any medical provider, particularly some, someone that works in the ER or the urgent care, um, they will say medicine has definitely changed over the last few, few years, and part of that is covid, but we live in a very, Demanding world. And that floats over to medicine as well where patients are, uh, coming in and it's, it's not like they're always asking for medical advice, which is what we're trained to give, um, and use evidence-based medicine. It's more like demands and that can sometimes be a little exhausting. Um, cuz you know, we're there to help people and use science and, um, you know, there's a lot of stuff on the internet that patients come in and. you know, talk to us about. Um, but it's a, it's a hard job. Uh, it's very rewarding. But, you know, I've had to tell patients they have, you know, a new mask that's likely cancer. Um, you know, just today I had to tell a woman she's mis discouraging and telling her what I saw on her exam and. , you know, just helping patients process and essentially my job is if someone comes in, they have a problem and I'm supposed to fix it and make sure they're not dying. So, uh, it's rewarding, but it's also very mentally exhausting and it is, it's a hard job. [00:12:17] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I wanted to make sure to highlight that. Cause I know like many athletes as you, as you said before, like there's this aura that your name is inve and you must be having a full ride with your sponsors and all you do is train. But I think you'll probably attest that, you know, probably 90% of the pro Peloton has other jobs behind them allowing them to do these things. [00:12:40] Paige Onweller: Yeah. And you know, it's best. And I also, um, you know, I own a coaching business and I coach, um, and that has allowed me to have work that's more mobile and, you know, a little bit more relaxing work, I should say. Not as mentally demanding or physically demanding too. Cuz right now, like, I don't know if people understand, like this last year, like I still had to work my weekend requirement, which is every other weekend. or every third weekend depending on which job I was at. And so, you know, basically I would like stack my hours in the ER and urgent care work, crazy amount of hours, like 56, 50, 60 hours, you know, in a week or a little over a week. And then I'd fly to a race, race bikes for a week, come back, work in the er, urgent care. So it was like this constant yo-yo of two lives. And I knew it wasn't sustainable for too long, but I knew I could do it for one year. Like anything's tolerable. Like if you have an end. Um, and I also knew, like I had so much potential in cycling, I just hadn't had the opportunity to get the support that I needed. Um, and you have to earn that. Like, there, I never expected to have, you know, to only be able to race bikes. Like I was thinking it'd be a five year process for me to get financial support. Um, but yeah, I mean, it's, it's. very hard. And I do think, you know, for example, social media is a good example. We're posting all the positives and, and that's a good thing. We want to do that. Um, but at the end of the day, the reality is like, it's not always as glamorous as people may, you know, assume that it is. [00:14:06] Craig Dalton: Yeah, so you were just touching on your journey. You got identified as, uh, a strong athlete via the zw kind of experience. Fast forward. When did you start racing outside on a bike, you know, kind of formally. And then let's jump into how the heck you got selected for the 2022 Lifetime Grand Prix. [00:14:30] Paige Onweller: yeah, yeah. So, , I think like, and I'm sorry, I'm gonna mute my, I'm not sure if you're getting notified. Um, I apologize. I just wanna make sure that you're not getting, are you hearing the dinging on your [00:14:43] Craig Dalton: No, no, [00:14:44] Paige Onweller: Oh, you are? Okay, cool. Yeah, won't worry about that then. Um, yeah, so I first started racing bikes, um, . So I basically did, started Swift the winter of 2020 to 2021 and then I was racing the premier leg ands with, after doing all the validation testing and making sure that like, you know, I was legit and not weight doping and, and power doping and all that stuff. Um, and then so my first like main, you know, race was, um, , you know, I did some time trials, so I got an coach coaches' exception to race U s a Pro Road Nationals in 2021. So that was one of my first like main races. I did a local, uh, time trial, Willow tt, uh, before that, but really like that was one of my first outdoor races, which is, Somewhat terrifying to show up at like Pro Road Nationals and like barely riding your bike outside. Um, I didn't know how to do a U-turn. Like I just really was afraid to ride the disc. Um, had no idea what I was doing to be, to be honest. Um, and it was kind of a disappointing, I think I was 11th there, which honestly is not that bad. Um, my, my power was really good, but again, like I lost so much time in the U-turns and I really wasn't maintaining an arrow position because I think. Guarded. And you know, if you barely know how to ride a bike and then you put an 80 mill up front, a disc on the back and then tell someone to get a really aggressive TT position, you're probably not gonna hold that . So, um, I kind of, you know, I was a little jaded after that experience because I had a coach at the time that kind of. Kind of dropped me, uh, I think because I had a disappointing, um, uh, race according to them and the team that I was previously on. And that honestly like little fire under my ass, uh, pardon of my language. Um, and so I was kind of told like, well, you don't need a coach. Like you just need to learn how to ride your bike. And in my mind I'm like, well, that's why I need a coach. And so I went and hired my own coach, paid my own money. Um, and then I signed up for the biggest mass dark gravel race that I could find. And I said, gravel doesn't have all these rules, like with road. I was working a lot of weekends and I live in the Midwest. There's not access to road races to do all the category upgrades, and it just didn't make sense for me. And Gravel seemed like a good way to like try to prove myself, um, and have the opportunity to race against the guys and really show like I was strong. So sign Up for Gravel Worlds. That was August of last year. That was my very. Mass start, bike race. Um, my very first ever bike race was the March bef, uh, so the march that, uh, March in 2021, but they did Covid wave, so I really don't count that as a mass start race. Um, so I would say, yeah, August, 2021 Gravel Worlds was my first mass start race, and I kind of told myself like, okay. Don't die because I like had barely rid it in a pack before. I didn't know what I was doing. And that race also starts in a dark, so it's like dark. There's like gravel flying everywhere. You're in a pack. I'm like, I'm gonna die. Like what am I doing? Um, But I didn't die. Uh, I definitely did. Okay. I was fifth. Um, but I remember thinking like, a, I had fun. B I did decently well relative to like, my experience. And I was like dangling off the Peloton, right? Like I wasn't in the middle. I didn't know how to draft. And so there's just all these things where I was like, okay, I think there's something here. Um, and again, more importantly, like I had fun. The community was great. That event is very inclusive, and so it was just a really good. First experience. Um, and so then I signed up and I did Barry Rebe that fall, and I ended up getting second there. Um, and yeah, I kind of thought to myself, you know, maybe I have a, have a future in this. I did iceman, you know, I barely rid a mountain bike. Borrowed a mountain bike from a local guy. His name's Peter. He had messaged me. He is like, you should do this. And I'm like, what? Single track? No way. Um, so yeah, last year was kind of like my first experience without all that. And then when I heard about the lifetime Grand pr. I kind, I applied thinking like, there's no way I'll get in, but [00:18:31] Craig Dalton: And was your, was your application sort. , Hey, I was this, this runner. I had this career in running and I've transitioned. I've shown these sort of glimmers of potential already kind of thing. [00:18:43] Paige Onweller: Yeah, and I, I had just highlighted and said like, I need more opportunity to show how strong I am and I need help with that. Like, I didn't even know about race centuries. You have to register and get into the lotteries. Like, before I even knew, I didn't even know what S B T was like, I was that new. People don't understand, like I have no idea even what these races are like. And so I didn't know there was a lottery. I had never even heard of the race before now. And so yeah, I kind of entered and my application was mostly. Hey, like, I think I'm strong, but I haven't had the opportunity. I've had bad experiences. Um, I've been put down and I'm a female and, and I feel like I have an opportunity to prove myself. So I kind of, I think I framed it in that way. Um, honestly, it was like a year ago. I'm not exactly sure what I put, um, but I do remember saying like, I'm not an influencer. I barely, I think I had like, I don't know, 800, you know, Instagram followers. So I told them. I'm not here to influence. Um, I don't know if social media's important to you, but I think I'm strong. And if you look at my story, I was fifth at gravel worlds against all these people. And uh, I was second at Barry Rebe and I was top 10 at Iceman. I think there's something there, like, please give me a chance. Um, and I didn't have any expectations. Of course you want to get in, but I was out on a training ride with a friend. I remember checking my email and I, I remember getting in and being like, oh no, I gotta buy a mountain bike. No. Like I was, you know, what did I get myself into? Um, so that was like very, very scary, if I'm being honest. Uh, and I was also working, um, and so I was worried about fitting everything in. Um, I was on a gravel. for this last year. So I did not have any mountain bike support. I had to source my own bike, pay for my own bike, uh, you know, all of that stuff. So yeah, I was like very excited I got in, but I was also scared and recognizing like I had to fund the mountain bike portion of my season. Um, but I also knew like worst case scenario, I would just really get experience in learning and I just am so new that I needed that experience. So of course I was gonna give it a whirl, [00:20:47] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Amazing. And obviously the Lifetime Grand Prix is a variety of different races, as you noted, both mountain bike and gravel cycling. How did you feel sort of at Sea Otter kicking off the year? There's a bunch of single track there. You have to get pretty aggressive to sort of do well in a race like that to get out and get, get out in front and be able to stay out in front [00:21:09] Paige Onweller: Yeah. And Sea Otter was horrible if I'm being totally transparent. Uh, so to put things into perspective, uh, my very first time riding a mountain bike was that fall, like that October, 2021. And then I live in Michigan, so I have no mountains here to train. We have the winters and so sea otter's in April and our trails like, really aren't that rideable. Um, and so I went to see ot. with like very minimal experience. Um, and I remember going there on a pre ride, um, and I literally crashed, I think it was like four, three or four times on the one pre ride and I broke my fork. Um, thankfully the guys at Fox replaced it for me. It was incredible. Um, but the reality is like, I remember crying on the sideline of the trail thinking. what am I doing? Like, I, I can't do this. Like, I can't even pre ride and stay upright. There's no way I can race in, in this course. immediately, I had to change perspective and say like, I can't view this as a race. I'm a very competitive person. If I view this as a race, like I will be competitive. So in my mind, I said, Seattle's gonna be my wash race. I'm just gonna do this as a skills day. Like literally view it as a skills day. Stay upright. Don't ruin your whole season. And then drop the race and you'll be fine. And so, um, yeah, I'm not gonna lie, I hated it. It was not a fun race for me because like, I just, you know, the descending, like the climbs, gimme a climb any, any day I will climb my heart out. I love climbing. My power to weight ratio is great. So climbs I excel at. But the reality is like you climb, you pass a bunch of people and those same people are passing you, not pedaling, doesn't make you feel the greatest. And [00:22:47] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I feel like many people who are listening may not be mountain bikers or have mountain bike racing experience, and it is definitely different being out there on the single track. And it's amazing, you know, if you're just not comfortable with the single, with the flow of the single track, or going fast through single track on the descents, make you nervous. [00:23:06] Paige Onweller: Right, [00:23:06] Craig Dalton: is like, you know, minutes and tens of minutes of time that can be lost versus someone who's just has the experience to be comfortable and, and let the bike flow. [00:23:15] Paige Onweller: For sure, for sure. And I don't think people realize like the type of mountain biking definitely changes. Like I was used to like tacky dirt in the Midwest, um, on our trails in the woods in sc Otter, it's like rock with like kitty litter and like you can't corner the same way you would in the Midwest. And so. , I think like pros that have been writing many years and have all these experiences across different terrains, like really have that knowledge. Um, and for me, like that was the first time I'm like, why am I going down? Like I know I'm cornering the right body position. Like I studied this. Um, and then I'm just like, oh, well it's totally different terrain. It's, you know, then someone said, oh, you're writing on kitty litter. I'd never heard that term before. Um, and I was like, yeah, that, that makes a lot of sense. [00:23:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I always, I thought that was interesting when the Lifetime Grand Prix came up and, and I understood the type of racing they were gonna have the athletes do, because it really does require that you've got a full bag of tricks. So it's interesting, you know, and I, I'm interested as we fast forward through this conversation at the end of 22, like, you know, how your skillsets have evolved and your comfort level, and as we go into 23, what that means for. Potential in these races. But so you start off at Sea Otter, have some ups and downs there, and then I forget what's next in the calendar. But why don't you quickly walk us through some of the other racing through the [00:24:31] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. So Seattle Oter. Um, and then unfortunately after Seattle Oter, uh, I was really gunning for Unbound. Unbound suits me very well, that course profile and like my power strengths and how I ride. Um, so Unbound was like the big priority of the race. Um, and I had like set a goal to podium at Unbound, um, top three. And so I was like, okay, like this is gonna be a good year, unbounds of my race. This is right up my skillset. And I was out on a training ride back in April and ended up crashing. Um, a cross wind kind of took me out in a really loose section. It was not ideal. Ended up having to have, uh, surgery to remove, uh, like a surgical debridement of my left knee cuz of all the gravel debris. Um, and that really set me back. I had like a month of like minimal to no riding and that my leg was immobilized and non-weightbearing. And so, Yeah, going into Unbound, I had been off the bike for like, literally a whole month and I started riding like, uh, three weeks, three or four weeks before Unbound. And so I was really trying to say like, I just need to not do Unbound. Um, but I also knew, like I have very little experience with Mass Start races and I know Unbound is very chaotic in the beginning, and so I kind of told myself, do the. Go all out, like you would act like you're in shape, behave like you're in shape, race, like you're in shape, knowing that I probably will blow up and that's fine, but I, I wanted that experience and then I would just, you know, maybe a miracle would happen and I'd pull it together. But, um, I mostly did it because I knew I needed the experience with a ma start. So, uh, showed up with very, very, very little fitness. Um, and then also a little bit like scared because after you have a crash with a surgery like. You know, you're very, you're a little bit more timid and I'm already timid at that point, So that was a challenge in itself just to show up and race. So, ended up getting through and I, I did fairly well. I started off a little bit more conservatively, then I started checking it off people, but then I totally bonked. Um, and it was like so painful, a painful death. And then I ended up crashing, like. at mile one 30 and hurt the knee. That, and so anyways, I, I ended up DN Fing at Unbound and I had never DN FD a race before. Um, so that was Unbound and then, then I was like, okay, crusher's next and starting to get fitness back. Um, then I got covid like two weeks before, um, crusher and I have asthma. I did not do well with Covid. I got very sick. that derailed, trailing or training yet again. So I showed up to Crusher, was like, do I do this? Do I not do this? You know, I was like, do it for the experience. Uh, ended up, you know, not doing very well there. I think I was like 15 through 18th or something like that. And so at that point my season just was not going very well and I was racing pretty poorly. I was like, do I even finish out the Grand Prix series? Like. , this is costing money for me. Like a time, like I'm taking all this time off of work to go to these events and travel. Um, and I was just struggling mentally, like just really wasn't happy with where I was at. Um, and so I actually kind of did something different and I went and did a ran nearing event and ran nearing is basically, um, , I don't know if you're familiar with it or not, but it's not a race. It's like ultra endurance cycling where you show up and the camaraderie is the main goal of the event, not competition. And a close friend of mine in training partner was doing a 750 miler. So basically we you ride from New York up to Montreal, then back to New York again. And so. . I was like, this seems kind of wild, but I just needed something different to remove, like the disappointment of having a poor season. And so I ended up doing that for him, just thinking it'd be a good mental reset, get me in shape, you know, for the rest of the year. But it was like 10 days before Leadville. So uh, I had like a 33 hour week, uh, leading into to Leadville. Not an ideal taper. Uh, you know, I joke and I call that the anti taper. Um, but it really was the mental reset that I needed. And I think too many times people set a calendar at the beginning of the year, especially pro riders because there's a lot on the line for us. The sponsors need to know, you know, there's, we plan our whole year around this and I think there needs to be some flexibility because you don't know what's gonna happen in eight months, six months, or whatever case may be. And for me, I knew my mental, where I was at mentally. Is going to impact where I finished in a race more than what people I think recognize. And so for me that mental reset at that event was really, really important. I showed up to Leadville with the anti taper as I talk about, and ended up doing really well. I was seventh there. And then, um, s B T was a bit of a struggle, I think just because of all the subsequent fatigue, uh, in the earlier weeks, and then ended up getting fourth, that lead boat. Um, and that's when I started to feel like my normal self again. I said, okay. Performance is getting back to where I think it should be. And, uh, I was starting to feel like I was racing again. Leadville was hard just because of the descending, and I'm not used to that. Um, and I've never raced a altitude either, so that was like a whole nother animal in itself. Um, yeah, so that was kind of through the summer and then, Schwa again, was after that, and Schwa again was a Med Fest. I've barely, I've barely ridden in any mud. You know, I've, there's a lot of racing, uh, that I haven't done, um, in a variety of conditions, but I felt like I always joke and say, schwa again was my very first CY Lacrosse race. And that's what it felt like to me. I was like, if I were to ever do cycl cost, this is what I would imagine it'd be like, except on skinnier tires. Um, ended up crashing at Schwam again, no surprise there because it was so muddy and I don't have that experience. Um, but I, I fought my way back, you know, fell off the group and then time trialed my way back and motor mooted through, you know, the chorus as much as I can and got seventh there. Um, so still a respectable finish [00:30:16] Craig Dalton: Yeah, very much so. Even on the ones that you said were, you know, like, oh, I, you know, didn't do that well or went in with a light mentality like you were consistently performing, you know, you weren't maybe knocking on the door of the podium on any of these yet. [00:30:28] Paige Onweller: Right. [00:30:29] Craig Dalton: but you, you were up there. [00:30:30] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. And I was kind of like, that's why I always joke, you know, before big sugar, you know, I did that, uh, news article with Vela News that I was kind of the dark horse because I was kind of like there under the radar. And you know, the unfortunate part with this sport and with any support is that like you really don't get the attention unless you're winning. Right. Um, and you know, there's some exceptions to that and there's, there's nothing wrong with that. Um, but I do think there's a lot of really strong athletes that are like consistent. , you know, performing quite well. Um, but they might not get the spotlight as as much. Um, and so for me, like, you know, I was. Okay. You know, I just, you know, this is something I'm always struggling with too, is just to be happy with what you have that day. Um, because I'm always, I'm always wanting more. Right. Um, and some of that is knowing what I'm capable of. And part of that is like wanting to prove, like, Who I am and what I, what my worth is in this sport. Mostly because I had, I had some rejection last year. My very first, you know, year in the sport, I was rejected by, you know, someone that I respected and I looked up to, and that was my coach. And then, you know, so I think like that kind of always had stayed with me a bit. Um, you know, and I admit that, you know, And I don't know if I should admit that, but I think there is some truth to that. And, and as an athlete, you need to assess like where the drive is coming from and you need to make sure it's from a healthy place. Um, so I did a lot of that this year in making sure that like, I wanna win because it's for me. Um, and not having anything to prove either. And I say that like I had had to prove myself, had to prove myself. I think I'm at a place now. I know what I'm capable of and other people know that too. Um, but in gravel it's such an unpredictable sport that you can be there, you can have the legs for the, for the win, but it doesn't mean that you're going to win. Um, [00:32:22] Craig Dalton: I think, yeah, I think as you go back to races every year the weather conditions can change. You can have a mechanical, you can have nutritional issues. There's so many things that can go wrong in these long events that it's, it's really, it's hard to keep going and cuz you always know, it's like something went wrong. I'm sure even in like a great day, winning big sugar, something still went long wrong along the way that you had to cure and keep. [00:32:46] Paige Onweller: for sure. Yeah. I think the biggest thing is, uh, you just have to be really good at losing . And, uh, I always, you know, in setting goals, I kind of tell myself I wanna be in the position to podium or the position to win. Knowing like if I tell myself, well, I wanna win, most people aren't gonna win. And even the best athletes, like, you're, you're not gonna win. Um, but if you set the goal that you wanna be in a position to win, then it's a little bit different because, . Yeah. Like I said, you have to be good at losing, and if you're not, , you're not gonna be sustainable in the sport long term. Like, I'm not here to race for one or two more years, like I'm here to race for another 10 years. And so you need to have the right mindset and be okay with those losses and, uh, be happy with what you brought to the table on those days. And, and that's not easy for someone that's competitive and. At my level, like I'm not a magical, you know, unicorn. Like we're all this way, we're all competitive, we all wanna win. And so I think the athletes that maybe have a more sustainable future in the sport, um, have a little bit better mindset or healthier mindset with, with or losing. [00:33:50] Craig Dalton: When you looked at that big sugar course in Bentonville, Arkansas, was that something you were naturally drawn to, that it was a course you could do well at? [00:33:59] Paige Onweller: Yeah, I mean, I think the rolling hills are good. Um, I had heard that course was a little scary with the off-camera descending. Um, and I actually re-wrote all of the course, uh, on the days leading up to it. Um, and I remember. You know, as I'm going through the course, um, thinking the course actually wasn't suited for me, uh, because of the descending. Uh, so looking at it on paper, I liked the climbs. I thought, you know, the course could do well with my strengths. Um, but then when I was out there pre-writing and I pre-rolled with like my, uh, friend John, and he just like bombs down, you know, the, the descents. And I'm like trailing a minute back and I'm like, oh my goodness. Like if this is how it is in a race, like there's no way I'm gonna win. So I remember kind of having some moments of panic during the pre ride. Um, so my goal and mindset completely changed in how I approached the race. Um, so I was like, well, if I know my descending is the weakness, then I wanna be at the front of all the descending so I can pick my line and people can go around me. Um, cuz it's easy to be a timid to sender and say, well, I don't wanna block anyone. I'll just, you know, enter from the back. So I don't get in any way anyone's way. But for me, I said no, like, I'm gonna push the uphills and then that way I would mitigate any losses, uh, on the time, on the descending. Um, but what I'm learning, and, and I don't know if this is relatable to other athletes, is for whatever reason, I'm a very different writer on race day and I do things on race day that I could never replicate in training. Um, or I haven't figured out how to replicate in training. And I think that's because I'm just very competitive and I do take more risk. and then you just kind of let the bike do its thing and you trust the process. And so on race day, like I really wasn't, I was descending quite well, much better than what I did on the pre rides. Um, but there's also a lot , you know, on a line too, so, [00:35:54] Craig Dalton: yeah, yeah. So, so, you know, one of the big things that weekend was that there was a forecast for heavy winds that did materialize. Did that go through your mind at any point, and did you make a calculation that that was a particularly good thing or bad thing for you? [00:36:11] Paige Onweller: Yeah, so whenever the race gets harder for a longer period of time, that will almost always benefit me, um, because I, the harder the day, the longer the day, the better. . And so, uh, when I saw the forecast and saw the wind, um, I, I liked that. I was like, yes, bring it on. Especially the headwind for the last 40 miles. I was like, uh, bring it on. Like, make it heavier winds. That's great. Um, so I, I liked that and I, I think that's important to. Have that mindset because how you think about things in a race or leading into a race will impact how you approach it. And so people that dread headwind or complain about it or maybe have a more negative mindset, um, maybe they don't do as well. I don't know. That's just my theory. Um, so I ended up making a move pretty early and it was risky, like without a doubt because I was with a pretty solid group of most of like the lead. and then I left that group to ride with one other person, one other person, one other guy came with me. And what ended up working in my favor is that we were both very strong and motivated to like keep going. And so we started picking up all these men that were falling off the league group. Um, and good strong guys like. You know, famous pro gravel guys. Um, and I just remember like the group kind of swelling and, um, that really benefited me into the, into the headwind section. So oftentimes, like if you're with a group and you leave them into a headwind, like it's a risk because you're with a smaller group, but then all the people that you just passed now catch back up to you. That's a possibility. Um, but I also knew at that point, like I was feeling pretty good. So if I had to like buckle down and just, you know, solo TT. Maybe I could have pulled that off. But the reality is like it worked out well and we started catching other men off the leads group and you know that that seemed to work well. And in gravel, like I'm sure you've maybe experienced this, like your group is really dependent on how you do and so, , sometimes you're with a group and we're all working well together and especially in wind sections, you know, having that even rotation, someone peeling off and not having this yo-yo of pace. Um, and the group I was with was doing, doing well with that and that helped. [00:38:28] Craig Dalton: yeah, yeah. Absolutely. That was huge for me that weekend as well. I just got, I happened to make a selection early on through one of the pinch points in the early port of the. And then I just happened to be with congenial, well-working simpatico people, and I was burying myself to stay with them because I knew, to your point, like if I was off by myself, it was gonna be a dramatically different day. And sort of as it turned out, I, like, I finished way ahead of where I ever would've predicted. I would've finished simply because of a, a coup couple good decisions, a decent amount of effort, but also a lot of just good luck of riding with people. [00:39:05] Paige Onweller: yeah, yeah. And like you said, like sometimes you do bury yourself and. That last hour of that race was really challenging for me, um, cuz I was at my limit. And um, I just remember thinking like, if you fall off, it's gonna suck a lot more than what it's doing. What, what is sucking right now? ? So I just remember thinking like, hang on, hang on just a little longer. Um, yeah. And I remember like Ted King kind of like made an attack, like, I don't know how many miles we were from the finish and I was just like, yep, see you later, . I was like, there's no way I'm going with any, anyone that makes any move right now. . But it's also hard cuz I didn't have any time gaps. Like I had no idea. And I remember thinking like going into the finish and I hadn't really seen a lot of media cars in the last half too. And so, . I remember thinking, I was like, is there something else in front of me? Like, do I put my hands up across the line? Like, did I really, am I really winning? Like I, I knew in my mind I was, but yeah, it's sometimes really hard cuz you're like, not thinking straight. You're working so hard. No one's told you you're in first, like, you know, an actual official or something like that. And yeah, like the lack of media and, and time gaps like sometimes. You don't really know, um, because we're not like the men where there's no other rider in front of us. There's all these men. And so it can get really confusing for the females. Um, and, and I get bummed about that sometimes. I think there's some opportunity for races to improve what that looks like. You know, a, a lead moto car for the women, right? Perfect example. Um, you know, that sort of stuff. I think there's some room for improvement there. [00:40:33] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Interesting. So when, when you crossed the finish line and someone confirms that you are indeed the first place women athlete, uh, how did you feel? I mean, you had a whole season where things weren't coming together necessarily. What was that like? [00:40:48] Paige Onweller: Yeah, I mean it felt so good. Like I, you know, I kind of like, I think I remember joking with a friend, I was like, you know, if, if I win I'll thank you for picking up my groceries or something. And you know, I think they probably chuckled like, yeah, you're not gonna win. And I just remember like, just being, I felt validating like these are things I knew I was capable of having a big win this year. Um, and you know, some of those beliefs are, things that I've learned and observed in racing, like knowing that I'm, that I'm strong and, and seeing and feeling that, but for me, like it just felt so validating to get that whim. But I also, like no one else really knew the struggles that I had during the year. I mean, some people that follow my process, but when you look at race results, you don't know, like she just had surgery a month ago, or she had covid 10 days ago. You just think they have a bad race and. , what I've learned this year is that race results do not tell the whole story. And so for me, like the wind was great and I'm sure a lot of people would be like, yeah, big breakthrough race, you know, she got lucky or good for her. But the reality is like it's so much deeper than that. And like those. , you know, feelings like are so personal and really the only people that know that are like, the people are closest to you and your family. And so I just remember being overwhelmed and like immediately wanting to call my family and talk to my sisters and my mom and dad and, and just, yeah, just felt so good. Um, and I was excited. Like I knew, like I had raced a little differently. I raced more aggressively and I came up with a plan and I stuck to it. And I wasn't afraid to like make the moves. And I think before like I was maybe more timid and more reactive to how I raced and you know, that was like eye-opening for me. So I remember thinking as I finished. I think I learned how to ride my bike today, . So, um, and what I mean by that is like just being more ballsy and when you make a move, you stick to it. Um, . So it made me really excited. Like I immediately wanted to be like, is it 2023 yet? Can I race more? You know, everyone's like tired and they want the season to be over and I'm just like getting started, you know? Um, so I remember just being, you know, validated, excited. Um, yeah, I just, I just felt really good. Um, but of course, like, you know, you get pulled away to get a drug test. I didn't have my phone, like I didn't eat after for a while and anyways. , it was a, a blur after that. Um, yeah. And then for me, it's like you win a big bike race and it's like this huge career defining moment for me to win big sugar. And then it's like immediately fly back and then go to work in the er. And you know, it's like people in the er, like they don't, they don't know what big sugar is. They don't even know that I was gone racing bikes. And so I just go back to work, see patients and blah, da da da, da, and then try to deal with all these sponsor, you know, decisions for next year. So it was like two worlds and um, yeah. , definitely an adjustment coming back home. [00:43:37] Craig Dalton: That's crazy and exciting and I'm glad I was able to witness it and I'm glad I was able to revisit it with you. Now, so you talked about your eagerness for 2023. I'm not sure exactly when this will post, but probably in January of 2023, I just saw the announcement that you've signed on board for another year of the Grand Prix. [00:43:57] Paige Onweller: Yeah. Yeah. So put my name in the hat. Uh, year two of the Lifetime Grand Prix. Um, so yeah, got accepted into that. So they upped the ante a bit with 35 athletes for the women and 35 for the men. Um, they seem to have a good lineup. And yeah, I mean that series really gave me a good opportunity and I really feel like Lifetime is trying to. make some good changes, some positive changes. Uh, it's the most competitive female, uh, pro Peloton. You know, you go to other races and you don't see the depth of women that the lifetime events are bringing. So that to me is like, if I'm racing, I wanna race against the best. Um, and I love that. So that's been awesome. They're also trying to make sure that this is a, a. Sport by doing drug testing and they're gonna be increasing that. And I very much support that. I think that's awesome. Um, and so, yeah, I just think there's so many positives that, uh, lifetime Grand Prix series is bringing in and, you know, it's not perfect. Nothing is, uh, but they're willing to listen to the athletes and get input and, you know, hopefully I can be a part of the change that's happening in American. [00:45:05] Craig Dalton: You must be happy that you did gut it out and attend all the events, so now you have at least a bit of knowledge of what those courses look like, et cetera. [00:45:14] Paige Onweller: yeah, for sure. For sure. [00:45:16] Craig Dalton: And then they have added a seventh event that they haven't announced. That's gonna be a wild card. And the fact that you can drop two events, does that meaningfully change the way you approach the season, those variables, or do you think it more is just an accommodation? That stuff happens to athletes along the way, and it's just giving a little bit more of a breathing room for, you know, getting covid, having a crash, et [00:45:39] Paige Onweller: right. Yeah. I think if you would've asked me that question last year, you know, I very much had the mindset of this is the race dropping and these are the ones I'm doing well at. But I think at this level of racing, like you better bring your A game to all seven and then like you're probably not, you're gonna get a flat or mechanical or an illness. So my mindset is to race hard, there will be races that will be more important to me personally, that I'll target. Uh, but for the most part, you know, I'll definitely, um, you know, target all of them and then, you know, just stuff just happens. Um, but you know, for example, sea Otter, like that's not gonna be an a race for me. Like, you know, I'll probably do the road event the day before. Um, that's, you know, it's just not going to be something that I'm gonna aim to win because of my lack of skillset. Now, will I do better than last, last year? Heck yeah. And I'm gonna have a skills coach that I'm working with this winter, and I'll be out in California and I pre-read the course a lot more. And there's all these things that I will prepare myself to be better than I was last year. But knowing like, you know, I only can go so far in one year, so, [00:46:43] Craig Dalton: Yeah, you talked about the rush of kind of, uh, talking to sponsors and media attention that happened after Big Sugar. I know you're not able to kind of reveal your sponsor program for 2023, but is it safe to say that it's expanded? You're gonna have more opportunities, a little bit more time and energy to focus and less stress on, uh, the rest of your life, so to speak. [00:47:07] Paige Onweller: Yeah, for sure. Like, as we talked about earlier, like I've been juggling a lot this year and it's been very difficult. Um, even though I act like I'm handling myself well, like it's been a struggle a lot of the time. So I am excited that in 2023, um, I will no longer be working as a pa. I will be racing bikes full-time and I'm extremely grateful to the, all the sponsors that I'll be bringing on board. That see my potential and wanna invest in, in what I'm potentially capable of doing. Um, cuz I am a new writer and um, you know, I think, you know, there's other people in this sport that may have the level of support that I'm going to be having, that have been doing this a very long time. And so I don't take for granted that these are sponsors that. See potential in me. Um, you can't just win one bike race and expect that, you know, you're gonna be able to race full-time and, and have that support. Um, so yeah, I'm very excited about that. Um, my last day in the ER is January 3rd, and then, yeah, I'll drive directly to California after that to escape the winter snow here in Michigan. Um, and get some big training blocking and yeah, start, uh, start learning more in 2020. [00:48:13] Craig Dalton: That's so amazing and congratulations for that all coming together. It's just gotta mean so much to just have the opportunity to kind of go after it in 23 and really see what your potential is. [00:48:25] Paige Onweller: Yeah, no, I am excited and, and I'll be doing a private tier program and I think what I love about it is that the, you get to work directly with the sponsors and, um, , you have input into products and equipment and um, you know, you feel like you have a voice and you work with people that you respect and value, and it just feels like a family. Um, it already has felt that way with me, uh, for the sponsors that I'll be working with and. I'm just excited. And the other part of that is that when you are privateering, like you have a platform for advocating for what you believe in. And, you know, I wanna race well, but I also have some goals off the bike too. And, um, I think those are important for me to start building towards in the cycling world. Um, so it's just fun to have that freedom and opportunity to, to work with brands that believe in that too. [00:49:15] Craig Dalton: Yeah. That's awesome. Well, I'll certainly be following along with you in 2023, and I think you've got a lot of new fans that wanna see. How you're gonna do out there. So best of luck. The conversation was a lot of fun. And again, I wish you all the best. [00:49:30] Paige Onweller: Thank you. Thank you. [00:49:32] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Big, thanks to Paige for joining us. We wish her all the best in the 2023 season as usual. The women's lifetime grand Prix is setting up to be one of the more exciting series to watch and follow throughout the year. If you're interested in connecting with me, I encourage you to join the ridership. That's www.theridership.com. That's a free global cycling community to connect with other gravel cyclists around the world. If you're able to support the podcast. Please visit, buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Or ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated and a great way for other gravel cyclists to discover the podcast. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt onto your wheels  

Left, Right & Centre
Men Who Dragged Woman's Body 13 km Had Borrowed Car Hours Earlier: Delhi Police

Left, Right & Centre

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 17:17


AA
Magicians Channeled (off planet summoning & difference between christed "magic" and borrowed magic)

AA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 30:18


the difference between who's born with it and who's trying to summon it --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/profpersonal/support

The Great Detectives of OTR Volume 1
Barrie Craig: The Case of the Borrowed Knife (EP0436)

The Great Detectives of OTR Volume 1

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 33:56


Release Date: June 27, 2011Barrie Craig is hired by a woman to ensure her marriage goes forward.Original Air Date: November 7, 1951Support the show monthly at patreon.greatdetectives.netSupport the show on a one-time basis at http://support.greatdetectives.net.Mail a donation to: Adam Graham, PO Box 15913, Boise, Idaho 83715Take the listener survey at http://survey.greatdetectives.netGive us a call at 208-991-4783Follow us on Instagram at http://instagram.com/greatdetectivesFollow us on Twitter @radiodetectives

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk
THE HASH: Sam Bankman-Fried Borrowed From Alameda to Buy Robinhood Shares; DeGods and Y00ts to Migrate Chains

Late Confirmation by CoinDesk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 27:02 Very Popular


This episode is sponsored by Bitstamp and the Galaxy Brains Podcast.The most valuable crypto stories for Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2022.Fallen FTX chief Sam Bankman-Fried borrowed hundreds of millions of dollars from Alameda Research to purchase his monster stake in Robinhood Markets Inc., according to court documents. Plus, the team behind DeGods and Y00ts, two of the top non-fungible token (NFT) projects on the Solana network, confirmed on Twitter that the projects would be migrating chains.See also: Bitcoin Miners Powered Off as Winter Storm Battered North AmericaSolana's Top NFT Projects DeGods and Y00ts to Migrate ChainsArgo Blockchain Suspends Trading in US Shares for 24 Hours-This episode has been edited by Nia Freeman. Our executive producer is Jared Schwartz. Our theme song is “Neon Beach.”-Bitstamp is the longest-running crypto exchange and recently rated #1 in the world by CryptoCompare. Regulation, transparency, and security are pillars that ensure customers' funds are safe; it's the Bitstamp way. Learn more about how your crypto is always yours at bitstamp.net.-Galaxy Brains: Whether it's breaking down market volatility or analyzing the latest development, come for the latest market insights from our in-house trading professionals and renowned experts from across the industry. Stay for the occasional rap from host Alex Thorn. Check out the latest episodes here: https://www.galaxy.com/research/podcasts/galaxy-brains/?utm_source=Hash&utm_medium=podcast&utm_id=CoinDeskSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Promptly Potter
Episode 197: A Somewhat Borrowed Body

Promptly Potter

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 4:19


- In Chapter 35 of Deathly Hallows, Harry awakens in what appears to be King's Cross Station. There, Dumbledore answers his questions and explains that Harry can choose to return to the land of the living if he wishes.- Today's prompt is: What is happening to Lord Voldemort while Harry and Dumbledore are in King's Cross?- This episode is hosted by Amy Hogan.- Join in the conversation on MuggleNet's social media channels by using #PromptlyPotter

Liberty's Highlights
'Severance' Season 1: Going Deep with Mostly Borrowed Ideas (MBI)

Liberty's Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 76:05


Let's go deep into season 1 of Severance (2022, Apple TV+), a thriller with science fiction elements created by Dan Erickson and directed by Ben Stiller and Aoife McArdle. It was nominated for 14 Emmys!

What the Dice!?
S1 E88 Borrowed Tools

What the Dice!?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 40:41


(corrected audio) Something new has been added to the intro! A strange eyepiece gives Phae a first-hand view of some strange sight. An item borrowed from the strange Collector. Is the item curse or a blessing, one the item was devoid of all magic

TOAD'S TUNES
Getting to hang with Kylie Frey, we talked music, boudin, learned guitar with.. a borrowed guitar, rodeo as a kid, Texas music being the inspiration, a tie to Human by Cody Johnson

TOAD'S TUNES

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 34:21


Growing up in Louisiana, made a stop in the Texas Music Scene before heading to Nashville, the back and forth […] The post Getting to hang with Kylie Frey, we talked music, boudin, learned guitar with.. a borrowed guitar, rodeo as a kid, Texas music being the inspiration, a tie to Human by Cody Johnson appeared first on TOAD'S TUNES.

Our American Stories
The Story of How Chick-fil-A Borrowed “My Pleasure” from a Luxury Hotel

Our American Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 9:29


On this episode of Our American Stories, Ritz-Carlton co-founder Horst Schulze on one of the few other American companies that's committed to excellence. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Liberty's Highlights
Going Deep on Cloudflare and Datadog with Mostly Borrowed Ideas (MBI)

Liberty's Highlights

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 104:49


First, something to keep in mind: This is a conversation about these companies not an interview of MBI. We both talk about equally and ask each other questions. I want to mention it upfront just so you don't expect a different format going in.I had a great time discussing these two very interesting companies with my friend MBI (

Anchored by Truth from Crystal Sea Books - a 30 minute show exploring the grand Biblical saga of creation, fall, and redempti

Episode 190 – Jesus’ Attributes Were Not “Borrowed” Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. In John 14:6, Jesus said, “I am the way, the truth, and the life.” The goal of Anchored by Truth is to encourage everyone to grow in the Christian faith by anchoring themselves to the secure truth found in the inspired, inerrant, and infallible word of God. Script Notes: “Jesus told her, “I am the resurrection and the life. Anyone who believes in me will live, even after dying.” The Gospel of John, Chapter 11, verse 25, New Living Translation “Jesus told him, “I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one can come to the Father except through me.” The Gospel of John, Chapter 14, verse 6, New Living Translation ******** VK: Hi! I’m Victoria K. Welcome to Anchored by Truth brought to you by Crystal Sea Books. I’m here today with RD Fierro, author and founder of Crystal Sea Books, and part-time event planning consultant. He rearranges the chairs in the conference room when we have meetings. Today on Anchored by Truth, as we approach Thanksgiving and Christmas, we want to continue our series where we focus on the life and ministry of Jesus. And we want to continue listening to Crystal Sea’s epic Christmas poem The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion. Frost Lion is the third part of the Golden Tree trilogy. The first installment of the Golden Tree saga was The Golden Tree: Komari’s Quest and copies of it are available from our website which is crystalseabooks.com. Even though we’re playing Frost Lion on our broadcasts and podcasts it has not yet been released for people to get their own copy but that will happen in the near future. Today we’re coming to part five out of seven of the poem. So, we’re getting close to bringing it home, right RD? RD: We are indeed. For any listeners who weren’t able to be with us for our last couple of episodes we should tell them that The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion is a poem that is written in the style of some classic Christmas stories. It was written in seven parts and each part ends in a sort of cliffhanger. So, now that we’re at part five we’re pretty deep into the story. But just as a quick refresher The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion is about a group of small koala bears who live in the Artic in valley that’s green and warm because in the middle of the valley is a Golden Tree that keeps the valley warm and fertile. They’ve been there for several generations but just as Christmas season is approaching two teenage bears, Koest and Kopaul, were on a high hill near their town when the spotted a dark shape crossing the snow and ice. The strange shape turned out to be a bear named Roleb. Roleb came from the village their ancestors had left many generations ago and had travelled with a friend who got lost. Roleb and his friend were travelling to the arctic to search for help for their village which had lost its faith. Thanks to the wisdom of the village elders, Kodan and Kojon, the bears have been able to summon an ice eagle. But what can this ice eagle do? What will this ice eagle do … if anything? VK: Sounds like we’re getting to the good part. So, let’s continue with the story. Here’s part five of Crystal Seas’ Christmas epic poem: The Golden Tree, The Frost Lion. ---- The Golden Tree: The Frost Lion – Part 5 VK: Ok. So, the bears from the village have now found Roleb’s lost friend. But it’s too late. Roleb’s friend has died from the cold. So, it seems as if Roleb’s whole journey to the north has been for nothing. That seems very sad – if that was how the story ended. But, of course, it hasn’t ended yet. So, maybe all hope isn’t lost. And, knowing you, the answer to finding out whether anything can be done for Roleb and his friend is …to tune in next time. RD: That sounds like a brilliant suggestion. And maybe listeners could gather some family members to join them ... VK: Sounds even better. Listening to Golden Tree as a family could be a great way for parents or grandparents to connect with their kids and help them develop their faith. It would also make a great centerpiece for a home school study group or church youth group discussion about the role that courage and commitment play in the Christian faith – something that’s particularly relevant as we get closer and closer to Christmas. RD: Right. Somebody once said that the Christian faith is so simple that even children can comprehend enough about it to understand the plan of salvation. But even though we can begin with the faith of a child we should pursue the goal of developing a truly mature faith. God will meet us and help us wherever we are in our faith journey but He isn’t satisfied with leaving us at the starting line. Hebrews 12:2 says that Jesus doesn’t just initiate our faith. He also wants to perfect it. And part of perfecting our faith is ensuring that we understand what the Bible tells us about Jesus. VK: Well, so far we’ve seen that there are extra-Biblical sources that confirm that Jesus was a real historical figure who lived and died in Judea during the time period described by the Bible. But we’ve also seen that as helpful as it is to know that there are secular sources that confirm Jesus’ life that those sources aren’t enough to tell us everything that we need to know about Jesus. We can only get a complete revelation about Jesus from God’s special revelation to people, the Bible. And as we saw in our last episode, and again in today’s scriptures, Jesus’ statements about himself tell us something pretty important: that Jesus is not only fully human but also fully divine. RD: Yes. And so that takes us to the next subject that we need to talk about as we are focusing on the life of Jesus in preparation for celebrating his birth at Christmas. VK: And that is... RD: And that is - that because Jesus is the central figure not just of Christianity, but also the entire Bible, one of the criticisms that’s sometimes directed toward Jesus is that the attributes that the Bible assigns to Jesus were borrowed from other cultures or religious sources. So, Christians need to be familiar with some of the assertions that Jesus’ deeds, especially his miracles, were simply drawn from other religious myths or pagan characters. VK: Can you give us an example of what you’re thinking about? RD: Sure. It is has been alleged that Jesus’ miraculous conception isn’t a unique belief. For instance, critics will say that the mythological figure, Hercules, was also supposed to be the son of a divine father – in this case Zeus - and a mortal mother. VK: But, of course, there are significant differences between Hercules purported conception and Jesus. In the Greek legend Hercules mother was named Alcmene (ALK-MEN-EE). Zeus was supposed to have taken on the human form of Alcmene’s husband and deceived Alcmene and slept with her. And that’s how Hercules was conceived. That’s not nearly the same thing as Jesus being born of Mary while Mary was literally still a virgin. RD: The differences are even more pronounced. Hercules was actually the Roman name of a hero the Romans adapted from the Greek Heracles. According to the Greek legend, Heracles’ mother Alcmene was simultaneously pregnant with Heracles by Zeus and his half-brother Iphicles by her husband. And that’s only the beginning of the legendary aspects in Alcmene’s pregnancy with Heracles. So, as soon as you get beyond the superficial similarity and look at the details, the notion that Jesus’ conception was somehow an adaptation of the Heracles/Hercules myth falls apart. But this is a good example of one kind of obviously fallacious attack that’s directed against the historicity of Jesus. VK: So, what you’re saying is that one form of attack that’s leveled at Jesus has to do with a particular attribute of Jesus and then trying to find a parallel somewhere else in a different religion that is obviously false. The critics then try to discredit the life of Jesus by saying that if story A is false, then story B must be false also. RD: Right. But that makes as much sense as saying that if there are two $5 bills on the table and one is counterfeit, the other one must be also which is just silly. So, sometimes the supposed pagan origin of the details of Jesus earthly life and ministry are concerned with specific attributes of Jesus, such as his virgin birth. But sometimes the copycat thesis is less concerned with the specifics of Jesus life and more concerned with generalities that might be associated just about any supernatural figure. VK: Again, do you have any specific examples in mind? RD: For instance, since sickness and disease are obviously a plague on human existence... VK: No pun intended… RD: No pun intended… anyway, the ability to bring miraculous healing would be expected to be a staple of myths or legends. And it is. For example, Asclepius or Asklepios was a Greek demi-god who was the god of medicine. He was supposed to have raised Hippolytus from the dead, though he was killed by Zeus for doing so. Asclepius was supposed to be the son of the god Apollo and a human mother. Buddha was also supposed to have been able to cure the sick. VK: But again, these kinds of general miracle workings of mythological characters vary considerably from the information we have about the miracles that Jesus performed. For instance, in the case of Jesus curing Peter’s mother we have precise details of the location where the miracle was done, the people involved, and even a pretty close approximation to the timing. And many of Jesus’ healings involved specific details that conform to the religious and cultural conventions known to exist. Such as when he healed the lepers and then told them to go show themselves to a priest which was required by Jewish law. And Jesus’ healing miracles weren’t always the cause for celebration the way you would expect of a miracle like when Jesus restored the eyesight of the man born blind. The blind man was rejected by the religious leaders and cast out by them. RD: Exactly. The descriptions of Jesus’ miracles read like historical accounts because they are. Again, the key to drawing distinctions between Jesus’ miracles and those general sorts of miraculous powers that are associated with the pagan sources is in the details. The Bible accounts provide the details and in the majority of cases there are multiple eyewitness accounts. But the case of Buddha provides another way of refuting the claims that the Bible’s descriptions of Jesus are drawn from other sources. The earliest known account of Buddha’s life was written in the 2nd century AD so it came after Jesus and not before it. That’s also true for another supposed religious figure who supposedly served as the source for many of the details of Christ’s life, Mithra. In Mithra’s manifestation during the Roman period he was supposed to have been born on December 25th, had 12 disciples, performed miracles, had a final meal before he died, and rose from the grave after 3 days. VK: And since Mithra was a religious figure that was known to come from the Persian culture, modern day Iran, supposedly he was the inspiration for much of what the disciples taught about Jesus. Right? RD: Right. The earliest mention of Mithra is around 1400 BC so as a religious figure Mithra would pre-date Christ by a considerable time period. But the problem is that the attributes of the Iranian version of Mithra do not correspond to the Roman version. The Roman version of Mithra is best known for slaying a bull whereas there is no known connection to bull slaying in the Iranian version. And a lot of the supposed correspondences between Christ and Mithra appear in the Roman version and the dating of the correspondences is after Christ. VK: So, many scholars believe there might have been some cross pollination between Christ and the Roman version of Mithra but given the timing of the appearance of the similarities it’s far more likely that the legends of Mithra borrowed from Christianity and not vice versa. RD: And that would have been fair because there was one way that Christianity did borrow from Mithraism, in art. In the early part of the 3rd century AD (313), the Roman emperor Constantine issued the edict of Milan which accepted Christianity. Before then the Roman emperors had generally been very hostile to Christians. Within 10 years Christianity had become the official religion of the empire. But by then Mithraism seems to have also gained a strong foothold within the empire as well. In the third and fourth centuries, the Roman church officials seemed to have embarked on an effort to prove that their faith was the superior one, embarked on an advertising campaign. One commentator said their efforts were “reminiscent of our soft drink wars. Mithra was depicted slaying the bull while riding its back; the church did a lookalike scene with Samson killing a lion. Mithra sent arrows into a rock to bring forth water; the church changed that into Moses getting water from the rock at Horeb.” VK: That sounds suspiciously like the law of unintended consequences. The church officials in the 3rd and 4th century went on a campaign to prove that Christianity was superior to Mithraism and 1,600 years later the church now has to defend itself against the claim that Jesus’ life and ministry were the copycat version. RD: I think that’s an excellent observation. And let’s close out with one more, quick example. In Hinduism Krishna was also supposed to have had a miraculous conception so some critics point to that legend as a possible inspiration for the Christian tenant. VK: But in that case, Krishna’s ‘miraculous conception’ is his mom being impregnated by ‘mental transmission’ from his completely human father. Again, not remotely similar to the Bible’s description of how Mary became pregnant. RD: And to add to that – how credible is it that the first Christians, who were largely Jews from Palestine, would have borrowed a legend from a thousand miles away. At a minimum the Jews were fiercely monotheistic whereas Hinduism is distinctly polytheistic. So, this again points to the need to not only examine the varying details of alleged instances of borrowing but also consider the cultural factors that would have been in play. Often either chronological or cultural factors alone will be enough to refute the alleged possibilities. To go back to our earlier example with the money, when new bank tellers are being taught to spot counterfeit dollars they aren’t given lots of counterfeits to study. They’re given lots of real bills to feel and handle. The idea is that if the tellers get so used to touching and handling the real thing, the fakes will become instantly recognizable. That same approach will work when it comes to being able to answer many of the criticisms that are addressed at Christianity and Jesus. VK: And that’s a good lesson for all of us. The more time we spend studying scripture – and developing familiarity with the details of the people, the nations, the geography, the culture – not only will we be able to be confident in our own faith. But we will also be able to point other people to the truth. RD: Precisely. Myths and legends read like myths and legends. They have fantastic details that have little or no correspondence to things in the real world. Good common sense enables us to quickly see elements that don’t make sense in our experience. By contrast, the history contained in the Bible reads like good histories that we see elsewhere. There are specifics about people, places, times, and events and quite often either archeological finds or extra-Biblical records will provide information that helps confirm the Biblical record. VK: Sounds like a great time for a prayer. Today since we’re so close to Christmas let’s listen to a prayer about that special day. ---- Prayer for Christmas VK: We’d like to remind our audience that a lot of our radio episodes are linked together in series of topics so if they missed any episodes or if they just want to hear one again, all of these episodes are available on your favorite podcast app. To find them just search on “Anchored by Truth by Crystal Sea Books.” We hope you’ll be with us next time as we continue our discussion of the reality of Jesus’ life. We hope you’ll take some time to encourage some friends to tune in too, or listen to the podcast version of this show. Also, we’d to remind listeners that copies of The Golden Tree: Komari’s Quest are available from our website. If you’d like to hear more, try out crystalseabooks.com where “We’re not famous but our Boss is!” (Bible Quotes from the New Living Translation) The Gospel of John, Chapter 11, verse 25, New Living Translation The Gospel of John, Chapter 14, verse 6, New Living Translation The Gospel of John, Chapter 15, verse 5, New Living Translation (Sources used for this episode or other in this series) https://creation.com/pagan-copycat-thesis-refuted http://www.tektonics.org/copycat/pagint.php http://www.tektonics.org/copycat/mithra.php

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 6 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 35:37


Part 6 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!SIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvYOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***GET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else atPAINE.TVCONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 4 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 33:03


Part 4 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!SIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvYOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***GET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else atPAINE.TVCONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 3 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 33:26


Part 3 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!SIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvYOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***GET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else atPAINE.TVCONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 2 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 33:28


Part 2 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!SIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvYOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***GET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else atPAINE.TVCONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 1 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 35:34


Part 1 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!SIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvYOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***GET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else atPAINE.TVCONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Thomas Paine Podcast
Part 5 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!

Thomas Paine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 32:37


Part 5 -- Young Girl with Cancer Needs Paine's Help; Paine Drops Hammer on Tucker For Protecting Fauci & Pals; FOX Slams Wall St Links to China But Paine Reveals Murdochs Just Borrowed $100 Million from China. Loaded!SIMPLY PUT -- We Cannot Say Much of the 'Really Good Stuff' on HereThat's Why We Created Paine.tvYOU CAN CONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***GET the Intel that's Too Hot For Anywhere Else atPAINE.TVCONTRIBUTE TO THE SHOW BY CLICKING THIS LINK -- *** DONATE HERE ***...See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

OCB Podcast
OCB Podcast #158 - So Much Mazel

OCB Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 40:13


Neil & Scott taste some bourbon balls; Big Sister Debra reveals her musical Something Old, New, Borrowed, & Blue selections; and every toy in the National Toy Hall of Fame gets reviewed. Enjoy!

Dirty Devotional
316 | Borrowed Faith

Dirty Devotional

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 8:53


Thank you for listening to the Dirty Devotional Podcast! Our goal is to bring you 10-minute devotionals that help you feel seen, known, and loved by a real God.Connect with me: I'd love to meet you!! If you get a chance go follow me on Instagram or Facebook @Z_chilConnect with others: We have a private Facebook Group specifically for people who value being seen, known, and loved!  If you want a community like this, you can join by clicking the link https://www.facebook.com/groups/264160779139989/Support: If you enjoy today's episode and want to help financially support the podcast, then visit https://www.patreon.com/dirtydevotional

What the Dice!?
S1 E88 Borrowed Tools

What the Dice!?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 41:35


Something new has been added to the intro! A strange eye piece gives Phae a first hand view of some strange sight. An item borrowed from the strange Collector. Is the item curse a blessing, one the item was devoid of all magi

Side Hustle School
#2155 - Failure Friday: “I never should have borrowed money to invest…”

Side Hustle School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 6:36


In this week's Failure Friday segment, we hear from a listener who borrowed money from a friend for an investment in a cryptocurrency project. Need we say more? Side Hustle School features a new episode EVERY DAY, featuring detailed case studies of people who earn extra money without quitting their job. This year, the show includes free guided lessons and listener Q&A several days each week. Show notes: SideHustleSchool.com Email: team@sidehustleschool.com Be on the show: SideHustleSchool.com/questions Connect on Twitter: @chrisguillebeau Connect on Instagram: @193countries Visit Chris's main site: ChrisGuillebeau.com If you're enjoying the show, please pass it along! It's free and has been published every single day since January 1, 2017. We're also very grateful for your five-star ratings—it shows that people are listening and looking forward to new episodes.

Daily Devotions from Lutheran Hour Ministries

November 24, 2022 Daily Devotion from Lutheran Hour Ministries

Jase & PJ
MINI - What have you borrowed from your neighbours?

Jase & PJ

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 9:43


Shame on you Debbie for eating all the pork crackle!!!! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jase & PJ
MINI - What have you borrowed from your neighbours?

Jase & PJ

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 8:58


Shame on you Debbie for eating all the pork crackle!!!! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoicesSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Simplify to multiply with Tim Yewchuk
#109: What Would Your Perfect Average Day Look LIke?

Simplify to multiply with Tim Yewchuk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 10:44


In this episode, I wanted to take a bit of an unusual approach toward improving how you plan and organize your work day. Borrowed from a classic Bill Murray movie, we'll be diving into the art of engineering your "perfect average day". Enjoy! Tim ⏰

With Flying Colors
Liquidity An NCUA Perspective with Expert Todd Miller

With Flying Colors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 30:25


On this week's episode I discuss Liquidity with Subject Matter Expert Todd Miller.Don't miss part 2 tomorrow.Why discuss Liquidity today?Many reasons. A great deal of evidence that liquidity risks are increasing. Inverted Yield Curve - 85 days as of 11/3/2022Prior inversions over 10 days – 18 days in May/June of 2007 -185 days in June 2006 through early 2007 (15-16 yrs removed from this) -226 days in 2000Inflation – Over 5% annualized since June 0f 2021.· Last time inflation was over 5% was 1991. (30 years ago). That was also a recession known today as the S&L Crisis. Who knows how this may impact loan performance today. In the banking industry net charge offs were 1.4%, 1.61%, and 1.29% in 1990, 91, and 92. Current bank charge off ratios are under 0.3%, very similar to credit unions.· Unlikely most management teams today have ever managed in an inflationary environment, compounded by an inverted yield curve.Prior to Covid the US savings rate was running in the 8% range. It spiked during Covid reaching a high of 33.8% in April of 2020. As late as March of 2021 is was 26.3%. We had 15 months of Covid where the savings rate was in double digits. It's been under 5% for all of 2022 and was down to 3.5% in July and August. It dropped to 3.1% in September of 2022, the most recent number I have. You can see this in share growth numbers.Share growth that was double digits from Dec 2020 to March 2022. From March to June, total shares increased by 2.8 billion, but 2.1 billion of that was non-member deposits. Member deposits grew a paltry $754 million or only .04%. Annualized that is growth rate of 0.49%. Borrowed money increased by $19.8 billion over the same 3 months, an increase of 42.2%. Of that $16.5 billion is less than one year maturity – so overnight most likely. NCUA now includes supplemental capital in borrowings. It is not broken out as separate line item. No longer able to determine what part of borrowed funds is actually being included in capital amounts. I'm sure with treasury Emergency Capital Investment Program (ECIP) funding, secondary capital amounts also grew. Treasury's website shows 70 credit unions receiving $2.1 Billion in ECIP Funds. Supplemental capital rules are also new. Interesting that NCUA chose to stop displaying secondary/supplemental capital amounts when it revised the call reports in March of this year. Per NCUA's financial trends reports, subordinated debt grew 106% in 2021, and 480% during the first 6 months of 2022. No amounts were reported in the trend reports however.Loan growth in the same period was $85.3 Billion. How was that funded. Investments dropped $2 million, corporate deposits dropped $11.2 billion, cash with the federal reserve dropped $51.1 billion, and cash in other financial institutions dropped $2.5 billion. Cash and short term investment to assets fell from 16.24% to 12.94%. I have call report data going back to 2000. December of 2018 is the only time cash and short term investment numbers were lower. In 2018, investment portfolios were within 2% of par values so liquidating investments was a cost effective way to raise liquidity. Current investment portfolio were around 7% underwater in June, probably more today. Liquidating investments may no longer be a reasonable way to raise liquidity.Asset Quality is still strong from the loan side. Delinquency and net charge off levels are at lowest levels seen in this century. Credit Risk management tools have come a long way in the last 10-15 years. Then again, there has been no inflation in the 21st century so who knows how loan losses will be impacted. The sudden end to share growth is telling though. We have rising interest rates, and an inverted yield curve. On top of that net worth rates are less today than they were going into the great recession of 2007. Almost all the layers of risk in financial institutions are increasing.Asset quality issues are at the heart of most liquidity events

Bleachmouth Post Script
Episode 73: Five and Change “Old, New, Borrowed and Blue”

Bleachmouth Post Script

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 51:14


Wanna hear me mutter incessantly about hardcore-punk? You’re in luck! I discuss some bands that I might include on a mixtape or playlist I might give to someone unfamiliar with the genre. Plus, an exciting(?) announcement about an upcoming show. Here are some of the bands I ramble on about;Minor Threat, Circle Jerks, End It, […]

Add to Cart with Kulap Vilaysack & SuChin Pak
Borrowed Carts: Why Ku and Su Are Always in the Red

Add to Cart with Kulap Vilaysack & SuChin Pak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 43:52


Ku and Su are taking a stroll down memory lane (or more accurately, the memory shopping aisle) and bringing back some of their favorite carts from past guests. Remember the irreplaceable Laneige lip mask, courtesy of Michelle Collins? Or the one thing minimalist David Walton can't go without? Producer Claire joins them to revisit these and so much more. Look no further for the ultimate cart roundup.  Please note, Add To Cart contains mature themes and may not be appropriate for all listeners.  To see all products mentioned in this episode, head to @addtocartpod on Instagram. To purchase any of the products, see below.  Keep your lips smooth and moisturized with the Laneige lip mask  With the ISNTREE Hyaluronic Acid Watery Sun Gel, sunscreen application is a million times easier Ku keeps her Gucci bag perfectly in order with the Joyintree purse organizer Keep your hands free with the Luka Belt Bag Sore muscles? Try the Releaf Balm with infused with CBD (600mg) Nettle Leaf capsules are great for hair growth The ever-iconic Thrive Causemetics Liquid Lash Extensions Mascara remains an ATC staple David Yi's book "Pretty Boys" has beautifully illustrated stories about the history of beauty and skin care Darn Tough Socks are perfect for hiking or just staying warm at home Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.  Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.  Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: lemonadamedia.com/sponsorsSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Afternoon Program On 102.9 The Hog
11/8/22 Borrowed Forever

The Afternoon Program On 102.9 The Hog

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 16:59


Yeah, you're never getting that back.

The Gentle Rebel Podcast
15 | Everything is Borrowed and We Can’t Take It With Us

The Gentle Rebel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 64:28


“Nobody really owns anything. We give back our bodies at the end of our lives. We own our thoughts, but everything else is just borrowed." - Deborah Ellis (From No Ordinary Day) In one of our Haven Kota sessions, we discussed self-belonging through the lens of ownership and possession. Where do control and entitlement fit with belonging? What does it mean for things to belong to us? How does it feel to belong to something or someone else? Why are some belongings more cherished and valuable than others? How do we hold ourselves, others, the world, our lives, goals, and relationships? Do we own them? What would it mean to give life back at the end? How much do our desires, emotions, and passions own us? What does it mean to be pre-possessed or owned by something? In this episode of The Gentle Rebel Podcast, we explore what it means to see ourselves, our lives, and the world in the light of these questions. What if they are all borrowed? Episode ContentsYou Can't Take it With You | 4:41Earning The Respect to Borrow | 6:56Living On Borrowed Time | 14:56Steal Like an Artist | 20:09The Difference Between Borrowing and Theft | 20:55The Burden of Originality | 24:50We Belong To Something Bigger | 28:02We Are Borrowing a Greater Story Than a Hero's Journey | 29:48The World Likes Possession | 37:15People Like Us vs People Like Them | 38:40Don't Leave Your Longings Unattended | 41:30You Can't Connect Dots Forwards | 44:23Collective Consciousness and A Borrowed Moment | 48:29Everything is Borrowed (Us Included) | 51:16Giving Thanks For What We've Borrowed | 52:18New Does Not Mean Better | 60:22The Haven | 61:30 You Can't Take it With You | 4:41 I regularly heard the phrase, "you can't take it with you", during my years as an undertaker. It is often expressed about the accumulation of material possessions and wealth. For some, it was a reason to spend without regret. For others, it was a reason to give without fear. But whatever the ramifications, its underlying premise is universal…whatever we collect, gather, and possess in life doesn't come with us when we're done with it. Everything is borrowed. Earning The Respect to Borrow | 6:56 How do you feel about lending things to other people? Would you happily give your stuff to anyone, or does trust need to be built first? How do you feel about things you borrow? Do you treat them with more or less respect than things you own? It might depend. Living On Borrowed Time | 14:56 We talk about "living on borrowed time" after a severe diagnosis or near-death experience. It's what we might say when confronted with our mortality. But is this time any different from our experience of time...all the time? In the episode, I share a story from childhood, when we were leant a games console by our hairdresser. I still have no idea why (I developed a solid theory while recording). But I remember the feeling when we were told we only had a few days before we needed to return it. I became focused and clear on the only thing that mattered: completing Sonic The Hedgehog. How is our mindset and approach to life affected by the reminder that everything is borrowed? Steal Like an Artist | 20:09 In his book, Steal Like an Artist, Austin Kleon suggests that there is no such thing as a truly unique or original idea when it comes to creativity and art. I agree wholeheartedly, though I might not describe the process as "stealing". Kleon writes, "how does an artist look at the world? First, you figure out what's worth stealing; then you move on to the next thing. That's about all there is to it." The Difference Between Borrowing and Theft | 20:55 There seems to be a difference between stealing, borrowing, owning, holding, using, collaborating, sharing, contributing, remixing, and plagiarising. We might describe stealing as deliberately depriving the rightful owner of their property. What Kleon describes is more like "honouring, studying,

Unlocked: Daily Devotions for Teens

Sometimes, I don't know how to pray for people. And that's a bummer, because Jesus calls us to pray for others—for our friends, our leaders, and even our enemies (Matthew 5:44; Luke 6:28; 1 Timothy 2:1-4). But how do you pray when you have no idea what to pray? One thing I've started doing is using some of the prayers in the Bible as a guide. After all, they are in the Bible. One of my favorite prayers is found in Ephesians 3. Paul is writing to Christians in Ephesus, and in the middle of his letter he includes a prayer. At the heart of it is a desire for his brothers and sisters in Ephesus to know Jesus's love. I like to insert the name of the person I'm praying for into this prayer, and then read it aloud or silently as my own prayer to God. And, because Paul mentions that he kneels before God the Father at the beginning of this prayer, sometimes I kneel while I read these verses: “I kneel before the Father…I pray that out of his glorious riches he may strengthen you [ _____ ] with power through his Spirit in your [ _____'s] inner being, so that Christ may dwell in your hearts [ _____'s heart] through faith. And I pray that you [ _____ ], being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord's holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge—that you [ _____ ] may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God” (Ephesians 3:14-19). So, the next time you want to pray for someone but you're not sure what to say, consider using a prayer from the Bible as a guide. As we ask according to God's will, we can rest assured that He hears us (1 John 5:14-15). • Hannah Howe • Have you ever wanted to pray for someone, but you weren't sure how? Read Romans 8:26. How could it be comforting to know that the Holy Spirit prays for us, even when we don't know how to pray? • Who is someone you could pray for right now? Consider taking a moment to read a prayer found in the Bible (such as Numbers 6:24-26; Ephesians 3:14-21; Philippians 1:9-11; or Colossians 1:9-14) and pray these words for this person. I urge, then, first of all, that petitions, prayers, intercession and thanksgiving be made for all people. 1 Timothy 2:1 (NIV)

BibleQuest Talk-Show | Live Q&A at BibleQuest.tv
WED: Was Jesus just another “rising gods” myth borrowed from paganism?

BibleQuest Talk-Show | Live Q&A at BibleQuest.tv

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 50:28


The story of Jesus is a well known story around the world. However… is it original? Or is it borrowed from other pagan religions? Is Jesus a hoax? How can we know if Jesus is who He says He is? Did the Bible authors make it all up? Let's talk about that together today. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Monday Morning Mindset Shift
EDSO - Happiness hormones

Monday Morning Mindset Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 22:05


Borrowed this concept from Mr. Atomic Habits, James Clear himself. He dedicates a chapter in his book to how to develop and understand the 4 hormones related to happiness: Endorphins, Dopamine, Seratonin, and Oxytocin.This episode dives into the evolution behind each one, and how to cultivate more EDSO in your life for free!Come hang in my Facebook group: facebook.com/groups/teamjaim91Or connect with me on Instagram: instagram.com/jaim91

The Whiskey Ring Podcast
Ep. 64: Borrowed Page Vol. 1 with American Mash & Grain

The Whiskey Ring Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 91:17


This week we turn to another new concept - blended whiskey overseen by a team of whiskey writers. Lifelong friends Devin Ershow and Chase Langdon have run American Mash & Grain for several years, but last year they decided to put their whiskey knowledge into practice.  The result: Borrowed Page Volume One, a whiskey blending four distilleries:  - Watershed Distillery in Ohio (WRP Episode 39) - Wigle Whiskey in Pennsylvania (WRP Episode 18) - Spirits of French Lick in Indiana (WRP Episode 5 and Episode 44) - Whiskey Del Bac Distillery in Arizona (WRP Episode 63) So, not only was I talking with the guys doing the blending, I had also talked to and tasted all four distilleries in the blend. That, to me, was an out-of-body experience.  Devin and Chase are fascinating to listen to, and their process for choosing distilleries and partners was equally intriguing. There are close to a dozen distilleries mentioned in this episode, and I hope I've tagged them all - if I miss any, tag them in the comments on IG, FB, or Twitter!  Borrowed Page Volume 1 is out now and available for purchase! _________________ Before we jump into the interview just a few quick notes: If you haven't joined the Patreon community yet, please consider doing so! The $5 tier has access to the Patreon-only segment called “Under the Influencer”, where some of your favorite YouTubers/Instagrammers/Podcasters and more join me to talk whiskey, life, and influencing. This tier will also have priority access to upcoming barrel picks, including one coming up in partnership with the This is my Bourbon Podcast.  The $25 tier - for people who really want to propel the pod and website forward - will have the same benefits as the $5 tier plus right of first refusal to join me on future barrel picks, access to bottles I'm sent to taste and review, and more. The first five boxes of samples have already been sent and only 5 spots remain!  You can still support for as little as $1 a month if you'd like to stay up to date with these changes and news about what we've got coming up.  Finally, please do like and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you're listening - it really helps the Whiskey Ring Podcast move up the rankings.  If you haven't yet, please follow Whiskey in my Wedding Ring and the Whiskey Ring Podcast on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter, and subscribe to the newsletter on the website.  Thanks for reading! Now here's Chase Langdon and Devin Ershow, writers of American Mash & Grain and blenders/producers of Borrowed Page American Whiskey Volume One.  American Mash & Grain American Mash & Grain Website American Mash & Grain on Facebook American Mash & Grain on Instagram American Mash & Grain on Twitter Reviews Borrowed Page Whiskey Volume 1 Review (Coming Today!) Thanks to our Sponsor, Scotch Malt Whisky Society SMWS Website SMWS of America Website (Use code WRP for 20% off your membership!) SMWS/A Facebook SMWS/A Instagram SMWS/A Twitter SMWS/A YouTube

Sexy Unique Podcast
Beverly Hell's Angels Ep. 45 - Birthday Birkins, Borrowed Diamonds

Sexy Unique Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 73:37


Lara and Carey do a tight 20 lamenting Los Angeles, and discuss the Oscar winner to social media AI pipeline. Back in Beverly Hills, the divisive season comes to an end, with a birthday soiree at Garcelle's filled with Birkins and Patrick the Gay Butler. Rinna's mounting drama with Kathy continues to make problems for Kyle, and a Princess Grace de Monaco Borrowed Diamond party to benefit...something...finds Kyle facing off with Rinna and EJ Global one last time.TICKETS TO SEXT UNIQUE PODCAST LIVE AT THE BOWERY BALLROOM, 10/15, ON SALE NOW. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.