Podcasts about Neurodiversity

Neologism used to refer to neurological differences in a non-pathological manner

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Best podcasts about Neurodiversity

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Latest podcast episodes about Neurodiversity

If This Goes On (Don't Panic)

In this episode, Alan and Diane chat with author, Martha Wells, about Neurodiversity, writing action scenes, the origins of ART (the sentient spaceship), developing humor in writing, and Martha's new book. If you'd like to support us you can give us a one time donation at Kofi or you can subscribe to our Patreon.

Embracing Autism
EP 704 – Failure to Thrive

Embracing Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 28:19


Tune in as we get personal and share our family's struggles with the public education system, thoughts on how the current system often fails the special needs community, and how we plan to tackle it. This episode is sponsored by The Exceptional Learning Institute (E.L.I.), learn more about their customized academic programs for autistic children at exceptionalinstitute.org.

Mind Matters
How Much Does Biology Influence Behavior?

Mind Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 37:54


What more do parents need to understand about their neurodivergent kids in order to reach that “aha” moment? Does it ever even really arrive? Penny Williams, author of Boy Without Instructions, host of the Beautifully Complex Podcast, and co-founder of The Behavior Revolution, joins Emily Kircher-Morris on episode 156 to talk about understanding what motivates our kids to be who they are. This is an episode every parent should hear. Today's episode is sponsored by The Council for Exceptional Children. For more information, go to exceptionalchildren.org. ABOUT THE GUEST - Penny Williams is a coach for neurodivergent families and the award-winning author of four books on ADHD, including Boy Without Instructions. She's the host of the Beautifully Complex Podcast, co-host of the annual Neurodiversity Summits, and co-founder of The Behavior Revolution, an initiative devoted to celebrating and supporting kids with ADHD or autism.  Penny empowers parents to help their neuro-atypical kids - and families - thrive.

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
Hacking Purple | A Conversation With AppSec Community Champion And Author Tanya Janca | The Hacker Factory Podcast With Phillip Wylie

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 57:04


Guest: Tanya Janca, Founder, CEO, Security Trainer @ We Hack Purple Training [@wehackpurple]On LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/tanya-janca/On Twitter | https://twitter.com/shehackspurpleOn YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/@SheHacksPurpleHost: Phillip WylieOn ITSPmagazine  

The Readout
David Crosby's Moved On

The Readout

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 44:55


In this special episode, award winning best-selling author Steve Silberman (“Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity”) joins the podcast to talk about the passing of his close friend, singer-songwriter David Crosby last week at 81. Over the past several years, Silberman hosted a podcast with Crosby called “Freak Flag Flying” which explored the musician's life and career. In this episode, Silberman describes how Crosby was singular as a musician, a unique American, and discusses the incredible life Crosby led.

Brain & Life
‘Bake Off' Star Lizzie Acker on Showstopping Cakes through Neurodivergent Eyes

Brain & Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 40:04


In this episode Dr. Audrey Nath speaks with Great British Bake Off contestant Lizzie Acker. Lizzie shares her experience of being diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, and dyspraxia and how she has learned to overcome the challenges that accompany these diagnoses not only to build confidence but also to create beautiful baked goods. Next Dr. Nath talks with Dr. David Urion, behavioral neurologist and director of education and director of behavioral neurology clinics and programs at Boston Children's Hospital, and associate professor at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Urion explains the history of ADHD, how it was first diagnosed, and how it is treated today. Additional Resources: https://www.brainandlife.org/disorders-a-z/disorders/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder https://www.brainandlife.org/disorders-a-z/disorders/dyslexia https://www.brainandlife.org/articles/adults-with-attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-often-have-other-conditions https://chadd.org/ https://dyslexiafoundation.org/ Social Media:   Guest: @lizzieacker_ (Instagram), @lizzieacker_ (Twitter), @lizzie.a.bakes (TikTok) Hosts: Dr. Daniel Correa @neurodrcorrea; Dr. Audrey Nath @AudreyNathMDPhD

Comadreando
COMADREANDO RAW

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 77:03


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 17th episode of Season 3! Let's talk about mental health and motherhood! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest/friend Daisy, of the Double Dose of Raw Talk Podcast, as they discuss Daisy's experience being a mother and her journey to heal. The comadres also discuss two current events that left them reeling. Tune in to find out more. Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast. If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation. If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing. If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well. If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com. NOTES: Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9 Links for Daisy's Socials: Double Dose of Raw Talk Podcast https://www.instagram.com/doubledose_of_rawtalk/ Daisy's IG: https://www.instagram.com/doubledose_of_ms.d Daisy's Linktree: https://linktr.ee/doubledose_of_rawtalk Link to Daisy's Book: https://www.doubledoseofrawtalk.store/listing/new-my-journal-to-self-love-dd?product=1227

The Business Of Happiness
#225 - Building a Habit of Happiness with Christine Ramsay

The Business Of Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 39:05


In this episode, Dr. Tarryn MacCarthy speaks with Coach, Speaker, Culture Architect, and Founder of Ignite Inclusion, LLC, Christine Ramsay. They talk about building a habit of happiness through gratitude, mindfulness, love, and service to others. She also shares how she helps people do this through her SMILE framework and her passion for creating a world where people feel seen and heard.Christine Ramsay is a first-generation Armenian-American whose life purpose is to create a world where all people feel seen, heard, valued, celebrated, and loved so they continue to thrive and ignite their happiness. She is a connector, storyteller, and cross-cultural inclusive leader whose superpower is empathy.She is the Chief Empowerment Officer and Founder of Ignite Inclusion, LLC, whose mission is to help individuals and organizations unlock their inner genius and discover their potential by taking control of their happiness and well-being. Our vision is to create an inclusive culture of happiness where all humans feel seen, heard, valued, celebrated, and loved for seeing the world differently.She is a Culture Architect, Certified Happiness and Leadership Coach, TEDx and motivational speaker, International Author of a new Anthology, “Your Life is Worth it,” Certified coach in Brain-Based Skills Neuroscience of Inclusion, Certified coach for Social and Emotional Intelligence (EI), and a Certified Diversity Professional (CDP).She is also a parent advocate for Gender inclusion, Autism & Neurodiversity, Well-being, and Happiness.Learn more about Christine:Website: https://www.igniteinclusion.comInstagram:  https://www.instagram.com/igniteinclusion/Email: igniteinclusion@gmail.comPhone: 484-883-2822Check out her TEDx Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaanJc7sI4kShow notes:[2:51] What is life-work flow?[4:45] How has her culture impacted what she does now?[11:14] Her SMILE Framework[16:15] Serving others[17:47] Join The Radical Happiness For Practitioners Program to rediscover happiness within your profession and life. Check out https://www.thebizofhappiness.com/radicalhappiness[22:11] Make mindfulness a habit[25:47] Intentionally choose happiness[28:01] Loving yourself and others[32:25] Express gratitude[36:29] What is her definition of happiness?[38:20] OutroSign up to Radical Happiness and become the Happiest Practitioner: https://www.thebizofhappiness.com/radicalhappinessPlease join my Facebook group: Business Of Happiness Hive, so we can all take this journey to find fulfillment and happiness together. Click here.Where to find meWebsite: www.thebizofhappiness.comFacebook: facebook.com/thebusinessofhappinessIG: @thebizofhappinessIt would mean the world to me if you subscribe, leave a review, and share this podcast with your friends, co-workers, and families. This will help the trajectory of this podcast and allow others who are seeking true happiness to find the podcast.

On The Hard Days
Ep.158 In Your Own Words: "The Time When My Church Community Isolated My Family Based On Their Lack of Understanding of Neurodiversity"

On The Hard Days

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 26:49


About The Episode: It's a mini "In Your Own Words" episode! Submitted to me by a mom of a neurodivergent child, this isn't my usual back-and-forth chat. In fact, I'm not in this episode at all (other than the intro!). This mom has a story to tell, and she's ready to put it out into the world.Want to submit your own story?  Record yourself telling "the time when" and send me the file via email: ontheharddays@gmail.com.I ALWAYS welcome YOUR thoughts! Feel free to DM me on IG (@on.the.hard.days) or email me: ontheharddays@gmail.com. This podcast is what it is because of YOU.February registration for Mothers Together has officially begun! Not sure if it's right for you? You have until 2/10 to cancel for a FULL refund. There's nothing to lose - only community to gain! Save your spot at ontheharddays.com/motherstogether.

The Me-Suite
Neurodiversity at Work: One Size Misfits All

The Me-Suite

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 26:56


Your host, Donna Peters, interviews David O'Coimin, Founder of Nook, and expert on neurodiversity and inclusivity in the workplace. Work spaces are historically, physically designed for the workforce mean. You'll quickly learn here why "one size misfits all" in the workplace. Our unique brains have unique needs. These needs must be met if we strive to balance personal wellbeing and productivity at work. David's research and expertise will make you think differently about physical work spaces, lighting, sound, vibrations, interruptions, temperature, smell, psychological safety.  There are so many a-ha moments in this discussion. You won't think the same about being at work. Enjoy!www.the-me-suite.comThe Me-Suite Book: Options Are PowerFB: @mesuiteLinkedIn: Donna PetersTwitter: @DonnaPetersCMeOThe Me-Suite podcast music by Moshun

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast
218: Neurodiversity, Double Empathy, and the Role of the SLP

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 67:18


Guest: Morgan Oates, MA CCC-SLP - In this episode, Michelle is joined by Morgan, a Ph.D. student in the Speech and Hearing Science Department at The Ohio State University with a Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization in Disability Studies. Morgan's research interests include the implications of double empathy theory in terms of the effects of neurotype on language and communication, neurodiversity-affirming supports for adolescent and adult autistic individuals, and the intersections of gender and autism. In this episode, Morgan provides clinicians and caregivers with insight into what neurodiversity and double empathy are and how they relate to communication. She then takes us on a joyful journey of how we can provide neurodiversity-affirming communication support for adolescent autistic individuals.

The ADHD Adults Podcast
Episode 74 ADHD and headaches

The ADHD Adults Podcast

Play Episode Play 53 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 29:14


In Episode 74, the ADHD Adults discuss the link between headaches, especially migraines, and ADHD.   As usual, Alex the Psycho-education Monkey delivers the science behind the subject,  personal reflections are delivered  from all three ADHD adults about headaches and ADHD (let's face it, just James really) and  some 'top tips' on managing migraines.  'What has James lost, forgotten or mislaid this week?" continues with a new annual score so Alex isn't embarrassingly failing,  and the usual correspondence, chaos and nonsense are included.  James shakes like a shitting dog, Mrs ADHD asks Alex if he is 'telling Beaut' and Alex attempts a Brummie accent. Fat crabs may or may not have returned...Support the showWritten by Alex Conner and James BrownProduced by James Brown and Afatscientist Ltd.Social media contacts: @theadhdadultsMusic by Sessionz

Sensory W.I.S.E. Solutions Podcast for Parents

One of my absolute favorite books is The Out of Sync Child from Carol Kranowitz. If you haven't read it yet, and you want to learn more abut SPD in a really easy to understand way, then check out this book. One of the post it notes that I have from when I still read it was the one with the quote, on page 28, “low self-esteem is one of the most telling symptoms of Sensory Processing Disorder.”  and this is in the section of the book where she talks about all the social and emotional challenges that are often associated with SPD. Today I want to unpack that idea and call to light some of the reasons why I think this is the case, based on my personal experience as a parent to a child with sensory needs, and as a clinician who's worked with hundreds of kids over the past 7 years. Links: Register for the winter 2023 SWS cohortEpisode transcript: https://www.theotbutterfly.com/podcastThe OT Butterfly Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theotbutterflyWork with Laura: https://www.theotbutterfly.com/parentconsult

Breaking Bread Podcast
When Neurodiversity is Present in Marriage: ADHD

Breaking Bread Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 26:56


Marriages can find themselves in places of despair. Marriages often assume the problems are symptoms of waning affection. Yet what is actually present is neurodiversity. In this episode of Breaking Bread, Kaleb Beyer educates us on the impact ADHD can have on marriage relationships and the hope that can be breathed into a marriage when this is understood.   Show Notes:  What is neurodiversity?  The neurodiverse brain is contrasted with the neurotypical brain. The neurodiverse brain thinks, responds to its environment and interacts with emotions outside of the normative operating neurotypical brain. This condition is diagnosed, for example, as autistic, dyslexic, or ADHD (Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder).   What is ADHD?  ADHD stands for Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder. This is a diagnosable disorder. An individual with ADHD has the ability to hyperfocus. Often, they can be exciting, fun, creative, in the moment and flexible. Those with ADHD can struggle to prioritize matters that need attention. They have a higher threshold for experiencing rewarding satisfaction and therefore require more stimulus. These attributes create symptoms of distractibility and impulsivity.   How can ADHD impact marriage?  When couples do not understand how ADHD is playing out in their marriage relationship, they run the risk of making the wrong meaning out of unfortunate interactions. Consider the examples below:  Lack of follow through by ADHD spouse is wrongly interpreted as lack of care.  Distracted ADHD spouse during conversation is wrongly interpreted as not valuing spouse.  What proactive steps can the ADHD spouse make?  Get a diagnosis from a professional.  Become educated on ADHD.  Treat the biology through diet, sleep, exercise and medicine.  Learn coping skills.  Build relational skills.  What proactive steps can the non-ADHD spouse make?  Become educated on ADHD.  Grieve the unmet expectation of what marriage was “supposed” to be.  Avoid reinforcing the negative unsuccessful interactions that historically has been used on your ADHD spouse. For example, nagging.  Rebuild trust by measuring it differently. Instead of measuring “follow through” on requests, measure “follow through” of applying oneself to the treatment ADHD requires.  What hope is there for marital health?  Beautiful marriages are possible when neurodiverse and neurotypical spouses live wisely with one another. 

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
Unleashing Your Inner Hacker | A Discussion With PinkDraconian | The Hacker Factory Podcast With Phillip Wylie

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 43:01


Guest: PinkDraconian aka Robbe Van Roey, Hacker Manager at Intigriti [@intigriti]On LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/robbe-van-roey-365666195/On Twitter | https://twitter.com/PinkDraconianOn YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/c/PinkDraconianHost: Phillip WylieOn ITSPmagazine  

Uniquely Human: The Podcast
“My Mother's Apprentice” - A Discussion with Gyasi Burks-Abbott

Uniquely Human: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 56:40


“My Mother's Apprentice” – The Special Qualities of my Upbringing. A Discussion with  Gyasi Burks-Abbott Gyasi Burkes-Abbott has a unique perspective as a late-diagnosed autistic man, who is African-American and raised by his mother in a white-dominated culture. In today's episode, he discusses how his mother was vigilant about exposing him to role models in black literature and culture, and how his upbringing led to a strong sense of identity, confidence and purpose. He shares the special way his mother accepted and appreciated his differences that all parents could benefit from hearing, and how it motivated him to become a strong advocate in supporting neurodivergent individuals. He also challenges concepts such as lack of “Theory of Mind” that have pathologized the autistic experience.

Embracing Autism
EP 703 – The Mind-Body Disconnect

Embracing Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 27:14


Join us as we talk about interoception and how the mind-body signals get disrupted in autistics. We chat about how this disconnect can result in bathroom accidents, fecal smearing, as well as poor awareness of sickness, hunger, thirst, emotional states, and beyond. This episode is sponsored by Kawaii Slime Company. Get 15% off your order while also supporting our channel by using the code AutismWish15 at kawaiislimecompany.com.

Mind Matters
Declarative Language: A New Strategy for Neurodivergent Communication

Mind Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 38:18


Often, neurodivergent people have a completely different communication experience than neurotypicals. They respond differently to regulation, attention, and motivation, and often parents struggle when trying to improve connections with their kids. Linda Murphy is the author of The Declarative Language Handbook, and she's joining us with ideas on how to reframe communication and break down barriers. Here's a link to the Neurodiversity University, where you can find info on our first two courses, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students, and Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. We'll be adding courses for parents, mental health professionals, and more as we enter 2023, so look for more information along the way. Episode 155 is brought to you by Bridges Academy Online, a high school education for twice-exceptional students. Find them at bridges.edu. ABOUT THE GUEST - Linda Murphy is a speech language pathologist and RDI Consultant. She co-founded the “Peer Projects Therapy From the Heart” clinic in Beverly, Massachusetts, and has authored several books and numerous articles during her career. Linda has enjoyed working with individuals with social learning differences for over 25 years.

The ADHD Adults Podcast
Episode 73 The week in ADHD (10)

The ADHD Adults Podcast

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 38:06


Thursday chaos resumes as The ADHD Adults again double-fist two episodes in a week, this time on ADHD and smartphone use.  The Week in ADHD (10) includes how our week has gone, questions from YOU our listeners, plus some extended thoughts on the week's subject, ADHD and smartphone use.  Alex does some weird painting, James doesn't know his uninterested from his disinterested and Mrs ADHD carries on saying 'Bye'... Support the showWritten by Alex Conner and James BrownProduced by James Brown and Afatscientist Ltd.Social media contacts: @theadhdadultsMusic by Sessionz

NBSCast
ARGS - DANCE with Cindy Terwilliger, Sylvia Jackson, and Alicia Avery

NBSCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 42:42


In this episode, hosts Rachel and Tommy have a conversation with some of the leaders from our DANCE (Disabilities, Access, Neurodiversity, and Caregiver Empowerment) Associate Resource Group here at Nelnet. Cindy Terwilliger - Director of Online Help and Communication at NBS, Sylvia Jackson - IT Infrastructure Engineer for Shared Systems, and Alicia Avery - IT Software Engineer for Accessibility share more about DANCE and how it helps our associates!

Two Sides of the Spectrum
A Social Curriculum that Centers Authenticity with Carolyn Long and Nick Kelsch

Two Sides of the Spectrum

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 45:55


This episode is about how we as therapists build something different to support our autistic clients' social and emotional development, with our ethics and values guiding us and our autistic students as our co-creators. Our guests are SLP Carolyn Long of Social Optics and her student-turned-colleague, Nick.

Sounds Like Autism
New Theme, Who Dis? - SLA's News In Neurodiversity

Sounds Like Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 36:32


Surprise! Season 4's theme is SLA's "News In Neurodiversity." Josh and Dave sit down to introduce this season's theme. The guys have a real life heart to heart beginning with an honest conversation about the closing of the Thomas Valva story (check this out for context). The conversation shifts to an international scope with a look at the divergent landscape around the world. Dave even brings out a top 10 list. Let us know what you think of this season's theme and, please, join the conversation. Hosted by Josh Mirsky & Dave Thompson. Follow @soundslike autism on Instagram and Facebook. Check out www.soundslikeautism.com for the video, merch & more from SLA. Sounds Like Autism is produced by Launchpad 516 Studios. Subscribe to Sounds Like Autism on Apple Podcasts and get notified of new episodes every month! https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/sounds-like-autism/id1454276806

Comadreando
THE AUTISTIC PROFESSIONAL SPEAKER

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 48:14


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 16th episode of Season 3!  Let's talk about achievement despite a diagnosis! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Dr. Kerry Magro  as they  discuss and share Kerry's experience of being an autistic professional, Dr. Magro's work to create accepting environments and his experience consulting on the show Love on the Spectrum (US). More about Dr. Kerry Magro (Mah-grow) Ed.D. is an award-winning autistic professional speaker, best-selling author and autism consultant to the HBO series Mrs. Fletcher that aired in Fall 2019 and the latest season of Netflix's Emmy-Award Winning Series ‘Love on the Spectrum' He started professional speaking 11 years ago via the National Speakers Association after he fell in love with theatre as a child to help with his social and communication skills. Today he has spoken at over 1150 events during that time include 2 TEDxTalks and a 'Talks at Google' presentation. In addition, Kerry is CEO & President of KFM Making A Difference, a nonprofit organization that hosts inclusion events and has provided 100 scholarships for students with autism for college and counting since 2011. In his spare time, he hosts a Facebook Page called Kerry's Autism Journey that now has 218,000 Facebook followers where he does on-camera interviews highlighting people impacted by a diagnosis to breaking down barriers in our community. His videos he's produced have been watched over 35 Million times.    Kerry's best-selling books Defining Autism From The Heart, and Autism and Falling in Love, I Will Light It Up Blue and his latest, Autistics on Autism have reached Amazon Best-Seller Lists for Special Needs Parenting. He is based in Hoboken, New Jersey.   Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast.   If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.     If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing.   If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well.   If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps.   You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES:   Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9   Links for Dr. Magro's Website: https://kerrymagro.com/   Shop with Books and Courses: https://kerrymagro.com/store/#products   Amazon Book Links: Autistics on Autism https://amzn.to/3wrrCUB   I Will Light It Up Blue https://amzn.to/3XfMZnz   Defining Autism From The Heart: https://amzn.to/3ZJ2N3R   Autism and Falling in Love: To The One That Got Away https://amzn.to/3GKfiTW   Link to Kerry's speaker website: www.kerrymagro.com/speaking   Link to KFM Making a Difference: www.kfmmakingadifference.org   Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@kerrymagro? Facebook.com: www.Facebook.com/kerrysautismjourney Twitter: www.twitter.com/kerrymagro Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kerrymagro/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/kerrysautismjourney

Product Voices
Becoming a More Inclusive Leader by Embracing and Celebrating Neurodiversity

Product Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 28:28


Product management is one of the best jobs in the world but it comes with great responsibility. If we are building products, we must ensure that we are putting inclusive products out in the world. And for leaders, inclusive leadership is paramount to a successful team and positive culture. In this personal, poignant, and impactful episode, Stephanie Leue, Chief Product Officer of Doodle shares how she has become a better, more inclusive leader by learning about, embracing, and celebrating neurodiversity at home and at work.Find more at ProductVoices.com.

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
Setting The Record Straight On What Red Team Actually Means | A Conversation With Shubham Khichi | The Hacker Factory Podcast With Phillip Wylie

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 44:30


Embracing Autism
EP 702 – Too Late To Apologize

Embracing Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 28:32


Why is apologizing so difficult for autistics? Today we talk about the challenges autistic children (and adults) face when asked to say "I'm Sorry", how inappropriately labeling your child as "proud" may do more harm than good, and what alternatives you can use for a successful apology. For a comforting sensory experience, check out Galaxy Lamps while also supporting our programs by using our special link: https://galaxylamps.co/?ref=AutismWish

Dad to Dad  Podcast
Dad to Dad 236 - Dr. Temple Grandin of Ft. Collins, CO An Autistic Person, Innovator, Author & Advocate for the Neurodivergent

Dad to Dad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 52:40


Out special guest this week is Dr. Temple Grandin of Ft. Collins, CO, a national speaker, a best-selling author, a professor of animal science at Colorado State University, and outspoken advocate for the neurodivergent and those on the Autism Spectrum. Temple was an Ashoka Fellow. She was also named in the Time 100 List as one of the 100 most influential people in the world in the ‘Heroes' category. She also has a number of honorary degrees form universities around the world, including; McGill University in Canada, the Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Carnegie Mellon University and Emory University. Temple is the author of numerous books including: - Emergence: Labeled Autistic - Developed Talents- Thinking In Pictures - The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across The Spectrum- Different Not Less Temple's TED Talk entitled: “The World Needs All Kinds Of Minds” has been viewed more than 6M times. The movie Temple Grandin, produced in 2010, received numerous awards including seven Emmy Awards. We are very grateful to Temple for her outspoken advocacy and for sharing her views with fathers raising children with special needs. That's all on this SFN Dad To Dad Podcast. Show Links: Website - https://www.templegrandin.comEmail – Cheryl.Miller@ColoState.EDUPhone - (970) 443-1510LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/temple-grandin-9a087165/Website - https://www.templegrandin.com/Website - https://www.grandin.com/Books - Thinking In Pictures - tinyurl.com/2dp589z5 TED Talk - https://www.ted.com/talks/temple_grandin_the_world_needs_all_kinds_of_mindsSpecial Fathers Network - SFN is a dad to dad mentoring program for fathers raising children with special needs. Many of the 500+ SFN Mentor Fathers, who are raising kids with special needs, have said: "I wish there was something like this when we first received our child's diagnosis. I felt so isolated. There was no one within my family, at work, at church or within my friend group who understood or could relate to what I was going through."SFN Mentor Fathers share their experiences with younger dads closer to the beginning of their journey raising a child with the same or similar special needs. The SFN Mentor Fathers do NOT offer legal or medical advice, that is what lawyers and doctors do. They simply share their experiences and how they have made the most of challenging situations. Special Fathers Network: https://21stcenturydads.org/ab...Check out the 21CD YouTube Channel with dozens of videos on topics relevant to dads raising children with special needs - https://www.youtube.com/channe... Please support the SFN. Click here to donate: https://21stcenturydads.org/do...

Mind Matters
Counseling In a Neurodiversity-Affirming World

Mind Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 41:15


What does it take to make a counseling practice neurodiversity-affirming? What do we need for the wider mental health community to understand or embrace in order to better support neurodivergent people? Dr. Andy Kahn from Understood.org is here to talk with Emily Kircher-Morris about these subjects and many more. The Belin-Blank Center is a proud sponsor of episode 154, for more information, go to www.BelinBlank.org. Here's a link to the Neurodiversity University, where  you can find info on our first two courses, Strategies for Supporting Twice-Exceptional Students, and Foundations of Dyslexia for Educators. We'll be adding courses for parents, mental health professionals, and more as we enter 2023, so look for more information along the way. ABOUT THE GUEST - Dr. Andrew Kahn is a licensed psychologist specializing in working with neurodivergent individuals. He's also the Associate Director of Behavior Change & Expertise for Understood.org. His extensive experience within the public school system encompasses providing training, evaluation, consultation and therapeutic support to students, families and staff. Dr. Khan has also worked closely with underserved communities, and supported school committees to develop policies on mental health supports, suicide prevention, and access to learning interventions. Dr. Khan himself identifies as a person with learning and thinking differences. He earned his bachelor's degree in psychology from Syracuse, and both master's and doctoral degrees from Nova Southeastern University.

Kaleidoscope of Possibilities
EP 65 – Honoring Neurodiversity & Difference with Jennifer Cairns

Kaleidoscope of Possibilities

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 37:08


To watch the video of this episode, please go to: https://youtu.be/p4JUQ3YGbB4   What is neurodiversity? What is possible to honor who we are, our difference, and our strengths? How can we be happier, support one another, and create more?   Find out more in a powerful and vulnerable new episode of Kaleidoscope of Possibilities: Alternative Perspectives on Mental Health, in which Dr. Adriana Popescu is joined by neurodiverse and disabled entrepreneur, mentor, bestselling author, self-empowerment speaker and Founder of Rebel World and the Lady Rebel Club movement, Jennifer Cairns.   In this highly interesting conversation, you will hear about what it is like to triumph beyond labels, unhide, empower yourself, elevate your life and business, and create supportive communities.   In this episode: Jennifer's journey Misconceptions and biases Founding of Lady Rebel Club and Rebel World Labels and expectations Hiding and masking Honoring ourselves, setting boundaries, and protection Neurodiversity explained Strengths and weaknesses Creating community Empowerment Filters Rebel With A Cause Book   Resources mentioned in this episode: Jennifer's Website: https://www.ladyrebelclub.com/ Rebel With A Cause Book:  https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0BJD9LNKN   About Jennifer: Jennifer Cairns is a neurodiverse and disabled entrepreneur, mentor, bestselling author, self-empowerment speaker, and Founder of Rebel World and the Lady Rebel Club movement where they're out to empower, connect, advocate for and elevate women and all marginalised gender entrepreneurs, small business owners and creatives.    “We don't have to hide who we are.” – Jennifer   Would you like to continue this conversation and connect with other people who are interested in exploring these topics? Please join us on our Facebook group! (https://www.facebook.com/groups/kaleidoscopeofpossibilitiespodcast/)   About your host: Dr. Adriana Popescu is a clinical psychologist, addiction and trauma specialist, author, speaker and empowerment coach who is based in San Francisco, California and practices worldwide. For more information on Dr. Adriana, her sessions and classes, please visit: https://adrianapopescu.org/ To learn about her new trauma treatment center Firebird Healing, please visit the website: https://www.firebird-healing.com/   You can also follow her on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrAdrianaPopescu/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dradrianapopescu/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrAdrianaP Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adriana-popescu-ph-d-03793 Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/dradrianapopescu Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCflL0zScRAZI3mEnzb6viVA Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/club/kaleidoscopepossibilities TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@dradrianapopescu?   Disclaimer: This podcast represents the opinions of Dr. Adriana Popescu and her guests. The content expressed therein should not be taken as psychological or medical advice. The content here is for informational or entertainment purposes only. Please consult your healthcare professional for any medical or treatment questions. This website or podcast is not to be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing “standard of care” in any legal sense or as a basis for legal proceedings or expert witness testimony. Listening, reading, emailing, or interacting on social media with our content in no way establishes a client-therapist relationship.

Comadreando
HOT MOM DATING

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 63:04


Hola Comadres!   Welcome to the 15th episode of Season 3!    Let's talk about autism masking!   Join your comadre Marcy and special guest Marlana  as they  discuss and share Marlana's experience of being a parent to a special needs child, having health complications and dating as a single mother. ,   Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast.   If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.     If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing.   If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well.   If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps. You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.   NOTES: Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9

The John Fugelsang Podcast
New House Rules Package Caters to MAGA Extremists

The John Fugelsang Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 75:00


John discusses the new House Rules Package which gives more power to individual members, allows for aggressive investigation of the Biden administration on issues such as COVID-19 and the southern border; and makes it more difficult to increase federal spending. Then he interviews Wired reporter and author Steve Silberman. They talk about politics and his new book "The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity". Next he delivers a requiem for Ineitha Lynnette Hardaway AKA Diamond of Diamond and Silk and takes a call from Bill in New Jersey who talks about restricting birth control access for teens in Texas. Then finally he chats with political and cultural legal analyst Dr. Tracy Pearson on current news and cultural issues.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast
Neurodiversity In Technology & Cybersecurity. Reflecting On The Job Market. ITvitae.

Cybercrime Magazine Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 40:07


ITvitae is an organization in the Netherlands that trains young people with a distance to the labor market, such as autism or other neurodiversities, to become information and communication technology professionals. In this episode, host Hillarie McClure is joined by Peter van Hofweegen, Harry Lemmens, and Thomas van Ruitenbeek to discuss their relationships to ITvitae, the job market in tech and cybersecurity for neurodiverse individuals, and more. To learn more about ITvitae, you can visit their website at https://itvitae.nl • For more on cybersecurity, visit us at https://cybersecurityventures.com

Arrest All Mimics: The Creative Innovation Podcast
Neurodiversity, ADHD and the importance of social activity. Studio BND's Ben Mottershead

Arrest All Mimics: The Creative Innovation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 74:16


One-half of Studio BND (But Never Dull) Ben Mottershead joins me to discuss allowing neurodivergent people to flourish in the right creative environment. Ben has ADHD and gives a great insight into the need for balance in a design environment so the weaknesses can be managed or carried by better-equipped people, and the strengths can be housed in a way that benefits all. We also get into the vital role of in-person socialising and positive relationships away from the screen among many other things. Out tomorrow! Supported by IllustrationX https://illustrationx.com https://studiobnd.com/ https://bentallon.com https://bentallonwriter.com

Sensory W.I.S.E. Solutions Podcast for Parents
Re-air: Accommodation vs Exposure for Sensory Kids

Sensory W.I.S.E. Solutions Podcast for Parents

Play Episode Play 44 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 22:29


So you have a sensory sensitive child who's sensitive to seams of socks, mushy textured food, messy play, or toilets flushing. What should you do? Do you accommodate every environment and task for them so they can avoid the sensory triggers altogether? Does that make them spoiled? Should you force them to get used to it? Where do you draw the line? Listen to this episode to find out how I talk about accommodating vs. exposure. Links: Transcript/show notes at www.theotbutterfly.com/19 instagram: @TheOTButterfly www.instagram.com/theotbutterflywebsite/blog: www.theotbutterfly.comemail: LauraPetix@TheOTButterfly.comwork with me: www.theotbutterfly.com/parentconsultWaitlist for Sensory W.I.S.E. Solutions Program: www.theotbutterfly.com/waitlist Buy me a coffee &  me a question for a future episode: www.theotbutterfly.com/coffee

The Mighty Mommy's Quick and Dirty Tips for Practical Parenting
How to support your child's neurodiversity

The Mighty Mommy's Quick and Dirty Tips for Practical Parenting

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 12:51


Are you raising a child with neuro-differences? In this episode, Dr. Nanika Coor offers some ways to be a more neurodiversity-affirming parent.Further listening: What to do if your child has an extreme need for control and autonomyProject Parenthood is hosted by Dr. Nanika Coor. A transcript is available at Simplecast.Have a parenting question? Email Dr. Coor at parenthood@quickanddirtytips.com or leave a voicemail at 646-926-3243.Find Project Parenthood on Facebook and Twitter, or subscribe to the Quick and Dirty Tips newsletter for more tips and advice.Project Parenthood is a part of Quick and Dirty Tips.Links: https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/subscribehttps://www.facebook.com/QDTProjectParenthoodhttps://twitter.com/qdtparenthoodhttps://brooklynparenttherapy.com/

Today’s Autistic Moment: A Podcast for Autistic Adults by An Autistic Adult
The Strengths and Achievements of Autistic Adults

Today’s Autistic Moment: A Podcast for Autistic Adults by An Autistic Adult

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 65:47


Go to todaysautisticmoment.com for the transcript. Ana Aragon is my special guest for this premier to discuss the context of the theme for Today's Autistic Moment in 2023. The Strengths and Achievements of Autistic Adults. The guests and topics during 2023 on Today's Autistic Moment's podcast and Autistic Voices Roundtable Discussions will do more than talk about our many challenges; we will talk about how so many amazing Autistic Adults are using their challenges to build up their strengths so that we can set reasonable goals and achieve them successfully. There are so many talented and skillful Autistic Adults that are authors, educators, mathematical geniuses, advocates, who are using their tenacity to help the movement for Neurodiversity create community to support and encourage one another. In 2023, you will be meeting and hearing from many of them on Today's Autistic Moment and Autistic Voices Roundtable Discussions. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/2daysautistic/support

Teachers Talk Radio
Neurodiversity in education: The Twilight Show with Eugene McFadden

Teachers Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 81:10


Hello, me and Catrina Lowri, AKA @neuroteacher on twitter, talking about who she is, why it is important to embrace neurodiversity in education, not ditching differentiation, therapy and any other random topic that crosses our skulls.  Also EHCPs. And the fetishization of attention. 

Embracing Intensity
256. Finding Neurodivergent Community with Marc Almodovar

Embracing Intensity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 24:57


The importance of neurodivergent community Neurodivergent individuals are those who think, process information, and experience the world in ways that differ from the neurotypical (i.e., not neurodivergent) population. The neurodiversity movement advocates for the recognition and celebration of neurodiversity as a natural and valuable form of human diversity, similar to cultural, racial, or gender diversity. Neurodivergence is an important facet of the human race. It seeks to create a more inclusive and accepting society for neurodivergent people. Finding neurodivergent community can play a crucial role in connecting with other like-minded folks. There are many different ways to be neurodivergent, and neurodivergent people may have unique ways of perceiving, learning, communicating, and interacting with the world. Neurodivergence can affect various brain functions such as attention, memory, and executive function, and can manifest in neurodevelopmental conditions such as ADHD, dyslexia, autism, and more. These neurodevelopmental differences can also provide unique perspectives that can lead to creative problem-solving. Dominant societal standards have traditionally prioritized neurotypical values and perceptions, which can often leave out the rich perspectives of what neurodivergent people experience. The diversity of human brains and the ways in which they function can lead to new ideas and perspectives that can benefit society as a whole. By fostering an environment that is inclusive and accepting of neurodiversity, we can tap into the unique abilities and potential of neurodivergent people and create a more diverse and innovative society. Building a solid neurodiversity network can help others connect over their common traits, and explore their own style of neurocognitive functioning. Finding neurodivergent community The Embracing Intensity Community is a supportive online space for gifted, creative, and neurodivergent individuals. It is a place where members can connect with others who share similar experiences and challenges, and find support and understanding. The community is designed to provide a safe and welcoming environment where members can discuss their unique perspectives, share their insights and skills, and explore their full potential. The goal of the Embracing Intensity Community is to empower gifted, creative, and neurodivergent individuals to embrace their intensity and to live fulfilling and meaningful lives. Other neurodivergent community resources There are a number of other ways that neurodivergent adults can find and connect with their neurodivergent community. Some options include: Online communities and forums: There are many online groups and forums specifically for neurodivergent people, where individuals can connect with others who share common experiences and challenges. Local support groups: Many cities and towns have support groups for neurodivergent people and their families. These groups can provide a sense of belonging, as well as practical advice and resources for navigating daily life as a neurodivergent person. Neurodiversity-focused events: There are often events and conferences focused on neurodiversity and the neurodiversity movement, where neurodivergent individuals can meet and connect with others. Professional organizations: There are professional organizations that advocate for and support neurodivergent individuals, such as CHADD, the Neurodiversity Project and the Dyslexia Foundation. You can also find local resources in many areas. College campuses: Colleges and Universities often have groups not only for neurodivergent students, but events for the larger community surrounding the school. By finding and connecting with other neurodivergent people, individuals can find support, validation, and a sense of belonging. Neurodivergent people may also be able to share their experiences and offer insights and advice to others. Additionally, the neurodiversity movement promotes greater understanding and acceptance of neurodivergent people within society, which can help create a more inclusive and equitable world for all. Neurodiversity advocates Neurodiversity advocates play an important role in promoting the acceptance and celebration of neurodevelopment differences and the unique ways in which people experience and perceive the world. They often share their personal experiences as neurodivergent individuals and work to educate others about the concept of neurodiversity. They may also work to highlight the strengths and abilities of neurodiverse people, as well as the challenges they face. By sharing stories and experiences, neurodiversity advocates can help to build understanding and acceptance of neurodivergent individuals within society. The neurodiversity movement is often seen as a social justice movement, as it seeks to create a more inclusive and equitable society for neurodivergent people. Neurodiversity advocates work to raise awareness about the infinite variation in the way people's brains function and the diverse ways in which people experience the world. One of the key roles of neurodiversity advocates is to connect neurodivergent individuals with the various neurodiversity resources that are available. This may include information about support groups, educational resources, and professional organizations that can help neurodiverse individuals navigate their daily lives and achieve their goals. In addition to advocating for neurodiversity within society, neurodiversity advocates may also work to build strong and supportive social relationships within the neurodivergent community. By connecting with others who share common experiences, neurodivergent individuals can find support, validation, and a sense of belonging. Overall, the role of neurodiversity advocates is to promote understanding, acceptance, and celebration of the unique ways in which people's brains function and the diverse ways in which people experience the world. By doing so, they help to create a more inclusive and equitable society for all. About Marc Marc Almodovar is a neurodiversity advocate, and the cofounder of the ADHD Men's Support Group, a group specifically for men who have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Marc founded the group after his own personal experience with ADHD led him to feel isolated and misunderstood. He saw a need for a safe space where men with ADHD could connect with others who shared common experiences and challenges. Through the ADHD Men's Support Group, Marc aims to provide a sense of belonging and support for men with ADHD. He believes that by sharing stories and experiences, men with ADHD can find validation and understanding, and build strong and supportive relationships. Marc also hopes to raise awareness about the unique ways in which people's brains function and the diverse ways in which people experience the world, as part of the larger neurodiversity movement. Marc recognizes that mental illness can be stigmatized within society, and he hopes that the ADHD Men's Support Group can be a place where men with ADHD can feel safe and supported, regardless of their unique ways of thinking and experiencing the world. He believes that by fostering a sense of belonging and acceptance within the group, men with ADHD can work together to advocate for neurodiversity awareness and acceptance within society as a whole. He strikes a unique balance between positive feel-good stories and authenticity, without resorting to toxic positivity. ADHD Men's Support Group The ADHD Men's support group is a group specifically for men who have been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The group provides a space for men with ADHD to connect with others who share common experiences and challenges. One of the main goals of the ADHD Men's support group is to provide a sense of belonging and support for men with ADHD. Many men with ADHD may feel isolated or misunderstood due to the unique way in which their brains function and the neurodevelopment differences they experience. The ADHD Men's support group can provide a safe and supportive environment where men can share their experiences and find validation and understanding. In addition to providing support and a sense of belonging, an ADHD Men's support group can also serve as a resource for men with ADHD. Group members may share information about treatment options, coping strategies, and other resources that can help men with ADHD navigate their daily lives. The ADHD Men's support group can also be a place for men with ADHD to connect with others who share common interests and goals. Through group discussions and social interactions, men with ADHD can build strong and supportive relationships and work together to advocate for neurodiversity awareness and acceptance. Overall, the ADHD Men's support group can be a valuable resource for men with ADHD, providing support, validation, and a sense of belonging, as well as an opportunity to connect with others who share common experiences and goals. It can also be a place for men with ADHD to work towards social change and advocate for neurodiversity acceptance within society. In this episode: Marc Almodovar is a coach, speaker, and has ADHD He is passionate about community building and helping men with ADHD feel seen Marc started an online support group for men with ADHD and it has grown into a nonprofit organization The organization is the largest online community for men with ADHD It's goal is to educate, empower, and inspire men with ADHD through community Marc enjoys chatting with other people with ADHD He struggled with understanding and managing his ADHD and had low self-confidence as a result Cultural factors, including a lack of awareness, education and understanding about ADHD, affected Marc's ability to express himself and understand his own brain Marc did not have behavioral or impulsive issues, but he was often “toned out” or distracted He learned to tone himself down by learning to manage his time and energy, setting boundaries, and practicing self-care Marc has also learned to embrace his intensity and use it to his advantage by finding ways to channel it into his work and passions He has found that learning to manage his intensity has helped him to be more present and engaged in his relationships and activities Creating neurodivergent community: Marc uses his intensity to create a space for others to be themselves and feel seen His personal brand is built on transparency and listening to others Marc has harnessed the power of his intensity by being true to himself and embracing his strengths He has found that by putting himself in spaces where he can be himself, he is able to use his speaking and active listening skills to connect with others and make a positive impact. Marc uses affirmations to hype himself up and boost his confidence before speaking events He helps others use their fire by sharing his own experiences and learning openly and transparently Marc believes that honesty and transparency are important and encourages others to embrace their intensity and not worry about pleasing everyone Marc emphasizes the importance of self-care and setting boundaries to manage intensity He advises others to embrace their passions and find ways to channel their intensity into their work and hobbies Marc encourages others to be kind to themselves and remember that it's okay to not have everything figured out * Transcript Available * Resources: Join the Embracing Intensity Community & Check out our calendar of upcoming events! Join the ADHD Men's Support Group Follow the ADHD Men's Support Group on Twitter Follow Marc on Twitter

Embracing Autism
EP 701 – Our Year In Review

Embracing Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 16:35


Today Lia goes solo as Matt recovers from Covid-19 and chats about Our Year in Review for 2022 and goals for 2023! Check out the Sensory Theraplay Box while also supporting our programs by using our special link: https://shrsl.com/3tqle

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
The Try Hard Mantra | A Conversation With Chris Southerland Jr. | The Hacker Factory Podcast With Phillip Wylie

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 24:17


GuestChris Southerland Jr.Penetration Tester at [Undisclosed]On LinkedIn | https://www.linkedin.com/in/chrissoutherlandjr/On YouTube | https://www.youtube.com/@chrisjr404On Instagram | https://www.instagram.com/ch.ris/Website | https://www.chrisjr404.com/HostPhillip WylieOn ITSPmagazine  

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast
215: Neurodiversity Affirming Practices with AAC Use

First Bite: A Speech Therapy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 76:07


Guest: Allison Bean, Ph.D., CCC-SLP - The episode is dedicated to understanding and growing our knowledge of the neurodiversity affirming practice. Allison, Associate Professor with The Ohio State University, and Topic Co-Chair for the Autism Committee for ASHA 2023 in Boston, who focuses her research on language development in nonspeaking autistic individuals and outcomes in individuals who use augmentative and alternative communication, will guide us on our journey to better engage in neurodiversity-affirming AAC practice. By the end of this spirited conversation, you will walk away with new strategies to support autistic children and their caregivers as they start their AAC journey.

I Have ADHD Podcast
How to Accomplish Impossible Goals

I Have ADHD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 45:50


In the first episode of 2023, I'm chatting with Felicia Broccolo, Director of Operations at I Have ADHD, about impossible goals. This time of year, everyone is setting resolutions — something that can be especially hard for those diagnosed with ADHD.An impossible goal doesn't have to be something huge and scary though. It can be as small as finishing work every day when you say you're going to or waking up at the first alarm without hitting snooze. The goal itself isn't often what's out of reach, it's our mindset about ourselves and negative self-talk that holds us back. The truth is, setting and working towards goals of any size helps us with our emotion management and facing failure head-on. Because we tend to be our own worst critics, finding a supportive coach and community is super essential to keep positive forces around us that don't let us self-sabotage ourselves. That's exactly what you get when you become a part of my group coaching program, FOCUSED.Plus, members who have completed one full year get access to tons of additional resources, including an Impossible Goals course. Click here to join FOCUSED today and start working towards your goals of all shapes and sizes.

Sensory W.I.S.E. Solutions Podcast for Parents

Have you ever heard of occupational therapists use terms like “top down and bottom up approach” to working with behaviors in neurodivergent children? This episode will teach you the difference between the two and help you understand the pros and cons to each approach. Links: Episode transcript: https://www.theotbutterfly.com/56The OT Butterfly Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theotbutterflyWork with Laura: https://www.theotbutterfly.com/parentconsultGet on the waitlist for Sensory W.I.S.E. Solutions : https://www.theotbutterfly.com/waitlist 

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 88 – Unstoppable Neurodiversity Specialist with Khushboo Chabria

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022


Khushboo Chabria describes herself as a “Neurodiversity Specialist and a Transformational Leader”. She comes by this description honestly. However, while she has her own neurodivergent characteristic, (she has been diagnosed as ADHD), she did not discover about her diagnosis until she was 30 years of age. Those of you who have listened to many of our episodes have heard me talk with others who have different characteristics such as ADHD, Autism and even blindness and low vision that were not discovered or properly diagnosed until they became adults. I would suspect in part this is due to our own growing knowledge base about such things. As you will hear from Khushboo, however, increased knowledge does not mean more positive attitudes. As she will explain, while in some quarters we are learning more, we do not spread this education and improved attitudinal advance throughout our culture.   Today, Khushboo works for a not-for-profit agency called Neurodiversity Pathways, (NDP) in the Silicon Valley She will tell us how NDP has created an in-depth program to help Neurodivergent individuals grow to gain and keep employment as well as simply learning how to live meaningful and productive lives.   I believe you will be inspired by Khushboo Chabria. She has lessons all of us can use about how to move forward in life.     About the Guest: Deeply passionate about diversity and inclusion, Khushboo is a Neurodiversity Specialist and a Transformational Leader, on a mission to advocate for and help provide access to high-quality services for neurodivergent individuals. Khushboo aims to make a meaningful impact in the world through education, empowerment, authentic engagement and unbridled compassion. With varied experiences in supporting neurodivergent individuals of all ages and their family members, working as a therapist and clinician, studying Organizational Leadership and discovering her own ADHD, Khushboo brings an interesting mix of skills and experiences to this field of work. Khushboo is currently a Program Manager, Career Coach and Program Facilitator at Neurodiversity Pathways (NDP) - a social impact program under the Goodwill of Silicon Valley focused on educating and supporting neurodivergent individuals to help launch their career and supporting organizations to integrate ND employees into the workplace through belonging and intentional empowerment. The tagline is “Inclusion for Abilities and Acceptance of Differences” and NDP is on a mission to inspire and improve the intentional inclusion of neurodistinct individuals in the workplace. Khushboo also sits on the board of Peaces of Me Foundation and is involved in consulting and speaking on the topics of Neurodiversity, DEIB, Transformational Leadership, Psychological Safety, Cultural Competency, Mental Health + Employee Wellbeing as well as Coaching. I believe in diversity in who we are, but also in how we see the world.   Social Media Links/Websites: Personal Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/khushboochabria/ Connect with Neurodiversity Pathways: https://ndpathways.org/ https://www.facebook.com/NDpathways https://www.linkedin.com/company/ndpathways https://www.instagram.com/ndpathways/ https://twitter.com/pathways Neurodiversity is Normal website:  https://sites.google.com/goodwillsv.org/neurodiversity/home   About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:20 Hi there and welcome to unstoppable mindset. It is late in August when we're recording this getting near the end of what they call the dog days. Speaking of dogs Alamo is over here asleep on the floor and quite bored. However, here we are. And our guest today is Khushboo Chabria. And Khushboo is a person who is very much involved in the world of neurodiversity, and providing services for people who are neurodivergent. She has her own things that she has dealt with along the way. And I'm sure that we'll get into all of that. And she had an adventure last week, which we might get into. If she wants to talk about it and set you went a little so we'll get there anyway. Welcome to unstoppable mindset. Glad you're with us.   Khushboo Chabria  02:07 Thank you. Thank you so much for having me.   Michael Hingson  02:09 And you are up in Northern California, right? That's correct. In the Silicon Valley. What's the weather up there?   Khushboo Chabria  02:17 It's really warm right now. It's hot.   Michael Hingson  02:21 We're about 96 degrees today. It was 104 yesterday, so   Khushboo Chabria  02:26 yeah, maybe not that hot. Yeah, I   Michael Hingson  02:29 know. But at least neither of us are in Palm Springs or Sacramento.   Khushboo Chabria  02:33 That's true. That's true, that would definitely be harder.   Michael Hingson  02:37 Well, let's start Would you just begin by telling us a little bit about you growing up and all that kind of stuff? And give us a little background like that?   Khushboo Chabria  02:46 Yeah, sure. Um, so I was actually born in India. My mom's sister had moved to the US in the late 80s. And we had applied for green card when we were little kids. And it wasn't until I was 10 years old that we got our green card, and I moved here with my family. So my parents and my brother and I, we all moved here in 1999.   Michael Hingson  03:15 Okay, and what was it like moving to obviously, a whole new country and all that what? What motivated your parents to come over here? And what was it like for you growing up in a new country? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  03:29 it was honestly very challenging. I was very young. And I was the I was at the kind of time in my life where I was very impressionable. So when we moved to America, my parents, they had to reestablish their careers here. And for the time being, we had stayed with different aunts and uncles, along the way, until my parents could afford their own place. And both my parents worked multiple jobs, in order to make sure that we had everything we needed. They wanted to move to America so that my brother and I would have additional opportunities, and a chance to really succeed at life. So that was, it was a whole American Dream story.   Michael Hingson  04:21 You when you moved here did or did not speak much English.   Khushboo Chabria  04:26 I actually spoke a lot of English because I went to an English school in India. So a lot of people don't know this, but the British when they had occupied India, took over the school system. So if you went to an English school in India, that means you got a really good education. And I went to a school called St. Mary's School in Pune, Maharashtra. And I had a little bit of a British accent, actually, when I moved here,   Michael Hingson  04:58 you've lost that   Khushboo Chabria  05:01 Yes, it's gone. It's been too long.   Michael Hingson  05:04 But what you don't have is, I guess more of a traditional Indian accent having been born and lived there for 10 years.   Khushboo Chabria  05:13 Yeah, I mean, I do speak in Hindi with my mom every day. But when anyone else hears me speaking Hindi, they think I have an American accent. So I feel like I've definitely lost the Indian accent. But it comes out every now and then when I'm speaking with my family.   Michael Hingson  05:34 It just always fascinates me to talk with people who have come from another country who have spent a lot of time here, but maybe grew up elsewhere. Some end up retaining an accent, and some don't. And I've always been fascinated by that and never understood how it works out that some do. And some don't, it must just plain be the listening or just the amount of work they put into what they choose their accent to be.   Khushboo Chabria  06:04 I think it also depends on age. So my brother still has a very much an Indian accent. Because when he moved here, he was 15. And because I was 10, I was still kind of at that age where it was easier for me to assimilate than it was for him.   Michael Hingson  06:23 So you, you, you get right in as it were,   Khushboo Chabria  06:26 yeah, definitely. Oops. So   Michael Hingson  06:29 you came here, you obviously were able to settle in from a language standpoint, and so on. But you say it was a little bit hard when you came, how come?   Khushboo Chabria  06:39 Um, it was challenging, because as I mentioned before, our family was staying with our extended family members. So we would stay at this aunt's house for six months, and then this uncle's house for three months. And then this uncle's house. So I ended up going to several different schools for sixth grade. And after that, my parents had enough, just enough to put a downpayment on a one bedroom apartment. And so when we moved into the apartment, those my parents were working all the time. And so often, I grew up in the apartment with my brother. And it was many times it was we were on our own. And it was a long time before my parents had established themselves enough in their careers that we had a more comfortable lifestyle.   Michael Hingson  07:37 What kind of career should they have? What did they do?   Khushboo Chabria  07:39 So my dad, he actually ended up going and getting a real estate license and is a broker. And full time for his job. He works at FedEx. And my mother, she took night classes at a school and got a certification and accounting. And then she basically became an accountant. And she worked for companies before. But now she manages the accounts for several different businesses from home.   Michael Hingson  08:15 Wow. That's still that's pretty cool. And then it shows the typical work ethic. I see, oftentimes, from people who move here from elsewhere, they're going to work hard, they're going to do whatever they need to do, to be able to establish themselves and care for families and so on. And I think that's personally so cool. My parents grew up here. And were born here. But still, they very much had that kind of an attitude. And they worked very hard to make sure that my brother and I also kept that same kind of attitude. And I, I don't think that that's a bad thing at all. And I think that we all can work pretty hard at trying to succeed, and we can do it in a good way.   Khushboo Chabria  09:03 Definitely. It was really important to learn that too.   Michael Hingson  09:07 Yeah, I agree. How long after you moved here? Did you guys finally get your own apartment?   Khushboo Chabria  09:13 Um, it must have been about what to say nine months or nine to 12 months before we did. Wow. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  09:25 For a 10 year old kid. That is a long time not to be able to put down roots somewhere and call someplace home.   Khushboo Chabria  09:34 Yeah. And you know, when I started in the public school system, I started first and a middle school. And then I ended up in an elementary school and then I ended up in a junior high. So it was a lot of switching around as well in between different school systems and trying to kind of figure out what where I fit into this whole education piece too?   Michael Hingson  10:03 Well, what was it like growing up just physically and so on? I know you have said that you, you have ADHD is something that you live with, when did you discover that?   Khushboo Chabria  10:16 I didn't discover that until I was 30 years old. So, you know, growing up, I was always a busy child, my mom had enrolled me and lots and lots of different classes when I was in India. So I was learning dance, I was learning singing, I was learning art, I was learning ceramics, I had a lot of different things that I was involved in, and my parents had a lot of structure in our lives. So I didn't for a long time even know that I had this different brain and that I actually struggled with ADHD. Even after I graduated college and started working in the field of behavior analysis, I didn't know that I had ADHD. And then at some point, when I became a board certified behavior analyst, and I actually move forward in my career, I went from being a therapist that spent 100% of my time with clients, to now becoming a clinician that spent 90% of my time with spreadsheets and 10% of my time fighting with insurance companies. And with all of that, I got further and further away from the clients, and further and further away from solving problems in real time, to just being behind the screen. And that's when my ADHD really started to show up.   Michael Hingson  11:54 So what made you finally realize that ADHD was part of your life.   Khushboo Chabria  11:59 Um, you know, to be honest, at first, I was just burned out, I was a burnt out clinician with a huge caseload, I was driving all over the Bay Area all day long. And I ended up in a clinic, and I got, I got diagnosed with depression. And I first got misdiagnosed with bipolar disorder, because that's something that a lot of people confuse, especially in regards to ADHD. And then I got a therapist who started to recognize that all the things that I was discussing in our sessions, all the areas of my life that I felt anxious and depressed about, were areas that are related to executive functioning, and ADHD. So she was, she was bright enough and keen enough to notice that, and to suggest that I be tested for ADHD, which is when they started the actual diagnosis process.   Michael Hingson  13:14 How do they test for ADHD?   Khushboo Chabria  13:17 Well, first, they took all of my notes that they had from the therapist, and they also interviewed my mother to find out what I was like as a child. And then lastly, they had me go through a bunch of different assessments where they were tracking my ability to focus. And these were usually tests on a computer where they showed different images. And I had to press specific keys when certain images popped up. And I did that for hours and hours and hours. And based on what they found, I definitely had ADHD. So I got the official diagnosis. Then I was connected with a cycle analyst who was able to then prescribe medication for me, which I didn't end up staying on. But that was the beginning.   Michael Hingson  14:13 A lot of it, though, is ultimately recognition. And then once you know it and believe it, then you can really work to understand it and not medications can't help but a lot of times it's more what you do internally that makes a difference.   Khushboo Chabria  14:32 Exactly. That's true.   Michael Hingson  14:35 So for you, you, you finally got diagnosed with that. But by that time you had been very much involved in a lot of psychology oriented kinds of things, which do you like better being a clinician or actually practicing and being in front of clients?   Khushboo Chabria  14:55 You know, to be honest, I think the field had completely changed. inch by the time I graduated with my master's, because at that point, the Affordable Care Act had passed. And what that what happened with that is all the insurance companies were now in the system. And while that made the services more available to lots and lots of people, it also meant that there was now this huge demand for the services. So I think my experience was the way it was because of the timing of that bill passing, as well as at that point, the need that was there for more service providers in this field. But that being said, I think that it was, it's much more reinforcing for me to engage with people, rather than engaging with spreadsheets. And as someone who has ADHD, since the time I was diagnosed, and all the years that I continued to struggle with ADHD, I have learned that I work best in an environment where I'm constantly solving novel problems, that are allowing me to research different kinds of things. And also to use everything in my toolbox to solve problems. And any problem that has a fast response in terms of solving it is one, that's the most reinforcing to me.   Michael Hingson  16:36 So does that translate today into you, looking at cases from kind of the outside or working more with people and being in front of them,   Khushboo Chabria  16:46 I think it's a little bit of both. Now, I would say that the most amazing part of my career is the coaching. And what the coaching allows me to do is to work with neurodivergent people with all kinds of different backgrounds. Because that makes it so that one day, I might be researching how to get a marketing internship. And the next day, I might be understanding how I should help my coachee brand themselves as a musician. And then maybe the third day, I'm working with someone who has a computer science background. And so I'm working with a lot of different skill sets and a lot of different abilities. And the great thing about what I get to do now is that it is fully aligned with how I work best. And that I get to continue solving novel problems. I get to continue teaching, I get to continue engaging with organizations on increasing the awareness of neurodiversity. So I get to solve these issues, and improve that awareness for neurodiversity in a lot of different ways that are very much in line with how I work best.   Michael Hingson  18:05 So what are the star diversity take in obviously ADHD would be a factor. What other kinds of things fall under that category?   Khushboo Chabria  18:15 Yeah, definitely. So ADHD is a big one. Autism is a big one. Dyslexia, dyscalculia. dyspraxia, bipolar disorder, as well as Tourette's   Michael Hingson  18:30 are all considered part of neurodiversity, or neuro divergent world.   Khushboo Chabria  18:36 Yeah, and neurodiversity as an umbrella term, just to explain what it is. You know, just like when, you know, you see any people we see, we say that, you know, people have different height, people have different hair color, people have different eye color. And just like how there's so much variability in humans, in terms how we present physically, the same way, our brains have just as much variability. So the term neuro diversity is to describe the natural variability in people's brains and behavior functioning.   Michael Hingson  19:15 When you talk about neurodiversity. Do people try to create some sort of box and fit everyone into it? Or do people generally recognize that it is a really broad category that takes in a lot of stuff?   Khushboo Chabria  19:29 I think different people have different ways of looking at it. You know, there are companies that instead of having specific groups for neurodiversity, we'll put everything in an ability group, which is about including anyone with any kind of disability, whether it's invisible or visible. In terms of neurodiversity. A lot of people know the main ones to be autism, dyslexia and ADHD. But we're still learning so much about bipolar does over and about to rats. And so there's a lot of understanding that still needs to happen around neurodiversity. There's still a lot of stigma there, there's still a lot of people who aren't really aware of what this term means. So I would say that people have different levels of understanding about this. But I think it's all kind of related, right? I mean, if we have different ways of processing information from the world, then we all kind of have a different way of going about it. And when we say neuro divergent, we're talking about one person who may or may not have one of those labels. When we say neuro diverse, we're talking about everyone, because everybody's in that umbrella of having a brain that's unique and processing information in a unique way, and making sense of the world in a unique way. So it depends, I guess that's the answer to the question.   Michael Hingson  21:06 No, it does. And I could make the case that we're all part of a neuro divergent world in a way, and I think that's what you're saying. But there, there are specific kinds of categories that mostly we deal with when we talk about neurodiversity. I'm a little bit familiar with Tourette's, but can you define that a little bit? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  21:27 definitely. Um, Tourette's has to do with basically, it has to do with just kind of its has to do with tics and involuntary repetitive movements. So in terms of how that relates to neurodiversity, we're just talking about individuals who have different behaviors, whether that sounds, whether that's saying the same words in the same way, or having physical behavioral differences that are stereotypical, well,   Michael Hingson  22:02 how was it for you grew up? Well, not growing up so much, but being in the workplace and not being diagnosed with ADHD and so on? That had to be quite a challenge?   Khushboo Chabria  22:13 Yeah, definitely. Um, you know, to be honest, one of the biggest things that I found out right off the bat was that when I had a lot of different cases, and different deadlines, and different things that I needed to accomplish in my job, I really struggled with keeping control over everything that was going on. And as a clinician, you know, there was a lot of things that I was responsible for I was responsible for training all the staff that was on my cases, I was responsible for keeping track of all the materials that were needed. On every case, I was responsible for parent training, I was responsible for scheduling meetings, I was responsible for completing reports, I was responsible for staying connected to insurance companies. And with all of those different things, I had a really hard time with managing all my responsibilities. And in the beginning, you know, it was just a write up about being more punctual and being more timely to meetings. Then it became about making sure that all my reports are complete, then it was about making sure that my reports had all the feedback taken into consideration. And throughout every single step of it, I was feeling more and more disheartened about where I was and how I was working. And it really made me question, you know, is something wrong with me? Why is it that everyone else is able to do all this without any issues, but when it comes to me, here, I am struggling so much. And I was really depressed. I, I thought I was depressed, and I thought I was burnt out. And in trying to get treatment for that I ended up finding out I had ADHD.   Michael Hingson  24:22 Did other supervisors or colleagues see kind of all the stress and the things that were going on? Or were you able to kind of hide it?   Khushboo Chabria  24:30 A lot of people were able to see the stress and to be honest, for the longest time, despite being in a field that was there to support children with neurodiverse conditions. I found myself in a workplace that was very toxic. And I was basically just told, Well, you need to meet your billable hours and maybe you need to do this or maybe you need to do Under planning, but nobody was sitting down and telling me how to go about doing that, or what steps I needed to take to get the support I needed. And not a single person in that office had identified what I was dealing with as something that could be related to ADHD. Instead, I was just being told that I wasn't working hard enough, or I wasn't working fast enough, or I wasn't being organized enough. And I took all of that to heart. For a long time, it took me a long time to unlearn those messages. Because I kept beating myself up over the simple things. And I felt like I wasn't a good employee. And I felt at times that I was being discriminated against. But I realized now looking back at it all, that I made a lot of mistakes as well. And I should have known how to ask for that support early on. But I didn't know what I didn't know. So there's a lot of thinking that's gone behind everything that happened then. But looking back at it, now I'm able to see all the different sides of that equation.   Michael Hingson  26:15 When did you start in the workforce?   Khushboo Chabria  26:17 I started in the workforce in 20. I would say 2007.   Michael Hingson  26:26 Okay, so you Where were you in school at that time?   Khushboo Chabria  26:33 At that time, I was in community college, okay. And I was working at a daycare center with a whole bunch of children. And I was also working as a campus activities coordinator at our school.   Michael Hingson  26:50 So that was 15 years ago. Do you see that there has been a lot of change in dealing with ADHD and and neuro diversity. And I don't mean, just talking about a real substantive change, that would nowadays make a difference. If you were starting out today, as opposed to what happened to you 15 years ago? Um, is it different? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  27:23 I think the way that we do work with children who are neurodiverse has changed a lot. Like the way that things are done. Now the way that treatment is carried out, is very neurodiversity affirming, which means that it's not really about fixing anything, it's about really understanding what are the challenges that this individual is facing? And how can we support them such that they can live fulfilling independent lives without having to depend on other people. And so a lot of what I did before, was in regards to teaching skills. So I might be teaching a two year old how to make eye contact, I might be teaching a five year old how to tie their shoelaces. I taught everything from toilet training, to how to make a purchase at the store, how to start a conversation with someone how to speak, a lot of my clients were nonverbal when I was in the field. So that whole space has changed a lot. In regards to working and working conditions. I don't know if there have been a lot of changes in how we provide care, and how we provide support to people who are providing that care. And I think that as a society, we need to do a better job of supporting the people who are providing health care to the disability population. Yeah, and we could do a lot better with that. Right?   Michael Hingson  29:08 Oh, no doubt about it. I was thinking, though, of how you described your work situation is you needed to work harder, you needed to work better, and so on. Do you think those attitudes in the workforce toward people who may be experiencing the same thing that you experience? Do you think that those kinds of conditions have changed much?   Khushboo Chabria  29:35 I think they have to some degree, but I wouldn't say all across the board. And what I've mean when I say that is because even now, when people have disclosed their neurodiversity to their employer, there are times where people are just saying, Well, you know, I understand that you're struggling with a XYZ, but this work needs to be completed. So this idea of kind of painting this color on somebody who's a little bit differently, who works differently, who thinks differently, who processes information differently, I think we still have these assumptions that we make about people and those assumptions of, oh, this person's just lazy, or this person's just not doing it, or this person's just not the right fit. And as soon as we start using that terminology, we've now made assumptions before trying to understand what it is that that person might be struggling with. Right? Oh,   Michael Hingson  30:46 I agree. And it sounds like that, even with the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. And now 32 years ago, and 31 years ago, actually being enacted and going into law, it hasn't made a lot of difference in these kinds of things, because we just haven't really dealt with the educational aspect of it yet.   Khushboo Chabria  31:11 Right? Yeah. I think you know, the problem is really with the stigma we have in society about people who are different, anyone who's another, right? It's very easy to say, Oh, this is just not working out, instead of approaching that person and saying, Hey, I noticed that in our last interaction, this is what happened. Is there something that I'm seeing that's confusing you? Or can you talk to me about what's going on, so I can help, right? And that moment, where you have the chance to question somebody, to understand that better before you judge them. That is something that we as a society just need to be better at, we need to be better managers, we need to be better educators, we need to be better leaders. And that comes with not trying to just rush things along and thinking that someone is going to be exactly the perfect candidate. But instead saying, You know what this is a human being. And the way that they might think, or work might be different than the way I think and work. So before I put them in a box, it's important to show that curiosity and that compassion to learn more about that person.   Michael Hingson  32:41 And I think you hit it on the head when you talk about curiosity very much. How do we get people to be more curious to be more open to ask why and why not? As opposed to just assuming? Yeah, definitely. That's a real general question. I really,   Khushboo Chabria  33:05 ya know, you know, and our presentations at neurodiversity pathways, we have this terminology called compassionate curiosity. And what that is, is that when you have a moment where something doesn't make sense, or someone's behavior is just not adding up to what you know about them. Or if some interaction happened, that leaves you feeling confused. Before you jump to, I can't believe this person hasn't gotten this to me. If we could all take a moment to say, Hey, I haven't heard from you. I just wanted to follow up is everything. Okay? Right. That's a really great way that we can sort of foster that kind of a culture, which capitalizes on empathy and understanding versus judgment and expectations. But that being said, to change that, I think that begins with increasing awareness. Right. So in the work that we do with neurodiversity pathways, the first thing we do when any company engages with us, and they say, We want to hire people with autism, or we want to hire neurodivergent people. The first thing we say to them is, there's no point in bringing anyone into your organization, unless and until you're able to foster a culture of inclusion, and a culture of understanding and awareness that's built around neurodiversity because as someone who is responsible for placing neurodivergent people into organizations, I know that if I place somebody in an organization that is not supportive neurodivergent talent, then that person is, forget, thrive or succeed, that person is not even going to be able to retain that position.   Michael Hingson  35:10 Do you hear people often say, Oh, we don't need to do that, because I'm certainly open. I'm glad to bring somebody in. Who is who has autism? Or who is neuro divergent in some way? Do you? Do you see that a lot? Or do people get it and then tend to be open to say, how do we really make that happen?   Khushboo Chabria  35:31 I would say probably a few years ago, there was a lot less awareness about neurodiversity. And I know that probably with every client that we engage with, they're at different levels of understanding about it. And maybe some of them have received trainings from other sources. But that being said, I think that there are definitely some companies who do try to rush these things. None of those are companies that we've engaged with. But the ones who try to rush into these diversity and inclusion efforts are usually the ones that fail. Because without that understanding, and that real culture of inclusion, and that culture of psychological safety, it's just kind of a recipe for disaster, when you have people who don't understand how to work with that population,   Michael Hingson  36:28 and don't really want to take the time to do it. Right.   Khushboo Chabria  36:32 Exactly. Exactly.   Michael Hingson  36:34 Well, how did you get involved in being interested in disabilities, and well, neurodiversity, and so on, because that clearly had to happen a long time before you were diagnosed with ADHD. So how did all that happen?   Khushboo Chabria  36:47 Yeah, definitely. Um, you know, so when I was in college, at UC San Diego, I had a major human development. And I was actually pre med at the time, because I thought that I wanted to go into medicine. And after I graduated from college, it was actually right when we had had our first sort of economic collapse as a country. And so there were still not a lot of jobs, I thought I wanted to do PhD programs in social psychology. And I had started applying to graduate programs all over the country in that degree. And it wasn't until I started working in the field of behavior analysis, that I felt I had kind of found a home. So growing up, I had a cousin, who had Global Developmental Delay, previously known as Mr. And I grew up with him. And I had always had a really special bond with them, I was very close to him. And I also had another cousin who grew up with schizophrenia. So I grew up kind of seeing how that had affected him. And when I graduated college, I needed a job, I applied to a part time job as a behavior therapist. And I worked for a very small company in Oakland, California. And my first client was an eight year old, nonverbal, autistic boy from Ethiopia. And he was the most beautiful child I had ever seen in my entire life. And I just fell in love with him. And within a few months of working with them, he started speaking his first words. And the first sentence he ever spoke was, I want more cookies. And that was it. I think that as soon as he started speaking, I knew that whatever I did, I wanted to be helping this population. And I wanted to work with neurodivergent people. And it started out with working with children. But when that client spoke his first words, I felt like the trajectory of my life had changed. And I decided to rescind all my applications for social psych. I reset for my GRE exams, and I reapplied to grad schools in behavior analysis. That's kind of what started the journey in that direction. And then obviously, as we spoke about before, when I was finally a clinician, I found out I had ADHD. i At that point, had worked for a school district. I had worked as an assessor. I had started a social skills group, I had tried to start a parent training program. I had done a lot of other things before I found neurodiversity pathways. Well,   Michael Hingson  39:59 the big Question, of course is did you give him more cookies?   Khushboo Chabria  40:03 Of course we did. Definitely   Michael Hingson  40:07 reward good behavior.   Khushboo Chabria  40:09 Yeah, he just it was amazing because as soon as he started speaking, just like babies do, he started babbling as well. And he would wake his mom up early in the morning and Babble Babble Babble for hours to her trying to communicate and everything that we pointed to and labeled for him was a word he picked up immediately. So it was a transformative case.   Michael Hingson  40:38 That is so cool. And do you? Do you hear anything about him nowadays?   Khushboo Chabria  40:46 Yeah, actually, I'm still in touch with his mom. And he just graduated high school a year ago. So he's starting in community college.   Michael Hingson  40:56 How old is he?   Khushboo Chabria  40:57 He is now 19 years old.   Michael Hingson  41:00 Wow. That's so cool.   Khushboo Chabria  41:04 Isn't that amazing?   Michael Hingson  41:05 It is. It's wonderful. Well, that's what doing good work like that. And being thorough is all   Khushboo Chabria  41:11 about. Exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  41:14 So for you, having eventually been diagnosed with ADHD that that certainly had to give you a great amount of well, relief on one hand, but then also, it gave you the ability to really sit back and look at your options and decide how you go forward. What kind of tools did you end up then starting to use that maybe you didn't use so much before tools that help you be more productive and deal with what you had to deal with?   Khushboo Chabria  41:46 Yeah. So at first, I had therapy, which is what I had started out with, and I had continued. At some point, I had also tried meds, but I found out that the meds were just too difficult on my body, and I couldn't handle staying on those. So I had to find other strategies. And some of those strategies were things like using a Google calendar using more reminders, planning ahead, having more of a morning routine, really building healthy habits around eating, sleeping hygiene and meditation so that I had a better handle on things, and also had to learn coping and resilience strategies for when things did not go my way. A lot of these tools and strategies got solidified when I joined neurodiversity pathways. And we actually used all this information to create the curriculum for our students who were going into the workplace. But for the time being, when I first gotten diagnosed, I started reading about things online. And I found people who were sharing strategies, on websites and on LinkedIn and on social media. And I slowly started piecing together the things that worked best for me, the things that were the most instrumental. In the beginning, were buying a habit calendar. And having a morning routine. With those two things, I was really able to get started. Then with the executive functioning, I started planning out reminders for things that I had do weeks in advance so that I was more on top of getting my tasks completed. And as I learned more and more about ADHD, I recognize that most of the things that I struggled with in regards to executive functioning, they weren't necessarily related specifically to cognitive differences, but they were more related to the emotional and behavioral aspects of executive functioning. So the anxiety of having to start a task that I've never done before, or just the fear of not getting it correct, that would just paralyze me from even beginning on the task. Those were the things that I needed tools around the most and that's where therapy came into play.   Michael Hingson  44:26 Do you still deal with therapy today?   Khushboo Chabria  44:29 I, I have been on and off therapy. I'm currently on a lookout for therapists. So if anyone's listening, I'm looking for one and I'm on many waitlist. The therapists in my area are all booked up because of COVID. And so there's been a little bit of challenge with that. But since the diagnosis, I have tried individual therapy. I've worked with different kinds of therapists so it was really important to me to try to find someone who was a South Asian therapist, because I felt like there were a lot of things that someone with a South Asian background would understand that someone who doesn't have that background would have a lot of difficulty in regard to cultural competency. In addition, I've also tried group therapy. And I've also done a workshop on ADHD that helped with learning how to be more organized. And with better planning.   Michael Hingson  45:34 You mentioned meditation, how does that play into what you do? And in your own progress in psyche? Yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  45:43 definitely, I think, you know, meditation is one of those things that a lot of people throw around. And it's kind of like, you know, the pop psychology thing to talk about, right? Like, let's all do mindfulness and meditation. And for me, because my mind is constantly racing at 100 miles per hour, what meditation and mindfulness practices allow me to do is to steal my mind, and to really focus on my breathing, and to really sort of observe the things that are making me anxious, without starting to act upon them right away. And so when I meditate, it's, that's my time to steal my mind of all the racing thoughts, to take account of the things that I'm anxious about. And instead of jumping on them, just observing them, reflecting on them, and noticing them before I can actually start to begin what it is that I want to do. And that single moment of clarity is enough for me to kind of be in a better headspace, so that I can tackle all the tasks on my to do list,   Michael Hingson  47:06 show what happens when you do that.   Khushboo Chabria  47:10 I think that it helps me relax, it helps me focus. It helps me prioritize on the things that I need to get done. And it allows me to have some breathing room to really plan things out in a way that doesn't take over my entire life. But instead, it helps me remember what things I have to do, what things I need to do, and what things I want to do. And as soon as I have that division and that clarity, in my mind, I'm better able to tackle the things I need to get done.   Michael Hingson  47:51 Cool. Well, you've mentioned neurodiversity pathways many times. And so we should get to that. Tell me about that. What led you to finding it, what it is, and so on?   Khushboo Chabria  48:04 Sure. So actually, when I decided to pivot to neurodiversity, in 2020, it was because at that point, I had tried to work in the field of behavior analysis for years, and continued to struggle and fail at that endeavor. And the reason being that I just didn't feel like the field was aligned with what I wanted to do. And I needed to figure out a different thing that I could take or a different path that I could take going forward with my career. So in the beginning of 2020, shortly before COVID, I had just left a position as a behavior specialist at a school district, where I was helping to support a class of students that were under the IDI category or emotionally disturbed. And at that point, I had decided that I wanted to shift away from all of the behavioral stuff and focus more on neurodiversity, because I wanted to be neurodiversity affirming in my career, and I wanted to be working with adults and I wanted to expand my skill set. And I didn't feel like my previous work was aligned with me anymore. So I ended up hiring a career coach. And this was in January of 2020. And he was someone who had a completely different background than me, but he was very good at learning what was awesome about me and what my strengths were, and how I could best showcase those strengths to the world. So together you him and I started our research into neurodiversity. And we learned a lot about how the field works. And then I started networking. And it's kind of ironic that I started with a career coach, because now I am a career coach to neurodivergent people. But in my networking, I ended up meeting someone named Jessica Lee, who has a neurodiversity program in Southern California. And she told me that I should speak to Ranga Rahman, who is the program director of neurodiversity pathways, and we set up a networking call, I opened up to him and honestly shared with him about everything that I had faced and where I was with my career, and what it is that I wanted to do. And to be honest with you, Michael, I cried to him. And 20 minutes later, he sent me a job description and said, I can only hire you as a volunteer for now. But you will get the work experience that you need in this space. And if at any point, you get another job, you're welcome to leave. But this would be a great starting place for you. And we will be happy to have you on the team. So that's how I came on to neurodiversity pathways. And when I joined the team, we have lost all our funding due to COVID. And we had to basically build our program from the ground up. So at the time, me Ranga, and a small group of volunteers work together to build our first online course. And that was growth mindset. And we went from building one course to three courses, to five courses, to 10 courses to 14 courses. And what our career launch program is now is a 14 course program training program called Career Readiness Training, followed by six months of one on one coaching. The entire program is called Career launch programs. And it is aimed at neurodivergent individuals who have a two or four year college degree and those who are unemployed or underemployed, in relation to their strengths, their qualifications and their interest. And it's focused on those who are really motivated to get a job and be good at it. And those who need the motivation and drive to get to their goals.   Michael Hingson  52:41 Well, overall, what is neuro diversity pathways as an organization, what what does it do? How do you start? Tell us a little more about that, if you would?   Khushboo Chabria  52:52 Yeah, definitely. So Rhonda J. Rahman, who's our program director, was actually responsible for starting a lot of coalition building around neurodiversity at Stanford University. And when he left Stanford, he joined goodwill, and started neurodiversity pathways, which used to be known as expandability. Colon autism advantage. And then after about two years, they rebranded themselves to not just focus on autism, but to be focused on the full neurodiversity umbrella, which is when they became neurodiversity pathways. We've been around since 2017. And we are a social impact program under the mission services umbrella at the goodwill of Silicon Valley. So we Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. I was gonna say we work on two sides. On one side, we work with individuals, which is the career launch program, which I was just telling you about. And on the organization side, we have workplace inclusion services, where we train companies on neuro Diversity Awareness, and we provide business process consultation. And we provide coaching and we provide half day and full day workshops to train companies on how to work with neurodivergent people. So those are the two ways in which we support   Michael Hingson  54:26 do you work on both sides of the company or mainly in the work?   Khushboo Chabria  54:31 I work on both sides. So on the individual side, I teach all the job development courses. And I do a lot of the coaching that we do with our students to get them placed into jobs. And on the organizational side and part of all the presentations and the consulting that we do with companies that want to hire neurodivergent people.   Michael Hingson  54:56 Are there other kinds of career launch programs around the country? Similar to what neurodiversity pathways does, or yeah,   Khushboo Chabria  55:05 there are, but there are many different kinds. And they're offering many different kinds of services. But I would like to say that there isn't a single program in the country that as in depth as ours, that has a 10 month commitment to neurodivergent individuals, where we teach everything from personal effectiveness to workplace competency skills, and job development. And a two week workplace experience, followed by six months of coaching,   Michael Hingson  55:38 is the program free to people who need it.   Khushboo Chabria  55:41 The program is free to anyone who is connected to any DLR office in California. However, if you live in a different state, if you live in a different country, we're willing and able to work with any local service providers or government agencies in order to get you the funding that you need to cover the costs of the program.   Michael Hingson  56:08 So you get funding from the Department of Rehabilitation now, for example. So there is funding, unlike there was at the beginning of the COVID time.   Khushboo Chabria  56:19 Yeah, so actually, I was only I was a volunteer for a part of the time. And then I was my manager pushed for me to become a contractor. And then I became a full time employee. So I have been a full time employee for a little bit. And we have gotten the program off the ground. So when we were building the courses, we did several test runs. We had our official first cohort launched in spring of this year, which went from March 1 to July 1. And we are now recruiting for our fall program, which begins on September 13.   Michael Hingson  57:00 How can organizations and people support or help what you're doing and neurodiversity pathways in the Korean lunch program.   Khushboo Chabria  57:09 There are so many different ways. So if you actually go to our website, you can make a donation to our mission. You can also sponsor the education of a student if you're interested in that you can hire us to come speak to your work groups, to your community groups, to your team, to your organization, about neurodiversity, you can also sign up to be a volunteer coach to help support one of our students while they're working, or look looking for jobs. So there are lots of different ways we host two neurodiversity awareness sessions that are free to anyone in the world online. And those are offered two times a month, you can sign up on our website when you click on awareness sessions, and go to individual and click on the Google Form there. Additionally, if you want to hire us for Neuro Diversity Awareness, or to help hire neurodiverse people into your company, we're happy to speak to you about that as well.   Michael Hingson  58:19 In it all operates under the umbrella of goodwill of Silicon Valley's 501 C three tax status, or do you have your own?   Khushboo Chabria  58:28 We're all under the goodwill and   Michael Hingson  58:32 it makes sense. Well, so what do you do when you're not working?   Khushboo Chabria  58:37 Um, to be honest, lately, I've been mostly just working. But I'm also working on my dissertation, which is kind of related to work.   Michael Hingson  58:49 Congratulations. So you're working toward a PhD?   Khushboo Chabria  58:52 Yeah, it's actually an EDD in organizational leadership.   Michael Hingson  58:57 Okay. Where, what what?   Khushboo Chabria  59:01 So I'm going to UMass global, which used to formally be known as Brandman University, under the Chapman umbrella. And I am getting my degree in organizational leadership. So I'm going to abd right now, which is all but dissertation, which means I have completed my coursework, but I haven't completed my dissertation yet. And so I am completing that now. My dissertation is going to be looking at the lived experience of colleagues of neurodivergent employees.   Michael Hingson  59:40 When do you think you'll get to defend it and become a doctor?   Khushboo Chabria  59:46 Well, to be honest with you, Michael, with my ADHD, I only have until August of next year to defend so I have to get it done by August of next year. Or school. Yeah, I do much better. They have deadlines. So when they told me I had a year left, I wish they had emailed me that, that actual email a few years prior, so I could have been scared enough to just get it done. But here we are towards the end of it outside of my dissertation. I am learning Tarot. So I'm moonlighting as a tarot reader. And I do a lot of different networking things. And I'm part of social groups, and I do speaking engagements. And I spend a lot of time with friends and family and I travel as well. Where have you traveled? I've traveled to a lot of places in Asia. So I've traveled to the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Hong Kong, Macau. I've also traveled a little bit in Europe. So I've traveled to Spain and to France. But I'm hoping to increase that once things settle down with COVID.   Michael Hingson  1:01:11 Yeah. Hopefully that will happen sometime in the near future, or at least in the future, but it's so unpredictable still.   Khushboo Chabria  1:01:20 Exactly, definitely.   Michael Hingson  1:01:23 Well, this has been a heck of a lot of fun. And I've learned a lot I appreciate all that you have had to say. So you haven't written any books or anything yet, your thesis is probably going to be your first major project.   Khushboo Chabria  1:01:37 Yes, definitely. I have been published as a poet and a couple of books, but that's not related to this.   Michael Hingson  1:01:45 Okay. Well, it's, it's great that you're doing some writing. And that is always exciting to do. Well, if people want to learn more about you, or reach out, if they want to explore neurodiversity pathways, and so on, if you would tell us all about how to contact you and how to learn about the program and so on.   Khushboo Chabria  1:02:05 Yeah, definitely. So when this podcast is published, I know you're going to be posting some links on our website, and all of those other things. But if you go to ndpathways.org. That is our website, all our information is there, our contact information is there as well. You can reach out to me directly, you can connect with me on LinkedIn, I'm happy to answer any questions that you have. And to be able to help you in any way that I   Michael Hingson  1:02:36 can. How do people connect with you on LinkedIn,   Khushboo Chabria  1:02:40 my LinkedIn profile will also be linked to this podcast, but it is actually just linked in.com and my U R L, let me just pull it up is linkedin.com backslash Khushboo Chabria, which is K h u s h B for boy, o o C a b r i a. And that's my full name after the LinkedIn and the backslash.   Michael Hingson  1:03:18 Khushboo. Thank you very much for being here. And I think it's always fun when we get to learn more and new and different things. And we get to explore new ideas, at least to some of us. They're new, but explore ideas and even picking up new things. Even though we may have heard some of it before. There's always new stuff. So thank you for bringing that to all of us.   Khushboo Chabria  1:03:46 Thank you so much for having me, Michael, I appreciate you.   Michael Hingson  1:03:49 Well, I appreciate you being here. And I hope you enjoyed this out there, please reach out to Khushboo. And also, I'd love to hear from you. Let me know what you thought about this. You can reach me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com or go to www dot Michael hingson.com/podcast. We also really would appreciate a five star review from you wherever you're listening to this podcast. Please do that. Your support is what makes this worthwhile and possible and we love to hear the things you have to say. So we appreciate you doing that. And we hope that you'll be here again next weekend Khushboo you thank you for once more for being here with us today.   Khushboo Chabria  1:04:35 Thank you so much for having   Michael Hingson  1:04:41 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Embracing Autism
EP 700 – Seasons of Change

Embracing Autism

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 18:30


Join us as we discuss how the Embracing Autism Podcast is evolving in the new year.

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society
A Conversation With Penetration Tester Richard Ardelean | The Hacker Factory Podcast With Phillip Wylie

ITSPmagazine | Technology. Cybersecurity. Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 27:22


Comadreando
THE COLOR OF AUTISM

Comadreando

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 68:58


Hola Comadres! Welcome to the 13th episode of Season 3!  Let's talk about navigating the spectrum as a person of color! Join your comadre Marcy and special guest, Camille Proctor, fellow autism advocate and a mother to an autistic boy. Your comadres discuss what it is like to navigate the spectrum being a person of color, the work Camille is doing to bring awareness to the fact that Autism is diverse .    More about Camille, Ms. Camille Proctor is the mother of a teen son and an adult daughter.  In 2008 shortly after her son's second birthday, he was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. As she searched for support services for her family, she soon realized a disparity in the black community. In 2009 she founded The Color of Autism Foundation to support African American families with children on the autism spectrum. The Color of Autism Foundation is a US Non-Profit (501 c3) organization committed to educating and assisting African American families affected by autism spectrum disorders. They aim to help families identify the warning signs of autism early on, so they can become their child's best advocate. Providing culturally competent support and training will improve outcomes for children in underserved communities on the autism spectrum.    She has served as a diversity and inclusion advisor for both television and film. Camille is a board member of the Behavioral Intervention Certification Council, where she serves as secretary. BICC is an independent and autonomous governing body for the Board-Certified Autism Technician (BCAT) & Board-Certified Autism Professional (BCAP) certification programs.    In September 2020, Governor Gretchen Whitmer appointed her to the Michigan State Disability Council. The Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council's mission is to support people with developmental disabilities to achieve life dreams.     Author of a CNN Essay “For the Walter Wallaces of the world, the police are not the answer” (October 2020).   Marcy is recording with Riverside-FM and if you'd like to watch instead of listen, head on over to YouTube and check out the video version of the podcast.   If you have any suggestions, opinions, questions, or comments about this or any episode, please send us a Comadre-Gram at marcy@comadreandopod.com or DM me via IG. Let's have a conversation.     If you like the podcast, please share with your family, friends, and significant other. You can support this podcast by finding it across all platforms and rating, liking, and reviewing.   If you chat about us, please use the hashtags #Comadreando, #ComadreTime, or #HolaComadres so that I can see and share you as well.   If you want to help the sustainability of Comadreando, please consider becoming a patron on Patreon. Become a monthly sustaining member or make a one time contribution. Every little bit helps.   You can contribute via $comadreandopod on CashApp and @comadreandopod on Venmo. Merchandise is out now, please visit our BRAND NEW WEBSITE to check out all the Comadre Gear https://www.comadreandopod.com.    NOTES:   Sign Up for Comadre-grams Using this link: http://eepurl.com/h-Gqw9   Camille's Links: Website: https://thecolorofautism.org/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/colorofautism/ Facebook Page:  https://www.facebook.com/colorofautism Twitter: https://twitter.com/ColorofAutism TICKETS FOR 1st COMADRE HAPPY HOUR of 2023. This is our second event ever... get ready to dance, have a drink and chop it up with our community of comadres. Save the date. Friday January 6, 2023 from 5-9PM at Suyo Gastrofusion in the Bronx. There is parking available. Get your tickets by clicking the link below.  Comadre Happy Hour Get Together

I Have ADHD Podcast
How to Rewire Your Brain with Barbara Arrowsmith-Young

I Have ADHD Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 50:29 Very Popular


Barbara Arrowsmith-Young overheard her first-grade teacher telling her mom, “Barbara really isn't going to amount to much.”Growing up, Barbara struggled to learn to read and write. Back then, there was no such term as “learning difficulty” — the understanding was that your brain was fixed forever. To Barbara, it felt like a life sentence.Today, she is known as “the woman who changed her brain.” After years of living with a diagnosed “mental block,” Barbara set out to understand why parts of her brain weren't functioning the way they should.What she discovered changed her understanding of the brain entirely, and she knew it was her life's work to help others overcome the learning difficulties that might be holding them back.The Arrowsmith Program is helping thousands of people worldwide reduce the factors in their life causing negative neuroplasticity so they can become effective, confident, and self-directed learners.Learn more about The Arrowsmith Program by visiting their website. Be sure to take the free questionnaire to get a snapshot of your own cognitive profile. I help people struggling with learning difficulties regularly in my group coaching program for adult ADHDers. Click the button below to learn more.>>FOCUSED