Podcast appearances and mentions of Ed Sullivan

American television host and columnist

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Ed Sullivan

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Best podcasts about Ed Sullivan

Latest podcast episodes about Ed Sullivan

Anderson Business Advisors Podcast
150% Commitment: Joey DeMaio Of Manowar on Succeeding In Today's Music Industry

Anderson Business Advisors Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 40:48


Today we've got another unusual and inspiring episode of Anderson Business Advisors, Toby Mathis speaks with Joey DeMaio of Valhalla Studios in New York. As you may know, Joey is the guitarist from the popular and long-lived metal band Manowar. Joey's career has spanned over 40 years at this point, and as an artist and businessperson, he has a fascinating story to tell. You'll hear how Joey joined a band days after seeing The Beatles on Ed Sullivan, some insider tips and advice about the “business” of music, how Manowar has survived and thrived for four decades and continues to perform around the world to huge crowds, and Joey's many successes in and around the music business - running a studio, scoring movies, touring, and much more. To most, DeMaio is known as the internationally acclaimed and award-winning virtuoso bass guitarist, founding member, composer, lyricist, engineer, and producer for the world-renowned Rock/Heavy Metal band MANOWAR, who have sold over 30 million records to date, and continue stunning their audiences with sold-out festival and solo performances ranging from 10,000 to 80,000 people a night. Since their inception, DeMaio has successfully steered the career of MANOWAR, who today are more popular than ever, all over the world. Highlights/Topics: Joey's history with Manowar and myriad of amazing accomplishments in business and music Seeing The Beatles on Ed Sullivan - Joey's future was clear Surprising insider nuggets about the music industry- musicians MUST know the business, and the band feeds an enormous network of people Manowar and their more than 40-year career– still going strong Breaking into the music business today- are you a ‘musician', or a ‘performer'? Monetary scenarios - earning a living in the music business Manowar - what's new, what's next? Resources: Joey DeMeDaio Linkt.ree https://linktr.ee/realjoeydemaio Manowar Website https://manowar.com/ Valhalla Studios NY http://valhallastudiosny.com/ Magic Circle Entertainment LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/magic-circle-entertainment/about/ Anderson Advisors https://andersonadvisors.com/ Toby Mathis on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX5nh607M8hSBLiMB9MgbIQ

Ambitchious
How to Start a Podcast with Mr. Ed Sullivan

Ambitchious

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 83:52


On this episode of the Ambitchious Podcast, we have my friend, mentor, and podcast producer, Ed Sullivan. Ed is an absolute celeb in the Podcasting world and is also an expert in all things sound. Ed has also been with Ambitchious from the jump and he helps me weekly make the Ambitchious Podcast available to incredible humans all across the globe. That being said, one of the most popular questions I receive is "how do I start a podcast?" Ed and I pull no punches and use no coded language when it comes to the ins and outs of creating, recording, and distributing your own podcast. I hope that this podcast either inspires you or deters you from adding a podcast to your repertoire. Either way, good luck cuz you're gonna need it.  IG: @edward_d_sullivan Twitter: @edwardsullivan Email: ed@soniccupcake.com This podcast is all about redefining the word “bitch” from a derogatory one to the acronym Being In Total Control of Herself. Katie Boyd will teach you how to use the very stones thrown at you to power your purpose and build your empire. You and only you can create and curate a life of happiness, abundance and magic. Join Katie for some truth bombs, life tools, laughs and spiritual smack talk. If you want personal empowerment with respect to your lifestyle, spirituality, health, fitness, and nutrition this is the podcast for you! Bitchapalooza: https://buy.stripe.com/fZe5lu2vq5yieIg28y A28P: https://buy.stripe.com/6oE4hqgmg4ue8jSdRi One on One with Katie: https://buy.stripe.com/cN28xG6LG7GqgQo28E Go to http://www.ambitchiousacademy.com/ to learn all about Ambitchious Academy and join today. Head to kbmfc.com for the inside scoop on everything Ambitchious. Check out the Bitch Box at https://www.kbmfc.com/ambitchious-bitch-box-book-and-bundle/ If you love this podcast, we invite you to join our Ambitchious community over at https://ambitchious.mn.co

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 562: Rockne S. O'Bannon

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 134:48


April 29 - May 5, 1967 This week Ken welcomes director, producer and writer (Evil, Farscape, The New Twilight Zone, V, Seaquest DSV) Rockne S. O'Bannon to the show.  Ken and Rockne discuss Ken's long time love of Rockne's work and how often it comes up on the show, 1967, the amazing nature of not aging since 1967, the boom of sci-fi TV in 1966, Film reboots of classic TV shows, quantum entanglement, growing up in LA, Rockne's mother being a Busby Barkley dancer, Rockne's father being a gaffer at Warner Brothers, writing your first pilot script at age 10 for The Boy from U.N.C.L.E., realizing people make television at an early age, Isaac Asimov's essay on how sexy Mr. Spock is, Lawrence Welk swimsuit issue, innovation in animal training, Raven with a Gun, writing for streaming shows and dealing with not needing the convention ad break structure, Sci-Fi Channel movie templates, Laugh-In, Hollywood Teletype, commissioned art, the rise of hippy culture in the mainstream, TV Guide's incredibly detailed listings for everything including reruns and sports, Frankenstein Jr, Space Angel, Clutch Cargo, The Andy Griffith Show, The Dick Van Dyke shows status as the greatest TV sitcom ever, Pistols & Petticoats, Gunsmoke, Tom Skerrit's week, The Avengers, Johnny Carson reruns, Saturday Night Live, TV shows about television, It's About Time, Ed Sullivan, the pre-muppet Muppets, Roger Miller's variety show, FBI, Rockne's Dad taking home TV scripts for him to study, the horror of pay tv, white guys as Native Americans, westerns, Steve Allen's invention of everything, Mr. Terrific, Captain Nice, Buck Henry, Get Smart!, The New Twilight Zone, "Wordplay", "The Shadow Man", Darkroom with James Coburn, Joey Bishop, Don Herbert is Mr. Wizard, TV Close Ups, The National Science Test, The Saint, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Girl from U.N.C.L.E., Red Skelton, The Invaders, pinkies, playing it cool around celebrities, Albert Brooks, Night of the Meek, The Afterhours, Fame is the Name of the Game, Lost in Space, Batman '66, Fringe, Evil, time travel, Time Tunnel, being the new Irwin Allen by mistake, gadgets, I Spy, Wild Wild West, Honey West, Green Hornet, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, F Troop, Larry Storch and Forrest Tucker's chemistry, not wanting to talk to Milton Berle, short lived shows that had an outsized impact on pop culture, the power of villains, vigilantes, Bob & Ray, Tim Conway, "you're very pleased to meet me", Patrick McNee's secrets to life, nudists, Mod Tampons, TV Teletype, and Chuck Connors, as a Cowboy in Africa. 

Top Secrets
How to Maximize Trade Show Revenue

Top Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 18:13


To maximize trade show revenue, switch the mindset from, "I'm here to meet people and give away stuff" to "I'm here to collect leads." This changes the entire dynamic. When she did that, she came back from the trade show, we were having a conversation and she said, "I've never had a show like that. I got so many leads. I have all these people I'm going to be following up with. You know, we had great conversations." And all it is, is a shift in the dynamic, a shift in the strategy and the overall approach. Going from "I'm here to be here and to see people and schmooze" to "I am here to collect leads, follow up on those leads and make sales." If you do nothing other than that, you're going to maximize your revenue from trade shows. David: Hi and welcome to the podcast. In today's episode, co-host Jay McFarland and I will be discussing how to maximize trade show revenue. Welcome, Jay. Jay: Hey, thank you for having me on, David. I hope everybody had a wonderful holiday and have big plans for the great new year, and I'm sure trade shows, for a lot of people that's part of their plan, so they should go in with some goals and some ways to make sure that they can maximize those benefits. David: Absolutely. In last week's podcast, we were talking about hitting the ground running in the new year. And today we will continue that trend with the idea of trade shows. In the promotional products industry, this is definitely trade show season, which is why I thought it would be a good idea to address this topic. This week, in fact, the PPAI Expo in Las Vegas is going on. From the standpoint of promotional product suppliers, this is a really big show because that's when they get to meet all the distributors. From a distributor's standpoint, they get to see all the new products that are coming out. They get to visit with the suppliers who decorate the products, and it's a really big show. I sound like Ed Sullivan, "it's a really big show!" Takes place in Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas, and that's going on this week. And what we're talking about today, because most of the people who take advantage of our materials are promotional product distributors. They're walking the show this week. So what I'm talking about in terms of this topic though, is maximizing trade show revenue as an exhibitor. Because a lot of our clients who are walking the show this week as attendees, also will very often exhibit at other shows and try to sell their wares there. And so I wanted to touch on that topic a little bit this week. Jay: Yeah. And I'm really glad you are because I've been in both situations. I've walked a show trying to meet people, handing out cards. "Hey, this is what we do." And I've also been an exhibitor. There's nothing worse than being an exhibitor and watching people walk by your booth all day long. You know, you almost need to have the old carnival barker out front, trying to bring people in. And that can be frustrating, because you paid money and you're hoping to generate revenue. David: Absolutely, and I've done the same thing, but on both sides of the equation. Walk shows, and also been an exhibitor at shows. And one of the first shows that we ever exhibited at, we had never done it before. So when you're new at exhibiting at a trade show, you have no idea what you're getting into. You're going to have a booth. You're going to have some sort of backdrop, or you're just going to have nothing and a couple of people standing there. But I don't really want to get into all of that too deeply. I mean, whatever you decide in terms of the environment that you want to create there, obviously you want to create an environment that looks inviting, looks welcoming. You probably don't just want to have two metal chairs and stand there looking at people as they go by. They're probably not going to want to approach. But, when you are not really familiar with what to do,

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast
TV Guidance Counselor Episode 561: Thom Shubilla

TV Guidance Counselor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 68:05


FALL PREVIEW ALERT! September 10-16, 1966 This week Ken welcomes author of the new book, Primetime 1966-1967: The Full Spectrum of Television's First All-Color Season, Thom Shubilla. Ken and Thom discuss Ken's slaughter of Thom's last name, Batman '66, knowing the Fall Preview well, the year TV was born, shaking off radio, Westerns, the first TV season everything was in color, classy Miller High Life ads making Ken and Thom want to drink, commissioned art, murals, Joe E. Ross, It's About Time, how The Moon Landing both ruined and improved sci-fi, Sherwood Schwartz, The Monkees, The Jackie Gleason Show, "The Lost" Honeymooners, Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, Get Smart!, Mission Impossible, Secret Agent Man, Patrick McGoohan, Hollywood Palace, Ed Sullivan, Ken's love of Robert Loggia, T.H.E. Cat, a show of all wacky neighbors, Lost in Space, being a Ginger or a Maryann, Bewitched, I Dream of Jeanie, the long terrifying decline of Lucy, that one episode of Route 66, Big Eye paintings, The Green Hornet, Occasional Wife, That Girl, poorly translated JFK triangles, Green Acres, the truth about nerve deafness, F Troop, loving Larry Storch, heists, Irwin Alan, Time Tunnel, hating Milton Berle, Paul Revere and the Raiders, Burt Reynolds as Hawk and not as Marlon Brando, Larry Cohen's Coronet Blue, needing satisfaction on a show, The Fugitive, and how absolutely awful the Tammy Grimes show was.

Ian Talks Comedy
Rick Podell (writer, "Nothing in Common", Broadway / TV actor, comedian, singer)

Ian Talks Comedy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2022 78:23


Rick Podell and I discuss his early influences; Jackie Gleason; Ed Sullivan; 50's and 60's standups; Alan King; doing standup for his dog; tap dancing; leaving college to do Dames at Sea off Broadway; getting hired as a Universal contract player; doing Baretta and getting a mentor in Robert Blake; Busting Loose; Garry Marshall; Paramount commissary; Chopped Liver Brothers; how appearing on the Mike Douglas Show makes you crave for new material; how his jack-of-all trades style hurt him; working with Milton Berle in Two by Two and meeting his endowment; Budd Friedman gets roasted; writing the pilots Brothers and Our Time with co-writer Mike Preminger; starring in films "Lunch Wagon" and "Underground Aces"; co-starring in "Hero at Large" with John Ritter; losing out on Chips to Erik Estrada; performing with Richard Lewis, Rich Hall, and Dana Carvey; Jay Leno saying he was too handsome to be a successful comedian; touring Montana with Gilbert Gottfried; guest starring as Jackie Jackerman on a memorable Family Ties; guest starring as a mohel on Cheers; writing the screenplay for "Nothing in Common" about his relationship with his dad; having Tom Hanks and Jackie Gleason star; receiving letters from people with the same situations; the film being perceived as too Jewish; Gleason's ill-health; opening with Ginger Rogers for a year; opening for Cher; working on Sunset Boulevard on Broadway with Andrew Lloyd Webber and Glenn Close; being directed by someone who directed Ronald Reagan and Clark Gable; working and later teaching at the Beverly Hills Playhouse; cell phones; and his one-man show

TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast
TCBCast 249: The Final Ed Sullivan Shows (feat. Ryan Droste)

TCBCast: An Unofficial Elvis Presley Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 163:44


For the first time since Baz Luhrmann's Elvis dropped, Ryan returns to TCBCast for an extensive discussion on Elvis's final two appearances on The Ed Sullivan Show on October 28, 1956 and January 6, 1957, with the latter being the infamous "filmed from the waist up" program. Are these performances truly as legendary as the myth around them? We'll find out together! Then, Ryan finally get to put forward his list of favorite Elvis songs by year in lieu of Song of the Week while Justin closes out the episode and 2022 by spotlighting the history behind the understated hymn, "Oh Little Town of Bethlehem," from Elvis's best selling 1957 Christmas album. It wouldn't be a TCBCast Christmas without starting out scratching the surface of the life story of its lyricist, Phillips Brooks, and his choice to imitate an archaic style of writing and ending up spiraling into an unexpectedly heartfelt exploration of the history of the Puritans and the Church of England, early America, the literary impact of the King James Version of the Bible, Abraham Lincoln's funeral, and the perpetual conflict between sincerity and crass commercialization. Happy holidays to all our listeners near and far! Thank you for a wonderful 2022 - see you next year!

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert
Late Show First Drafts With Evie Colbert | Holiday Cards 2020

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2022 9:54


As talented as they are, the people who write greeting cards don't always nail it on the first try. Join Stephen and Evie Colbert in the Ed Sullivan storage space turned Late Show COVID set in taking a look at some 2020 holiday greeting card efforts in this edition of Late Show's long-running series, First Drafts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Bishop On Air
Opponents to proposed Illinois gun ban testify

Bishop On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 19:53


Bishop reviews some of the moments from the nearly five hour Illinois House hearing on HB5855, including testimony from Cook County Sheriff Tom Dart, ISP Director Brendan Kelly, ISRA's Ed Sullivan, Todd Vandermyde, state Rep. LawShawn Ford and state Rep. Denyse Stoneback.

Kaatscast
Sea Lion Training in ... Kingston! The Tale of Sharkey and "Seal College"

Kaatscast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 17:37


Just off the Kingston traffic circle, you'll find a couple of gas stations, a used car dealer, and a drive-through vegetarian burger joint. But in the 1940s, this was the site of "Seal College," a training facility for some of the most famous sea lions to share the stage with the likes of Abbott and Costello, Bob Hope, and Ed Sullivan. In his new book, Sharkey: When Sea Lions Were Stars of Show Business, author Gary Bohan, Jr., delves deep into the history of his great-grandfather's trained sea lion business, situated on the Esopus Creek (water source for the sea lion tanks), with plenty of interesting crossover into entertainment and broadcast history, much of which was happening just 90 miles or so south of Kingston, in NYC, and beyond. Click here for your chance to win a signed copy of Bohan's book! Thanks to our sponsors: Central Catskills Chamber of Commerce The Mountain Eagle Briars & Brambles Books --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kaatscast/support

The Beatles Stuffology Podcast
I Want To Hold Your Hand

The Beatles Stuffology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 61:35


It's one of the biggest songs of all time on this week's episode as JG and Andrew get stuck into I Want To Hold Your Hand. Does the song deserve it's place as one of the most significant tracks in the Beatles' back catalogue? Is the whole more than the sum of its parts? And does it deserve to be the vanguard of the British Invasion in America? Plus there's more Doctor Who and Star Trek references than you're probably expecting, Portugese gets used as an unlikely comparison to something, and the Ed Sullivan show is, of course, gone over in far too much detail.   Rankings: Track-by-track Ranking eMail: beatlesstuffology@gmail.com Twitter: @beatles_ology JG's Blog: Judgementally Reviews...   Produced by: JG McQuarrie

The Ash Holes
Ed's Cigar-cation to Florida

The Ash Holes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 43:04


Today, the Ash Holes are lighting up the Adventura La Llorona. Joining the show remotely today from their current Cigar-cation (Cigar Vacation) in Florida, Ed Sullivan and honorary Ash Hole Chef Charlie are giving us an update on their adventure so far. They have been visiting local cigar manufacturers such as Calle Ocho, smoking some new cigars and of course indulging in the local cuisine. As always, we have our regular segments, Delightful News and our Top 5.   #TAA #TAH #Cigars #UnitedPodcastNetwork #Studio21PodcastCafe   Follow Us On: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AshHolesRadio YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeDdSI6hO2-nYVkvdKlc3gQ Odysee: https://odysee.com/@theashholespodcast:f Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/ashholesradio/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheAshHoles   Listen to Us on: theashholes.podbean.com   or anywhere you listen to your favorite podcasts Join us as we broadcast live on location from Studio 21 Podcast Cafe high above Two Guys Smoke Shop in Salem, New Hampshire on the United Podcast Network, every Tuesday @ 4pm.

FORE the Good of the Game
Amy Alcott - "The Ed Sullivan Show" SHORT TRACK

FORE the Good of the Game

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 2:19


World Hall of Fame member Amy Alcott takes us back to a "Really Big Shew" from the 1960's doing her best Ed Sullivan impersonation, "FORE the Good of the Game."

Tom Kelly Show
251: Jackie Mason The Musical

Tom Kelly Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 57:44


Comedian Sheba Mason's dad is legendary stand-up comedian Jackie Mason. Sadly, she only knew him through his TV appearances, a handful of visits and child support payments. Now she is sharing her story in The Jackie Mason The Musical. Did having a famous comedian as an absent father drive Sheba into becoming a stand-up comic herself? What kept Jackie Mason from being more involved in his daughter's life? Did Jackie Mason give Ed Sullivan the middle finger. Sheba and co-star Ian Wehrle, who plays Jackie Mason, answer those and even more personal question . . . with a shock revelation at the end! Show Notes: Jackie Mason The Musical At Carolines: JackieMasonTheMusical.com

Laugh Tracks Legends of Comedy with Randy and Steve

For those of us of a certain age (ok, our age), Adam West was our first Batman and the legendary Frank Gorshin was our first Riddler. A gifted comic impressionist, Gorshin built a long career as a standup comic and character actor. And while his maniacal Riddler is best known, you couldn't have watched television in the 1960s and 70s without catching Frank in a sitcom, on a talk show, or logging time on The Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts. As always, find longer clips below and thanks for sharing our shows. To find an easy to search archive of our past shows find us on YouTube at "Laugh Tracks Legends of Comedy." And thanks for sharing our shows! Want more Gorshin? While Frank is best remembered for his Batman work, he was first a fine comic impressionist with a long list of credits. Here is a bit of Frank's act from 1964 on Ed Sullivan -- the time he "opened" for the Beatles. https://dai.ly/x4wd08m Frank Gorshin's Riddler was the breakout villain of the Adam West version of Batman. Frank played the role 10 times, plus he took the character to other shows and even issued a single in character that scraped the Billboard Top 40. Here is a nice fan-made supercut of some of the Riddler's best bits from 1966.https://youtu.be/C9aCdP83eAw   Frank Gorshin did an uncanny Burt Lancaster and an even better Dean Martin -- so what better time to deploy them both than on a Dean Martin Celebrity Roast!https://youtu.be/mJzcU8z2U14      

Battle4Freedom
Battle4Freedom - 20221114 - Democratic Demolition Derby - Path to Extinction

Battle4Freedom

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 55:59


Democratic Demolition Derby - Path to ExtinctionWebsite: http://www.battle4freedom.comNetwork: https://www.mojo50.comStreaming: https://www.rumble.com/c/Battle4FreedomStreaming LIVE @ https://rumble.com/v1ucafc-battle4freedom-2022-democratic-demolition-derby-path-to-extinction.htmlhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11423789/Miami-Beach-hotel-hosted-Beatles-1960s-heyday-imploded-Sunday.htmlMiami Beach hotel where the Beatles performed for the Ed Sullivan show - and which hosted President John F. Kennedy and Frank Sinatra during its 1960s heyday - is demolished after falling into disrepairhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11357439/THOUSANDS-Americans-stalkware-planted-Android-devices.htmlTHOUSANDS of Americans have had 'stalkware' planted on their Android devices - with millions of messages, call logs and passwords being trackedhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11408365/Apple-watching-Tech-giant-collects-data-users-built-apps-study-reveals.htmlApple IS watching you! Tech giant collects data about users from its own pre-installed apps - including what stocks you watch - even when your iPhone says it isn't, study revealshttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11424877/Elon-Musk-mocks-Senator-Twitter-account-impersonated-saying-real-account-sounds-like-parody.htmlElon Musk mocks Senator after his Twitter account was impersonated saying his 'real account sounds like a parody': Democrat Ed Markey fires back, warning him 'Fix your companies. Or Congress will'https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11425225/Moment-female-bomber-arrested-Turkish-police-CCTV-showed-suspect-fleeing.htmlMoment 'female bomber' is arrested by Turkish police after CCTV 'showed suspect fleeing the scene' following explosion that killed six including a little girl and her fatherhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11424841/Armed-dangerous-suspect-large-shooting-University-Virginia-campus.htmlThree people are killed and two injured after student, 22, started shooting on University of Virginia campus before going on the run: Police warn locals to shelter in place as they hunt for 'armed and dangerous' gunmanTRUMP TROJANhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11424705/The-presidents-words-reckless-decided-problem-Pence-tears-Trump.html'His words were reckless… he decided to be part of the problem': Mike Pence tears into Trump for 'endangering me, my family and everyone there' by tweeting as supporters ransacked the Capitol on January 6https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11421249/Candace-Owens-latest-high-profile-backer-jump-Trump-train.html'Trump needs to take a good look in the mirror': Now former Trump supporter Candace Owens turns on him - and tells former president to stop attacking Ron DeSantis, says 'he's too old' and reveals he was 'rude' to herhttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11423865/Out-control-Tesla-speeds-Chinese-streets-killing-two-people-injuring-three-others.htmlOut of control Tesla speeds through Chinese streets, killing two people and injuring three others: Family member of driver, 55, says he had issues with brake pedal - but Tesla vows to find out the 'truth'https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-11413339/Donuts-chips-pizza-redefined-DRUGS-scientist-say.htmlEXCLUSIVE: Donuts, cereal and pizza should be redefined as DRUGS: Scientists say highly processed foods are just as addictive and harmful as CIGARETTEShttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11402991/Children-young-THREE-watch-violent-TV-worse-secondary-school-study-warns.htmlChildren as young as THREE who watch violent TV do worse at secondary school, study warnshttps://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-11376797/Planet-killer-asteroid-spotted-lurking-inner-Solar-System.html'Planet killer' asteroid measuring almost one MILE wide is spotted lurking in the inner Solar System – and could hit Earth one day, scientists warn

Around The Ropes
Today In Music History October 9th-15th

Around The Ropes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 9:37


Today In Music History October 9th-15th October 9th 1961 - Ray Charles started a two week run at No. 1 on the U.S. singles chart with "Hit The Road Jack." 1993 - Nirvana entered the U.S. album chart at No. 1 with In Utero, their third and final studio album. Birthdays: PJ Harvey is 51 October 10th 1962 - The BBC somehow determined that "Monster Mash," by Bobby "Boris" Pickett was offensive and banned it from their airwaves. 2014 - Taylor Swift was named Billboard's Woman of the Year 2014, making her the first artist to receive the award twice. Birthdays: David Lee Roth is 68 October 11th 1990 - Drummer Dave Grohl played his first gig with Nirvana when they appeared at the North Shore Surf Club in Olympia. 1997 - Elton John went to No. 1 on the U.S. singles chart with "Candle In The Wind 1997", a rewrite of his 1974 hit about Marilyn Monroe. Birthdays: Daryl Hall of Hall and Oates is 76 And Cardi B is 30 October 12th 1969 - A DJ on Detroit's WKNR radio station received a phone call telling him that if you play The Beatles 'Strawberry Fields Forever' backwards, you hear John Lennon say the words "I buried Paul." This started a worldwide rumour that Paul McCartney was dead. 1997 - With Backstreet Boys mania building worldwide, the group had to cancel a free, open-air concert at the Mostenses Plaza in Madrid when too many fans show up. October 13th 1974 - Renowned television host Ed Sullivan dies of esophageal cancer in New York City, at age 73. One of the biggest events in music history unfolded on his program, The Ed Sullivan Show, when a new group from Liverpool called The Beatles made their live U.S. debut. 1979 - Michael Jackson went to No. 1 on the U.S. singles chart with "Don't Stop Till You Get Enough," his second solo chart-topper. Birthdays: Sammy Hagar is 75 October 14th 1968 - The Jackson Five made their national TV debut on ABC's Hollywood Palace. 2020 - Post Malone won nine awards including top artist at the 2020 Billboard Music Awards held at the Dolby Theater in Los Angeles. Birthdays: Natalie Maines of the The Chicks is 48 October 15th 1979 - ABBA played their first concert in North America when they appeared in Vancouver, B.C. 1994 - R.E.M. entered the Billboard 200 album chart at No. 1 with Monster. The album was their ninth and was a stylistic shift from the bands previous two albums-- 1991's Out of Time and 1992's Automatic for the People --with loud, distorted guitar tones and simple arrangements, and included the successful single, "What's the Frequency, Kenneth?" Birthdays: Brother Of Michael Jackson Tito Jackson is 68 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/b29podcast/message

DigiGods
DigiGods Episode 243: Digi-Spooky!

DigiGods

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 123:54


The Gods offer their early Halloween recommendations, including Scream 2 and Fright Night on 4k, a new 4k Night of the Living Dead from Criterion and a long-awaited release of David Lynch's Lost Highway from Criterion. DigiGods Podcast, 10/11/22 (M4a) — 50.8 MB right click to save Subscribe to the DigiGods Podcast In this episode, the Gods discuss: Army of Darkness - Collector's Edition - STEELBOOK (4k UHD Blu-ray) Arsenic and Old Lace (Blu-ray) Barfly (Blu-ray) The Beatles And India (Blu-ray) Bel-Air: Season One (Blu-ray) Bernard-Henri Lévy Collection: The Will to See, Peshmerga, The Battle of Mosul, The Oath of Tobruk (DVD) Cinematographer (DVD) DC League of Super-pets (4k UHD Blu-ray) Dersu Uzala (Blu-ray) Dexter: The Complete Series + Dexter: New Blood (Blu-ray) Ed Sullivan's Rock & Roll Classics (DVD) Evil Dead Trap 2: Hideki (Blu-ray) Fanny: The Right to Rock (DVD) Fatal Attraction 4k (4k UHD Blu-ray) Fatal Attraction: SE Friday the 13th (4k UHD Blu-ray) Fright Night (4k UHD Blu-ray) Gallant Indies (DVD) Goldenera (DVD) Hacks: Season 1 (Blu-ray) Harem (Blu-ray) A History of the European Working Class (DVD) The Horrible Sexy Vampire (Blu-ray) I Know What You Did Last Summer (4k UHD Blu-ray) Kamen Rider Kuuga: The Complete Series (Blu-ray) The Kindred (Blu-ray) Krypto the Superdog: The Complete Series (DVD) Kung Fu: The Complete Second Season (DVD) The Limey (4k UHD Blu-ray) Lolita (1997) (Blu-ray) Lost Highway (4k UHD Blu-ray) Love Brides of the Blood Mummy (Blu-ray) Marionette (DVD) Mayor of Kingstown - Season One (Blu-ray) Melrose Place: The Complete Series (DVD) Monobloc (DVD) Mortal Kombat Legends: Snow Blind (4k UHD Blu-ray) Mr. Mayor: The Complete Series (Blu-ray) The Neighborhood: Season Four (DVD) Nick Cave - 20,000 Days On Earth (Blu-ray) Night of the Living Dead (4k UHD Blu-ray) The Other Side of the Mirror (Blu-ray) Paranormal Activity: The Ultimate Chills Collection (Blu-ray) The Police: Around the World - Restored and Expanded (Blu-ray) Putin's Witnesses (DVD) Randy Rhoads (Blu-ray) The Return Of The Living Dead [Collector's Edition] + Enamel Pin Set + Exclusive Poster (4k UHD Blu-ray) The Road Home (Blu-ray) Rutherford Falls: Season One (Blu-ray) Samira's Dream (DVD) Satan's Little Helper (Blu-ray) Scarf Face (DVD) Scream 2 (4k UHD Blu-ray) Star Trek: Picard - Season Two (Blu-ray) Summers with Picasso (DVD) Superman & Lois: The Complete Second Season (Blu-ray) Sweet Tooth: The Complete First Season (Blu-ray) Sweet Tooth: The Complete First Season (DVD) That Dirty Black Bag (Blu-ray) The Twilight Zone (Reboot) - The Complete Series (DVD) Two Witches (Blu-ray) Walker: Season 2 (DVD) Walker: Season One (Blu-ray) War of the Worlds / When Worlds Collide (4k UHD Blu-ray) Why is we Americans? (DVD) Wife Swap: Season Two (DVD) Winning Time: The Rise of the Lakers Dynasty: The Complete First Season (Blu-ray) Yellowjackets: Season 1 (DVD) Yellowjackets: Season 1 (Blu-ray) Please also visit CineGods.com. 

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich
Episode 88 | "Top of the Mountain: The Beatles at Shea Stadium 1965"/Laurie Jacobson

Booked On Rock with Eric Senich

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 43:58


On a sweltering Sunday evening in August 1965, 56,000 people traveled by plane, car, bus, ferry, and subway train to pack New York's Shea Stadium. They were there not for a ballgame, but a rock and roll concert—the audacious dream of promoter Sid Bernstein. No band had ever played a baseball stadium, and few believed it could be pulled off, but on that glorious night, The Beatles sold out Shea Stadium, shattering all existing box office and attendance records in show business history.Against a backdrop of mounting political and cultural tumult, “Top of the Mountain” delivers the details and excitement of Shea and the spirited, curious new generation who would soon claim the decade for its own. Packed with hundreds of color photographs, it gives a one-of-a-kind account of this monumental event, gathering first-person interviews and quotes from dozens of those who experienced a piece of pop-culture history—celebrities, writers, agents, producers, photographers, opening act performers, security guards, radio personalities, cameramen, and fans of all kinds. Among them were young Caryn Johnson (Whoopi Goldberg), Mary Louise Streep (Meryl Streep), and Steven Lento (Steven Van Zandt); future Beatle wives Linda Eastman and Barbara Bach; established stars like Bobby Vinton and Ed Sullivan; and artists such as Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Felix Cavaliere and The Rascals, Marvin Gaye, and more. Together, they paint an unforgettable picture of a night like no other.An award-winning author, leading Hollywood historian, and reformed stand-up comic, Laurie Jacobson has written and produced documentaries, television series, and specials such as “The 20th Anniversary of the Mary Tyler Moore Show” and “The Museum of Television and Radio's Salute to Funny Women of Television”. Her other books include “Hollywood Heartbreak”, “Hollywood Haunted”, “Dishing Hollywood”, “Timmy's in the Well—The Jon Provost Story”, and “TV Dinners”. She's a frequent guest on radio and podcasts.Purchase a copy of “Top Of The Mountain: The Beatles At Shea Stadium 1965” through Amazon: www.amazon.com/Top-Mountain-Beatles-Shea-Stadium/dp/1493065289Listen to a playlist of The Beatles at Shea '65 setlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/67DcinWoSQwNTVVdwYLKNu?si=74013cd000d44b53Visit Laurie Jacobson's website: www.lauriejacobson.comFollow Laurie Jacobson:Facebook: www.facebook.com/lauriejacobsonTwitter: https://twitter.com/lauriejacobsonInstagram: www.instagram.com/lauriejacobsonhollywoodThe Booked On Rock Website: www.bookedonrock.comFollow The Booked On Rock with Eric Senich:FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/bookedonrockpodcastTWITTER: https://twitter.com/bookedonrockINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/bookedonrockpodcastSupport Your Local Bookstore! Find your nearest independent bookstore here: www.indiebound.org/indie-store-finderContact The Booked On Rock Podcast:thebookedonrockpodcast@gmail.comThe Booked On Rock Music: “Whoosh” & “Nasty” by Crowander (www.crowander.com)

Dad's Attic
A Really Big Shoe That's Strong to the Finich

Dad's Attic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 43:29


We can only hope in our wildest dreams that our dear listeners avidly tune in to episodes of Dad's Attic the way the masses tuned in to Ed Sullivan on Sunday nights. In this show we discuss how Ed made it all work so well. If that's not enough, sit back, crack a can of spinach, as we gleefully explore the metaverse of Popeye the Sailor Man (Toot!).

American Timelines
Episode 191: American Timelines 1956, Part 5: Sep & Oct 1956

American Timelines

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 63:10


Episode 191: American Timelines 1956, Part 5:  Sep & Oct 1956:  A Suspected Doctor Murderer & Drunken Airplane Thefts:  Joe & Amy move on to September and October of 1956, to cover a suspected serial killing doctor, a train crash, desegregation crises in schools, Harry Belafonte's Calypso, Elvis Presley appearing on Ed Sullivan, Drunken Plane Stealing, A pilot shooting himself down, and more! Also, get 40% off your subscription of Magic Mind at: https://www.magicmind.co/ATL14  With discount code  ATL14   Part of the Queen City Podcast Network: www.queencitypodcastnetwork.com. Credits Include: Blackpast.org, The Desert sun, Notable Kentucky African Americans Database,Tnmuseum.org, Life magazine, GMU, The Tennessee Tribute, planeandpilotmag.com, Popculture.us, Wikipedia, TVtango, IMDB & Youtube.  Information may not be accurate, as it is produced by jerks. Music by MATT TRUMAN EGO TRIP, the greatest American Band. Click Here to buy their albums!

Weekend Superstars with George Molton & John McHugh

The Beatles on Ed Sullivan lit the fire for this talented musician and from too many acts to list (Breedings Bunch, Daddy's Car, Showboat etc) this man has been and still is a force to be reckoned with when it comes to bass players

Around The Ropes
This Week In Music History September 25 To October 1

Around The Ropes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 9:23


September 25 1964 - The Temptations began recording 'My Girl' which went on to be their first US number one and the first of fifteen US Top Ten hits. 1990 - Drummer Dave Grohl auditioned for Nirvana and was instantly given the job. A year later, the band recorded Nevermind which exceeded all expectations and became a worldwide commercial success Birthdays: Will Smith is 52. September 26 1937 - Blues singer Bessie Smith died aged 43 after being involved in a car accident while traveling along Route 61 outside Memphis, Tennessee. With the nickname "the Empress of the Blues" 1987 - Michael Jackson started a six-week run at No. 1 on the U.S. album chart with Bad Birthdays: Olivia Newton-John was born on this day in 1948. She passed away in August of 2022 September 27 1982 - Prince released his fifth album, 1999. It was a breakthrough, selling well over 5 million copies worldwide, thanks to "Little Red Corvette" and the title track. 2014 - Taylor Swift issues 1989, her biggest-selling album. The first two singles are monster hits: "Shake It Off" and "Blank Space.” Birthdays: Scott Weiland of Stone Temple Pilots was born today in 1967. He passed away in 2015 September 28 1985 - Kate Bush scored her second UK No.1 album with 'Hounds Of Love'. 1991 - On the week their album, Nevermind, was released, Nirvana made an appearance at the Tower Records store in New York City and then played a show at The Marquee Club in New York Birthdays: Television host Ed Sullivan was born today in 1901. He passed away in 1974. September 29 1976 - Enjoying his own birthday celebrations, Jerry Lee Lewis accidentally shot his bass player, Norman Owens, in the chest 1991 - MTV played the "Smells Like Teen Spirit" video for the first time, giving most Americans their first look at Nirvana. A little over a month later, the song was No. 1 on the Hot 100. Birthdays: "Great Balls of Fire" singer Jerry Lee Lewis is 87. September 30 1995 - Mariah Carey made chart history when she started an eight-week run at No. 1 on the U.S. singles chart with "Fantasy," making her the first woman to enter the chart in the No. 1 spot. 2021 - Tony Bennett, 95, releases an album of standards with Lady Gaga called Love For Sale, making him (according to Guinness) the oldest person to release an album of new material. Birthdays: Singer Johnny Mathis is 87. October 1 1970 - Janis Joplin makes her last recordings, singing "Mercedes Benz," which is included on her posthumous Pearl album a capella. She dies three days later. 1982 - Sony launched its first compact-disc player, the CDP-101, for $730. That's the equivalent of about $1,630 today. 1987 - Soundgarden release their first EP, Screaming Life, on Sub Pop Records Birthdays: Kevin Griffin frontman of Better Than Ezra is 53 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/b29podcast/message

Lo Mejor de la Vida es Gratis
Lo mejor de la vida es gratis - 30/09/2022

Lo Mejor de la Vida es Gratis

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 56:00


Nunca habíamos asistido, como en estos últimos años, a la proliferación de grabaciones en directo de famosos en la historia de la música popular. Hoy, y la próxima semana, recuperaremos algunas de las editadas en fechas recientes. Por ejemplo, el desfile de famosos como la ORQUESTA DE DUKE ELLINGTON o los cantantes LOUIS PRIMA y KEELY SMITH por el histórico show televisivo de ED SULLIVAN en los años setenta. La recuperación de un directo de 1971 de ARETHA FRANKLIN a la que se ha querido poner un título sugestivo y curioso. Otro directo que se desconocía es el grabado por el famoso guitarrista LARRY CORYELL , en Nueva York, en 1975. Y nos ha sorprendido la edición de un disco de CARLOS SANTANA, grabado en directo en 1981 y que ha aparecido con el título de EL DÍA DE LA INDEPENDENCIA

Historia de Aragón
Lo mejor de la vida es gratis - 30/09/2022

Historia de Aragón

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 56:00


Nunca habíamos asistido, como en estos últimos años, a la proliferación de grabaciones en directo de famosos en la historia de la música popular. Hoy, y la próxima semana, recuperaremos algunas de las editadas en fechas recientes. Por ejemplo, el desfile de famosos como la ORQUESTA DE DUKE ELLINGTON o los cantantes LOUIS PRIMA y KEELY SMITH por el histórico show televisivo de ED SULLIVAN en los años setenta. La recuperación de un directo de 1971 de ARETHA FRANKLIN a la que se ha querido poner un título sugestivo y curioso. Otro directo que se desconocía es el grabado por el famoso guitarrista LARRY CORYELL , en Nueva York, en 1975. Y nos ha sorprendido la edición de un disco de CARLOS SANTANA, grabado en directo en 1981 y que ha aparecido con el título de EL DÍA DE LA INDEPENDENCIA

The 260 Journey
The One Word that Stops Most of Our Dreams from Coming True

The 260 Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 7:02


Day 194 Today's Reading: 1 Timothy 4 How long does it take to become an expert in something? In the Development of Talent Project, Dr. Benjamin Bloom of Northwestern University studied the careers of world-class sculptors, pianists, chess masters, tennis players, swimmers, mathematicians, and neurologists. Across the board, he discovered that it takes between ten to eighteen years before someone can reach world-class competency. The point of the study was that it takes time to be the best at whatever chosen career or path you aspire to. In Outliers, author and researcher Malcolm Gladwell calls “becoming an expert” the ten-thousand-hour rule. How do you become the greatest band of all time? An expert in rock and roll? You work at it for ten thousand hours. Gladwell speaks about the Beatles seemingly instant success that many think happened on the Ed Sullivan show in one night. Gladwell says that's not the case. Before landing in America, they'd already been playing together for seven years. It was the band's ten-thousand hours of playing that made them who they were, not a night on American television. They'd started out doing one-hour sessions, in which they performed their best numbers, the same ones, at every one. But then they were invited to play in Hamburg, Germany. While there, they played eight hours, seven days a week. Gladwell explains much of their ten-thousand hours: The Beatles ended up traveling to Hamburg five times between 1960 and the end of 1962. On the first trip, they played 106 nights, five or more hours a night. On their second trip, they played 92 times. On their third trip, they played 48 times, for a total of 172 hours on stage. The last two Hamburg gigs, in November and December of 1962, involved another 90 hours of performing. All told, they performed for 270 nights in just over a year and a half. By the time they had their first burst of success in 1964, in fact, they had performed live an estimated twelve hundred times. . . . Most bands today don't perform twelve hundred times in their entire careers. The Hamburg crucible is what set the Beatles apart. Gladwell considers that the key to success in any field is simply a matter of practicing a specific task that can be accomplished with twenty hours of work a week for ten years. Paul gave this challenge to Timothy in one word: Have nothing to do with worldly fables fit only for old women. On the other hand, discipline yourself for the purpose of godliness; for bodily discipline is only of little profit, but godliness is profitable for all things, since it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come. (1 Timothy 4:7-8) Discipline! The grandmaster level chess player, a concert pianist, a high-level athlete all have the word discipline in common. The saying goes, “The distance from your dreams to reality is called discipline.” This is why most people miss their dreams. The other side of an undisciplined life is disappointment. Paul was telling Timothy that the goal in discipline is godliness. Or putting it another way: “godliness” is not automatic. We have to work toward it. Getting born again? Christ did the work for us. Getting godly? We have to discipline ourselves. Listen to the passage from The Message: “Exercise daily in God—no spiritual flabbiness, please! Workouts in the gymnasium are useful, but a disciplined life in God is far more so, making you fit both today and forever.” I had a friend tell me one time that he was speaking to the boxing welterweight champion, who told him that he would set his alarm for 1 a.m. every night so he could get up and do one hundred sit-ups and one hundred push-ups. When my friend asked him why he would do that, he said, “I knew I was working while my opponent was sleeping, and I wanted the edge on him.” That's where ten-thousand hours comes from. Discipline and effectiveness, discipline and success travel together. Theologian Henri Nouwen spoke about discipline for our spiritual lives: “Discipline means to prevent everything in our life from being filled up. Discipline means that somewhere we're not occupied, and certainly not preoccupied. In the spiritual life, discipline means to create that space in which something can happen that we hadn't planned or counted on.” Jim Elliot was a modern-day missionary and martyr, who practiced ten-thousand-hour devotional living. He wrote these powerful words: “I may no longer depend on pleasant impulses to bring me before the Lord. I must rather respond to principles I know to be right, whether I feel them to be enjoyable or not.” Discipline is focus. Discipline is work. Discipline puts blinders to things that are crying for our time and attention. Because Timothy joined Paul before AD 50 and Paul was writing in the early sixties, Timothy was at least in his mid-twenties and could well be in his early or mid-thirties. This term for “youth” (in verse 12) could apply up to the age of forty in that culture, although it usually applied especially to someone under twenty-nine. And the challenge to young Timothy was that he would have a lot of distractions in life, so it was important to get focused on the right thing. Paul challenged Timothy to make his discipline not simply about going to Planet Fitness; reminding him that disciplining ourselves physically isn't wrong or bad—it's just that there's a better discipline, and that is about pursuing eternal things. Listen to Paul's admonishment again: “Workouts in the gymnasium are useful, but a disciplined life in God is far more so, making you fit both today and forever” (verse 8, MSG). No life ever grows great until it is focused, dedicated, and disciplined. Gary Player, one of the greatest golfers in the world, was known for his discipline. When he was 80 years old, he still got up every morning at 5 a.m. and did 1,300 sit-ups. One day while hitting off the practice tees, he heard someone say, “I wish I could hit a ball like that.” He turned around and said to the onlooker, “No, you don't. You know what it takes to hit a golf ball like [I do]? It takes getting up at 5:00 a.m. every morning to hit 1,000 balls until my hand bleeds, then I go to the clubhouse to bandage my hand, then go back and hit another 1,000 balls.” We want the results but not the discipline. Godliness is the goal for us, says Paul, and discipline is the key.

History & Factoids about today
Sept 28th- Drink Beer, Ed Sullivan, Ben E. King, Little Big Town, Mira Sorvino, Naomi Watts, Hilary Duff

History & Factoids about today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 10:31


drink beer day. pop culture 1971. flogging abolished, space X first flight, woman arrested for smoking in public, 2nd worst flood in history. today's birthdays-ed sullivan, ben e king, tommy collins, jeffrey jones, hillary duff, naomi watts, mira sorvino, karen fairchild-little big town, janeane garafalo.

Sleepy Bedtime Blessings
Coziness with the Angels + TV Guide Feb 23-Mar1 1963

Sleepy Bedtime Blessings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 55:23


The angels bring forth cozy clearing energies to help you drift off to sleep. Then Laurel will wander through the pages of TV Guide from 1963.  The shows of that time include The Flintstones and the pending arrival of Fred and Wilma's daughter, Pebbles, The Beverly Hillbillies, Ed Sullivan with iconic plate spinners and so much more. The story begins at  16:09You can learn more about Laurel and the angels at illuminatingsouls.comReceive an inspirational message from Laurel + Illuminating Souls each day via email. Join our Daily Inspiration Blast for a sweet little morsel of goodness delivered to your mailbox Monday thru Friday. Find daily inspirational messages on the Illuminating Souls Facebook page

Timesuck with Dan Cummins
314 - George Motherf*cking Carlin: Best To Ever Do It

Timesuck with Dan Cummins

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 185:45 Very Popular


Get ready to meet one of my comedy heroes, but only if you can handle a LOT of profanity. George Carlin, following the path of his mentor, Lenny Bruce, kicked the doors of censorship down so people like myself could have careers in comedy, and not worry about being arrested for saying something "obscene."  Today, we learn about the amazing, prolific, inspiring life of George Carlin - how a boy raised by a single mother in New York City grew up to become a radio DJ, then part of two man comedy team, then a solo nightclub act who first achieved success after some early struggles as a clean-cut, mainstream comic. He next decided to follow his counterculture leanings only to lose it all, rebuild into something better, nearly lose it all again, and then become the Carlin of legend. Carlin battled a crippling cocaine addiction, domestic problems at home, a business that wrote him off numerous times, battles with a government that tried to censor him over and over again, and much more to end up with fourteen HBO comedy specials and the designation of one of the best, if not THE best to ever do it - the father of modern standup. Myself and the rest of the comedy community owe him a huge debt of gratitude, and I'm excited to share his life with you here today, on another biographical episode, of Timesuck. Bad Magic Productions Monthly Patreon Donation:  In honor of the passing of Jeff Burton from the Rizzuto Show aka the Rizz Show on 105.7 FM in St Louis, we are donating $16,640 to Jeff's charity of choice - Kids Rock Cancer. Through the proven healing power of music therapy, Kids Rock Cancer helps children combat feelings of anxiety, depression, uncertainty, and helplessness.  To find out more, go to KidsRockCancer.org  We also are donating $1850 to our scholarship fund! Watch the Suck on YouTube: https://youtu.be/lJkZj_F42uIMerch: https://www.badmagicmerch.comDiscord! https://discord.gg/tqzH89vWant to join the Cult of the Curious private Facebook Group? Go directly to Facebook and search for "Cult of the Curious" in order to locate whatever happens to be our most current page :)For all merch related questions/problems: store@badmagicproductions.com (copy and paste)Please rate and subscribe on iTunes and elsewhere and follow the suck on social media!! @timesuckpodcast on IG and http://www.facebook.com/timesuckpodcastWanna become a Space Lizard?  Click here: https://www.patreon.com/timesuckpodcastSign up through Patreon and for $5 a month you get to listen to the Secret Suck, which will drop Thursdays at Noon, PST. You'll also get 20% off of all regular Timesuck merch PLUS access to exclusive Space Lizard merch. You get to vote on two Monday topics each month via the app. And you get the download link for my new comedy album, Feel the Heat. Check the Patreon posts to find out how to download the new album and take advantage of other benefits.

Wachtelligence
S2, Episode 10: Charles Rosenay: ... And The Beatles, Yeah, Yeah, Yeah

Wachtelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 74:36


Season 2, Episode 10, AJ has a Fab conversation with Charles Rosenay. Living in New Haven, CT, like most of the nation he immediately fell in love with The Beatles, watching the Ed Sullivan show in 1964. So much that for over 50 years, he has been been involved with Beatles conventions, concerts, for 25 years he published the ultimate Beatles Fanzine “Good Day Sunshine” and currently (since 1983) he has been organizing Beatle Tours to Liverpool. His passions also involve Horror Movies and Paranormal Investigations, which of course, they cover. This episode is “guaranteed to raise a smile”.

The Letterman Podcast
The Letterman Podcast 026 Steve Young and the Bathtubs Over Broadway Super Happy Fantastic Show

The Letterman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 118:18


Steve Young returns to The Letterman Podcast to go deep and talk about Bathtubs Over Broadway, the documentary he and many Letterman alum, and even Dave himself were featured in. One might say this amazing film was spawned from 'Dave's Record Collection,' a bit featured on Late Night and Late Show going back decades. Steve and Mike continue their rapport going far down the rabbit hole, exploring a piece of entertainment Americana that most people have no idea even existed...the world of industrial musicals. For any enthusiast of David Letterman, this documentary is a MUST own, and for any enthusiast of the documentary, this episode is a Must watch. Steve shows his incredible depth of knowledge and insight while of course being hysterical in the process. This episode also features a cameo by Darin Cox, host of the Irritable Dad Syndrome Podcast, and the very first guest on The Letterman Podcast. Steve Young and many of his past and current antics and projects can be found at Steveyoungworld.com. As always, Rupert Jee and the Hello Deli are happy to sponsor The Letterman Podcast. Hello-Deli.com is the only place to purchase Late Show with David Letterman merchandise. Shirts, mugs and more are available at the legendary Soup and Sandwich shop located in the womb of the Ed Sullivan theater, and each purchase made is packed by Rupert Himself. If you ask really nicely, he might add onions to your order. We ask that everybody who reads these words would Share, Like, Subscribe, and leave a positive comment for our show, then knock on every neighbors door on the block and ask them to do the same. If everyone did that just once we would never have to ask again, and that would be really neat.

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)
Sept 9th - Not At Any Time - w/Ed Sullivan

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 2:43


Fred discusses entertainer and TV host Ed Sullivan, who gave in on this day in 1956 and allowed Elvis Presley on his show. www.rockysealemusic.com https://rockysealemusic.com/wow-i-didn-t-know-that-or-maybe-i-just-forgot https://www.facebook.com/150wordspodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rocky-seale7/message

Music History Today
Music History Today Podcast September 9 - What Happened on This Day in Music History

Music History Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 10:58


On the September 9 edition of the Music History Today podcast, Elvis gets on Ed Sullivan, Nirvana takes one for the team, & Apple pisses off its customers by giving away a free album. Plus, its Otis Redding's birthday. ALL MY LINKS - https://allmylinks.com/musichistorytoday --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/musichistorytodaypodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/musichistorytodaypodcast/support

Monsters In The Morning
THE UNIVERSE IS INCREDIBLE

Monsters In The Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 38:51


FRIDAY HR 2 RRR Trivia - We meet Peggy. What were the songs Elvis preformed on the Ed Sullivan show? Queen Peggy!! Angel on the 1s & 2s wait in the truck

Peter & Phil's Courageous Conversations

Peter & Phil finish the season by discussing the A&E documentary, Right to Offend' and all the comedian greats the film covers. Join us for another great conversation regarding Bill Cosby, Flip Wilson, Ed Sullivan, The Smothers Brothers, Robin Williams, Richard Pryor, and many more! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ppcourageousconversation/message

Records Revisited
Episode 252: Episode 252 – “The Freewillin’ Bob Dylan” with Barnaby Bright

Records Revisited

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 85:33


The guys are joined by Becky and Nathan Bliss of Barnaby Bright to discuss Bob Dylan's “The Freewillin' Bob Dylan.”  Plenty of discussion about Barnaby Bright's catalog (why are all their albums saying 2022?), making great and personal videos, “in my soul I smell something as good as bread,” slipping to #255, Ed Sullivan, “War?  Maybe we should focus on healthcare,” some playful Bob songs and writing songs way more advanced for your age.Check out Barnaby Bright at: https://www.barnabybright.com/Check out Bob Dylan at: https://www.bobdylan.com/Check out other episodes at RecordsRevisitedPodcast.com, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Castbox, iHeartMedia, Google Podcasts and Spotify. Additional content is found at: Facebook.com/recordsrevisitedpodcast or twitter @podcastrecords or IG at instagram.com/recordsrevisitedpodcast/ or join our Patreon at patreon.com/RecordsRevisitedPodcast

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)
Sept 6th - Misdirection - w/Fred Kaps

Wow! I Didn't Know That! (or maybe I just forgot)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:43


Fred discusses renowned Dutch magician, Fred Kaps, who won his third Grand Prix of magic titles on this day in 1961. This earned him an appearance on the Ed Sullivan show... yeah, yeah, yeah. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/rocky-seale7/message

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast
Lewis Black Encore

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 89:15 Very Popular


GGACP celebrates the birthday (August 30) of actor, playwright and Grammy-winning comedian Lewis Black with this ENCORE of an interview from 2020. In this episode, Lewis discusses the inventiveness of Pixar, the cinema of Barry Levinson, the timelessness of “Dr. Strangelove” and the political comedy of Mort Sahl, Dick Gregory, Paul Krassner and the Smothers Brothers. Also, Christopher Walken cracks a joke, Ruth Buzzi meets Michael Corleone, Ed Sullivan chews out Jackie Mason and Lewis tours the Middle East with Robin Williams. PLUS: Topo Gigio! Saluting Joe Grifasi! George Carlin leaves a message! The musical satire of Mark Russell! And Lewis sings the praises of the National Comedy Center! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 151: “San Francisco” by Scott McKenzie

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022


We start season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs with an extra-long look at "San Francisco" by Scott McKenzie, and at the Monterey Pop Festival, and the careers of the Mamas and the Papas and P.F. Sloan. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Up, Up, and Away" by the 5th Dimension. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As usual, all the songs excerpted in the podcast can be heard in full at Mixcloud. Scott McKenzie's first album is available here. There are many compilations of the Mamas and the Papas' music, but sadly none that are in print in the UK have the original mono mixes. This set is about as good as you're going to find, though, for the stereo versions. Information on the Mamas and the Papas came from Go Where You Wanna Go: The Oral History of The Mamas and the Papas by Matthew Greenwald, California Dreamin': The True Story Of The Mamas and Papas by Michelle Phillips, and Papa John by John Phillips and Jim Jerome. Information on P.F. Sloan came from PF - TRAVELLING BAREFOOT ON A ROCKY ROAD by Stephen McParland and What's Exactly the Matter With Me? by P.F. Sloan and S.E. Feinberg. The film of the Monterey Pop Festival is available on this Criterion Blu-Ray set. Sadly the CD of the performances seems to be deleted. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to season four of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs. It's good to be back. Before we start this episode, I just want to say one thing. I get a lot of credit at times for the way I don't shy away from dealing with the more unsavoury elements of the people being covered in my podcast -- particularly the more awful men. But as I said very early on, I only cover those aspects of their life when they're relevant to the music, because this is a music podcast and not a true crime podcast. But also I worry that in some cases this might mean I'm giving a false impression of some people. In the case of this episode, one of the central figures is John Phillips of the Mamas and the Papas. Now, Phillips has posthumously been accused of some truly monstrous acts, the kind of thing that is truly unforgivable, and I believe those accusations. But those acts didn't take place during the time period covered by most of this episode, so I won't be covering them here -- but they're easily googlable if you want to know. I thought it best to get that out of the way at the start, so no-one's either anxiously waiting for the penny to drop or upset that I didn't acknowledge the elephant in the room. Separately, this episode will have some discussion of fatphobia and diet culture, and of a death that is at least in part attributable to those things. Those of you affected by that may want to skip this one or read the transcript. There are also some mentions of drug addiction and alcoholism. Anyway, on with the show. One of the things that causes problems with rock history is the tendency of people to have selective memories, and that's never more true than when it comes to the Summer of Love, summer of 1967. In the mythology that's built up around it, that was a golden time, the greatest time ever, a period of peace and love where everything was possible, and the world looked like it was going to just keep on getting better. But what that means, of course, is that the people remembering it that way do so because it was the best time of their lives. And what happens when the best time of your life is over in one summer? When you have one hit and never have a second, or when your band splits up after only eighteen months, and you have to cope with the reality that your best years are not only behind you, but they weren't even best years, but just best months? What stories would you tell about that time? Would you remember it as the eve of destruction, the last great moment before everything went to hell, or would you remember it as a golden summer, full of people with flowers in their hair? And would either really be true? [Excerpt: Scott McKenzie, "San Francisco"] Other than the city in which they worked, there are a few things that seem to characterise almost all the important figures on the LA music scene in the middle part of the 1960s. They almost all seem to be incredibly ambitious, as one might imagine. There seem to be a huge number of fantasists among them -- people who will not only choose the legend over reality when it suits them, but who will choose the legend over reality even when it doesn't suit them. And they almost all seem to have a story about being turned down in a rude and arrogant manner by Lou Adler, usually more or less the same story. To give an example, I'm going to read out a bit of Ray Manzarek's autobiography here. Now, Manzarek uses a few words that I can't use on this podcast and keep a clean rating, so I'm just going to do slight pauses when I get to them, but I'll leave the words in the transcript for those who aren't offended by them: "Sometimes Jim and Dorothy and I went alone. The three of us tried Dunhill Records. Lou Adler was the head man. He was shrewd and he was hip. He had the Mamas and the Papas and a big single with Barry McGuire's 'Eve of Destruction.' He was flush. We were ushered into his office. He looked cool. He was California casually disheveled and had the look of a stoner, but his eyes were as cold as a shark's. He took the twelve-inch acetate demo from me and we all sat down. He put the disc on his turntable and played each cut…for ten seconds. Ten seconds! You can't tell jack [shit] from ten seconds. At least listen to one of the songs all the way through. I wanted to rage at him. 'How dare you! We're the Doors! This is [fucking] Jim Morrison! He's going to be a [fucking] star! Can't you see that? Can't you see how [fucking] handsome he is? Can't you hear how groovy the music is? Don't you [fucking] get it? Listen to the words, man!' My brain was a boiling, lava-filled Jell-O mold of rage. I wanted to eviscerate that shark. The songs he so casually dismissed were 'Moonlight Drive,' 'Hello, I Love You,' 'Summer's Almost Gone,' 'End of the Night,' 'I Looked at You,' 'Go Insane.' He rejected the whole demo. Ten seconds on each song—maybe twenty seconds on 'Hello, I Love You' (I took that as an omen of potential airplay)—and we were dismissed out of hand. Just like that. He took the demo off the turntable and handed it back to me with an obsequious smile and said, 'Nothing here I can use.' We were shocked. We stood up, the three of us, and Jim, with a wry and knowing smile on his lips, cuttingly and coolly shot back at him, 'That's okay, man. We don't want to be *used*, anyway.'" Now, as you may have gathered from the episode on the Doors, Ray Manzarek was one of those print-the-legend types, and that's true of everyone who tells similar stories about Lou Alder. But... there are a *lot* of people who tell similar stories about Lou Adler. One of those was Phil Sloan. You can get an idea of Sloan's attitude to storytelling from a story he always used to tell. Shortly after he and his family moved to LA from New York, he got a job selling newspapers on a street corner on Hollywood Boulevard, just across from Schwab's Drug Store. One day James Dean drove up in his Porsche and made an unusual request. He wanted to buy every copy of the newspaper that Sloan had -- around a hundred and fifty copies in total. But he only wanted one article, something in the entertainment section. Sloan didn't remember what the article was, but he did remember that one of the headlines was on the final illness of Oliver Hardy, who died shortly afterwards, and thought it might have been something to do with that. Dean was going to just clip that article from every copy he bought, and then he was going to give all the newspapers back to Sloan to sell again, so Sloan ended up making a lot of extra money that day. There is one rather big problem with that story. Oliver Hardy died in August 1957, just after the Sloan family moved to LA. But James Dean died in September 1955, two years earlier. Sloan admitted that, and said he couldn't explain it, but he was insistent. He sold a hundred and fifty newspapers to James Dean two years after Dean's death. When not selling newspapers to dead celebrities, Sloan went to Fairfax High School, and developed an interest in music which was mostly oriented around the kind of white pop vocal groups that were popular at the time, groups like the Kingston Trio, the Four Lads, and the Four Aces. But the record that made Sloan decide he wanted to make music himself was "Just Goofed" by the Teen Queens: [Excerpt: The Teen Queens, "Just Goofed"] In 1959, when he was fourteen, he saw an advert for an open audition with Aladdin Records, a label he liked because of Thurston Harris. He went along to the audition, and was successful. His first single, released as by Flip Sloan -- Flip was a nickname, a corruption of "Philip" -- was produced by Bumps Blackwell and featured several of the musicians who played with Sam Cooke, plus Larry Knechtel on piano and Mike Deasey on guitar, but Aladdin shut down shortly after releasing it, and it may not even have had a general release, just promo copies. I've not been able to find a copy online anywhere. After that, he tried Arwin Records, the label that Jan and Arnie recorded for, which was owned by Marty Melcher (Doris Day's husband and Terry Melcher's stepfather). Melcher signed him, and put out a single, "She's My Girl", on Mart Records, a subsidiary of Arwin, on which Sloan was backed by a group of session players including Sandy Nelson and Bruce Johnston: [Excerpt: Philip Sloan, "She's My Girl"] That record didn't have any success, and Sloan was soon dropped by Mart Records. He went on to sign with Blue Bird Records, which was as far as can be ascertained essentially a scam organisation that would record demos for songwriters, but tell the performers that they were making a real record, so that they would record it for the royalties they would never get, rather than for a decent fee as a professional demo singer would get. But Steve Venet -- the brother of Nik Venet, and occasional songwriting collaborator with Tommy Boyce -- happened to come to Blue Bird one day, and hear one of Sloan's original songs. He thought Sloan would make a good songwriter, and took him to see Lou Adler at Columbia-Screen Gems music publishing. This was shortly after the merger between Columbia-Screen Gems and Aldon Music, and Adler was at this point the West Coast head of operations, subservient to Don Kirshner and Al Nevins, but largely left to do what he wanted. The way Sloan always told the story, Venet tried to get Adler to sign Sloan, but Adler said his songs stunk and had no commercial potential. But Sloan persisted in trying to get a contract there, and eventually Al Nevins happened to be in the office and overruled Adler, much to Adler's disgust. Sloan was signed to Columbia-Screen Gems as a songwriter, though he wasn't put on a salary like the Brill Building songwriters, just told that he could bring in songs and they would publish them. Shortly after this, Adler suggested to Sloan that he might want to form a writing team with another songwriter, Steve Barri, who had had a similar non-career non-trajectory, but was very slightly further ahead in his career, having done some work with Carol Connors, the former lead singer of the Teddy Bears. Barri had co-written a couple of flop singles for Connors, before the two of them had formed a vocal group, the Storytellers, with Connors' sister. The Storytellers had released a single, "When Two People (Are in Love)" , which was put out on a local independent label and which Adler had licensed to be released on Dimension Records, the label associated with Aldon Music: [Excerpt: The Storytellers "When Two People (Are in Love)"] That record didn't sell, but it was enough to get Barri into the Columbia-Screen Gems circle, and Adler set him and Sloan up as a songwriting team -- although the way Sloan told it, it wasn't so much a songwriting team as Sloan writing songs while Barri was also there. Sloan would later claim "it was mostly a collaboration of spirit, and it seemed that I was writing most of the music and the lyric, but it couldn't possibly have ever happened unless both of us were present at the same time". One suspects that Barri might have a different recollection of how it went... Sloan and Barri's first collaboration was a song that Sloan had half-written before they met, called "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann", which was recorded by a West Coast Chubby Checker knockoff who went under the name Round Robin, and who had his own dance craze, the Slauson, which was much less successful than the Twist: [Excerpt: Round Robin, "Kick that Little Foot Sally Ann"] That track was produced and arranged by Jack Nitzsche, and Nitzsche asked Sloan to be one of the rhythm guitarists on the track, apparently liking Sloan's feel. Sloan would end up playing rhythm guitar or singing backing vocals on many of the records made of songs he and Barri wrote together. "Kick That Little Foot Sally Ann" only made number sixty-one nationally, but it was a regional hit, and it meant that Sloan and Barri soon became what Sloan later described as "the Goffin and King of the West Coast follow-ups." According to Sloan "We'd be given a list on Monday morning by Lou Adler with thirty names on it of the groups who needed follow-ups to their hit." They'd then write the songs to order, and they started to specialise in dance craze songs. For example, when the Swim looked like it might be the next big dance, they wrote "Swim Swim Swim", "She Only Wants to Swim", "Let's Swim Baby", "Big Boss Swimmer", "Swim Party" and "My Swimmin' Girl" (the last a collaboration with Jan Berry and Roger Christian). These songs were exactly as good as they needed to be, in order to provide album filler for mid-tier artists, and while Sloan and Barri weren't writing any massive hits, they were doing very well as mid-tier writers. According to Sloan's biographer Stephen McParland, there was a three-year period in the mid-sixties where at least one song written or co-written by Sloan was on the national charts at any given time. Most of these songs weren't for Columbia-Screen Gems though. In early 1964 Lou Adler had a falling out with Don Kirshner, and decided to start up his own company, Dunhill, which was equal parts production company, music publishers, and management -- doing for West Coast pop singers what Motown was doing for Detroit soul singers, and putting everything into one basket. Dunhill's early clients included Jan and Dean and the rockabilly singer Johnny Rivers, and Dunhill also signed Sloan and Barri as songwriters. Because of this connection, Sloan and Barri soon became an important part of Jan and Dean's hit-making process. The Matadors, the vocal group that had provided most of the backing vocals on the duo's hits, had started asking for more money than Jan Berry was willing to pay, and Jan and Dean couldn't do the vocals themselves -- as Bones Howe put it "As a singer, Dean is a wonderful graphic artist" -- and so Sloan and Barri stepped in, doing session vocals without payment in the hope that Jan and Dean would record a few of their songs. For example, on the big hit "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena", Dean Torrence is not present at all on the record -- Jan Berry sings the lead vocal, with Sloan doubling him for much of it, Sloan sings "Dean"'s falsetto, with the engineer Bones Howe helping out, and the rest of the backing vocals are sung by Sloan, Barri, and Howe: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "The Little Old Lady From Pasadena"] For these recordings, Sloan and Barri were known as The Fantastic Baggys, a name which came from the Rolling Stones' manager Andrew Oldham and Mick Jagger, when the two were visiting California. Oldham had been commenting on baggys, the kind of shorts worn by surfers, and had asked Jagger what he thought of The Baggys as a group name. Jagger had replied "Fantastic!" and so the Fantastic Baggys had been born. As part of this, Sloan and Barri moved hard into surf and hot-rod music from the dance songs they had been writing previously. The Fantastic Baggys recorded their own album, Tell 'Em I'm Surfin', as a quickie album suggested by Adler: [Excerpt: The Fantastic Baggys, "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'"] And under the name The Rally Packs they recorded a version of Jan and Dean's "Move Out Little Mustang" which featured Berry's girlfriend Jill Gibson doing a spoken section: [Excerpt: The Rally Packs, "Move Out Little Mustang"] They also wrote several album tracks for Jan and Dean, and wrote "Summer Means Fun" for Bruce and Terry -- Bruce Johnston, later of the Beach Boys, and Terry Melcher: [Excerpt: Bruce and Terry, "Summer Means Fun"] And they wrote the very surf-flavoured "Secret Agent Man" for fellow Dunhill artist Johnny Rivers: [Excerpt: Johnny Rivers, "Secret Agent Man"] But of course, when you're chasing trends, you're chasing trends, and soon the craze for twangy guitars and falsetto harmonies had ended, replaced by a craze for jangly twelve-string guitars and closer harmonies. According to Sloan, he was in at the very beginning of the folk-rock trend -- the way he told the story, he was involved in the mastering of the Byrds' version of "Mr. Tambourine Man". He later talked about Terry Melcher getting him to help out, saying "He had produced a record called 'Mr. Tambourine Man', and had sent it into the head office, and it had been rejected. He called me up and said 'I've got three more hours in the studio before I'm being kicked out of Columbia. Can you come over and help me with this new record?' I did. I went over there. It was under lock and key. There were two guards outside the door. Terry asked me something about 'Summer Means Fun'. "He said 'Do you remember the guitar that we worked on with that? How we put in that double reverb?' "And I said 'yes' "And he said 'What do you think if we did something like that with the Byrds?' "And I said 'That sounds good. Let's see what it sounds like.' So we patched into all the reverb centres in Columbia Music, and mastered the record in three hours." Whether Sloan really was there at the birth of folk rock, he and Barri jumped on the folk-rock craze just as they had the surf and hot-rod craze, and wrote a string of jangly hits including "You Baby" for the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "You Baby"] and "I Found a Girl" for Jan and Dean: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "I Found a Girl"] That song was later included on Jan and Dean's Folk 'n' Roll album, which also included... a song I'm not even going to name, but long-time listeners will know the one I mean. It was also notable in that "I Found a Girl" was the first song on which Sloan was credited not as Phil Sloan, but as P.F. Sloan -- he didn't have a middle name beginning with F, but rather the F stood for his nickname "Flip". Sloan would later talk of Phil Sloan and P.F. Sloan as almost being two different people, with P.F. being a far more serious, intense, songwriter. Folk 'n' Roll also contained another Sloan song, this one credited solely to Sloan. And that song is the one for which he became best known. There are two very different stories about how "Eve of Destruction" came to be written. To tell Sloan's version, I'm going to read a few paragraphs from his autobiography: "By late 1964, I had already written ‘Eve Of Destruction,' ‘The Sins Of A Family,' ‘This Mornin',' ‘Ain't No Way I'm Gonna Change My Mind,' and ‘What's Exactly The Matter With Me?' They all arrived on one cataclysmic evening, and nearly at the same time, as I worked on the lyrics almost simultaneously. ‘Eve Of Destruction' came about from hearing a voice, perhaps an angel's. The voice instructed me to place five pieces of paper and spread them out on my bed. I obeyed the voice. The voice told me that the first song would be called ‘Eve Of Destruction,' so I wrote the title at the top of the page. For the next few hours, the voice came and went as I was writing the lyric, as if this spirit—or whatever it was—stood over me like a teacher: ‘No, no … not think of all the hate there is in Red Russia … Red China!' I didn't understand. I thought the Soviet Union was the mortal threat to America, but the voice went on to reveal to me the future of the world until 2024. I was told the Soviet Union would fall, and that Red China would continue to be communist far into the future, but that communism was not going to be allowed to take over this Divine Planet—therefore, think of all the hate there is in Red China. I argued and wrestled with the voice for hours, until I was exhausted but satisfied inside with my plea to God to either take me out of the world, as I could not live in such a hypocritical society, or to show me a way to make things better. When I was writing ‘Eve,' I was on my hands and knees, pleading for an answer." Lou Adler's story is that he gave Phil Sloan a copy of Bob Dylan's Bringing it All Back Home album and told him to write a bunch of songs that sounded like that, and Sloan came back a week later as instructed with ten Dylan knock-offs. Adler said "It was a natural feel for him. He's a great mimic." As one other data point, both Steve Barri and Bones Howe, the engineer who worked on most of the sessions we're looking at today, have often talked in interviews about "Eve of Destruction" as being a Sloan/Barri collaboration, as if to them it's common knowledge that it wasn't written alone, although Sloan's is the only name on the credits. The song was given to a new signing to Dunhill Records, Barry McGuire. McGuire was someone who had been part of the folk scene for years, He'd been playing folk clubs in LA while also acting in a TV show from 1961. When the TV show had finished, he'd formed a duo, Barry and Barry, with Barry Kane, and they performed much the same repertoire as all the other early-sixties folkies: [Excerpt: Barry and Barry, "If I Had a Hammer"] After recording their one album, both Barrys joined the New Christy Minstrels. We've talked about the Christys before, but they were -- and are to this day -- an ultra-commercial folk group, led by Randy Sparks, with a revolving membership of usually eight or nine singers which included several other people who've come up in this podcast, like Gene Clark and Jerry Yester. McGuire became one of the principal lead singers of the Christys, singing lead on their version of the novelty cowboy song "Three Wheels on My Wagon", which was later released as a single in the UK and became a perennial children's favourite (though it has a problematic attitude towards Native Americans): [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Three Wheels on My Wagon"] And he also sang lead on their big hit "Green Green", which he co-wrote with Randy Sparks: [Excerpt: The New Christy Minstrels, "Green Green"] But by 1965 McGuire had left the New Christy Minstrels. As he said later "I'd sung 'Green Green' a thousand times and I didn't want to sing it again. This is January of 1965. I went back to LA to meet some producers, and I was broke. Nobody had the time of day for me. I was walking down street one time to see Dr. Strangelove and I walked by the music store, and I heard "Green Green" comin' out of the store, ya know, on Hollywood Boulevard. And I heard my voice, and I thought, 'I got four dollars in my pocket!' I couldn't believe it, my voice is comin' out on Hollywood Boulevard, and I'm broke. And right at that moment, a car pulls up, and the radio is playing 'Chim Chim Cherie" also by the Minstrels. So I got my voice comin' at me in stereo, standin' on the sidewalk there, and I'm broke, and I can't get anyone to sign me!" But McGuire had a lot of friends who he'd met on the folk scene, some of whom were now in the new folk-rock scene that was just starting to spring up. One of them was Roger McGuinn, who told him that his band, the Byrds, were just about to put out a new single, "Mr. Tambourine Man", and that they were about to start a residency at Ciro's on Sunset Strip. McGuinn invited McGuire to the opening night of that residency, where a lot of other people from the scene were there to see the new group. Bob Dylan was there, as was Phil Sloan, and the actor Jack Nicholson, who was still at the time a minor bit-part player in low-budget films made by people like American International Pictures (the cinematographer on many of Nicholson's early films was Floyd Crosby, David Crosby's father, which may be why he was there). Someone else who was there was Lou Adler, who according to McGuire recognised him instantly. According to Adler, he actually asked Terry Melcher who the long-haired dancer wearing furs was, because "he looked like the leader of a movement", and Melcher told him that he was the former lead singer of the New Christy Minstrels. Either way, Adler approached McGuire and asked if he was currently signed -- Dunhill Records was just starting up, and getting someone like McGuire, who had a proven ability to sing lead on hit records, would be a good start for the label. As McGuire didn't have a contract, he was signed to Dunhill, and he was given some of Sloan's new songs to pick from, and chose "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?" as his single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "What's Exactly the Matter With Me?"] McGuire described what happened next: "It was like, a three-hour session. We did two songs, and then the third one wasn't turning out. We only had about a half hour left in the session, so I said 'Let's do this tune', and I pulled 'Eve of Destruction' out of my pocket, and it just had Phil's words scrawled on a piece of paper, all wrinkled up. Phil worked the chords out with the musicians, who were Hal Blaine on drums and Larry Knechtel on bass." There were actually more musicians than that at the session -- apparently both Knechtel and Joe Osborn were there, so I'm not entirely sure who's playing bass -- Knechtel was a keyboard player as well as a bass player, but I don't hear any keyboards on the track. And Tommy Tedesco was playing lead guitar, and Steve Barri added percussion, along with Sloan on rhythm guitar and harmonica. The chords were apparently scribbled down for the musicians on bits of greasy paper that had been used to wrap some takeaway chicken, and they got through the track in a single take. According to McGuire "I'm reading the words off this piece of wrinkled paper, and I'm singing 'My blood's so mad, feels like coagulatin'", that part that goes 'Ahhh you can't twist the truth', and the reason I'm going 'Ahhh' is because I lost my place on the page. People said 'Man, you really sounded frustrated when you were singing.' I was. I couldn't see the words!" [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] With a few overdubs -- the female backing singers in the chorus, and possibly the kettledrums, which I've seen differing claims about, with some saying that Hal Blaine played them during the basic track and others saying that Lou Adler suggested them as an overdub, the track was complete. McGuire wasn't happy with his vocal, and a session was scheduled for him to redo it, but then a record promoter working with Adler was DJing a birthday party for the head of programming at KFWB, the big top forty radio station in LA at the time, and he played a few acetates he'd picked up from Adler. Most went down OK with the crowd, but when he played "Eve of Destruction", the crowd went wild and insisted he play it three times in a row. The head of programming called Adler up and told him that "Eve of Destruction" was going to be put into rotation on the station from Monday, so he'd better get the record out. As McGuire was away for the weekend, Adler just released the track as it was, and what had been intended to be a B-side became Barry McGuire's first and only number one record: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "Eve of Destruction"] Sloan would later claim that that song was a major reason why the twenty-sixth amendment to the US Constitution was passed six years later, because the line "you're old enough to kill but not for votin'" shamed Congress into changing the constitution to allow eighteen-year-olds to vote. If so, that would make "Eve of Destruction" arguably the single most impactful rock record in history, though Sloan is the only person I've ever seen saying that As well as going to number one in McGuire's version, the song was also covered by the other artists who regularly performed Sloan and Barri songs, like the Turtles: [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Eve of Destruction"] And Jan and Dean, whose version on Folk & Roll used the same backing track as McGuire, but had a few lyrical changes to make it fit with Jan Berry's right-wing politics, most notably changing "Selma, Alabama" to "Watts, California", thus changing a reference to peaceful civil rights protestors being brutally attacked and murdered by white supremacist state troopers to a reference to what was seen, in the popular imaginary, as Black people rioting for no reason: [Excerpt: Jan and Dean, "Eve of Destruction"] According to Sloan, he worked on the Folk & Roll album as a favour to Berry, even though he thought Berry was being cynical and exploitative in making the record, but those changes caused a rift in their friendship. Sloan said in his autobiography "Where I was completely wrong was in helping him capitalize on something in which he didn't believe. Jan wanted the public to perceive him as a person who was deeply concerned and who embraced the values of the progressive politics of the day. But he wasn't that person. That's how I was being pulled. It was when he recorded my actual song ‘Eve Of Destruction' and changed a number of lines to reflect his own ideals that my principles demanded that I leave Folk City and never return." It's true that Sloan gave no more songs to Jan and Dean after that point -- but it's also true that the duo would record only one more album, the comedy concept album Jan and Dean Meet Batman, before Jan's accident. Incidentally, the reference to Selma, Alabama in the lyric might help people decide on which story about the writing of "Eve of Destruction" they think is more plausible. Remember that Lou Adler said that it was written after Adler gave Sloan a copy of Bringing it All Back Home and told him to write a bunch of knock-offs, while Sloan said it was written after a supernatural force gave him access to all the events that would happen in the world for the next sixty years. Sloan claimed the song was written in late 1964. Selma, Alabama, became national news in late February and early March 1965. Bringing it All Back Home was released in late March 1965. So either Adler was telling the truth, or Sloan really *was* given a supernatural insight into the events of the future. Now, as it turned out, while "Eve of Destruction" went to number one, that would be McGuire's only hit as a solo artist. His next couple of singles would reach the very low end of the Hot One Hundred, and that would be it -- he'd release several more albums, before appearing in the Broadway musical Hair, most famous for its nude scenes, and getting a small part in the cinematic masterpiece Werewolves on Wheels: [Excerpt: Werewolves on Wheels trailer] P.F. Sloan would later tell various stories about why McGuire never had another hit. Sometimes he would say that Dunhill Records had received death threats because of "Eve of Destruction" and so deliberately tried to bury McGuire's career, other times he would say that Lou Adler had told him that Billboard had said they were never going to put McGuire's records on the charts no matter how well they sold, because "Eve of Destruction" had just been too powerful and upset the advertisers. But of course at this time Dunhill were still trying for a follow-up to "Eve of Destruction", and they thought they might have one when Barry McGuire brought in a few friends of his to sing backing vocals on his second album. Now, we've covered some of the history of the Mamas and the Papas already, because they were intimately tied up with other groups like the Byrds and the Lovin' Spoonful, and with the folk scene that led to songs like "Hey Joe", so some of this will be more like a recap than a totally new story, but I'm going to recap those parts of the story anyway, so it's fresh in everyone's heads. John Phillips, Scott McKenzie, and Cass Elliot all grew up in Alexandria, Virginia, just a few miles south of Washington DC. Elliot was a few years younger than Phillips and McKenzie, and so as is the way with young men they never really noticed her, and as McKenzie later said "She lived like a quarter of a mile from me and I never met her until New York". While they didn't know who Elliot was, though, she was aware who they were, as Phillips and McKenzie sang together in a vocal group called The Smoothies. The Smoothies were a modern jazz harmony group, influenced by groups like the Modernaires, the Hi-Los, and the Four Freshmen. John Phillips later said "We were drawn to jazz, because we were sort of beatniks, really, rather than hippies, or whatever, flower children. So we used to sing modern harmonies, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross. Dave Lambert did a lot of our arrangements for us as a matter of fact." Now, I've not seen any evidence other than Phillips' claim that Dave Lambert ever arranged for the Smoothies, but that does tell you a lot about the kind of music that they were doing. Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross were a vocalese trio whose main star was Annie Ross, who had a career worthy of an episode in itself -- she sang with Paul Whiteman, appeared in a Little Rascals film when she was seven, had an affair with Lenny Bruce, dubbed Britt Ekland's voice in The Wicker Man, played the villain's sister in Superman III, and much more. Vocalese, you'll remember, was a style of jazz vocal where a singer would take a jazz instrumental, often an improvised one, and add lyrics which they would sing, like Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross' version of "Cloudburst": [Excerpt: Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross, "Cloudburst"] Whether Dave Lambert ever really did arrange for the Smoothies or not, it's very clear that the trio had a huge influence on John Phillips' ideas about vocal arrangement, as you can hear on Mamas and Papas records like "Once Was a Time I Thought": [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Once Was a Time I Thought"] While the Smoothies thought of themselves as a jazz group, when they signed to Decca they started out making the standard teen pop of the era, with songs like "Softly": [Excerpt, The Smoothies, "Softly"] When the folk boom started, Phillips realised that this was music that he could do easily, because the level of musicianship among the pop-folk musicians was so much lower than in the jazz world. The Smoothies made some recordings in the style of the Kingston Trio, like "Ride Ride Ride": [Excerpt: The Smoothies, "Ride Ride Ride"] Then when the Smoothies split, Phillips and McKenzie formed a trio with a banjo player, Dick Weissman, who they met through Izzy Young's Folklore Centre in Greenwich Village after Phillips asked Young to name some musicians who could make a folk record with him. Weissman was often considered the best banjo player on the scene, and was a friend of Pete Seeger's, to whom Seeger sometimes turned for banjo tips. The trio, who called themselves the Journeymen, quickly established themselves on the folk scene. Weissman later said "we had this interesting balance. John had all of this charisma -- they didn't know about the writing thing yet -- John had the personality, Scott had the voice, and I could play. If you think about it, all of those bands like the Kingston Trio, the Brothers Four, nobody could really *sing* and nobody could really *play*, relatively speaking." This is the take that most people seemed to have about John Phillips, in any band he was ever in. Nobody thought he was a particularly good singer or instrumentalist -- he could sing on key and play adequate rhythm guitar, but nobody would actually pay money to listen to him do those things. Mark Volman of the Turtles, for example, said of him "John wasn't the kind of guy who was going to be able to go up on stage and sing his songs as a singer-songwriter. He had to put himself in the context of a group." But he was charismatic, he had presence, and he also had a great musical mind. He would surround himself with the best players and best singers he could, and then he would organise and arrange them in ways that made the most of their talents. He would work out the arrangements, in a manner that was far more professional than the quick head arrangements that other folk groups used, and he instigated a level of professionalism in his groups that was not at all common on the scene. Phillips' friend Jim Mason talked about the first time he saw the Journeymen -- "They were warming up backstage, and John had all of them doing vocal exercises; one thing in particular that's pretty famous called 'Seiber Syllables' -- it's a series of vocal exercises where you enunciate different vowel and consonant sounds. It had the effect of clearing your head, and it's something that really good operetta singers do." The group were soon signed by Frank Werber, the manager of the Kingston Trio, who signed them as an insurance policy. Dave Guard, the Kingston Trio's banjo player, was increasingly having trouble with the other members, and Werber knew it was only a matter of time before he left the group. Werber wanted the Journeymen as a sort of farm team -- he had the idea that when Guard left, Phillips would join the Kingston Trio in his place as the third singer. Weissman would become the Trio's accompanist on banjo, and Scott McKenzie, who everyone agreed had a remarkable voice, would be spun off as a solo artist. But until that happened, they might as well make records by themselves. The Journeymen signed to MGM records, but were dropped before they recorded anything. They instead signed to Capitol, for whom they recorded their first album: [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "500 Miles"] After recording that album, the Journeymen moved out to California, with Phillips' wife and children. But soon Phillips' marriage was to collapse, as he met and fell in love with Michelle Gilliam. Gilliam was nine years younger than him -- he was twenty-six and she was seventeen -- and she had the kind of appearance which meant that in every interview with an older heterosexual man who knew her, that man will spend half the interview talking about how attractive he found her. Phillips soon left his wife and children, but before he did, the group had a turntable hit with "River Come Down", the B-side to "500 Miles": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "River Come Down"] Around the same time, Dave Guard *did* leave the Kingston Trio, but the plan to split the Journeymen never happened. Instead Phillips' friend John Stewart replaced Guard -- and this soon became a new source of income for Phillips. Both Phillips and Stewart were aspiring songwriters, and they collaborated together on several songs for the Trio, including "Chilly Winds": [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Chilly Winds"] Phillips became particularly good at writing songs that sounded like they could be old traditional folk songs, sometimes taking odd lines from older songs to jump-start new ones, as in "Oh Miss Mary", which he and Stewart wrote after hearing someone sing the first line of a song she couldn't remember the rest of: [Excerpt: The Kingston Trio, "Oh Miss Mary"] Phillips and Stewart became so close that Phillips actually suggested to Stewart that he quit the Kingston Trio and replace Dick Weissman in the Journeymen. Stewart did quit the Trio -- but then the next day Phillips suggested that maybe it was a bad idea and he should stay where he was. Stewart went back to the Trio, claimed he had only pretended to quit because he wanted a pay-rise, and got his raise, so everyone ended up happy. The Journeymen moved back to New York with Michelle in place of Phillips' first wife (and Michelle's sister Russell also coming along, as she was dating Scott McKenzie) and on New Year's Eve 1962 John and Michelle married -- so from this point on I will refer to them by their first names, because they both had the surname Phillips. The group continued having success through 1963, including making appearances on "Hootenanny": [Excerpt: The Journeymen, "Stack O'Lee (live on Hootenanny)"] By the time of the Journeymen's third album, though, John and Scott McKenzie were on bad terms. Weissman said "They had been the closest of friends and now they were the worst of enemies. They talked through me like I was a medium. It got to the point where we'd be standing in the dressing room and John would say to me 'Tell Scott that his right sock doesn't match his left sock...' Things like that, when they were standing five feet away from each other." Eventually, the group split up. Weissman was always going to be able to find employment given his banjo ability, and he was about to get married and didn't need the hassle of dealing with the other two. McKenzie was planning on a solo career -- everyone was agreed that he had the vocal ability. But John was another matter. He needed to be in a group. And not only that, the Journeymen had bookings they needed to complete. He quickly pulled together a group he called the New Journeymen. The core of the lineup was himself, Michelle on vocals, and banjo player Marshall Brickman. Brickman had previously been a member of a folk group called the Tarriers, who had had a revolving lineup, and had played on most of their early-sixties recordings: [Excerpt: The Tarriers, "Quinto (My Little Pony)"] We've met the Tarriers before in the podcast -- they had been formed by Erik Darling, who later replaced Pete Seeger in the Weavers after Seeger's socialist principles wouldn't let him do advertising, and Alan Arkin, later to go on to be a film star, and had had hits with "Cindy, O Cindy", with lead vocals from Vince Martin, who would later go on to be a major performer in the Greenwich Village scene, and with "The Banana Boat Song". By the time Brickman had joined, though, Darling, Arkin, and Martin had all left the group to go on to bigger things, and while he played with them for several years, it was after their commercial peak. Brickman would, though, also go on to a surprising amount of success, but as a writer rather than a musician -- he had a successful collaboration with Woody Allen in the 1970s, co-writing four of Allen's most highly regarded films -- Sleeper, Annie Hall, Manhattan, and Manhattan Murder Mystery -- and with another collaborator he later co-wrote the books for the stage musicals Jersey Boys and The Addams Family. Both John and Michelle were decent singers, and both have their admirers as vocalists -- P.F. Sloan always said that Michelle was the best singer in the group they eventually formed, and that it was her voice that gave the group its sound -- but for the most part they were not considered as particularly astonishing lead vocalists. Certainly, neither had a voice that stood out the way that Scott McKenzie's had. They needed a strong lead singer, and they found one in Denny Doherty. Now, we covered Denny Doherty's early career in the episode on the Lovin' Spoonful, because he was intimately involved in the formation of that group, so I won't go into too much detail here, but I'll give a very abbreviated version of what I said there. Doherty was a Canadian performer who had been a member of the Halifax Three with Zal Yanovsky: [Excerpt: The Halifax Three, "When I First Came to This Land"] After the Halifax Three had split up, Doherty and Yanovsky had performed as a duo for a while, before joining up with Cass Elliot and her husband Jim Hendricks, who both had previously been in the Big Three with Tim Rose: [Excerpt: Cass Elliot and the Big 3, "The Banjo Song"] Elliot, Hendricks, Yanovsky, and Doherty had formed The Mugwumps, sometimes joined by John Sebastian, and had tried to go in more of a rock direction after seeing the Beatles on Ed Sullivan. They recorded one album together before splitting up: [Excerpt: The Mugwumps, "Searchin'"] Part of the reason they split up was that interpersonal relationships within the group were put under some strain -- Elliot and Hendricks split up, though they would remain friends and remain married for several years even though they were living apart, and Elliot had an unrequited crush on Doherty. But since they'd split up, and Yanovsky and Sebastian had gone off to form the Lovin' Spoonful, that meant that Doherty was free, and he was regarded as possibly the best male lead vocalist on the circuit, so the group snapped him up. The only problem was that the Journeymen still had gigs booked that needed to be played, one of them was in just three days, and Doherty didn't know the repertoire. This was a problem with an easy solution for people in their twenties though -- they took a huge amount of amphetamines, and stayed awake for three days straight rehearsing. They made the gig, and Doherty was now the lead singer of the New Journeymen: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "The Last Thing on My Mind"] But the New Journeymen didn't last in that form for very long, because even before joining the group, Denny Doherty had been going in a more folk-rock direction with the Mugwumps. At the time, John Phillips thought rock and roll was kids' music, and he was far more interested in folk and jazz, but he was also very interested in making money, and he soon decided it was an idea to start listening to the Beatles. There's some dispute as to who first played the Beatles for John in early 1965 -- some claim it was Doherty, others claim it was Cass Elliot, but everyone agrees it was after Denny Doherty had introduced Phillips to something else -- he brought round some LSD for John and Michelle, and Michelle's sister Rusty, to try. And then he told them he'd invited round a friend. Michelle Phillips later remembered, "I remember saying to the guys "I don't know about you guys, but this drug does nothing for me." At that point there was a knock on the door, and as I opened the door and saw Cass, the acid hit me *over the head*. I saw her standing there in a pleated skirt, a pink Angora sweater with great big eyelashes on and her hair in a flip. And all of a sudden I thought 'This is really *quite* a drug!' It was an image I will have securely fixed in my brain for the rest of my life. I said 'Hi, I'm Michelle. We just took some LSD-25, do you wanna join us?' And she said 'Sure...'" Rusty Gilliam's description matches this -- "It was mind-boggling. She had on a white pleated skirt, false eyelashes. These were the kind of eyelashes that when you put them on you were supposed to trim them to an appropriate length, which she didn't, and when she blinked she looked like a cow, or those dolls you get when you're little and the eyes open and close. And we're on acid. Oh my God! It was a sight! And everything she was wearing were things that you weren't supposed to be wearing if you were heavy -- white pleated skirt, mohair sweater. You know, until she became famous, she suffered so much, and was poked fun at." This gets to an important point about Elliot, and one which sadly affected everything about her life. Elliot was *very* fat -- I've seen her weight listed at about three hundred pounds, and she was only five foot five tall -- and she also didn't have the kind of face that gets thought of as conventionally attractive. Her appearance would be cruelly mocked by pretty much everyone for the rest of her life, in ways that it's genuinely hurtful to read about, and which I will avoid discussing in detail in order to avoid hurting fat listeners. But the two *other* things that defined Elliot in the minds of those who knew her were her voice -- every single person who knew her talks about what a wonderful singer she was -- and her personality. I've read a lot of things about Cass Elliot, and I have never read a single negative word about her as a person, but have read many people going into raptures about what a charming, loving, friendly, understanding person she was. Michelle later said of her "From the time I left Los Angeles, I hadn't had a friend, a buddy. I was married, and John and I did not hang out with women, we just hung out with men, and especially not with women my age. John was nine years older than I was. And here was a fun-loving, intelligent woman. She captivated me. I was as close to in love with Cass as I could be to any woman in my life at that point. She also represented something to me: freedom. Everything she did was because she wanted to do it. She was completely independent and I admired her and was in awe of her. And later on, Cass would be the one to tell me not to let John run my life. And John hated her for that." Either Elliot had brought round Meet The Beatles, the Beatles' first Capitol album, for everyone to listen to, or Denny Doherty already had it, but either way Elliot and Doherty were by this time already Beatles fans. Michelle, being younger than the rest and not part of the folk scene until she met John, was much more interested in rock and roll than any of them, but because she'd been married to John for a couple of years and been part of his musical world she hadn't really encountered the Beatles music, though she had a vague memory that she might have heard a track or two on the radio. John was hesitant -- he didn't want to listen to any rock and roll, but eventually he was persuaded, and the record was put on while he was on his first acid trip: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want to Hold Your Hand"] Within a month, John Phillips had written thirty songs that he thought of as inspired by the Beatles. The New Journeymen were going to go rock and roll. By this time Marshall Brickman was out of the band, and instead John, Michelle, and Denny recruited a new lead guitarist, Eric Hord. Denny started playing bass, with John on rhythm guitar, and a violinist friend of theirs, Peter Pilafian, knew a bit of drums and took on that role. The new lineup of the group used the Journeymen's credit card, which hadn't been stopped even though the Journeymen were no more, to go down to St. Thomas in the Caribbean, along with Michelle's sister, John's daughter Mackenzie (from whose name Scott McKenzie had taken his stage name, as he was born Philip Blondheim), a pet dog, and sundry band members' girlfriends. They stayed there for several months, living in tents on the beach, taking acid, and rehearsing. While they were there, Michelle and Denny started an affair which would have important ramifications for the group later. They got a gig playing at a club called Duffy's, whose address was on Creeque Alley, and soon after they started playing there Cass Elliot travelled down as well -- she was in love with Denny, and wanted to be around him. She wasn't in the group, but she got a job working at Duffy's as a waitress, and she would often sing harmony with the group while waiting at tables. Depending on who was telling the story, either she didn't want to be in the group because she didn't want her appearance to be compared to Michelle's, or John wouldn't *let* her be in the group because she was so fat. Later a story would be made up to cover for this, saying that she hadn't been in the group at first because she couldn't sing the highest notes that were needed, until she got hit on the head with a metal pipe and discovered that it had increased her range by three notes, but that seems to be a lie. One of the songs the New Journeymen were performing at this time was "Mr. Tambourine Man". They'd heard that their old friend Roger McGuinn had recorded it with his new band, but they hadn't yet heard his version, and they'd come up with their own arrangement: [Excerpt: The New Journeymen, "Mr. Tambourine Man"] Denny later said "We were doing three-part harmony on 'Mr Tambourine Man', but a lot slower... like a polka or something! And I tell John, 'No John, we gotta slow it down and give it a backbeat.' Finally we get the Byrds 45 down here, and we put it on and turn it up to ten, and John says 'Oh, like that?' Well, as you can tell, it had already been done. So John goes 'Oh, ah... that's it...' a light went on. So we started doing Beatles stuff. We dropped 'Mr Tambourine Man' after hearing the Byrds version, because there was no point." Eventually they had to leave the island -- they had completely run out of money, and were down to fifty dollars. The credit card had been cut up, and the governor of the island had a personal vendetta against them because they gave his son acid, and they were likely to get arrested if they didn't leave the island. Elliot and her then-partner had round-trip tickets, so they just left, but the rest of them were in trouble. By this point they were unwashed, they were homeless, and they'd spent their last money on stage costumes. They got to the airport, and John Phillips tried to write a cheque for eight air fares back to the mainland, which the person at the check-in desk just laughed at. So they took their last fifty dollars and went to a casino. There Michelle played craps, and she rolled seventeen straight passes, something which should be statistically impossible. She turned their fifty dollars into six thousand dollars, which they scooped up, took to the airport, and paid for their flights out in cash. The New Journeymen arrived back in New York, but quickly decided that they were going to try their luck in California. They rented a car, using Scott McKenzie's credit card, and drove out to LA. There they met up with Hoyt Axton, who you may remember as the son of Mae Axton, the writer of "Heartbreak Hotel", and as the performer who had inspired Michael Nesmith to go into folk music: [Excerpt: Hoyt Axton, "Greenback Dollar"] Axton knew the group, and fed them and put them up for a night, but they needed somewhere else to stay. They went to stay with one of Michelle's friends, but after one night their rented car was stolen, with all their possessions in it. They needed somewhere else to stay, so they went to ask Jim Hendricks if they could crash at his place -- and they were surprised to find that Cass Elliot was there already. Hendricks had another partner -- though he and Elliot wouldn't have their marriage annulled until 1968 and were still technically married -- but he'd happily invited her to stay with them. And now all her friends had turned up, he invited them to stay as well, taking apart the beds in his one-bedroom apartment so he could put down a load of mattresses in the space for everyone to sleep on. The next part becomes difficult, because pretty much everyone in the LA music scene of the sixties was a liar who liked to embellish their own roles in things, so it's quite difficult to unpick what actually happened. What seems to have happened though is that first this new rock-oriented version of the New Journeymen went to see Frank Werber, on the recommendation of John Stewart. Werber was the manager of the Kingston Trio, and had also managed the Journeymen. He, however, was not interested -- not because he didn't think they had talent, but because he had experience of working with John Phillips previously. When Phillips came into his office Werber picked up a tape that he'd been given of the group, and said "I have not had a chance to listen to this tape. I believe that you are a most talented individual, and that's why we took you on in the first place. But I also believe that you're also a drag to work with. A pain in the ass. So I'll tell you what, before whatever you have on here sways me, I'm gonna give it back to you and say that we're not interested." Meanwhile -- and this part of the story comes from Kim Fowley, who was never one to let the truth get in the way of him taking claim for everything, but parts of it at least are corroborated by other people -- Cass Elliot had called Fowley, and told him that her friends' new group sounded pretty good and he should sign them. Fowley was at that time working as a talent scout for a label, but according to him the label wouldn't give the group the money they wanted. So instead, Fowley got in touch with Nik Venet, who had just produced the Leaves' hit version of "Hey Joe" on Mira Records: [Excerpt: The Leaves, "Hey Joe"] Fowley suggested to Venet that Venet should sign the group to Mira Records, and Fowley would sign them to a publishing contract, and they could both get rich. The trio went to audition for Venet, and Elliot drove them over -- and Venet thought the group had a great look as a quartet. He wanted to sign them to a record contract, but only if Elliot was in the group as well. They agreed, he gave them a one hundred and fifty dollar advance, and told them to come back the next day to see his boss at Mira. But Barry McGuire was also hanging round with Elliot and Hendricks, and decided that he wanted to have Lou Adler hear the four of them. He thought they might be useful both as backing vocalists on his second album and as a source of new songs. He got them to go and see Lou Adler, and according to McGuire Phillips didn't want Elliot to go with them, but as Elliot was the one who was friends with McGuire, Phillips worried that they'd lose the chance with Adler if she didn't. Adler was amazed, and decided to sign the group right then and there -- both Bones Howe and P.F. Sloan claimed to have been there when the group auditioned for him and have said "if you won't sign them, I will", though exactly what Sloan would have signed them to I'm not sure. Adler paid them three thousand dollars in cash and told them not to bother with Nik Venet, so they just didn't turn up for the Mira Records audition the next day. Instead, they went into the studio with McGuire and cut backing vocals on about half of his new album: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire with the Mamas and the Papas, "Hide Your Love Away"] While the group were excellent vocalists, there were two main reasons that Adler wanted to sign them. The first was that he found Michelle Phillips extremely attractive, and the second is a song that John and Michelle had written which he thought might be very suitable for McGuire's album. Most people who knew John Phillips think of "California Dreamin'" as a solo composition, and he would later claim that he gave Michelle fifty percent just for transcribing his lyric, saying he got inspired in the middle of the night, woke her up, and got her to write the song down as he came up with it. But Michelle, who is a credited co-writer on the song, has been very insistent that she wrote the lyrics to the second verse, and that it's about her own real experiences, saying that she would often go into churches and light candles even though she was "at best an agnostic, and possibly an atheist" in her words, and this would annoy John, who had also been raised Catholic, but who had become aggressively opposed to expressions of religion, rather than still having nostalgia for the aesthetics of the church as Michelle did. They were out walking on a particularly cold winter's day in 1963, and Michelle wanted to go into St Patrick's Cathedral and John very much did not want to. A couple of nights later, John woke her up, having written the first verse of the song, starting "All the leaves are brown and the sky is grey/I went for a walk on a winter's day", and insisting she collaborate with him. She liked the song, and came up with the lines "Stopped into a church, I passed along the way/I got down on my knees and I pretend to pray/The preacher likes the cold, he knows I'm going to stay", which John would later apparently dislike, but which stayed in the song. Most sources I've seen for the recording of "California Dreamin'" say that the lineup of musicians was the standard set of players who had played on McGuire's other records, with the addition of John Phillips on twelve-string guitar -- P.F. Sloan on guitar and harmonica, Joe Osborn on bass, Larry Knechtel on keyboards, and Hal Blaine on drums, but for some reason Stephen McParland's book on Sloan has Bones Howe down as playing drums on the track while engineering -- a detail so weird, and from such a respectable researcher, that I have to wonder if it might be true. In his autobiography, Sloan claims to have rewritten the chord sequence to "California Dreamin'". He says "Barry Mann had unintentionally showed me a suspended chord back at Screen Gems. I was so impressed by this beautiful, simple chord that I called Brian Wilson and played it for him over the phone. The next thing I knew, Brian had written ‘Don't Worry Baby,' which had within it a number suspended chords. And then the chord heard 'round the world, two months later, was the opening suspended chord of ‘A Hard Day's Night.' I used these chords throughout ‘California Dreamin',' and more specifically as a bridge to get back and forth from the verse to the chorus." Now, nobody else corroborates this story, and both Brian Wilson and John Phillips had the kind of background in modern harmony that means they would have been very aware of suspended chords before either ever encountered Sloan, but I thought I should mention it. Rather more plausible is Sloan's other claim, that he came up with the intro to the song. According to Sloan, he was inspired by "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures: [Excerpt: The Ventures, "Walk Don't Run"] And you can easily see how this: [plays "Walk Don't Run"] Can lead to this: [plays "California Dreamin'"] And I'm fairly certain that if that was the inspiration, it was Sloan who was the one who thought it up. John Phillips had been paying no attention to the world of surf music when "Walk Don't Run" had been a hit -- that had been at the point when he was very firmly in the folk world, while Sloan of course had been recording "Tell 'Em I'm Surfin'", and it had been his job to know surf music intimately. So Sloan's intro became the start of what was intended to be Barry McGuire's next single: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] Sloan also provided the harmonica solo on the track: [Excerpt: Barry McGuire, "California Dreamin'"] The Mamas and the Papas -- the new name that was now given to the former New Journeymen, now they were a quartet -- were also signed to Dunhill as an act on their own, and recorded their own first single, "Go Where You Wanna Go", a song apparently written by John about Michelle, in late 1963, after she had briefly left him to have an affair with Russ Titelman, the record producer and songwriter, before coming back to him: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] But while that was put out, they quickly decided to scrap it and go with another song. The "Go Where You Wanna Go" single was pulled after only selling a handful of copies, though its commercial potential was later proved when in 1967 a new vocal group, the 5th Dimension, released a soundalike version as their second single. The track was produced by Lou Adler's client Johnny Rivers, and used the exact same musicians as the Mamas and the Papas version, with the exception of Phillips. It became their first hit, reaching number sixteen on the charts: [Excerpt: The 5th Dimension, "Go Where You Wanna Go"] The reason the Mamas and the Papas version of "Go Where You Wanna Go" was pulled was because everyone became convinced that their first single should instead be their own version of "California Dreamin'". This is the exact same track as McGuire's track, with just two changes. The first is that McGuire's lead vocal was replaced with Denny Doherty: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] Though if you listen to the stereo mix of the song and isolate the left channel, you can hear McGuire singing the lead on the first line, and occasional leakage from him elsewhere on the backing vocal track: [Excerpt: The Mamas and the Papas, "California Dreamin'"] The other change made was to replace Sloan's harmonica solo with an alto flute solo by Bud Shank, a jazz musician who we heard about in the episode on "Light My Fire", when he collaborated with Ravi Shankar on "Improvisations on the Theme From Pather Panchali": [Excerpt: Ravi Shankar, "Improvisation on the Theme From Pather Panchali"] Shank was working on another session in Western Studios, where they were recording the Mamas and Papas track, and Bones Howe approached him while he was packing his instrument and asked if he'd be interested in doing another session. Shank agreed, though the track caused problems for him. According to Shank "What had happened was that whe

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