Podcasts about Napster

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  • 700PODCASTS
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  • Oct 20, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Napster

Latest podcast episodes about Napster

Deep Cuts
QAnon Pt. 3: Inception w/Travis View, Will Sommer, Fredrick Brennan | Case File #90

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 229:13


Part 3 of an exhaustive multi-episode deep dive into the mega conspiracy movement, QAnon. In October of 2017, a mysterious poster known only as Q began posting cryptic messages on the image board 4Chan. As these messages started to be noticed by the users of the board, and eventually many people outside of 4Chan, Q slowly started to take shape as the leader of some kind of new movement. But where will that movement go? -- Listen to QAnon Anonymous https://www.qanonanonymous.com -- Follow Travis View on Twitter https://twitter.com/travis_view -- Follow Fredrick Brennan on Twitter https://twitter.com/fr_brennan -- Join our brand new Discord server! https://bit.ly/deepcutsdiscord -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Land of the Giants
Apple Saved Music. Why Not TV?

Land of the Giants

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 33:07


Back in the early 2000s, file sharing services like Napster devastated the music industry. Steve Jobs threw it a lifeline with the iTunes Store, offering people an easy way to download songs legally. That saved the music industry and made Apple a dominant player in the music biz...for a time. Twenty years later, the television industry is going through a similar upheaval, but this time, Apple isn't leading the way. What happened to Apple's golden touch? Hosted by Peter Kafka (@pkafka) Enjoyed this episode? Rate us ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ and leave a review on Apple Podcasts. Want to get in touch? Tweet @recode Subscribe for free. Be the first to hear next week's episode by subscribing in your favorite podcast app. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Deep Cuts
QAnon Pt. 2: Blood Libel & HyperNormalisation | Case File #89

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 91:46


Part 2 of an exhaustive multi-episode deep dive into the mega conspiracy movement, QAnon. Dating back hundreds of years, people have spread anti-semitic conspiracy theories about Jews conspiring to kidnap and murder Christian children to drink their blood. And throughout the 20th century a radical shift in the nature of reality, the meaning of truth, and our collective trust in authority, occurred and slowly eroded any semblance of a collective worldview. All of these things have contributed to a world where QAnon can exist. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we will explore the ancient origins of the beliefs of the movement and the events that took place that got us here. -- Watch HyperNormalisation by Adam Curtis https://www.amazon.com/HyperNormalisation-Adam-Curtis/dp/B08L6KBTLB -- Join our brand new Discord server! https://bit.ly/deepcutsdiscord -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
QAnon Pt. 1: Pizzagate | Case File #88

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 103:51


Part 1 of an exhaustive multi-episode deep dive into the mega conspiracy movement, QAnon. In November of 2016, amidst a monumental presidential election, WikiLeaks obtained 20,000 private emails from former White House Chief of Staff, John Podesta, and released them to the public. A handful of the emails contained references to various foods such as pizza. Seemingly innocent, but little did anyone know that it would spark the beginning of one of the biggest conspiracy movements of all time, destabilize the political climate of the United States, and eventually result a massive riot at the Capitol building in Washington D.C. -- Join our brand new Discord server! https://bit.ly/deepcutsdiscord -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
How Batman Was Stolen | Case File #87

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 122:24


Batman is one of the most well-known fictional characters of all time. He was completely stolen from his original creator. In the late 1930s, a new comic book character hit newsstands across the country. He was called The Bat-Man (later on just Batman), and he quickly took the nation by storm. Over the years he could go on to become one of the most popular characters - comic book or otherwise - ever conceived. And, as we all know, he was created by Bob Kane. He was credited as the sole creator, writer, and artist behind Batman, he appeared in countless interviews as the creator of Batman, and he even had a cameo in the 1989 Batman movie. However, he didn't actually create the character at all, and in fact shameless stole credit from another man. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we delve into the truth behind who created Batman. -- Join our brand new Discord server! https://bit.ly/deepcutsdiscord -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Komando On Demand
Tech Refresh: Scam texts going up, Amazon's new guarantee, the first MP3

Komando On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 56:01


Scam calls are on their way down, while scammy texts are increasing. Here's what to do about it. Plus, Amazon is finally taking responsibility for lousy third-party products, and Kim, Ben and Allie reminisce about the first MP3, Napster and even tapes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
Arthur Conan Doyle Pt. 2 | Case File #86

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 94:24


An obsessed Sherlock Holmes fan lived out a bizarre and tragic real life Sherlock Holmes murder mystery. In the early 2000s, Richard Lancelyn Green, an obsessed Arthur Conan Doyle scholar and biographer, began down a path of obsession. He was searching for some lost papers on Conan Doyle that would allow him to write the definitive biography, but they had somehow fallen into the hands of an auction house to be sold to private collectors instead of a museum archive like they should have been. He was devastated. And a few weeks later, he turned up dead in his apartment. Did he commit suicide? Or was he murdered? On this episode of Deep Cuts we explore the tragic and intriguing life and real life murder mystery of Richard Lancelyn Green. -- Join our brand new Discord server! https://bit.ly/deepcutsdiscord -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
Pizza Pizza Paparizza Memearizza Celebrizza Special 1 | Case File #85

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 111:28


The first ever Pizza Pizza Paparizza Memearizza Celebrizza meme competition full-length episode. -- The Memes https://www.dropbox.com/sh/eephixesoy817hi/AACcIbgMu6vQC0PBWzq77qLta?dl=0 -- Join our brand new Discord server! https://bit.ly/deepcutsdiscord -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
Arthur Conan Doyle, Fairy Hunter | Case File #84

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 87:46


He created Sherlock Holmes, the world's most famous detective. He also believed in fairies and magic. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's literary creation, Sherlock Holmes, took the world by storm and became one of the most popular characters of all time. Holmes was known for his dedication to science and his brilliant deduction skills, and the man who created him equally valued these skills and - by many accounts - largely based the character on himself. However, as his life progressed he lost interest in Holmes, and instead became passionate about studying the paranormal, psychics and mediums, and literal fairies. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we explore the surprisingly bizarre life of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. -- Join our brand new Discord server! https://bit.ly/deepcutsdiscord -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Roll and Move
Episode 97: Pegleg!

Roll and Move

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 40:31


Land hooooo! We're back from the dead! As you know, we've been dealing with shipping issues and boardgame logistics the past couple of weeks. If you're curious check out our Kickstarter page for the slew of updates that we've churned out! But right now let's talk a little bit about pirating! No, we're not referring to Napster or Pirate Bay, or any other torrenting website. We're talking about setting sail on the seven seas and getting up to no good! Frankly, this is something we've never done, but thankfully there's a board game for that! Pegleg is a card game about crude solutions to amputations and also pirating... it's also really bad. Is it possible that this game has less going for it than Go Fish? You'll have to walk the plank with us to find out! Find out more at https://roll-and-move.pinecast.co

Deep Cuts
Dark and Bloody History of Chiquita Banana | Case File #83

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 134:00


The origins of the world's biggest banana company are darker than you could ever imagine. In the late 1800s, several enterprising American businessman saw an opportunity to move into Central America and build successful companies growing, shipping, and selling bananas to the masses. Several fruit companies cropped up during this time, but none bigger or more powerful than the United Fruit Company - which would later become known as Chiquita Brands International, seller of Chiquita Bananas. But in order to become the biggest banana brand in history, the company would have to leave behind a trail of blood, exploitation, military coups, slavery, and genocide. On this episode we dive deep into the incredibly bleak origins of Chiquita Banana. -- This Week's Listener Memes: -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Permanently Moved
301 - 2133 - A Napster Moment For Collective Storytelling?

Permanently Moved

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 5:02


S04E33 Experienced Future shock this week with the launch of three NFT projects: LOOT, The Logged Universe, and Lifeforms. Permissive IPs are coming. If I was a major producer/owner of culture. I'd be very worried. Full Show Notes: https://www.thejaymo.net/2021/09/04/301-2133-napster-moment/ Watch 301 on youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/jayspringett Support: https://thejaymo.net/support/ Webshow: http://comeinternetwith.me Website: https://www.thejaymo.net/ Permanently moved is a personal podcast 301 seconds in length, written and recorded by @thejaymo

Deep Cuts
Velocity Gnome Pt. 2 w/ Dylan Reiff & Joe Korsmo | Case File #82

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 138:17


Two complete strangers planned out an elaborate 3-year prank on a 19-year-old guy that would change his life forever. Today we interview those two guys. -- This Week's Listener Memes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/vxoh6aq0jb51jws/AAC9w8mdITkhSNpwpT_rIiY2a?dl=0 -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Might Be News Network
Might Be Brews - Post Flood Happy Hour

Might Be News Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 99:43


On this week's Might Be Brews, John and Mr. Steve hang out with Taylor and Bret. We review beers from Victory, Human Robot, Burley Oak, The Seed, Prairie and East Branch. We also get nostalgic talking about 90s TV shows, music, Diskmen, Napster and we eat 90s snacks like Bugles, fruit by the foot, fruit roll ups, gushers, Sunny D and DunkARoos. Make sure you subscribe.

Deep Cuts
The Twilight Zone Movie Deaths | Case File #81

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 106:01


One of the most famous movie directors was responsible for the death of a legendary actor and two children on his set, and he got away with it. In the early 1980s, hot off the heels of several hit movies, director John Landis was hired to direct a segment from the Twilight Zone movie being produced by Steven Spielberg. After a series of shady decisions - most of them illegal, Landis ended up directing a scene at 2:30 AM featuring an actor, two small children, a bunch of fake rain and explosions, and an actual helicopter. The night would end in tragedy. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we take a look at the shocking deaths on the set of the Twilight Zone movie. -- This Week's Listener Memes: -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Unsung Podcast
Episode 185 - Humbug by Arctic Monkeys (Side A)

Unsung Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 59:20


The cat is truly among the pigeons this week, as Chris puts the Arctic Monkeys' third album Humbug forth for our consideration. Is this the biggest band we've ever covered?! Probably not, no - we did cover Metallica after all - but they are the first band we've ever covered with a song on Spotify that is has over 1 billion plays (It's Do I Wanna Know? incidentally) so I suppose you could argue that they are the biggest band we've yet covered. On this episode we talk about the band's history, as well as how they came about in this weird post-Napster pre-Facebook era, coming completely out of nowhere at a time when MySpace was the places where all the kids hung out online. The band have made a number of interesting stylistic choices over the years, which is impressive for a band with their profile. What's more impressive though is how their fans seem to come on the journey with them, which is rare for just about any band, let alone a huge act like these guys. Next week we'll talk about Humbug itself and of course the Josh Homme factor.

Alt.Pop.Repeat
S2E08 – Click to Play: The Internet Episode w/ Amber MacArthur

Alt.Pop.Repeat

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 87:00


From Mark Twain to Napster & the secret 70s Canadian "internet". This this episode we explore the history & impact of the world wide web on pop culture.

Podcast Like It's 1999
186: Smashing Pumpkins: The Everlasting Gaze w/ Matthew D'Ambrosio

Podcast Like It's 1999

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 95:54


Do you remember when we still had to listen to music on discs and cassettes? Before Spotify and Napster? This week, Phil is joined by fellow writer Matthew D'Ambrosio (The Witcher, The Vampire Diaries) to discuss one of the most influential bands of the 90s, SMASHING PUMPKINS.We dig through the band's storied discography in an attempt to track their fall from relevance. We also discuss Billy Corgan's fatal flaws, the highs and lows of their career, and list off our favorite SP songs. Plus, you get to hear Phil say "I had a CD player, you son of a bitch", so this episode is an all around win.Find Matt at: twitter.com/drmattdambrosioPatreon: patreon.com/podcastlikeits1989Twitter: twitter.com/podcastlikeitsInstagram: instagram.com/podcastlikeitsReddit: reddit.com/r/PodcastLikeIts See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Deep Cuts
James Hydrick, Psychic With a Dark Secret | Case File #80

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 113:50


He fooled the world into believing he had telekinetic powers, but his true secret was much darker. In the late 1970s, James Hydrick came onto the scene claiming to have the ability to move objects with his mind. This landed him in newspaper articles, owning a handful of martial arts dojos, and making several television appearances where he demonstrated his powers. For a while it seemed like he had fooled the world...until he had a VERY bad week, and his lies were revealed. But that wasn't the worst thing that would come out about Hydrick in the end. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we explore the deceptive life of James Hydrick. -- This Week's Listener Memes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/7qpdggp3ezhedbr/AACWUdj24uzjn_xsLwIt00d0a?dl=0 -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
Anton LaVey, Father of Satanism | Case File #79

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 109:05


He invented the Satanic Church to shock people, but he had an immeasurable impact on our culture. In the 1960s, Anton LaVey founded the Church or Satan, wrote the Satanic Bible, and became one of the most infamous figures in history. But so many people wildly misunderstand what LaVey and the Church of Satan was about. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we explore the strange world of Anton LaVey and the Church of Satan. -- This Week's Listener Memes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/tw7vq8kb9zhmdon/AAArjNpAHAFDHXjuwQ2zjhFwa?dl=0 -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Media Masters
Media Masters - Anthony Matchett

Media Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 45:12


Anthony Matchett is chief executive of Napster Group. He acquired the platform - renowned for illegally sharing music in the 1990s - for £50m last year; and then merged it with MelodyVR, his virtual reality music company. In this in-depth interview, Anthony lays bare the depth of the devastation the pandemic has bought to live music, and his passionate belief that virtual reality will play a key part in its recovery; highlights the plight of how musicians are struggling financially, noting the irony that Napster - a platform with roots in bootlegging - is now the world leader in compensating artists fairly; and discusses the “immersive experience” of attending live events through virtual reality - building on the record online audience of this year's Wireless Festival.

Deep Cuts
Disney VS the Air Pirates | Case File #78

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 109:38


They stole Mickey Mouse and put him in comics where he did drugs and had sex. The legal battle they fought against Disney saved free speech. In the late 1960s, newspaper cartoonist Dan O'Neill wanted to walk away from his job at the San Francisco Chronicle with ownership of the copyright to his comic strip, Odd Bodkins. But they wouldn't give it to him. So he hatched a plan. He'd start sticking tons of Disney characters like Mickey Mouse into his strip and then get Disney to sue him, which would force the Chronicle to give him the copyright back to avoid legal liability. But that wasn't enough for O'Neill. He formed an underground comics collective called The Air Pirates, and started producing comics that completely stole classic Disney characters and put them into situations that the house of mouse would never approve of. This would be the start of a 13-year-long legal battle that would see Dan and the Air Pirates broke, in danger of paying millions of dollars in fines and facing possible prison time, and also fighting for the very concept of free speech. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we are diving into the court case that saved free speech, Disney VS the Air Pirates. -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com Dadbeats http://bit.ly/FoodFightPod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Back Issue
That Time The Internet Wasn't A Hellscape

Back Issue

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 53:41


Dearly beloved, we are gathered here today to pay tribute to this thing called Beyoncé's internet. No, not today's digital hellscape, but the one we first fell in love with way back in ye olde days of AOL, Napster, and LiveJournal. *dial up bings and gurgles* This week, Josh and Tracy reminisce on how being online once had the potential to affirm us. How did we go from that to *gestures at the entire World Wide Web* whatever mess this is? And how can we imagine and create a better cyber world for us, by us? To help answer these questions, we'll be joined by two people we would definitely rank in our Myspace Top 8, Bridget Todd (digital activist and host of “There Are No Girls On The Internet”) and Naj Austin (founder of Ethel's Club and Somewhere Good). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: Jonathan Taplin

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 48:44


Jonathan Taplin, former road manager for The Band, has done it all. He set up the equipment for Dylan's electric set at Newport in ‘65 (“the soundcheck lasted ten minutes”) and was production manager for Dylan and The Band at the Guthrie Tribute in '68. He organised the groundbreaking Concert For Bangladesh and produced the concert and film of The Last Waltz. Oh, and he was responsible for Martin Scorsese's Mean Streets getting made. Jon “was brought into the circle” by Albert Grossman (“after Bob left and Janis died, Albert got his heart broken”). He saw “all the junkie signs” when he met Keith Richards in the South of France and left Rock behind when he saw what drugs were doing to his friends and the music he loved. He passionately blames illegal Napster downloads for Levon Helm's financial problems (“the record world dropped off a cliff”). With a cast list including Scorsese, Clapton, Robertson and Dylan (“Bob was a really good teacher”), Jonathan Taplin tells us definitively where it was at. Jonathan Taplin is a writer, film producer and scholar. He began his entertainment career as tour manager for the Jim Kweskin Jug Band and organised Bob Dylan and The Band's appearance at the Isle of Wight Festival. Between 1973 and 1996, Taplin produced many television documentaries and feature films including Under Fire and To Die For. His films were nominated for Oscars and Golden Globes and chosen for The Cannes Film Festival five times. His book “Move Fast And Break Things” (2017) is subtitled “How Facebook, Google and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy”. His latest book “The Magic Years” (2021) is about the rock ‘n' roll side of his life. Jon is the Director Emeritus of the Annenberg Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California. Website Trailer Twitter Spotify playlist Listeners: please subscribe and/or leave a review and a rating. Twitter @isitrollingpod Recorded 7th June 2021 This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Good Game Nice Try
Arin Hanson on Game Grumps and Gitaroo Man

Good Game Nice Try

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2021 44:08


Game Grumps co-founder Arin Hanson joins Sonja and Bley this week to talk about how Napster played a pivotal part in his career. He also shares his love of the PS2 game Gitaroo Man and dishes on what went into creating the popular dating simulator, Dream Daddy.

Yamshayin Podcast
Episode 8

Yamshayin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2021 39:18


Dive in with us, we go back a few months, suns were up, it was a bit cooler, the world was still waiting to see what was gonna happen, we talk a bit about everything and get a bit personal for the moment, try to figure out who bought Napster, huge differences how our music impacts us and when we're inspired. ALOT --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Deep Cuts
Citizen, Orwellian Nightmare App | Case File #77

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 91:08


It's an app where people can learn about and report crimes in their neighborhood. It's designed to make us spy on each other and stoke fear. In the mid 2010s, Andrew Frame and his company launched an app called Vigilante which was literally designed to listen to police scanner broadcasts, alert users of crimes in their area, and encourage them to go...be vigilantes. The app was immediately shut down by all app stores within 48 hours. So they re-branded as Citizen, an app that's merely supposed to alert users to crimes in their area so they can be more aware of danger to avoid. However, Andrew Frame merely made his Orwellian nightmare police state app more subtle. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we dive deep into the creepy reality of Citizen. -- This Week's Listener Memes https://www.dropbox.com/sh/iqmvfhecatbw08m/AACzdXBUT-mxKR4NcbJer_2va?dl=0 -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com Dadbeats http://bit.ly/FoodFightPod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Forward GC

Listen now | This week: A Napster case may influence Spotify, and ScarJo sues Disney. Plus: Big Law bonuses are going to the next level.

Deep Cuts
Velocity Gnome, Greatest Prank Of All Time | Case File #76

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 155:06


Two complete strangers planned out an elaborate 3-year prank on a 19-year-old guy that would change his life forever. In August of 2003, Kolin Pope - known as Velocity Gnome on the Internet - got a knock at his door. It was a man from the future named Zane Figiam who handed him a scrapbook that foretold that Kolin would one day become to savior of all mankind and the leader of the Resistance army that would go on to fight against an evil robot army that would eventually conquer the world. Little did Kolin know that this was just the beginning of a three year long prank/performance art experiment/augmented reality game that is basically the greatest thing that's ever happened in the world. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we dive into the delightful event that is the Velocity Gnome saga. The Velocity Gnome Saga from Kolin Pope's perspective http://www.thefutureshock.com Scrapbook #1 Gem Missile: A Tribute to Velocity Gnome http://www.thefutureshock.com/gemmissile.html Scrapbook #2 Earthslide http://www.thefutureshock.com/earthslide.html Kolin and "Tyler" introduction video https://youtu.be/8H4EZRSFeKQ Zane VS Maggie Street Fighter Mod Video https://youtu.be/4vYmxMXDDr0 Father Time Loop 7-Page Story http://www.thefutureshock.com/timeloop.html Father Time Loop Video https://youtu.be/fNC0ZX1N8o0 Velocity Gnome Theme Song https://youtu.be/KZPKJrw1LsE Father, Don't Bother Song https://youtu.be/dnxuliYALCQ Papa Pricey Proposal ARG Video https://youtu.be/ACiPbkB0j2s -- This Week's Listener Memes (Pizza Pizza Paparizza Edition) https://www.dropbox.com/sh/0s62q1s7z0j16wt/AAAchkM_b26SYKYddQzQIyy2a?dl=0 -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives D.Catalano https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com P S E U D O C I D E https://www.facebook.com/pseudocidesc/ Dadbeats http://bit.ly/FoodFightPod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Speak N' Destroy
Andrew Carter & Eric German (Music Attorneys)

Speak N' Destroy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 132:15


Guns N' Roses & Metallica! The incredible co-headlining tour, filled with cancelations, a death-defying pyro accident, a riot, the ego ramp, debauchery, and so much more. It's the 30th anniversary of the Black Album this year and a perfect time to revisit 1992's infamous Guns N' Roses/Metallica tour. Andrew Carter and Eric German return to share memories about the gigs. Andrew is ex-Deputy Editor for Terrorizer Magazine, a former band manager, and a longtime attorney in the film business. Eric, part of the major label lawsuits against Napster back in the day, represents huge rock acts, including Five Finger Death Punch, AWOLNATION, Bad Wolves, and Ice Nine Kills. Speak N' Destroy podcast theme by Scott Mellinger. Visit the Speak N' Destroy website and socials HERE. Part of the PopCurse podcast network.

My Amazon Guy
Robert Wright Q&A: Stopping Hijackers & Copycats on Amazon

My Amazon Guy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 42:56


Launching a business isn't easy, but protecting it can be. Robert Wright is an E-commerce and online business Attorney who is an expert in helping entrepreneurs protect their personal assets, bulletproof their brand, and weaponize their works of authorship. Robert Wright is the founding partner of Superhero Legal, a virtual law practice that helps e-commerce sellers and online business owners protect their digital and physical assets. A sister company to Marketplace Superheroes, Superhero Legal has advised thousands of E-Commerce sellers on how to future-proof their business.  To better understand the needs of his clients, Robert launched his own physical products business and currently sells on globally Amazon. Robert's interest in intellectual property began more than two decades ago. Intrigued by the lawsuit that led to Napster being shut down by the RIAA back in early 2001, Robert headed into Law School with a mission to find out what was so wrong with ‘sharing songs' with friends. That quest spurred an interest in intellectual property law (where he learned the difference between sharing and stealing!). That mission spurred Robert's interest in entrepreneurship. While discovering his own entrepreneurial path, Robert noticed that other entrepreneurs often need help navigating the ins and outs of intellectual property. When he decided to launch his first virtual law practice, it was a no-brainer for him to support folks who had an idea and were looking to build a business around it.00:00 Intro10:00 Introduction of guest: Robert Wright10:24 What is Private Label Law11:08 Why are you seeing an increase in demand for  your service (PLL) and what do you see the problem on  Amazon happening14:47 What happens and what should I do if someone is hijacking your listing14:44 Advantages with Brand Registry21:00 Canadian Trademark23:50 How do to get hijacker off your listing26:26 If someone shows up with the same design of the item, can I file a copyright claim27:44 If somebody edited your image, is that valid for copyright claim28:33 How do you prove that your copyright claim30:46  What info should be put in empty spaces on inventory templates to close holes on the backend of listings that hijackers can exploit in the US & Canada? How to defend in CA if only actively sell in the US?32:11 Any experience in leveraging legal letter to Amazon36:44 Tim Ferriss: How it inspired Robert Wright38:52 What is a Copycat41:55 Get in touch with Robert WrightSupport the show (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/myamazonguy)

Learning Tech Talks
Collaborate and Listen with Intrepid

Learning Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2021 61:09


Alright stop, collaborate and listen / Intrepid is back with their brand-new invention Peer-to-peer had a very different meaning to me during my freshman year of college and it had absolutely nothing to do with the file-sharing software, Napster, and “downloading” songs to burn a sick mix cd. Today, peer-to-peer learning is something I'm more fluent in practicing and it's at the highest priority when I'm restructuring. One of the major flaws in early learning platforms was the severe lack of a dynamic relationship between the learning content and the learner. In my career, it becomes more apparent to me every. single. day. that learning is something that grows stronger and faster when shared with others. In this episode, I have the pleasure once again to speak with Vice President & General Manager of Intrepid, Sam Herring. If any of you were watching my show a year ago (episode link below) Sam and I had the chance to debunk the myth that online collaborative learning wasn't possible #fakenews. We finally have the opportunity to catch back up and see what he and Intrepid are doing to continually innovate and push their collaborative learning platform to the next level to inspire and transform organizations in the #futureofwork. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/learningtechtalks/support

Deep Cuts
The Worst Dating Service Of All Time | Case File #75

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 105:52


The Dating Ring was a service that flew single women from New York City to go on blind dates with tech bros in Silicon Valley. It didn't go well. In the early 2010s, dating startup The Dating Ring got into the Y Combinator program and worked for several months trying to develop a successful business model. They cycled through many different ideas, the founders fighting and struggling to feel confident in their abilities. They finally settled on the bizarre idea to take advantage of the shortage of available single men in the New York City dating scene and the shortage of available single women in the San Francisco dating scene to launch possibly the strangest company idea ever - to ship a bunch of single women to Silicon Valley to go on awkward blind dates with tech bros. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we explore the half-baked dating app, The Dating Ring. -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives P S E U D O C I D E https://www.facebook.com/pseudocidesc/ Dadbeats http://bit.ly/FoodFightPod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
Ashtar Galactic Command, Accidental Religion | Case File #74

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 71:08


An airport owner in the 1950s created a weird story about time machines and aliens to get more business. It ended up becoming a religion. In the late 1950s, George Van Tassel was running a small airport in Giant Rock, California. One day, out of nowhere for this seemingly normal clean-cut business owner and family man, Van Tassel started peddling a story about how he'd been visited by an alien who had given him plans to build a time machine. The story was clearly meant to drum of word of mouth hype about his airport so that more people might visit the various tourist attractions and restaurants on the property, but that didn't stop his wild story about Ashtar the alien and the Galactic Command from getting co-opted by the New Age movement in the 1970s and turned into a legitimate religion that still exists to this day. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we explore the baffling creation of Ashtar Galactic Command. -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

No One Likes the Tuna: A Fast and Furious Podcast
160. Fast and Furious: Call me the Napster - Cycle 20 Inbetweener

No One Likes the Tuna: A Fast and Furious Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 52:18


Watching: The Italian Job (2003)

Deep Cuts
The Church That Worships Machine Guns | Case File #73

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2021 93:49


They started off as a religious cult in the 1980s, but turned into a smaller cult that literally worships guns. In the 1980s, The Moonies were a very popular hyper-religious cult. Now, the son of the leader of that cult, Sean Moon, has started his own smaller offshoot. And they worship guns. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we delve into the bizarre and terrifying world of the Church of Guns. -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

We, the 90s
Napster

We, the 90s

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 60:25


This week on the show Jolene talks about the software that made us all child-criminals: Napster! (also look up E-Donkey200... it's a good time). AND for the 1st time ever, we have a Topic Update on everything Britney Spears! #FreeBritney #DontForgetWeStillHateDianeSawyer0:00 - We Are the 90s1:30 - #FreeBritney update!28:20 - Napster33:45 - The Beginning of the End... of Napster46:30 - The Evolution of Napster1:00:06 - Dope OutroBecome  Patreon! - patreon.com/wethe90sFind all of our links! - linktr.ee/wethe90s 

Deep Cuts
Man Who Killed 19 Aliens With a Katana | Case File #72

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 84:35


He claims to fight extraterrestrials on his ranch in Arizona on a daily basis, and to have killed 19 of them with a sword. John Edmonds and his wife bought Stardust Ranch in the late 90s so they could retire on the outskirts of Phoenix, Arizona. However, quickly after moving in they discovered that the place was swarming with aliens from another world. Or so they claim. Edmonds says that dozens of these aliens warp in from their spaceships and attack him on a daily basis, and he defends himself using nothing but a katana. He also claims to have personally killed 19 of them, and he has a bloodstained katana to prove it. But is any of this true? Well, obviously not, but the story and this guy are super fascinating. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we explore the incredibly fascinating and outlandishly fake story of Stardust Ranch. -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Detours and Outliers
Lou Reed & Metallica's “Lulu”

Detours and Outliers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2021 123:29


LOU REED AND METALLICA – TOGETHER AT LAST! This week we look at "Lulu" an album that is the result of the lyrical genius behind "Metal Machine Music" collaborating with the band that brought us St. Anger. What did people expect this team-up to sound like? Does Metallica have a bass player? Is this harder to listen to than a double-album of guitar feedback? How many songs include the word "vulva" in their lyrics, much less "spermless"? Could this make for a Broadway musical? Is Lou Reed a creepy old man or is he just playing a creepy old man? Did Bob Rock neuter Metallica like Sampson, or was it a happy little accident? Can Lars groove? Or just play tennis? Even if he was right about Napster, why is he so hard to take seriously? Join us for a round TABLE discussion this week on Detours and Outliers.

Deep Cuts
Forest Ray Colson, the Man From Mars | Case File #71

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2021 73:58


In the 1950s, he dressed up like an apocalyptic storm trooper and robbed banks. Nobody remembers him. Forest Ray Colson was ex-military and an ex-cop. He'd gone on tour during World War II without ever seeing combat, and he was fired from two different police stations for improper conduct. But he wanted power and he wanted to be respected. And so, in the early 1950s, he started dressing up in a terrifying apocalyptic costume and robbing banks in Southern California. He ravaged the area for 10 months, but for some reason nobody remembers him. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we explore the shocking and forgotten life of Forest Ray Colson. -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

What the Hell Were You Thinking
Episode 318: It's A Pirate's Life for Me Part Two: Downloaded From Napster

What the Hell Were You Thinking

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 39:17


Show Notes Episode 318: It's A Pirate's Life for Me Part Two: Downloaded from Napster This week Host Dave Bledsoe boots up his old laptop from college and is happy to discover he still remembers the password! (That's because it is the same one he uses today and is the kind of thing an idiot would have on his luggage!) On the show this week we wrap up our series on music piracy with the halcyon days of Napster before the music industry flooded it with porn and viruses!  (Yeah, we KNOW it was you, assholes!) Along the way we briefly visit Columbia House Records and explain why their business model actually DID work for so many years!  (Come to find out, people are really dumb!)  Then we dive right into the Information Superhighway circa 1999.  (Was there porn?  You betcha!) From there we say mean things about the recording industry for a good long while before finally getting around to talking about Napster.  (This show is really only tangentially about Napster, did you expect anything different?)  From there we talk about the rise and fall of file sharing, the fall and rise of the modern music industry and how throughout it all, it is still a corrupt, venal bunch of assholes dedicated to ripping off artists so they can make billions of dollars.  (#America) Finally we cover how the music industry recovered and found new and exciting ways to rip off the artists! Our Sponsor this week is Polka Songs dot com, the source for all your pirated polka music!  We open the show with guys from Metallica telling you how shitty you are for downloading their music and close with Terra Naomi being caught stealing! Show Theme: https://www.jamendo.com/track/421668/prelude-to-common-sense The Show on Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheHell_Podcast The Show on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/whatthehellpodcast/ www.whatthehellpodcast.com Give us your money on Patreon  https://www.patreon.com/Whatthehellpodcast The Show Line: 347 687 9601 Closing Music: https://youtu.be/T-I7ZpXphzY We are a proud member of the Seltzer Kings Podcast Network! http://seltzerkings.com/ Citations Needed: A Brief History of The Music Industry http://www.musicthinktank.com/mtt-open/a-brief-history-of-the-music-industry.html Putting the Band Back Together https://ir.citi.com/QnhL09FARMDbvMhnCWFtjkqYOlPmgXqWS5Wrjts%2B6usU7suR9o7uUEFwZNjmUfyrAn10iZxCkYc%3D Napster: the day the music was set free https://www.theguardian.com/music/2013/feb/24/napster-music-free-file-sharing 12-year-old settles music swap lawsuit https://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/internet/09/09/music.swap.settlement/ Artists, Musicians and the Internet https://www.pewresearch.org/internet/2004/12/05/artists-musicians-and-the-internet/ The Year The Music Dies https://www.wired.com/2003/02/dirge/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Deep Cuts
Unmaking of Shane Carruth Pt. 2 | Case File #70

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 271:49


He created some of the most inventive films in history, but his continued struggles with Hollywood would lead to a dark, self-destructive spiral. In the early 2000s, a software engineer from Texas decided to spend $7,000 making an independent film about time travel called 'Primer.' The movie would go on to win at the Sundance film festival and become a huge cult hit. He would go on to spend the next 20 years struggling to get more of his films made - with increasing frustrations with the Hollywood system and their lack of support of his ideas. He made more films, and wrote some that would ultimately never see the light of day, but eventually his growing bitterness and resentment towards a world and an industry that rejected him would cause a dark and unforgivable downward spiral. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we dive into the conclusion to the harrowing tale of Shane Carruth's career and fall. -- Further resources: Watch Primer here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9A7fCKM4ERA Explanation of Primer time travel loop explained with visuals here: https://youtu.be/tUzy-xPf0MI Read 'A Topiary' here: https://indiegroundfilms.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/a-topiary-numbered.pdf?fbclid=IwAR1L5YwYfvVmL71P1zWcVGBfzL1T7Y7y2XGlrguOo9hCs2p70972OKiXAKI 'A Topiary' Sizzle Reel: https://vimeo.com/23608364 Watch 'Upstream Color': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6e7SgOEMymw Read 'The Modern Ocean': https://www.dropbox.com/s/4xunl7kkmnvccgl/TheModernOcean_for_Steven.pdf?dl=0&fbclid=IwAR1O4KGwehJDfjuaCk-oB63QTiP3FmJRx4J6mqg31MF_9y1nsW65s6DQu7g -- Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Everything '80s Podcast
From Netflix In Mail to Netflix & Chill

The Everything '80s Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 26:07


This is the fourth and final part of my mini-series about the early days of the Internet. Today, we're looking at the origins of Netflix and how it changed the way we consume content. We'll look at the fake origin story of the company, how they were almost a part of Blockbuster Video, and how Napster may have been responsible for their success. Then, we look at how they created the binge-style of consuming content, and how this may be going away. We finish by looking at what the state of movies may become now that we are getting more instant access to new releases. Support the Show: Patreon.com/80s

Non Obvious with Hugh Hansen
Episode 17: Annsley Ward

Non Obvious with Hugh Hansen

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2021 72:09


In this episode, Hugh sits down with Annsley Merelle Ward, who has become well-known beyond her years. She recently became Counsel in Intellectual Property Litigation at WilmerHale in London and has been writing for IPKat since 2009. They discuss a number of issues and experiences, including: - Annsley's nomadic upbringing in the U.S. and U.K; - Why the Napster litigation sparked her interest in intellectual property law; - Memories from her first one-on-one meeting with Sir Hugh Laddie, her University College London thesis supervisor; - Her views on harmonization in the European system and the remaining differences in approach to IP within Europe; - Annsley's thoughts and strategies on where and when to bring an action; - The overlooked importance of considering international effects and implications of legal actions.

The History of Computing
The Laws And Court Cases That Shaped The Software Industry

The History of Computing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2021 28:56


The largest global power during the rise of intellectual property was England, so the world adopted her philosophies. The US had the same impact on software law. Most case law that shaped the software industry is based on copyright law. Our first real software laws appeared in the 1970s and now have 50 years of jurisprudence to help guide us. This episode looks at the laws, supreme court cases, and some circuit appeals cases that shaped the software industry. -------- In our previous episode we went through a brief review of how the modern intellectual property laws came to be. Patent laws flowed from inventors in Venice in the 1400s, royals gave privileges to own a monopoly to inventors throughout the rest of Europe over the next couple of centuries, transferred to panels and academies during and after the Age of Revolutions, and slowly matured for each industry as technology progressed.  Copyright laws formed similarly, although they were a little behind patent laws due to the fact that they weren't really necessary until we got the printing press. But when it came to data on a device, we had a case in 1908 we covered in the previous episode that led Congress to enact the 1909 Copyright Act.  Mechanical music boxes evolved into mechanical forms of data storage and computing evolved from mechanical to digital. Following World War II there was an explosion in new technologies, with those in computing funded heavily by US government. Or at least, until we got ourselves tangled up in a very unpopular asymmetrical war in Vietnam. The Mansfield Amendment of 1969, was a small bill in the 1970 Military Authorization Act that ended the US military from funding research that didn't have a direct relationship to a specific military function. Money could still flow from ARPA into a program like the ARPAnet because we wanted to keep those missiles flying in case of nuclear war. But over time the impact was that a lot of those dollars the military had pumped into computing to help develop the underlying basic sciences behind things like radar and digital computing was about to dry up. This is a turning point: it was time to take the computing industry commercial. And that means lawyers. And so we got the first laws pertaining to software shortly after the software industry emerged from more and more custom requirements for these mainframes and then minicomputers and the growing collection of computer programmers. The Copyright Act of 1976 was the first major overhaul to the copyright laws since the 1909 Copyright Act. Since then, the US had become a true world power and much as the rest of the world followed the British laws from the Statute of Anne in 1709 as a template for copyright protections, the world looked on as the US developed their laws. Many nations had joined the Berne Convention for international copyright protections, but the publishing industry had exploded. We had magazines, so many newspapers, so many book publishers. And we had this whole weird new thing to deal with: software.  Congress didn't explicitly protect software in the Copyright Act of 1976. But did add cards and tape as mediums and Congress knew this was an exploding new thing that would work itself out in the courts if they didn't step in. And of course executives from the new software industry were asking their representatives to get in front of things rather than have the unpredictable courts adjudicate a weird copyright mess in places where technology meets copy protection. So in section 117, Congress appointed the National Commission on New Technological Uses of Copyrighted Works, or CONTU) to provide a report about software and added a placeholder in the act that empaneled them. CONTU held hearings. They went beyond just software as there was another newish technology changing the world: photocopying. They presented their findings in 1978 and recommended we define a computer program as a set of statements or instructions to be used directly or indirectly in a computer in order to bring about a certain result. They also recommended that copies be allowed if required to use the program and that those be destroyed when the user no longer has rights to the software. This is important because this is an era where we could write software into memory or start installing compiled code onto a computer and then hand the media used to install it off to someone else.  At the time the hobbyist industry was just about to evolve into the PC industry, but hard disks were years out for most of those machines. It was all about floppies. But up-market there was all kinds of storage and the righting was on the wall about what was about to come. Install software onto a computer, copy and sell the disk, move on. People would of course do that, but not legally.  Companies could still sign away their copyright protections as part of a sales agreement but the right to copy was under the creator's control. But things like End User License Agreements were still far away. Imagine how ludicrous the idea that a piece of software if a piece of software went bad that it could put a company out of business in the 1970s. That would come as we needed to protect liability and not just restrict the right to copy to those who, well, had the right to do so. Further, we hadn't yet standardized on computer languages. And yet companies were building complicated logic to automate business and needed to be able to adapt works for other computers and so congress looked to provide that right at the direction of CONTU as well, if only to the company doing the customizations and not allowing the software to then be resold. These were all hashed out and put into law in 1980. And that's an important moment as suddenly the party who owned a copy was the rightful owner of a piece of software. Many of the provisions read as though we were dealing with book sellers selling a copy of a book, not dealing with the intricate details of the technology, but with technology those can change so quickly and those who make laws aren't exactly technologists, so that's to be expected.  Source code versus compiled code also got tested. In 1982 Williams Electronics v Artic International explored a video game that was in a ROM (which is how games were distributed before disks and cassette tapes. Here, the Third Circuit weighed in on whether if the ROM was built into the machine, if it could be copied as it was utilitarian and therefore not covered under copyright. The source code was protected but what about what amounts to compiled code sitting on the ROM. They of course found that it was indeed protected.  They again weighed in on Apple v Franklin in 1983. Here, Franklin Computer was cloning Apple computers and claimed it couldn't clone the computer without copying what was in the ROMs, which at the time was a remedial version of what we think of as an operating system today.  Franklin claimed the OS was in fact a process or method of operation and Apple claimed it was novel. At the time the OS was converted to a binary language at runtime and that object code was a task called AppleSoft but it was still a program and thus still protected. One and two years later respectively, we got Mac OS 1 and Windows 1. 1986 saw Whelan Associates v Jaslow. Here, Elaine Whelan created a management system for a dental lab on the IBM Series One, in EDL. That was a minicomputer and when the personal computer came along she sued Jaslow because he took a BASIC version to market for the PC. He argued it was a different language and the set of commands was therefore different. But the programs looked structurally similar. She won, as while some literal elements were the same, “the copyrights of computer programs can be infringed even absent copying of the literal elements of the program.” This is where it's simple to identify literal copying of software code when it's done verbatim but difficult to identify non-literal copyright infringement.  But this was all professional software. What about those silly video games all the kids wanted? Well, Atari applied for a copyright for one of their games, Breakout. Here, Register of Copyrights, Ralph Oman chose not to Register the copyright. And so Atari sued, winning in the appeal. There were certainly other dental management packages on the market at the time. But the court found that “copyrights do not protect ideas – only expressions of ideas.” Many found fault with the decision and  the Second Circuit heard Computer Associates v Altai in 1992. Here, the court applied a three-step test of Abstraction-Filtration-Comparison to determine how similar products were and held that Altai's rewritten code did not meet the necessary requirements for copyright infringement. There were other types of litigation surrounding the emerging digital sphere at the time as well. The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act came along in 1986 and would be amended in 89, 94, 96, and 2001. Here, a number of criminal offenses were defined - not copyright but they have come up to criminalize activities that should have otherwise been copyright cases. And the Copyright Act of 1976 along with the CONTU findings were amended to cover the rental market came to be (much as happened with VHS tapes and Congress established provisions to cover that in 1990. Keep in mind that time sharing was just ending by then but we could rent video games over dial-up and of course VHS rentals were huge at the time. Here's a fun one, Atari infringed on Nintendo's copyright by claiming they were a defendant in a case and applying to the Copyright Office to get a copy of the 10NES program so they could actually infringe on their copyright. They tried to claim they couldn't infringe because they couldn't make games unless they reverse engineered the systems. Atari lost that one. But Sega won a similar one soon thereafter because playing more games on a Sega was fair use. Sony tried to sue Connectix in a similar case where you booted the PlayStation console using a BIOS provided by Connectix. And again, that was reverse engineering for the sake of fair use of a PlayStation people payed for. Kinda' like jailbreaking an iPhone, right? Yup, apps that help jailbreak, like Cydia, are legal on an iPhone. But Apple moves the cheese so much in terms of what's required to make it work so far that it's a bigger pain to jailbreak than it's worth. Much better than suing everyone.  Laws are created and then refined in the courts. MAI Systems Corp. v. Peak Computer made it to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1993. This involved Eric Francis leaving MAI and joining Peak. He then loaded MAI's diagnostics tools onto computers. MAI thought they should have a license per computer, but yet Peak used the same disk in multiple computers. The crucial change here was that the copy made, while ephemeral, was decided to be a copy of the software and so violated the copyright. We said we'd bring up that EULA though. In 1996, the Seventh Circuit found in ProCD v Zeidenberg, that the license preempted copyright thus allowing companies to use either copyright law or a license when seeking damages and giving lawyers yet another reason to answer any and all questions with “it depends.” One thing was certain, the digital world was coming fast in those Clinton years. I mean, the White House would have a Gopher page and Yahoo! would be on display at his second inauguration. So in 1998 we got the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). Here, Congress added to Section 117 to allow for software copies if the software was required for maintenance of a computer. And yet software was still just a set of statements, like instructions in a book, that led the computer to a given result. The DMCA did have provisions to provide treatment to content providers and e-commerce providers. It also implemented two international treaties and provided remedies for anti-circumvention of copy-prevention systems since by then cracking was becoming a bigger thing. There was more packed in here. We got MAI Systems v Peak Computer reversed by law, refinement to how the Copyright Office works, modernizing audio and movie rights, and provisions to facilitate distance education. And of course the DMCA protected boat hull designs because, you know, might as well cram some stuff into a digital copyright act.  In addition to the cases we covered earlier, we had Mazer v Stein, Dymow v Bolton, and even Computer Associates v Altai, which cemented the AFC method as the means most courts determine copyright protection as it extends to non-literal components such as dialogue and images. Time and time again, courts have weighed in on what fair use is because the boundaries are constantly shifting, in part due to technology, but also in part due to shifting business models.  One of those shifting business models was ripping songs and movies. RealDVD got sued by the MPAA for allowing people to rip DVDs. YouTube would later get sued by Viacom but courts found no punitive damages could be awarded. Still, many online portals started to scan for and filter out works they could know were copy protected, especially given the rise of machine learning to aid in the process. But those were big, major companies at the time. IO Group, Inc sued Veoh for uploaded video content and the judge found Veoh was protected by safe harbor.  Safe Harbor mostly refers to the Online Copyright Infringement Liability Limitation Act, or OCILLA for short, which shields online portals and internet service providers from copyright infringement. This would be separate from Section 230, which protects those same organizations from being sued for 3rd party content uploaded on their sites. That's the law Trump wanted overturned during his final year in office but given that the EU has Directive 2000/31/EC, Australia has the Defamation Act of 2005, Italy has the Electronic Commerce Directive 2000, and lots of other countries like England and Germany have had courts find similarly, it is now part of being an Internet company. Although the future of “big tech” cases (and the damage many claim is being done to democracy) may find it refined or limited. In 2016, Cisco sued Arista for allegedly copying the command line interfaces to manage switches. Cisco lost but had claimed more than $300 million in damages. Here, the existing Cisco command structure allowed Arista to recruit seasoned Cisco administrators to the cause. Cisco had done the mental modeling to evolve those commands for decades and it seemed like those commands would have been their intellectual property. But, Arista hadn't copied the code.  Then in 2017, in ZeniMax vs Oculus, ZeniMax wan a half billion dollar case against Oculus for copying their software architecture.  And we continue to struggle with what copyright means as far as code goes. Just in 2021, the Supreme Court ruled in Google v Oracle America that using application programming interfaces (APIs) including representative source code can be transformative and fall within fair use, though did not rule if such APIs are copyrightable. I'm sure the CP/M team, who once practically owned the operating system market would have something to say about that after Microsoft swooped in with and recreated much of the work they had done. But that's for another episode. And traditional media cases continue. ABS Entertainment vs CBS looked at whether digitally remastering works extended copyright. BMG vs Cox Communications challenged peer-to-peer file-sharing in safe harbor cases (not to mention the whole Napster testifying before congress thing). You certainly can't resell mp3 files the way you could drop off a few dozen CDs at Tower Records, right? Capitol Records vs ReDigi said nope. Perfect 10 v Amazon, Goldman v Breitbart, and so many more cases continued to narrow down who and how audio, images, text, and other works could have the right to copy restricted by creators. But sometimes it's confusing. Dr. Seuss vs ComicMix found that merging Star Trek and “Oh, the Places You'll Go” was enough transformativeness to break the copyright of Dr Seuss, or was that the Fair Use Doctrine? Sometimes I find conflicting lines in opinions. Speaking of conflict… Is the government immune from copyright? Allen v Cooper, Governor of North Carolina made it to the Supreme Court, where they applied blanket copyright protections. Now, this was a shipwreck case but extended to digital works and the Supreme Court seemed to begrudgingly find for the state, and looked to a law as remedy rather than awarding damages. In other words, the “digital Blackbeards” of a state could pirate software at will. Guess I won't be writing any software for the state of North Carolina any time soon! But what about content created by a state? Well, the state of Georgia makes various works available behind a paywall. That paywall might be run by a third party in exchange for a cut of the proceeds. So Public.Resource goes after anything where the edict of a government isn't public domain. In other words, court decision, laws, and statutes should be free to all who wish to access them. The “government edicts doctrine” won in the end and so access to the laws of the nation continue to be free. What about algorithms? That's more patent territory when they are actually copyrightable, which is rare. Gottschalk v. Benson was denied a patent for a new way to convert binary-coded decimals to numerals while Diamond v Diehr saw an algorithm to run a rubber molding machine was patentable. And companies like Intel and Broadcom hold thousands of patents for microcode for chips. What about the emergence of open source software and the laws surrounding social coding? We'll get to the emergence of open source and the consequences in future episodes! One final note, most have never heard of the names in early cases. Most have heard of the organizations listed in later cases. Settling issues in the courts has gotten really, really expensive. And it doesn't always go the way we want. So these days, whether it's Apple v Samsung or other tech giants, the law seems to be reserved for those who can pay for it. Sure, there's the Erin Brockovich cases of the world. And lady justice is still blind. We can still represent ourselves, case and notes are free. But money can win cases by having attorneys with deep knowledge (which doesn't come cheap). And these cases drag on for years and given the startup assembly line often halts with pending legal actions, not many can withstand the latency incurred. This isn't a “big tech is evil” comment as much as “I see it and don't know a better rubric but it's still a thing” kinda' comment. Here's something better that we'd love to have a listener take away from this episode. Technology is always changing. Laws usually lag behind technology change as (like us) they're reactive to innovation. When those changes come, there is opportunity. Not only has the technological advancement gotten substantial enough to warrant lawmaker time, but the changes often create new gaps in markets that new entrants can leverage. Either leaders in markets adapt quickly or see those upstarts swoop in, having no technical debt and being able to pivot faster than those who previously might have enjoyed a first user advantage. What laws are out there being hashed out, just waiting to disrupt some part of the software market today?

Deep Cuts
Unmaking of Shane Carruth Pt. 1 | Case File #69

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 252:43


He created some of the most inventive films in history, but his continued struggles with Hollywood would lead to a dark, self-destructive spiral. In the early 2000s, a software engineer from Texas decided to spend $7,000 making an independent film about time travel called 'Primer.' The movie would go on to win at the Sundance film festival and become a huge cult hit. He would go on to spend the next 20 years struggling to get more of his films made - with increasing frustrations with the Hollywood system and their lack of support of his ideas. He made more films, and wrote some that would ultimately never see the light of day, but eventually his growing bitterness and resentment towards a world and an industry that rejected him would cause a dark and unforgivable downward spiral. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we dive into the life and times and unmade masterpieces of Shane Carruth. -- NEW! Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives D.Catalano's music used with permission of Fivese7encollective https://wekeepoddhours.bandcamp.com Dadbeats http://bit.ly/FoodFightPod Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Prisoners of Rock and Roll 18: I Want My MTV!

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 125:05


Rock and roll wouldn’t be what it is today without MTV. Before the rise of Napster and YouTube, MTV was where you discovered music and learned about what was going on with your favorite artists. There was something for everyone with shows like Headbangers Ball, Yo MTV Raps, 120 Minutes, and Club MTV. It also had shows like Remote Control, Singled Out, and Beavis & Butthead. On today’s episode of Prisoners of Rock and Roll, we’re talking about the golden years of MTV. Part of Pantheon Podcasts

Deep Cuts
The Man Who Got Boobs on a Bet | Case File #68

Deep Cuts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2021 80:02


In the late 90s he got breast implants to win a $100k bet. 20 years later he still has them. In 1996, Brian Zembic, a somewhat eccentric gambling addict, entered into a wager with a fellow gambling friend that he would get breast implants for an entire year for $100,000. He did it, but then after that year he kept the breasts, and has basically crafted his entire life and personality around having them. The weird transphobia at play in this decades-long publicity stunt is troubling and fascinating, and the man at the center of it is a strange and unsettling figure - not because he's a man who has boobs, but because of why. On this episode of Deep Cuts, we delve into the strange life of Brian Zembic. -- NEW! Pick up some Deep Cuts T-Shirts and other merch! https://bit.ly/deepcutsmerch -- Get the official Deep Cuts shoulder patch! http://bit.ly/deepcuts_patch -- Listen to our new album, a 9 song rock opera about the rise and fall of Napster! https://open.spotify.com/album/63C5uu1tkzZ2FhfsrSSf5s?si=q4WItoNmRUeM159TxKLWew -- Additional incidental music credits: The Deadboy Detectives Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain
Screaming Infidelities: Chris Carrabba

That's What She Said with Sarah Spain

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2021 78:13


Sarah talks to Dashboard Confessional front man Chris Carrabba about why he has a positive outlook on Napster, his memories of doing MTV's Unplugged, shaping his look and stage presence, writing about his feelings, and his recovery from a motorcycle accident last summer.

Dave Ryan Show's Minnesota Goodbye
I Was Second in my Weight Class

Dave Ryan Show's Minnesota Goodbye

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2021 13:43


Jenny and E White join Dave today to talk about things that E White knows nothing about like Napster and Limewire, what we have on workout playlists and how E White used to deadlift 500 pounds!