Podcasts about Emi

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  • 879PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Emi

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Latest podcast episodes about Emi

Pod Gave Rock'N Roll To You
Crazy Little Thing Called Love/It Has To Be A Bubble Bath

Pod Gave Rock'N Roll To You

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2022 43:25


Twitter: @podgaverockInsta: @podgaverockQueen 1979 “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” from the album "The Game"and released on EMI and Elektra. Written by Freddie Mercury and produced by Queen and Reinhold Mack.Personel:Freddie Mercury - lead and backing vocals, acoustic guitar, hand clapsBrian May - electric guitar, backing vocals, hand clapsRoger Taylor - drums, backing vocals, hand clapsJohn Deacon - bass guitar, hand clapsCover:Performed by Jonathan HortonIntro Music:"Shithouse" 2010 release from "A Collection of Songs for the Kings". Written by Josh Bond. Produced by Frank Charlton.Other Artists Mentioned:Bel Biv DavoeThe Wonder YearsJoe Cocker “With a Little Help From My Friends”The Lost BoysAerosmithRun DMC “Walk This Way”Keith RichardsPeacemakerJohn CenaFoxy ShazamThe Nashville PussiesThe PoodlesThe QuireboysThe Cruel IntentionsFirehouseDustbowl JunkiesSanta CruzBoogie NightsMark Wahlberg “Feel the Heat”Shane GillisWilliam S  Burroughs “Naked Lunch”Queen “Another One Bites the Dust”Sun Records Elvis PresleyQueen “We Are the Champions”Queen “Fat-Bottomed Girls”Roy OrbisonPaul McCartneyGiorgio MoroderELOSparksPentatonixLed Zeppelin “Hot Dog”The Rolling Stones “The Girl With The Faraway Eyes”The Rolling Stones “Dead Flowers”John Travolta “Grease Lightnin'”Kim Carnes “Bette Davis Eyes”Ray CharlesLittle Richard “Tutti Frutti”Jimi HendrixThe Beatles “I've Just Seen A Face”Captain and TennilePink Floyd “Another Brick in the Wall Pt. 2” FlashdanceTommy BoyRob LoweMichael Sembello “Maniac on the Floor”The Stray CatsFlock of SeagullsSir Cliff RichardLonnie Donegan “Rock Island Line”West Side StoryThe Brian Setzer OrchestraFor the Kings “Lyin' Eyes”Dwight YoakumPeggy Lee “Fever”The Darkness “I Believe In a Thing Called Love”Michael BubleAcoustic HeartstringsJerry DouglasScary PocketsCasey AbramQueen Live in Montreal

Composers Datebook
HRH is amused

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 2:00


Synopsis “We are NOT amused,” is the dour statement attributed to the matronly Queen Victoria in her later years, although some historians dispute she ever really said it. But as a young woman, in her diary Queen Victoria did write, “I was VERY MUCH amused indeed!” after seeing the Italian opera singer Giulia Grisi on stage. The young Queen was a fan, and made a drawing of the singer in a role she created: that of Elvira in Vincenzo Bellini's opera “I Puritani,” or “The Puritans,” which debuted in Paris on today's date in 1835. When Bellini's brand-new opera came to London later that same year, with Grisi in the cast, the young Queen attended several performances, and the opera she called “Dear Puritani” became a life-long favorite, perhaps because it was the first she attended with her husband-to-be, the young Prince Albert. The opera is set in 17th century England during the Civil War between Royalist supporters of the deposed King Charles I and Puritan rebels led by Oliver Cromwell. Its plot involves a Romeo and Juliet-like love story between a delicate Puritan soprano and a dashing Royalist tenor. Unlike Shakespeare's tragedy, however, Bellini's opera provides a happy ending for its politics-crossed lovers. Music Played in Today's Program Vincenzo Bellini (1801 – 1835) — Sinfonia (Overture), fr I Puritani (Philharmonia Orchestra; Riccardo Muti, cond.) EMI 09149

Beginnings
Episode 518: Logan Lynn

Beginnings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 67:46


On today's episode, I talk to musician Logan Lynn. Born in York, Nebraska, Logan eventually moved to Portland after a tumultuous childhood. His musical career began there when he was discovered by The Dandy Warhols.Since 1998, he's released over a dozen albums and EPs on labels like EMI and Caroline, hosted NewNowNext Music on the Logo Network, and in 2021 was named one of the OUT100 in the Performers of the Year category by Out Magazine. This is just a small smattering of his accomplishments. His latest album New Money is out now on Kill Rock Stars! This is the website for Beginnings, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, follow me on Twitter.

Jaie Spot
Episode 36: Eric Benèt

Jaie Spot

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 91:43


Georgy Porgy!!! Episode 26 is all about the smooth vocalist that we all know as Mr. Eric Benet. Eric Benét is a contemporary R&B singer with mild hip-hop and strong adult contemporary influences. As a teenager, he performed in a family vocal group (appropriately named Benét) with his sister and cousin. The group signed with EMI and released an eponymous album in 1992 that largely went unnoticed. Eric blazed his own trail as a solo artist shortly afterward, signing to Warner Bros. and releasing his debut album, True to Myself, in the fall of 1996. A Day in the Lifefollowed in 1999. Its first single, a cover of Toto's "Georgy Porgy," was a moderate radio hit, but it was the album's second single, "Spend My Life with You" (featuring Tamia), that helped put him on the map. The song went to number one on the Billboard R&B chart, was certified gold, and received a nomination for the 2000 Grammy Award for Best R&B Performance by a Duo or Group. Benét's popularity was on the rise, and A Day in the Life went platinum and earned a Soul Train Music Award for Best R&B/Soul Album, Male. To enjoys Jaie's entier playlist and get a heads up on songs to come.. Follow Jaie's playlist on Apple Music https://music.apple.com/profile/jamiemichelle531 To hear todays songs including Jaie's Mental Jukebox and Song of the Week, click the link below and listen on Apple Music https://music.apple.com/us/playlist/eric-benét/pl.u-PDb4YVpTLdWDLlK FOLLOW JOIN THE FAMILY ON FACEBOOK.. https://www.facebook.com/groups/2686975681604527 --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

BIN Radio
Dealing with Gym Anxiety

BIN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 46:41


Emi stops by to talk about Gym Anxiety. It's the new year, you might have committed to making positive changes to your life, and there's a bit of stress and anxiety holding you back or making you shrink inside of yourself. Emi and Ryan have a conversation to share their experiences and lessons they've learned on how to deal with anxiety, lack of confidence, and stress stepping into gyms, whether it's your first time or you've been at it for 40 years.

STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.
Sean Panikkar: Free From the Burden of Perfection

STOPTIME: Live in the Moment.

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 39:21


Lisa speaks to world renowned operatic tenor Sean Panikkar about his journey to the opera stage, his passion for his role as a father, his experience as a finalist on AGT with Forte , his friendship with Josh Page and how if he hadn't met his wife he would have pursued his passion as a civil engineer. Learn how  this extraordinary artist keeps himself balanced in all his roles in life and work.Sean Panikkar continues “to position himself as one of the stars of his generation… His voice is unassailable—firm, sturdy and clear, and he employs it with maximum dramatic versatility” [Opera News].  The American tenor of Sri Lankan heritage made his Metropolitan Opera debut under the baton of James Levine in Manon Lescaut (commercially available on DVD on EMI), and his European operatic debut in Mozart's Zaïde at the Aix-en-Provence Festival in a production directed by Peter Sellars and conducted by Louis Langrée (commercially available on DVD on Opus Arte).Sean Panikkar is a member of Forte, the operatic tenor group combining voices from different cultures into one incredible sound.  The trio was created and debuted for the first time ever on America's Got Talent and had never met until only days before their first audition. During the summer 2013 broadcasts of America's Got Talent, Forte was seen and heard by tens of millions of television viewers in national broadcasts on NBC.  Their self-titled debut recording on Columbia Records was released in November 2013 and a follow-up recording, The Future Classics, was released in 2015.IG: @panikkarTwitter: @seanpanikkarFORTE:  FB https://www.facebook.com/ForteTenorsCheck out Brother's Page@TenorJoshPage | @zaachpage

4ème de couverture
82. Valérie Seguin "Les trois jours et demi après la mort de mon père" avec Frédéric Goulet

4ème de couverture

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 29:09


Valérie Seguin "Les trois jours et demi après la mort de mon père" (Les Arènes 2015) A la mort de son père, au lieu d'être dévastée par le chagrin, Valérie Seguin se sent merveilleusement paisible, comme si si son père était à côté d'elle. Elle reçoit des messages à transmettre pour rassurer ses proches. Puis cette onde d'amour qui l'enveloppe se dissipe. Pour comprendre ce qui lui est arrivé, elle commence une enquête et découvre que, selon le "Livre tibétain des morts", la première étape du voyage de l'âme dure trois jours et demi. Elle s'intéresse alors aux expériences aux frontières de la mort (EMI), aux études. Elle rencontre des personnes qui ont vécu des situations similaires et interroge d'autres traditions. Ce livre est une enquête spirituelle, mais aussi un petit traité de l'art de mourir: Comment se préparer à mourir ? Que pouvons-nous dire à nos proches pour les aider à "bien mourir"?  Choix musical : Vivaldi "L'hiver" des 4 Saisons et Leonard Cohen "The guests"

Composers Datebook
Mendelssohn cooks up some music

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 2:00


Synopsis The greatest clarinetist of the early 19th century was Heinrich Baermann, whose son Carl was also a fantastic performer on the basset horn, the lower-voiced member of the clarinet family. Felix Mendelssohn, in addition to being fond of their playing, was fond another Baermann Family specialty: the “Dampfnudeln” or sweet dumplings they served their friends. In December of 1832, Mendelssohn asked if they'd whip him up a batch. The Baermanns said “Sure – if you'll whip something up for us, namely a duet for clarinet and basset horn.” Carl Baermann described what happened next: “Mendelssohn put a chef's hat on my head, drew an apron around my waist and stuck a cooking spoon into the waistband. He did the same himself, except that instead of a spoon, he stuck a pen behind his ear. Then he led me into the kitchen... He returned to his room where, as he said, he was going to stir and knead tones... “When I brought the dumpling in a covered dish to the table at the time agreed upon, Mendelssohn also had his duet in a covered dish. Father and I were delighted with the charming piece – although Mendelssohn kept saying that my creation was better than his.” Music Played in Today's Program Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809–1847) — Concert Piece, Op. 113, no. 1 (Sabine and Wolfgang Meyer, clarinet and basset horn; Wurtemberg Chamber Orchestra; Jorg Faerber, cond.) EMI 47233

Meet Me For Coffee
Jesse Cook

Meet Me For Coffee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 16:47


He is the first guest to actually grind and make his coffee on the air. Jesse Cook joins us to talk about his love for coffee, new record called Libre, and of course finding his love for flamenco. Join us for this amazing holiday edition featuring Jesse Cook. Jesse Arnaud Cook is a Canadian guitarist. He is a Juno Award winner, Acoustic Guitar Player's Choice Award silver winner in the Flamenco Category, and a three-time winner of the Canadian Smooth Jazz award for Guitarist of the Year. He has recorded on the EMI, E1 Music and Narada labels and has sold over 1.5 million records worldwide. www.jessecook.com www.meetmeforcoffee.co #jessecook #jessecookmusic #flamencoguitar #libre

MetalProgPop Cast
157: Please Please Me - The Beatles

MetalProgPop Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 128:29


Please Please Me  (1963) es el álbum debut de la banda británica de rock The Beatles, lanzado el 22 de marzo de 1963 en el Reino Unido. Su publicación acompaña el inicio de la Beatlemanía, después del éxito de los sencillos «Please Please Me» (n.º 1 en varias listas musicales inglesas, pero solo n.º 2 en el Record Retailer) y «Love Me Do» (n.º 17 en el Record Retailer).  Además de los cuatro títulos en los sencillos, el álbum contiene diez canciones grabadas el día 11 de febrero de 1963 en los estudios EMI de Abbey Road, durante una sesión de grabación de 585 minutos (nueve horas y 45 minutos). 

Notation Mixcast
NM#076 – BREEZY – DNB

Notation Mixcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 43:59


Breezy comes through, after a long podcast break, to give you a fantastic DNB mix! TRACKLIST: 1. Stitches – The Vanguard Project ft Jemimah Read – Spearhead Records 2. Just Hold On (Sub Focus & Wilkinson vs. Pola & Bryson Remix) – Sub Focus & Wilkinson – EMI 3. Keep It Up – nCarmargo – … Continue reading

Headliner Radio
Neve Sessions E17: Jake Miller | Recording Ness

Headliner Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 49:16


Jake Miller describes how he co-produced, engineered and mixed a special edition audiobook of Robert Macfarlane's book, Ness, going to extraordinary lengths to get on-location recordings from the setting of the book, and then processing them almost exclusively using period-correct EMI technology. He also explains how he recently recorded a promo single for TV series, American Gods, at Snap Studios on their ultra rare, 1972 Neve 5316 recording console.

The Strange Brew - artist stories behind the greatest music ever recorded

Wally Waller, ex-Pretty Things songwriter, producer and musician reveals key moments in his career. We delve into his lifelong friendship with Phil May, early years with The Fenmen, The Pretty Things, time as an EMI producer and reinventing Parachute with the xPTs. See also: Wally Waller interview on The Pretty Things Rock St Trop Jon […] The post Wally Waller – The Pretty Things appeared first on The Strange Brew.

The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music
An Eggnogstic Synthesized Holiday Special

The Holmes Archive of Electronic Music

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2021 67:13


Episode 62 An Eggnogstic Synthesized Holiday Special   Playlist Here is an approximate order for the tracks, which are sometimes mixed with other sounds or played at the same time. Joseph Byrd, “Carol of the Bells” from A Christmas Yet to Come (1975 Takoma). USA. ARP 2600 Synthesizer with an Oberheim Expander Module. Bells only. Bob Wehrman, John Bezjian and Dusty Wakeman, “Ring Christmas Bells” from Christmas Becomes Electric (1984 Tropical Records). Not be confused with an album by the same name by The Moog Machine in 1969. Unnamed synthesizer programmed and performed by Bob Wehrman and John Bezjian. From Marina Del Rey in California. Bells only. Joseph Byrd, “Carillon” from A Christmas Yet to Come (1975 Takoma). USA. ARP 2600 Synthesizer with an Oberheim Expander Module. Bells only. Tod Dockstader, “Holiday Meltdown” from Recorded Music For Film, Radio & Television: Electronic Vol.1 (1979 Boosey & Hawkes). Yes! A manic collage of electronic sounds from New Yorker Dockstader who did this album of broadcast library music for a UK firm. Rudolf Escher, “The Long Christmas Dinner”(1960) from Anthology Of Dutch Electronic Tape Music: Volume 1 (1955-1966) (1978 Composer's Voice). Netherlands. Electronic tape composition. Douglas Leedy, “In Dulci Jubilo” from A Very Merry Electric Christmas to You (1970 Capitol). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer and Buchla Synthesizer. Beck, “The Little Drum Machine Boy” from Just Say Noël (1996 Geffen). USA. Roland TR-808 Rhythm Composer. The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Paul Freeman, and The Chicago Synthesizer-Rhythm Ensemble, John Tatgenhorst, “The Little Drummer Boy” from Turned On Christmas (1985 Columbia). Just a little of this mixed-in with Beck. Philippe Renaux, “Noël Blanc” (“White Christmas”) from We Wish You A Cosmic Christmas (1977 Sinus). Belgium. Minimoog, Arp Axe, Arp Soloist, EMS Synthesizer, Stringman Crumar, Fender Rhodes, Electronic Drums. Paul Tanner, “Holiday on Saturn” from Music for Heavenly Bodies (1958 Omega). USA. Electro-theremin. Taeko Onuki, Inori (Prayer) from We Wish You A Merry Christmas (1984 Yen). A compilation of specially recorded Christmas-themed songs from various artists on the Yen Records label. Japanese synth-pop with vocals by Onuki. Maybe Ryuichi Sakamoto on keyboards. Mitch Miller & the Gang, “Give Peace a Chance—Thom's Festive Remix” from Peace Sing-Along (1970 Atlantic). USA. This is a tune that I remixed with other recordings. Don Voegeli, “Jingle Bells” long, short, and tag from Holiday & Seasonal Music (1977 EMI). USA. Produced at the Electrosonic Studio of the University of Wisconsin-Extension. Joseph Byrd, “Jingle Bells” from A Christmas Yet to Come (1975 Takoma). USA. ARP 2600 Synthesizer with an Oberheim Expander Module. Jimmy Smith, “The Christmas Song” from Christmas Cookin' (1964 Verve). USA. Hammond organ. Jean Jacques Perrey and Sy Mann, “Tijuana Christmas” from Switched on Santa (1970 Pickwick). USA. Moog Modular Synthesizer. Thom Holmes, Happy Christmas (War is Over) Lennon and Ono Sliding Moment remix (2001). Richie Havens, “End of the Season” from Alarm Clock (1970 Stormy Forest). A melancholic reflection on life from Mr. Havens, totally synthesized on the Moog Modular by Bob Margoleff. Jon Hassell, “Clairvoyance” from Last Night The Moon Came Dropping Its Clothes In The Street (Pentimento Volume One) (2009 ECM). Composer, keyboards, Jon Hassell; producer, bass, Peter Freeman; Live Sampling, Jan Bang; Violin, Kheir-Eddine M'Kachiche. Live recordings from Courtrais, Belgium, and London. Jon Hassell, “Courtrais” from Last Night The Moon Came Dropping Its Clothes In The Street (Pentimento Volume One) (2009 ECM). Composer, trumpet, keyboards, Jon Hassell; producer, bass, Peter Freeman; sampler, Dino J.A. Deane, Jan Bang; percussion, Steve Shehan; Live recordings from Courtrais, Belgium, and London. Opening and closing sequences voiced by Anne Benkovitz. Additional opening, closing, and other incidental music by Thom Holmes. For additional notes, please see my blog, Noise and Notations.

Simpatía por la Industria Musical
Simpatía por la industria musical #101: Jesús Ortiz

Simpatía por la Industria Musical

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 65:56


JESUS ORTIZ DE ZÁRATE es el invitado a la entrega 101 de SIMPATÍA POR LA INDUSTRIA MUSICAL, el podcast donde apenas suena música pero es de Música de todo lo que se habla.Empezó con una banda de covers que tocaba en las bases americanas, para después entrar en el departamento artístico de FONOGRAM / POLYDOR, donde participa en el fichaje de NACHA POP, LA FRONTERA y BARRICADA entre otros.Es uno de los artífices del éxito arrollador de LOS REFRESCOS y su "Aquí no hay playa", para después pasar dos años en la compañía de Paco Martin PASIÓN, donde se gestó "El sitio de mi recreo" de ANTONIO VEGA.En MCA, la compañía que dirige con éxito Carlos Ituiño, ficha a ROSANA y sus "Lunas rotas", y junta a RAIMUNDO AMADOR con BJORK, para después ir a la RCA de la Avenida de los Madroños , y más tarde a EMI, que abandona en el 2002 ante la perspectiva de cambios en el negocio.Actualmente ejerce como Music Advisor y colabora en departamento artístico de MAD COOL.Una trepidante e interesante carrera, otra, la que aquí compartimos con entusiasmo. Disfruten.

the artisan podcast
ep24 | the artisan podcast | jaime levy | ux strategist, author, speaker

the artisan podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 44:41


Jaime Levy, Ux Strategist, Speaker and author of UX Strategy: Product Strategy Techniques for Devising Innovative Digital Solutions available in 6 languages and now also on Audible You can find Jaime on LinkedIn and on jaimelevy.com   ----------------- Katty: I've been watching your career trajectory, and I was super excited to see that you had written a book, UX Strategy and that the audio version has just come out. So I wanted to have a conversation about you, about the book, and how you started your path. One thing that I've noticed is this trend of reinvention with you from a designer to a strategist to an author to a public speaker to a professor, and how all of that's going to come together for you. I just found that fascinating, so I'd love for you to talk about your origin story and what's steps you've taken to come here. Jaime: Let's see. Well, I guess it started even before the browser when I was creating my floppy disk magazines, and I was a graduate student at NYU, and just really interested in nonlinear storytelling.  And then trying to invent this new medium like it was just this total insane dreamer thing. And I guess because of the floppy disk I made, I actually finished it, and then I successfully brought the product to market by selling it. A floppy disk that opened into a HyperCard or Director presentation. I know for all the newbies, they're like, “What are you talking about?” Don't worry, you don't need to know this old-school stuff.  But you know it used to be really hard to make interactive presentations, but the upside of all of that was that you could be the first or you could do something that is only mediocre in design. But because it was the first it was like “yay.”  That was how I started out. I was a horrible interface designer and a horrible coder. But I just kept pounding on these floppy disks, and then, the short version of it is Billy Idol bought one, and then it got launched as a commercial endeavor and then I got my gigs at EMI records and Viacom. And it all just kept going from there you know to eventually, doing an online magazine, and then getting a creative director role and just constantly working.  I really believe that if you just keep working, and applying yourself, and learning new things, that eventually you'll connect and get whatever it is that you want. Some job, or some gig, or an opportunity. And I think that relentlessness to persevere was something that has stayed with me, and I actually need to kind of manifest it now as I'm starting the next chapter of my career.  Before UX, it was called interface design and then after interface design, then it was web design and then after web design, then we had information architecture and interaction design. And by the time I got back to LA after 9/11 and the dot com thing crashed in New York, as well as, San Francisco and LA, I came back here and it seemed at that point I needed to focus.  And I should mention early on as a result of the (floppy) disk I was asked to be a part-time professor at NYU, and I did get flown around the country and the world, to speak at conferences, and I think like when you have that success when you start out you think that's normal. And so for me, it's just been catching up with my old normal, and it's a curse and a blessing, and the blessing is obvious because you're like, oh, I just want to continue to be a public speaker, I want to continue being known or recognized for my work. But the negative consequences, it's an addiction, it's like a high that you set here and you think, Oh, I always have to be at this level of an overachiever. And so, you know, in that sense I feel like I didn't engage in my own personal life, you know because I sacrificed it for my career so much and didn't really like relax into it until my 30s when I got back to Los Angeles. Katty: Interesting. I saw you actually speak about it in one of your talks. I think was your Brazil talk about being an overachiever and what that means and constantly trying to do things, new things, or do things in a new way. I found that fascinating, it went through that same reinvention theme that I recognized in what you were talking about. So thanks for sharing that. So you mentioned, the new chapter, a new iteration of Jaime. Jaime: New? It's in progress. So, you know, I did my first book and I did really well with the first book. I was insane to write a book. That was so crazy. But I just felt like UX strategy was so interesting and even though nobody was paying me to write it, you certainly don't make money off of the book. I just was like okay I'll take a year and a half and spend my savings and write a book and sit in the library. And it was really rewarding.  And so then when it came time to do a second edition, if I want to be current I did that. And I did it during the lockdown so that was kind of a good thing to do when you can't really go teach in a classroom or go run workshops in a public space. But basically, my book is now out in the second edition and is being translated into languages, and I just found out it's in German and Italian, and Portuguese this time, you know, on top of the other six languages and that's really exciting.  But the thing with the book is you need to promote it, and you know and you need to go do things to market it. Whenever you make anything whether it be a floppy disk or a website or an app or a book or you're marketing yourself as a public speaker, it's one thing that you do it, but the other half of it is in order to be successful, you just got to market yourself or your product. And it's fine when I get paid to do growth design and markets and run experiments to market other people's products. But I think, I'm kind of at least right now, I feel I'm just kind of over-marketing myself. All of a sudden I feel like, ah, can't life just be simple again? Let me just get a job ideally as a UX strategist and, you know, and that's it, let things quiet down.  And so you can say it's an existential post-midlife crisis, or maybe it's a phase but I just had a job interview with a company that I hope I get, and they were telling me that they just had written an article related to this subject about so many people basically looking at their careers and saying, “Do I even want to do this?”  I feel like COVID Hit the reset button for a ton of people and so now I'm less killing myself about, “Oh wow, I'm really not going to go crazy promoting this book because I don't feel like it? Is there something wrong with me? Or is it just like maybe I just have to accept to let people read the book. I hope they like it.” And if people ask me to speak fine, but you know, I think it's like at a certain point you have to say okay where's friction and friction is trying to go tour and do workshops at what we hope might be the end of the pandemic but isn't. You know, it's like I suffered the same fate as people who, you know we're in an orchestra, you know, or who had movies that came out. So I'm in great company of people who made their money by doing things for the public and in person and now that you know, there's no UX conferences really planned. I'm speaking at the one in Estonia, one, this year, zero last year zero the year before, you know. So it makes you say what am I going to do now? Katty: You're right, it definitely has been a reset button on many fronts. We've seen this so much with so many other candidates that we work with who are re-evaluating “I've been doing XYZ until now, do I still want to do it, do I still want to live here?” Just really evaluating everything, but I totally hear you about the book because I also wrote a book during this pandemic. I had been working on it for three years, which was far too long but that's just the length of time that it took. The circumstances where we found ourselves allowed me to finish it, so I am grateful for that. That was the silver lining in this crazy year and t it allowed me to finish it and get it out. But it's just sitting there and it's nowhere near where it needs to be... but it is what it is. It's a story I needed to get out. I got it out. Now, if people find it, awesome, and if they don't then we'll cross that bridge.  Jaime: What's your book called? Katty: It's called The Butterfly Years, and it's just my personal story dealing with grief and has nothing to do with Artisan Creative and it has everything to do with me. Obviously, as somebody who's running a company, it is going to have to come to grips with having to manage grief and make that work otherwise it permeates everything. Katty: If it helps people out there, it's there. If somebody is going through it and they need to hear somebody else's story who's been in the same boat. Then I've done my job.  Katty: Yeah, So when I heard that you had done your second edition and you had just done an audiobook. I thought you know I want to talk to her and see how that whole process was for her.  Katty: Congratulations on your interview and I hope that it ends up being the right next thing. Jaime: I hope so too. That would be great if my first interview turned into a job offer. Katty: Putting out the good vibes. Jaime: They were very surprised because it was a UX strategy position and I didn't have anywhere in my portfolio that I wrote it. I didn't want to say that I literally wrote the book on UX strategy because then they think oh she's not humble or she's too experienced so I didn't mention it. They saw something in there and I'm like, “Oh yeah, I wrote a book kind of related to UX strategy.” and they're like what's it called, I'm like, UX Strategy. I can't even own it. I can't even own it, you know, I'm just like, ahh so shocking. Yeah, you know, I want the opportunity to practice what I preach. Enough, running around with the same lectures and enough training.  I've done so much training in the last year, I think sometimes we just need to go back and forth and be okay with it. I'm not saying I'll never do workshops again, I just need to take a break from that part of it or and pursue it. So yeah hopefully something will come up for me that is enjoyable. Because I think it's important to have a job if you like and what I was shocked by when I looked at the job market this time was, oh my god there's 8,624 UX jobs in this country and 30 or 40% of them are remote, and there's actually jobs advertised for UX strategist title. It used to just be me and two other people. I don't know if my book helped define the industry but it seems like when I read the job description, it had everything that I wrote about in my book so it's a really exciting time that there's so much opportunity out there. Katty: Yeah, for sure. I'd love for you to maybe help define that a little bit, because obviously, we hear you know there's on the design side of it, UX there's XD. Now it's customer experience, employee experience. Can you talk a little bit about that I know for just what I've heard you talk about before, it's really the research and the strategy is the precursor before you even get into the design part of it. And I learned that thinking time is so important to be able to do that? Can you talk a little bit about that? Katty: A little bit of both, actually. Jaime: Sure. So I basically define UX strategy as the intersection between product design and business strategy. So business strategy is the top-level vision of an organization. How do we make money, who are our customers? You know business is defined, ultimately by their customers.  So they have a vision and the vision might be a platform, multiple products, a suite of products, or one product. And then it's like how do you really elevate that product, and bring it to market? So that when people have that first whiff of it, they're like, smells awesome. And so when I started doing discovery phases back in 2008, 2009 for Schematic and for Huge, I really fell in love with it. Because I love doing competitive research. So interesting, I mean who doesn't want to get paid to research the marketplace? And I loved the idea of finally getting to do user research. And so that was when I really became interested in it and realized that there was nothing out there that told us how to do it. I would just make things up as I went along and as I moved from different organizations, I would clean up my deliverables and take them to the next level.  And then when Lean Startup came out--People don't think of Lean Startup, as a product strategy methodology but I certainly do. It's this idea to build the smallest version of your product, get it in front of your target customer, learn from it, whether it be an alpha or prototype, extract data from these learnings and learn from it, and then iterate.  All of a sudden the discovery phase became not something like Waterfall; first, we do discovery, then we do the implementation, then we do usability testing and find out at the very end that not only does our product suck but nobody wants it. It was insane. And now all of a sudden, the discovery phase became something that can be iterative and cross into the implementation phase, and you can start building products and doing strategy, and testing it and validating it in much smaller loops all along the way. So that's what's really exciting is an opportunity to run some kind of experiments to knock out, to do rapid prototyping, to use whatever it is like sketch XD, other prototyping tools to get business concepts in front of the target users, and start doing user research that's more focused on validating a value proposition, versus, you know, is this thing usable? Even if it's really usable, but nobody wants it, then who cares if it's usable, right? Katty: Yep. Very good, and with plenty of products out there with great usability but they're sitting on the shelf. I probably have a few of them. Katty: Fantastic. You talked a little bit about this but I think, given where you are going, pivoting, and where you see the future to be for you at this juncture. What can you share with people who are either just starting out in their career path? And/or because of this past year, lost their positions, and they have to reinvent themselves. Where is it that you dig down deep to find that inspiration and that determination to just say you know what, this isn't working, let me figure out where it is that I want to go? Jaime: Yeah, I think just to be honest it's very different for someone like me with two to three decades in the industry versus somebody who's starting out. So I wouldn't give someone the same advice I would give myself, there's definitely different things going on. I can remember very well when I was starting out and the same feelings that I have now are similar. My dad gave me this great advice. When you're looking for a job, or when you're starting on your career, and when you interview with people, you want to be careful that you don't have this flashing L on your head. Loser, loser, loser.  Because people will spot this lack of confidence or low self-esteem, you know, and it doesn't matter how successful you are, or have been, like me. Because you can still have low self-esteem or imposter syndrome, and so, it's like you need to somehow put all of these fears of I suck;. I'm not gonna make it; I'm an imposter;I am so crazy that I thought I could do this film, to begin with. I'm too old or I'm too young or my portfolio doesn't have X, X, X.  I have to constantly work on this, to this minute, which is spinning a much more positive narrative in my head that, “No, no, I have something of value to give”. And then putting that negative energy into therapy, exercise, whatever you need to do to take care of yourself, but I still to this day, put it into how can I showcase my work, what's missing? You know, look at my portfolio. Okay, it has all this but it's missing, you know, this one deliverable. Well, I better make it, fake it till you make it, you know, and figure out a way to like get it in there.  And the funny thing is is they may not even ask for it on that job interview, but if it's like this thing that you think is missing, then it's going to be flashing the L on your forehead and so to me, it's like puffing yourself up and what is it going to do to make you confident for these interviews and if showing your portfolio and getting excited around the storytelling of your UX design which, it still is for me, then get that into your portfolio and any missing things.  Don't spend eight hours a day looking for a job, spend four hours and the other four hours teaching yourself a new tool because there's always going to be new things to learn. And if you're not open to learning new things, up until, you know, your 50s and 60s, then whenever that is where you're not open to new things, you better be at that last job that you're going to station yourself at, because the industry, I promise you, just keeps on changing. You know it's amazing. Katty: Gosh. Great advice. I think for all levels of career and years in the industry and also not even to have to do with business. I think for anything where we tend to sometimes focus in on the thing we don't have versus on the things that we do have it's just such a great lesson to say you know what to say we have to reshift that mindset.  There's a great book that I read a couple of years ago by this woman called Sally Helgason, and it's called How Women Rise, and she talks a lot about specifically women and how we get into this mindset of, oh, but you know what, let me work harder because I'm missing this 10% thing and not focus on the 90% that I have and it's just crazy. I see it all the time. I see it, not just in candidates I see it in myself. And putting myself out for a conversation or a talk or something and if I don't get it's like, oh, that's because I didn't talk about this. You know what, maybe just wasn't the right thing. So, yeah, great lesson. And I think also that that whole thing also speaks of desperation, and I think that that comes through, so loud and clear, it erodes the confidence that would naturally be there if somebody has worked on their craft. Jaime: Yeah and we need to in this field of product design or research, ultimately we're making something that we need to upsell, at the very end, even if it's to our boss and say yeah this is awesome, you know, and it's like, oh my gosh if we come to it from this place of fear, we're never going to sell it.  So I think it's easy to focus on the negatives for a lot of us, and we can't afford to do that in our field because we're always upselling our work. Katty: Yeah. Have you ever taken the StrengthsFinder assessment? Have you ever done that?  Jaime: No, I don't even know what that is. Katty: It's similar to a DISC or Myers-Briggs. But it focuses on your strengths. The reason I like it, we do it for our company and we talk about our strengths all the time. Its created by Don Clifton, and is now as part of Gallup and it's a personality assessment. The reason for him creating this was that he felt people focused on their weaknesses, and not on their strengths. The whole thing is about what are your top five strengths and let's lead with your strengths and not focus on a thing that is number 30 something for you, let's focus on the things that you're really good at and then find someone else who your bottom five is their top five and then collaborate. So it sounds like it's just human nature that we go there. If we could learn not to go there, it would be less, I think less of a headache for all of us. Katty: Crazy. So, I know you're teaching, you're doing online courses, you mentioned that you're doing a talk in Estonia. Are you doing that in person, are you doing that virtually? How are you managing your time and all the different places you need to be, or how did you manage your time and all the different places you need to be? Jaime: Yeah, I don't know how I'm managing my time right now yet. I'm still waiting to see where a bunch of things land. But the Estonia conference is the first onsite conference since COVID, since March of 2020. Well, basically there's very few conferences in the beginning of the year for the first quarter anyway.  So, anyway, it's Web Usability Day I think is their legacy name. But it's a one-day conference and then there's workshops, three days prior to it. It's in Estonia, it's very affordable, it's gonna bring in like a massive crowd of UX professionals. A lot of new ones but people mid-level and all over the place. And they're coming from Estonia, but they're also coming across the Baltic from Finland, and a couple of other Baltic states. So, I'm closing the conference, I guess I'm kind of headlining it, and then my workshop is one day right before that. So November 25th,iis my UX Strategy Workshop and then November 26th is the conference. It's a Thursday, Friday, so but I'll be in Berlin back in November, and then I'm doing a couple of talks, just private ones where I'm flying in. And then going back to Berlin and then I'm going to do this thing in Estonia.  I am so over this idea of more online workshops. I think they're a joke, sorry guys, but the whole point of conferences was to get people together physically in a space to network and touch base with other people and build relationships. And it seems I've done a bunch of these fake conferences, and it doesn't feel the same, they never pay and it's a joke. So I'm not into those anymore.  I'm really stoked that these people you know, the COVID cases are extremely low [in Estonia]. I've had my third vaccine. already so I'm totally going. I won't be taking too much risk but definitely, I'm really excited to be around humans and doing my thing. Katty: Yeah, humans, human connection. I'm traveling internationally for the first time since March of last year as well, and I'm going to Mexico and then to Dubai. But, I have to navigate the whole PCR test thing because I'm not going to be in the States for three days before I go so I got to figure that part out. Jaime: Yeah. It's a crazy time. I can't believe really what happened. How much the pandemic just changed everything, it's just, it's shocking. Katty: Are you seeing that in the world of products, are you seeing what's happened with a pandemic impact, whether it be design thinking or about how people are approaching research. I would imagine that it's changed how people are looking at how they go forward. Jaime: Yeah well, everything's online now. When I left Huge back in 2009, 2010. It was because I didn't want to drive in my car in rush hour to agency land in Culver City, and I didn't want to work in person, I wanted to work from home. So I've been working remote since 2010 and it's not new to me, and Cisco Systems when I worked for them as a UX strategist, everybody was a remote workforce. So finally, the rest of the world is catching up with us and learning that it is possible, and even outside of product so I think it's opening up opportunities in many ways. But, the negative consequence, and I felt this when I taught my last course at Claremont University, was that my students who were graduating, were just getting internships, but they're online.  At Facebook or wherever, and at any point in your life where you need human contact, and you need the nuance of someone kind of seeing that you're confused, and you need mentoring or you need to get the confidence to ask for help, we need that to be in person. I feel like the people that are getting the worst end of the deal is the college graduates, the people who are just starting their career who have to start it by themselves in Zoom rooms. Hopefully, there's going to be some way that it isn't just this experience of online collaboration, because I just feel even when I had my second or third cat life of getting into the UX world, I can't even imagine that I would have had the trust and camaraderie that I had with people at Schematic who came over and showed me how to wireframe when nobody was looking. So hopefully maybe there's some way that people can reach out and have people to connect with for that kind of support since they can't get it in person. Katty: The whole mentoring piece of it. Yeah, taking somebody under your wing. It's harder to do it this way. Yeah, you're absolutely right. I have some nieces and nephews who started their first year in college last year. You've worked really hard to get into the school of your choice, but you don't get a chance to really experience that. So now as a sophomore, they're getting to experience it for the first time because now some other classes are in person. So really interesting to kind of watch this new generation of those who are starting and those who are graduating, it's just a very different world, for sure. Jaime: Yeah it's crazy. It's really crazy and maybe five years from now we'll look back on that and go, Oh man, it was so great, why didn't we just do all that remote work and it was so easy. But it is weird, I just got off the phone with a client and he's just saying that he's not leaving the house and he doesn't want to get the vaccine because he almost died from a vaccine from something else a long time ago, so he's just like staying in his house for his whole life. And I just, I feel in our field where we're designing products for customers and users, it's like, “Nah, we need to have human contact and get out there.” When I'm feeling really low, I reach out to a friend and I have to dump, and say “Ugh”, and have them tell me. I just hope we don't lose everything as a result of this, online world that we live in now. Katty: I don't think so. I mean I certainly hope not. I do feel that there's a hybrid version of it that's going to be more pronounced. I mean we went to such an extreme this past year, I do think there's going to be a hybrid world in front of us. I haven't quite figured it out yet, but little by little I think we'll fall into place. Let's end on a couple of inspiration pieces. Where do you get your inspiration? Jaime: My inspiration now is probably-- I consume a lot of film. I like to have a big impact. I actually went to the movie theater, on Sunday, by myself, bought a ticket to go see Ich bin dein Mensch, I'm Your Man, a German film about a man robot who was built to learn on what a woman wants and then they program him to be the perfect partner. It was amusing, to walk into it, to have it open up and see all of Mitte Berlin and see the TV tower and see the food and see inside the flat. I miss Berlin so much right now, I felt like when I got out of there  I had just gone to Berlin. It just reminded me of all these tiny little things. So I get a lot of inspiration from being able to transport myself into different realities physically and through film, and right now, traveling is limited,but I definitely get my inspiration from seeing other cultures, other ways to live.  I lived in Berlin for most of the pandemic, and it took months, but after being there and away from here for so many months it really-- when you experience other cultures, it makes you appreciate and also find things you don't like about your own culture. But I feel like having perspective is what inspires me. Katty: Love that, and for creativity to bloom, do you need that spark of inspiration for creativity to happen, or is there another thing you tap into when you sit down to write or to do another wireframe or to create, what would you tap into for that? Jaime: I don't know, I wish I could answer that. I don't know. I spend my days at the computer then I go and walk on a trail. It's extremely important for me to get out and walk in nature and I do that every day and I listen to the same 3 podcasts. The New York Times Day thing, The Berlin Briefing, and then Doug Rushkoff's Team Human And that stuff, while I'm like in nature and walking around listening to these podcasts, again, I guess I feel transported and I feel immersed. I think that when I leave the house, and when I come back, whether I'm jogging or listening to music and weird experimental atonal music that nobody would like unless they're into weird music. That helps me really reset the crazy stuff we're telling ourselves in our head or just like being in a mundane moment. I think sitting at a computer for more than four hours, not healthy for me.   Katty: I love that. Both for creativity and inspiration, it's not going to happen nine to five necessarily looking at a little screen. To be able to get out of this and just get other influences. I find nature so healing in so many ways and my ideation just goes off the roof when I'm out and about. Jaime: Where do you go, where do you get your nature?  Katty: My favorite place is Point Doom in Malibu. It's a very easy little hike, but you are at eye level of the pelicans flying by. It's just the most incredible sensation sitting there and you see these majestic birds flying right at your eye level. So whenever I can, whether it's a birthday or an anniversary or something special, that's where I like to go.    Jaime: Nice. Yeah.   Katty: Well Jamie where can people find you?   Jaime: People can find me on LinkedIn, @Jaimerlevy. I'm on Twitter, I'm not tweeting so much. I was told I need to get on Instagram but I'm like, “What?”. And then Jaimelevy.com and then the book userexperiencestrategy.com. I'd love to just mention if people don't like to go walk in nature. I recorded my audible book at this great studio in the valley, where I grew up, and it's me reading my book and doing some impressions of myself, and it's a lot of stories and so far the reviews have been really favorable. And so if you're not a big reader like me I hate it, I don't really like reading. I can read an article but long-format, not so good. Check out my audible book if you're not sure go to userexperiencestrategy.com and listen to the first two chapters and try it on. But I'm really excited about the audible, you know for my book I self-produced it, paid for it, and it's mine. So that was important to me, you know.      

Gearhunks
Ep. 137 - Gearbuds React to The Beatles: Get Back

Gearhunks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 103:38


Spoiler Warning: you know those sorta' groany reaction videos you see all over YouTube these days? At about the 30 minute mark this becomes one of those, Gearbuds Podcast style.This week the dudes go Full Boomer with a review and deep dive into the new Peter Jackson-helmed Beatles documentary, Get Back, or as we're calling it Get Buds. In this Dave's Doc about a Dave's Doc we spend ample time nerding over all of the Fender, Vox, Hofner, Gibson, Neumann, AKG, & EMI gear, digging into each episode individually, covering some issues the documentary omitted, and obvy providing our own *spicy* takes.Also discussed: Spotify Wrapped 2021, Guitar Slip No More, Moog Animoog Z, hacking away at the back of an old Les Paul, handling auditions, and tells for failing electrolytic capacitors.Take the beans.

Leveling Up: Creating Everything From Nothing with Natalie Jill
What Nutrigenomics and Epigenetics Have To Do With Weight Loss with Dr. Emi Hosoda

Leveling Up: Creating Everything From Nothing with Natalie Jill

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 33:04


Doctor Emi Hosoda is originator of the Youthful Slim Solution, a fat loss solution that helps people achieve the toned, beautiful body they desire as and they look younger, more beautiful and more toned. Doctor Emi helps make weight loss simple by customizing fat loss solutions uniquely to the person. She does this by testing for what makes each of us unique, our unique genes which can control which diet and exercise is best for us, our unique hormone balance, our unique mind body wellness, our unique food sensitivities, our unique intestinal health- all of these factors can hold keys to making weight loss simple. Doctor Emi also helps makes weight loss a journey in aging in reverse, becoming more beautiful and vibrant as you lose weight by supporting our skin and muscles with proper supplementation unique to your specific needs as you lose weight. Having lost 100 lbs and 15 % body fat by using this specific information to help her after a lifetime of weight struggles, Doctor Emi is passionate about helping others do the same. Getting answers unique to you and finding the root cause of where your struggles with weight came from and how they can best be corrected in a way that is specific to you and no one else. She sees medicine as a field of service and a dynamic opportunity to help change lives. In this episode, you will learn: What is Nutrigenomics What are natural things you can do to heal Why you need to utilize Nutrigenomics with your health

Crisis What Crisis?
33. Guy Hands on fortune, failure and the fear of the ‘Under Toad'

Crisis What Crisis?

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 60:25


In this first episode of our fifth series I talk to Guy Hands - a man who Tom Wolfe would have described as ‘A Master of the Universe'. A private equity titan who through his skill and sheer force of personality has been one of the most successful dealmakers of the last three decades.Not every deal has gone well though – some in fact have gone spectacularly wrong. Most famously his acquisition of EMI was a multi-million-pound failure which still stings. Guy talks with candid honesty about those professional crises and peels back the lid on the secretive world of private equity.But what's truly remarkable about this episode is not the riches gained or lost. It's the personal challenges that Guy faced before the success and indeed since, that really makes this a crisis story worth listening to.Challenges like his severe dyslexia – Guy still has a reading age of 13 and the spelling level of a seven-year-old, dyspraxia, chronic OCD and a number of other crippling conditions.Guy's life under its successful veneer has often been one of significant struggle which at times has taken him to the darkest of places in terms of his mental health. A battle against what he describes (quoting from the World According To Garp) as The Under Toad – the constant fear of being dragged down to disaster.A reminder that whoever you think someone is – however perfect and successful a life they appear to be leading – the reality will almost certainly be something very, very different. Guy's Crisis Cures:1. Gardens – Being able to smell the garden. If it's raining a bit softly – even better.2. Yoga – I find it very, very useful. Partly the stretching which I really enjoy. Partly a little bit of physical exercise, but not too much. And partly just to clear my mind to think.3. Listening to music – The one that gets me up when I'm really down is Mama's & Papas – Dedicated To The One I Love. It has that wonderful line about the darkest time being just before dawn. I can play that line over and over again. Links:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Guy-Hands/e/B09593QRNK?ref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share https://engagebritain.org Stream/Buy ‘Allies' by Some Velvet Morning: https://ampl.ink/qp6bm Some Velvet Morning Website: www.somevelvetmorning.co.uk

Holtecast - An Aston Villa Podcast
ASTON VILLA 1-2 MANCHESTER CITY: A Positive Defeat

Holtecast - An Aston Villa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 34:53


Cole and Danny got together immediately after the final whistle at Villa Park to go over Aston Villa's spirited loss to Manchester City and look ahead to Leicester City on Sunday. You can listen for FREE on Acast, Apple Podcasts, and Spotify - dig in!WHAT DO WE DISCUSS?A frantic start and a spirited second half; more encouraging signs under Steven Gerrard?Super Ollie Watkins! How brilliant was he and could we have had a couple more goals?Should we see Douglas Luiz remain in a more advanced midfield role?Emi delight and Bailey frustrations; what can we make of our wingers on Wednesday?Looking confidently ahead to Leicester City on Sunday — can Villa grab win?All of this and so much more! Enjoy the podcast and Up The Villa!STAY CONNECTED:Email: holtecast@gmail.comTwitter: @7500ToHolteCole Pettem: @TalkAstonVillaDanny Raza: @RazaJournoEPISODE NOTES:Thank you to our charity partner, Acorns Children's Hopsice.Donate today to support a fantastic charity: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/villaThank you to our FPL league sponsor, One2ElevenKits.Take advantage of their fantastic inventory of football apparel: https://twitter.com/one2elevenkits See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

OnTrack with Judy Warner
Pathological Design Features

OnTrack with Judy Warner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 44:51


Dr. Eric Bogatin, Dean of Signal Integrity Academy, is back for some awesome discussion about bad PCB design guidelines. How to spot them to avoid ruining your design? This is going to be fun and insightful! Make sure to check the show notes and additional resources below. Watch until the end. Our favorite Dean has some perks for our listeners. Altium 365: Where the World Designs Electronics Watch the video, click here. Show Highlights: Eric's AltiumLive Presentation Pathological Design Features Demonstration of the 2D Field Solver built-in for free in Altium Designer Your intuition + PCB design tool can make or break your PCB design performance Most Common Sources of Noise Ground bounce as an extreme case of crosstalk Design structures that can strongly contribute to EMI failures Eric Explains “transparent interconnect” Best measurement practice and routing correctly Is an Arduino board really for beginners? EMI Problems caused by split planes—the trifecta, you get reflection noise, you get crosstalk noise, you get EMI noise out of it Eric Bogatin, Steve Sandler, and Larry Smith debunked PCB design myths and legends—the Myth of Three Capacitor Values Power integrity becoming Signal Integrity What is Rad-hard? Reliability concerns in aerospace technology and automotive systems Fiber in vehicle and fiber base radar could be the solution Eric answers, What do you think about right-angle traces? 3 Month Signal Integrity Academy Subscription, use promo code ALT21 AltiumLive Connect, register now! Links and Resources: Article: The Myth of Three Capacitor Values  Signal Integrity Journal Laboratory for Atmospheric Space Physics Should You Worry About 90 Degree Bends in Circuit Board Traces? Previous Podcast Episode with Eric Bogatin Why You Should Stop Hanging on to Legacy Design Rules Eric Bogatin Debunks Common Misconceptions About Transmission Lines Signal Integrity Expert Eric Bogatin on Best Measurement Practices AltiumLive 2022 Connect: Now open for registration Connect with Zach Peterson on LinkedIn Connect with Eric Bogatin on Linkedin Watch Zach's latest Altium Academy courses on Youtube Read Zach's articles on Altium's resource hub Full OnTrack Podcast Library Altium Website Download your Altium Designer Free Trial Learn More about Altium Nexar Altium 365: Where the World Designs Electronics

SCEPTICISME SCIENTIFIQUE
Épisode #516: Nécessité d’un groupe Zet non mixte (témoignages de femmes)

SCEPTICISME SCIENTIFIQUE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 71:15


Jérémy Royaux reçoit pour cet épisode 3 femmes membres du groupe Facebook non mixte « Zététique, Scepticisme et Féminisme ». Il s'agit de Joyce, Mélanie et Boddidi. Nous les remercions chaleureusement d'avoir accepté de témoigner ensemble pour cet épisode. Double remerciements à Bobbidi qui a remplacé Emi en dernière minute. Au programme : une brève présentation du […]

Café com ADM
Do Omelete à Huuro: Erico Borgo e os novos negócios do mundo nerd — Café com ADM 266

Café com ADM

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 63:19


Erico Borgo (@ericoborgo)é o convidado desta edição do podcast. Ele bate um papo com Leandro Vieira sobre as interseções entre cultura pop e negócios e explica como e por que o mundo geek/nerd deixou de pertencer ao domínio dos esquisitos e foi adotado pela mídia mainstream. Conteúdo recomendado IFOOD BENEFÍCIOS Indique empresas e ganhe entre R$ 100 R$ 1000 por cada indicação que fechar com o iFood Benefícios. Conheça e cadastre-se. CRESCIMENTO PREVISÍVEL Conheça o RD Station CRM e o RD Station Marketing, a dupla de softwares de automação que ajudará sua empresa a crescer de forma previsível, angariando mais clientes e faturando cada vez mais. Acesse o site e conheça. PRESENÇA DIGITAL A Locaweb ajuda você a ampliar sua presença digital e vender mais. Acesse o site da Locaweb e saiba como aumentar o faturamento da sua empresa por meio da internet. Sobre o entrevistado Erico Borgo é um dos principais nomes da cultura nerd e geek do Brasil. Começou sua carreira trabalhando como editor para os sites da Panini e da EMI no final dos anos 1990, quando participou da fundação do Grupo Omelete, onde atuou durante duas décadas; nesse período, inclusive, ajudou a trazer a CCXP, o maior evento global de cultura pop e geek, para o Brasil. Empresário, jornalista e designer gráfico formado pela Fundação Armando Alvares Penteado, Erico Borgo atualmente é diretor da Huuro Entretenimento, produtora criativa com foco em cultura pop.

80s Music by Hache
90s Brit-Pop (Compilated by Hache)

80s Music by Hache

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 69:04


A casi 30 años del surgimiento Brit-Pop hoy en día se puede ver mas como un movimiento político y de marketing que musical. Luego del oscuro reinado de Margaret Thatcher sobre el Reino Unido los británicos necesitaban volver a sentirse orgullosos de su país, cosa que con la política de Thatcher se perdió y por otro lado las grandes discográficas necesitaban artistas que vendieran. La gran estrategia de las multinacionales fue comprar sellos independientes, así fue que Sony se hizo con Creation (Oasis), EMI con Food Records (Blur), Nude Records (Suede) tenía un acuerdo de distribución con Sony, London Records se hizo con Factory Records (Happy Mondays, New Order). Pero vamos a la música que es lo que nos interesa, ¿que fue exactamente el Brit-Pop? La verdad que no hay una idea concreta de lo que fue este movimiento… OK, canciones de 3 minutos formadas por estrofa-estribillo-estrofa-solo de guitarra-estribillo, reivindicación de bandas muy británicas como los Kinks, Jams, Who, Rolling Stone, Beatles y exaltación del nacionalismo británico. Fue más bien un “movimiento generacional” donde varias bandas surgieron, más o menos, en el mismo momento y que coincidieron en el tiempo con Oasis. Pero si los comparamos con Blur o con Suede la verdad que ninguna de las tres bandas se parece en absoluto. El primer disco de Blur es del 91 y es casi un álbum tardío del movimiento Madchester. Suede revolucionaron el mercado con su primer disco en el año 92, con un sonido más cercano al Glam Rock y el Punk Rock Newyorkino de los ‘70s que al sonido sesentero de los Who por ejemplo. Pulp venía dando tumbos hacia mas de 10 años cambiando de estilo y de sellos discográficos, hasta que en el 93 lanzaron “His ‘N’ Hers” a través de Island Records. Un caso aparte son los Oasis, que fueron los que realmente definieron el sonido y por ende quedaron atrapados en el durante el resto de los 90s, cuando el movimiento ya era un recuerdo. El resto de bandas de “segunda línea” fueron presionadas por las discográficas para crear canciones en base a la radio-fórmula basadas en los artistas clásicos de los 60s. Su reinado fue entre los años 94 y 96, y a partir de aquí comenzó la lenta agonía del movimiento. Podríamos decir que el lanzamiento del primer disco de las Spice Girls fue el día que el Brit-Pop paso a segundo plano para los medios y las discográficas. Ya habían encontrado a la nueva gallina de los huevos de oro. Hubo excelentes discos, excelentes canciones que hoy en día muchos seguimos recordando, aunque posiblemente no han envejecido todo lo bien que nosotros queremos o deseamos. En este Podcast podréis escuchar varias de aquellas canciones que han marcado a toda una generación. TRACKLIST: 01 - Oasis - Live Forever 02 - Kula Shaker - Tattva 03 - Suede - Animal Nitrate 04 - Teenage Fanclub - What You Do To Me 05 - Pulp - Do You Remember The First Time? 06 - Sleeper - Inbetweener 07 - Manic Street Preachers - A Design For Life 08 - Mansun - Wide Open Space 09 - Ocean Colour Scene - The Riverboat Song 10 - The Verve - Slide Away 11 - Suede - Beautiful Ones 12 - Elastica - Connection 13 - Blur - Country House 14 - Supergrass - Alright 15 - The Boo Radleys - Wake Up Boo! 16 - Pulp - Common People 17 - Echobelly - Great Things 18 - Oasis - Roll With It 19 - Blur - Parklife

Composers Datebook
Korngold writes a symphony

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 2:00


Synopsis On today's date in 1972, almost two decades after its premiere, Erich Wolfgang Korngold's Symphony in F-sharp received its first successful concert performance by the Munich Philharmonic led by Rudolf Kempe. A recording was made with the same performers, supervised and produced by the composer's son, George Korngold. Korngold had died in 1959, so was not able to enjoy the eventual success of this major work. He completed his Symphony in 1950, and its Austrian Radio premiere in 1954 had been a disaster. As the composer himself put it: “The performance, which was an execution in every sense of the term, took place under the most unfavorable conditions imaginable, with inadequate rehearsals and an exhausted and overworked orchestra.” Korngold had become an American citizen during the 1940s, and dedicated his Symphony to the memory of America's wartime President, Franklin D. Roosevelt. The postwar European premiere of his Symphony came at a time when shifting tastes in music made his late-Romantic style seem hopelessly old-fashioned to many of critics of that day. “More corn than gold” was one dismissive appraisal of his style. These days, Korngold's music – including his Symphony –make more frequent, better-played, and eagerly welcomed appearances on concert programs. Music Played in Today's Program Erich Wolfgang Korngold (1897 – 1957) — Symphony, Op. 40 (Philadelphia Orchestra; Franz Welser-Most, cond.) EMI 56169

Composers Datebook
A belated Schumann premiere

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 2:00


Synopsis On today's date in 1937, a gala concert in Berlin presented the premiere performance of Robert Schumann's Violin Concerto in D-minor, a work composed in the fall of 1853, shortly before Schumann's tragic mental collapse. The Concerto was never given a public performance during Schumann's lifetime, although the great 19th century violinist Joseph Joachim read through the score during an orchestral rehearsal early in 1854, and played the work privately in 1855, with piano accompaniment provided by Schumann's wife, Clara. Clara, Joachim and their mutual friend Johannes Brahms all judged the concerto sub-par and perhaps embarrassing evidence of Schumann's declining mental state. Oddly enough, the 1937 premiere in Berlin, attended by none other than Adolf Hitler, was presented as part of the Nazi's “Strength Through Joy” cultural program. German commentators touted Schumann's ties to the German “folk,” while American critics bemoaned that most of the great German violinists of the day were unavailable for this important premiere, having all left Germany for racial or political reasons. On this side of the Atlantic, it was violinist Yehudi Menuhin who gave the American premiere of Schumann's long-neglected Concerto a month later, first with piano accompaniment at Carnegie Hall, then later with the St. Louis Symphony. Music Played in Today's Program Robert Schumann (1810 – 1856) — Violin Concerto in D Minor (Gidon Kremer, violin; Philharmonia Orchestra; Riccardo Muti, cond.) EMI 69334

Kudazzers
S7 KUDA 40: oLL i WaNt 4 XmAz

Kudazzers

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 40:35


GoodEve mga Marites! XD At dahil Thanksgiving weekend this week, ito na ang simula ng pag open ng ating Christmas SZN!!!! The happiest Szn of all sa mga hindi single EMI!

Your Brain on Facts
Best Served Loud (do-over, ep. 172))

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 35:48


A microphone is a good enough platform for getting back at people, but an entire recording studio is even better.  Popular music is littered with songs getting back at an ex lover, from Waylon Jennings to Taylor Swift, but a fair number of the tracks you know by heart are actually clap-backs to the people in the mixing booth or the record label offices. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website.   I love this podcast and am so happy Moxie is so prolific! A very compelling mix of the obscure to the commonplace, and a riveting listen no matter what.

los angeles google fashion stage american america music mushrooms berlin detroit audible kevin macleod taylor swift new york city young republicans opera recorded british david bowie billboard water buried internet chaos band ben folds alaska brainiac death magazine palin states mercury warner bros warner bahamas plymouth sisters reach hang popular cbs morrison heart pink barack obama disorders warner brothers record shine boy scouts shortly audiobooks new year neil young rock and roll kris kristofferson william friedkin pink floyd lsd rolling stones mick jagger frank zappa loud brian may brits dedicated bang sean connery emi van morrison sheffield jimi hendrix east west freddie mercury landing reuters zappa geffen marvin gaye ashes morse releasing warren beatty rca goin syd exorcist sarah palin space oddity crazy horse lawyers jump street moxie emancipation syd barrett queensryche barracuda lodger richard branson billboard hot rnc merch roger taylor little queen cta unluckily public enemy ann wilson david geffen wilsons roger waters david gilmour major tom roger fisher dreamboat annie john reid waylon jennings kroq michael fisher shine on no way carly simon golden years tubular bells gypsys fillmore east shadows fall nancy wilson wish you were here days of our lives brown eyed girl i googled trident studios mike oldfield david briggs lather scary monsters oldfield virgin records amarok virgin atlantic virgin mobile one down warner music purple one david fesliyan geffen records night at super creeps pinwheel so vain andrew eldritch for unlawful carnal knowledge two legs best served
Disques de légende
Le coffret EMI « Les introuvables du chant verdien » d'André Tubeuf

Disques de légende

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 15:30


durée : 00:15:30 - Disques de légende du mardi 23 novembre 2021 - Aujourd'hui dans Disques de légende, nous écoutons la compilation EMI de 1986 « Les introuvables du chant verdien », dont André Tubeuf était le maitre d'œuvre.

The Engineering Career Coach Podcast
TECC 260: Top Skills All Engineers Need to Excel in for Their Careers

The Engineering Career Coach Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 25:59


In this episode, we talk to Pamela A. Scott, an executive coach to CEOs and business owners, focusing on communication, managing people, leadership, and emotional intelligence. You might have seen some of the inspirational articles she has authored on The Engineering Management Institute blog before. She's also been a guest speaker for EMI's program, The Civil […] The post TECC 260: Top Skills All Engineers Need to Excel in for Their Careers appeared first on Engineering Management Institute.

Penderecki in Memoriam
Jonny Greenwood about Penderecki

Penderecki in Memoriam

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 16:34


Penderecki in Memoriam Podcast is produced and hosted by Max Horowitz, Crossover Media. Created by Anna Perzanowska and Klaudia Ofwona Draber, and presented by Polish Cultural Institute New York. Penderecki in Memoriam Podcast unveils a multifaceted portrait of Krzysztof Penderecki, with commentary from musicians, colleagues, radio programmers, and writers who lend insight and memories of Poland's greatest modern composer. This podcast is part of Penderecki in Memoriam Worldwide project, honoring the life and legacy of the great composer. Thank you to project partners DUX, NAXOS, Ludwig van Beethoven Association, and Schott EAM for sharing Krzysztof Penderecki's music with the world. Jonny Greenwood is best known as the lead guitarist of the band Radiohead whom he joined whilst still at school. He started to study psychology and music at Oxford Brookes University, but only finished his first term before leaving to sign a six-album deal with EMI, and start his recording career with Radiohead. Radiohead have realized phenomenal success over the past decade, with multi-platinum album sales and an ever growing worldwide following. Greenwood is no stranger to classical music, though. His musical interests included Messiaen and Ligeti and he started out as a viola player. He plays several other instruments too, including piano, recorder and harmonica, and has a particular love for the ondes martenot. To date Greenwood has penned a number of “classical” works: smear (two ondes martenots and ensemble), Popcorn Superhet Receiver (string orchestra), Doghouse (string trio and large orchestra), 48 Responses to Polymorphia (48 strings), Water (chamber orchestra), and Horror vacui (solo violin and 68 strings). In 2004, Greenwood was made Composer in Residence with the BBC Concert Orchestra. The first fruit of this association was Popcorn Superhet Receiver, a BBC commission, premiered by the BBC Concert Orchestra and Robert Ziegler in April 2005. The piece was inspired by radio static and the extended, dissonant chords of Polish composer Penderecki's Threnody for the Victims of Hiroshima.  Popcorn Superhet Receiver won the BBC Radio 3 Listeners' Award at the 2006 British Composer Awards. Sections of this work were later worked into his soundtrack for the Oscar-winning Paul Thomas Anderson film There Will Be Blood (2007). Subsequent film credits include Tran Anh Hung's Norwegian Wood, based on the novel by Haruki Murakami, Lynne Ramsay's We Need To Talk About Kevin, psychological thriller You Were Never Really Here, and the Paul Thomas Anderson films The Master and Inherent Vice. Track Credits: Popcorn Superhet Receiver: Pt. 1 Popcorn Superhet Receiver: Pt. 2B 48 Responses to Polymorphia: Three Oak Leaves 48 Responses to Polymorphia: Pacay Tree 48 Responses to Polymorphia: Bridge 48 Responses to Polymorphia: Baton Sparks Penderecki Polymorphia https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.557980 (https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.557980) Threnody https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.554491 (https://www.naxos.com/catalogue/item.asp?item_code=8.554491) Kanon For Orchestra and Tape https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESmO1ibZbII (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESmO1ibZbII) 

Death in the Northwest
Get to Know Stevie Minisode!

Death in the Northwest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:14


We are so excited for season 2 of Death in the Northwest! In this minisode, you can up with Jordan and Emi to hear what we've been doing with our lives. Plus you get to meet our new co-host, Stevie! Listen as Stevie partakes in answering personal questions for all to hear. Thank you for your continued support! Find us on Instagram @deathinthenwpodcast or email us at deathinthenwpodcast@gmail.com to say hi or suggest a case. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/deathinthenwpodcast/support

Finding Mastery
Jay Samit: Take Control of Your Future, Now

Finding Mastery

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 81:06


This week's conversation is with Jay Samit, a dynamic entrepreneur and intrepreneur who is widely recognized as one of the world's leading experts on disruption and innovation. The former Independent Vice Chairman of Deloitte Consulting, Jay helped grow pre-IPO companies such as LinkedIn, been a Nasdaq company CEO, held senior management roles at EMI, Sony and Universal Studios, pioneered breakthrough advancements in mobile, ecommerce, digital distribution, and spatial reality that are used by billions of consumers every day. Jay raises hundreds of millions of dollars for startups, advises Fortune 500 firms, transforms entire industries, revamps government institutions, and for three decades continues to be at the forefront of global trends.His list of partners and associates reads like a who's who list of innovators, including: Bill Gates, President Bill Clinton, Pope John Paul II, Steven Spielberg, Steve Jobs, Reid Hoffman, David Geffen, Sir Richard Branson, and Paul Allen.And if you're interested in learning more after listening to this conversation, I definitely recommend checking out Jay's book - Disrupt You! Master Personal Transformation, Seize Opportunity, and Thrive in the Era of Endless Innovation.----Please support our partners!We're able to keep growing and creating content for YOU because of their support. We believe in their mission and would appreciate you supporting them in return!!To take advantage of deals from our partners, head to http://www.findingmastery.net/partners where you'll find all discount links and codes mentioned in the podcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Composers Datebook
Herschel Looks Up

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 2:00


Synopsis Today is the birthday of a quite remarkable 18th century British composer, Sir William Herschel, who was born in Hannover, Germany, on this date in 1738. Herschel's father was a regimental oboist, and young William himself eventually joined papa's regimental band – also as an oboist. In his early 20s he settled in England, was active in Newcastle, Leeds, Halifax, and Bath, and in time became a prominent figure on the music scene, attracting the attention of the Royal Family. He composed 24 symphonies and a number of concertos. In addition to musicHerschel had a passion for astronomy, and, beginning in the 1770s, concentrated more and more of his attention on scientific matters. In 1781, he discovered the planet Uranus, a feat that made him famous throughout Europe. Herschel was named “Astronomer Royal” to the British crown and given a pension that enabled him to give up music and devote himself entirely to astronomy. Haydn, during his stay in England, paid Herschel a visit to take a peek through his impressive 40-foot telescope. Herschel was knighted in 1817 and became the first president of the Royal Astronomical Society in 1821. He died the following year, in 1822, at the age of 83. Music Played in Today's Program William Herschel (1738 – 1822) — Oboe Concerto in C (Richard Woodhams, oboe; The Mozart Orchestra; Davis Jerome, cond.) Newport Classic 85612 Gustav Holst (1874 – 1934) — Uranus, from The Planets (Philharmonia Orchestra; Simon Rattle, cond.) EMI 9513

Wake Up to Money
Wake Up To Money Boardroom Stories - Guy Hands, Founder Terra Firma

Wake Up to Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 33:12


One of the biggest names in the world in private equity, Guy Hands, talks candidly about what he calls 'going from hero to zero'. Speaking with Felicity Hannah he shares his experience of growing his business Terra Firma Capital Partners which became one of the largest investment companies in the world. He discusses the controversy around his ownership of record label EMI and losing control of the care home company Four Seasons. He also talks about being dyslexic and how it's affected his life as well as the challenge of making business greener.

And Introducing
#104 30 SECONDS TO MARS! (ft. Indieheads Pod)

And Introducing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 94:44


And introducing….OPPRESSED by the music industry! Silenced for their ART! It's Jared Leto and Thirty Seconds To Mars!! Yes this week is a mmmmmmovie episode. We're joined by Matty Monroe and Gavin Wilks of the Indieheads Podcast to dive into the wildly mediocre world of Oscar Winner Jared Leto's alt rock act and its struggle with their label EMI, through his 2012 self-direct documentary ARTIFACT. Check out the Indieheads podcast here: https://rindieheadspodcast.wordpress.com/

When They Was Fab: Electric Arguments About the Beatles
2021.r30 Let It Be SDE - Disc 2 (Apple Sessions)

When They Was Fab: Electric Arguments About the Beatles

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 59:24


Week 3 of the WTWF look at the "Let It Be" SDE box.     This week, Apple Sessions.       Chat and sessions from January 1969.     The Beatles are working on their next project with the start date on filming for "The Magic Christian" looming.     Jams, recording sessions on EMI's portable in the basement and more!

icqpodcast's Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast
ICQ Podcast Episode 363 - The Lost Tribe, the Pied Piper and the Executive

icqpodcast's Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 105:12


In this episode, Martin Butler (M1MRB) is joined by Dan Romanchik KB6NU, Edmund Spicer M0MNG, Ed Durrant DD5LP and Leslie Butterfield G0CIB to discuss the latest Amateur / Ham Radio news. Colin (M6BOY) rounds up the news in brief and in the episode we feature is The Lost Tribe, the Pied Piper and the Executive. We would like to thank Mark Weber, AB4IX, and our monthly and annual subscription donors for keeping the podcast advert free. To donate, please visit - http://www.icqpodcast.com/donate - VP0 New Prefix - Laboratory Test Model of 'Sputnik 1 EMC/EMI', 1957 - You can now order Pizza with Morse Code - ARRL Clean Signal Initiative on the Horizon - Broadcaster in Ham Radio 40m Band - High School Students Learn how to use Ham Radio - Denmark's 40 MHz Beacon is Back on the Air - New UK Mock Exam Papers Available - Pearl Harbor Day Memorial Special Event

Orbital
JioPhone Next Review

Orbital

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 33:48


It's finally here — the fruits of Jio and Google's partnership have come home this Diwali with a new entry-level phone that Reliance hopes will be the 4G smartphone for everyone. Gadgets 360 video producer Aditya Nath Jha and senior reviewer Sheldon Pinto join host Akhil Arora to discuss the JioPhone Next. We talk about the phone's 5.45-inch 720p display and the 1.3GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 215 quad-core processor, neither of which is class-leading. The JiPhone next is also stuck with Android Go — rebranded here as Pragati OS — though thanks to Google, the camera's AI processing is definitely class-leading. Watch: JioPhone unboxing, in Hindi But there are problems elsewhere too. The JioPhone Next must have Jio as its primary SIM, Jha tells us, while the secondary SIM is restricted to 2G network. So much for Reliance's ‘2G-Mukt Bharat' vision. And though Jio is bringing EMIs (that can also be paid in cash) to low-cost phones with the JioPhone Next, there are catches. With the most affordable EMI plan, the JioPhone Next will end up costing you over Rs. 13,000. Yes, that includes Jio data and voice plans but they are quite limited. Additionally, if you fail to pay EMIs on time, the phone can be locked by the financier. No word on whether that will affect basic features such as calls too. Follow Gadgets 360 on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube. Write to us at podcast@gadgets360.com Chapters Intro (00:00) Basic build (00:23) Removable battery (01:33) Jio 4G, rest 2G (02:45) Performance? (04:11) EMI plan combos (09:03) Defaulting locking (13:30) Google camera AI (15:35) Custom features (18:22) Alternatives (23:30) Made for India (26:18) Outro (33:31) Photo credits: Aditya Nath Jha/Gadgets 360

Business Daily
Guy Hands on deal making and private equity

Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 17:28


Guy Hands, the founder of Terra Firma, opens up on the highs and lows and risks involved in deal making and private equity. From being bullied at school to becoming a household name, buying and selling businesses from cinema chains and pubs to waste management, aircraft leasing and green energy companies. We hear his side of the deal that turned sour, the acquisition of multinational music company EMI in 2007, and how his addiction to doing deals has affected his personal life. Ed Butler is in conversation with Guy Hands about his new book, The Dealmaker. (Image: Guy Hands; image credit: John De Garis)

Composers Datebook
Rimsky-Korsakov's bee takes flight

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 2:00


Synopsis The Russian composer Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov might be described as an operatic dynamo: he composed fifteen of them himself and had a hand in editing, orchestrating, and promoting important operas by his fellow countrymen: Mussorgsky's “Boris Godunov” and “Khovantschina,” Borodin's “Prince Igor,” and Dargomïzhsky's “The Stone Guest.” Rimsky-Korsakov's fifteen operas are rarely staged with any regularity outside Russia, although instrumental suites and excerpts from them have proven immensely popular as concert pieces. The familiar “Flight of the Bumble-Bee” is from a Rimsky-Korsakov opera that premiered in Moscow on today's date in 1900, and, like most of his operas, is based on Russian fairytales. The opera's full title is: “The Tale of Tsar Saltan, of his Son the Renowned and Mighty Bogatïr Prince Guidon Saltanovich, and of the Beautiful Swan-Princess.” If you think the title is a bit long, consider the required cast of performers, which in addition to thirteen main characters calls for Boyars and their wives, courtiers, nursemaids, sentries, troops, boatmen, astrologers, footmen, singers, scribes, servants and maids, dancers of both sexes, 33 knights of the sea with their leader Chernomor, a squirrel, and – oh yes – a bumblebee. Music Played in Today's Program Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov (1844 – 1908) — Flight of the Bumble Bee, from Tsar Saltan (Philharmonia Orchestra; Vladimir Ashkenazy, cond.) London 460 250 Rimsky-Korsakov — Flight of the Bumble Bee (Budapest Clarinet Quintet) Naxos 8.553427 Rimsky-Korsakov — Flight of the Bumble Bee (Itzhak Perlman, violin; Samuel Sanders, piano) EMI 54882

The Hustle
Episode 340 - Alan Parsons/Mike Thorne

The Hustle

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 125:09


This week is a special two-fer, two legendary producers in one shot! First up is the legend himself, Alan Parsons! If you think about it, even with all the iconic albums he's worked on like Dark Side and Abbey Road, his main focus has largely been his Alan Parsons Project. In fact, they are releasing a brand new live CD/DVD called The Neverending Show: Live in the Netherlands on Nov. 5th. We discuss the Project's history and hits as well. Then we talk to producer Mike Thorne. This is the man who produced eternal hits like "Tainted Love", "Smalltown Boy", and "Voices Carry". Not to mention that while he worked A&R, he encouraged EMI to sign the Sex Pistols! Lots to cover!  www.alanparsons.com www.stereosociety.com/thorne www.patreon.com/thehustlepod

Tape Notes
TN:83 CHVRCHES

Tape Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 117:14


In this episode, John links up with Lauren, Iain and Martin of CHVRCHES to talk about how they wrote, recorded and produced the album ‘Screen Violence'. Largely working remotely from different parts of the world, the trio look back on how they adapted their writing process, discussing how the effects of the pandemic ended up shaping some of the themes and meanings within the album. Sharing some of their day one demos, we hear stories of forming entire songs around single elements, combining and blending vintage gear with modern recording techniques, and using creative production tricks to respond to and reinforce certain lyrics. Listen to find how powerful hidden live drums on an electronic beat can be, why you should always keep your day one demo in a session, and how to react when Robert Smith emails you saying “what do you want?”   Tracks discussed:  How Not To Drown, He Said She Said, California Listen to ‘Screen Violence' here. ‘Screen Violence' - EMI, Virgin Records   GEAR MENTIONS Auto-Tune Melodyne Soundtoys Alter Boy Soundtoys Microshift Soundtoys Decapitator Valhalla Delay Universal Audio OX Amp Arcade Roland D50 Roland Juno 106 Siel Orchestra Synthesizer Fender 6 Bass  AMS Reverb Space Echo Tube-Tech CL 1B Compressor Pultec 1176 Compressor LA-2A Leveling Amp   SUBMIT A JINGLE For all of the details on sending in a jingle email jingles@tapenotes.co.uk   Submit your Tape Notes jingle and we'll play our favourites each week on the podcast. Jingles can be in any style, can feature the Tape Notes theme, lyrics, or none of those things - be as creative as you'd like (as long as they're between 5-15 seconds).   HELP SUPPORT THE SHOW If you'd like to help support the show you can donate as little or as much as you'd like here, (we really appreciate your contributions :)  Donate   KEEP UP TO DATE For behind the scenes photos and the latest updates, make sure to follow us on:  Instagram: @tapenotes  Twitter: @tapenotes  Facebook: @tapenotespodcast   To let us know the artists you'd like to hear, Tweet us, slide into our DMs, send us an email or even a letter. We'd love to hear!  Visit our website to join our mailing list: www.tapenotes.co.uk

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
How to handle our financial insecurities? - Hot Seat (Listener Special)

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 16:07


In this listener special episode of #TheHabitCoach Podcast, Host Ashdin answers an interesting question from an anonymous listener - they ask "My parents constantly complain that I ignore them and don't care for them. However, because of their pressure, I compromised on many of my aspirations, I ended up buying a house when I wasn't ready. I didn't have enough down deposit amount and ended up taking a personal loan apart from a housing loan to fulfill their dream. This is on top of an education loan and another personal loan that I had already taken a few years ago. Today, I have no money that I can spend on or for myself since every penny goes towards EMIs. There is my sister's wedding which they expect me to fund and I don't know where I can get that money from. I try hard to not let their constant complaining affect me but it's hard. I know I can't change them but I want peace of mind without which my performance at work is taking a huge hit. I'm worried about losing my job if this goes on. How can I deal with this? I need to change myself to handle them...thank you in advance."Ashdin answers by explaining why there's a need to unpack certain things like - Insecurities, denial and setting principles. He further shares the importance of understanding our own aspirations and how to say No to other people without being rude to others. Ashdin also talks about a few super simple habits that can help people to make better financial and life decisions. Tune in to this awesome episode to understand how to set your own principles. You can listen to The Habit Coach Kannada Podcast here: ( https://ivm.today/3j0Libf )Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Awesome 180 Website: ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Choses à Savoir SCIENCES
Que voit-on avant de décéder ?

Choses à Savoir SCIENCES

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 1:52


De nombreuses personnes ranimées après avoir été plongées dans un épisode de coma avancé ou après avoir connu un état de mort clinique, font état d'expériences étranges, connues sous le nom d'"expériences de mort imminente", ou EMI.D'étonnantes expériences aux portes de la mortLes EMI ne sont pas des phénomènes rares. Elles concerneraient de 10 à 20 % des personnes survivant à un arrêt cardiaque. Un médecin américain a même constaté, au cours d'une recherche menée en 2014, que près de 40 % des patients interrogés avaient vécu une telle expérience.De plus, ce curieux phénomène se produit chez des patients de tous âges. Il semble aussi survenir partout dans le monde, sans que la culture propre de chaque peuple semble beaucoup influencer son déroulement.Certains patients dans le coma ou en état de mort clinique disent entrer dans un tunnel, au bout duquel brille une intense lumière. Certains prétendent rencontrer des défunts, dont des membres de leur famille décédés, qui semblent les attendre.D'après ces récits, certains patients sortiraient de leur corps, et, parvenus au plafond, se verraient eux-mêmes étendus sur leur lit. Ils verraient aussi toute leur vie défiler rapidement.Les personnes ayant vécu une EMI resteraient souvent marquées par une expérience qui changerait parfois leur façon de vivre et de penser.À la recherche d'explications rationnellesPour la plupart des scientifiques, qui se refusent a priori à envisager d'autres hypothèses, ces phénomènes ne peuvent qu'avoir une origine organique.Pour eux, il ne peut donc s'agir que d'illusions, produites par un fonctionnement altéré, ou du moins différent, du cerveau et d'autres organes. Ils pointent en particulier le dérèglement des régions cérébrales impliquées dans le déclenchement des émotions ou la mémoire.La sécrétion plus abondante de certaines hormones, dans cette ultime étape de la vie, ou le manque d'oxygène pourraient aussi jouer un rôle dans l'apparition de ce que ces médecins qualifient de visions. Autant d'hypothèses qu'il reste à démontrer.Par ailleurs, le cerveau continuerait d'être actif plusieurs minutes après l'arrêt du cœur. Une certaine forme de conscience pourrait donc subsister durant ce court laps de temps. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

First Name Basis Podcast
4.11 Our Kiddos Are Going to Change the World

First Name Basis Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 26:32


In many ways, Emi Kim is what you might consider a typical 9-year-old. When she grows up, she wants to be a scientist or president of the United States, but for now, she loves to swim and sketch — and fight racism.   And fight racism she has.    When Emi noticed that her school library was lacking diverse books, she decided to do something about it. She led her whole family in hosting a lemonade stand to raise money to buy books with diverse characters for her school library, and her first lemonade stand raised more than $750!   “I'm changing the world one lemonade stand at a time,” Emi said.   Emi's commitment to anti-racism is nothing short of inspiring. To hear of someone so young making such a big difference gives me the chills, but even more than that, it gives me hope.   Our kiddos are going to change the world, and if we do our part now to raise them to be anti-racist and inclusive, they are going to change the world into a much better place.   Listen to the episode to hear all of Emi's story. I can guarantee you'll leave fired up and ready to follow Emi's example to make a positive change.   Ally Elementary  Parents have been asking for a practical, interactive way to implement the anti-racist strategies that I lay out in the First Name Basis Podcast. So this October we are launching “Ally Elementary: Anti-Racist Education For Families."    During this five-week program parents will work together with their children to create a culture of anti-racism in their home, and I will be there to guide them every step of the way. We will use hands-on activities to teach our children about everything from the untold story of how race was created to how they can disrupt racism in their everyday lives. I am so excited to watch the families in our community make a meaningful transformation and improve their communities through anti-racist action. Click here to invest in Ally Elementary for your family! Free Class! Ally ABCs: 3 Simple Ways to Embed Anti-Racism Into Your Family Culture   If you're ready to reignite your fire for anti-racism or deepen your commitment to the movement this class is for you, and Tuesday, Nov. 2, is your last chance to catch it! During this free online class we will work together to create a plan that you can use to bring your kiddos along on this anti-racist journey. Click here to choose a time that fits best with your schedule and sign up today!  Song Credit: “Sleeper” by Steve Adams” and “Dive Down” by VYEN

The Vinyl Guide
Ep310: Alan Parsons and The Neverending Show

The Vinyl Guide

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 54:20


Alan Parsons started his career at EMI working with artists like The Beatles and Pink Floyd. Within a few years, The Alan Parsons Project was topping the charts and lifting the sonic standards of popular music. Alan has been taking his music on the road and today we talk about his new live album and incredible career. Topics include: Recording with tape & Pro Tools Becoming an OBE Working at EMI, Sgt Pepper Tape operator for Let It Be The Beatles Rooftop Concert Going from musician to engineer to producer The recording of Pink Floyd Dark Side of the Moon Vinyl mastering for Atom Heart Mother The beginnings of The Alan Parsons Project Tales of Mystery & Imagination / The Orson Welles tapes Working w Storm Thorgerson & Hipgnosis Rotating musicians in the Alan Parsons Project The NeverEnding Show - Live in the Netherlands Transitioning to touring and playing live Listener questions Listen on Apple: https://apple.co/2Y6ORU0 Listen on Spotify: https://spoti.fi/36qhlc8 Follow our Podcast: https://linktr.ee/vinylguide Facebook: www.Facebook.com/VinylGuide Instagram: www.Instagram.com/VinylGuide Support our show: www.Patreon.com/VinylGuide If you like records, just starting a collection or are an uber-nerd with a house-full of vinyl, this is the podcast for you. Nate Goyer is The Vinyl Guide and discusses all things music and record-related

BIN Radio
Episode 85: What is Hypertrophy?

BIN Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 69:20


Emi and Kiefer, two of our resident experts on all things muscle, sit down to talk about hypertrophy. They describe what it is, how and why it happens, why it's good to go through periods of hypertrophic training even if you're an athlete focused on strength or performance. We decided at the beginning of the episode that the topic of hypertrophy, strength, and muscle building in general should be a series, so this is part 1 of that series! Part 2 will be out soon!

Small Business, Big Mindset
Money Manifestation, Mindset, and Science

Small Business, Big Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 43:17


This week I get to chat with Emily King, wealth and abundance coach. She focuses on helping women entrepreneurs with their money mindset to grow their income and impact doing what they love. After years of hoarding money and coming from a scarcity mindset, Emily learned about money mindset. In addition to vision boards, mantras, and visualizations she learned the science behind it all. Things that 'shouldn't have happened' started to happen the more she learned and implemented…like a $100K product launch. Highlight Discussions:What a financial thermostat is and how to manage yoursHarnessing your reticular activating systemThe first steps Emily has her clients take toward financial freedomWhat she implemented to earn at $100K launch The Wrap-UpIf you could listen to one music artist for the rest of your life, who would it be? Mumford and Sons Where can people find you online?WebsiteInstagramManifesting Meditations

DreamNation Real Estate Podcast with Casanova Brooks
DNRE97 - Knolly Williams: The Eight Pillars of Success in Business

DreamNation Real Estate Podcast with Casanova Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 57:12


Here's a snapshot of a few things we talked about…         Who is the Clark Kent, When It Comes to Knolly Williams? [00:02:06]         The Business that He Started at the Age of 13 [00:03:09]         What Does the Process of Profit Look Like? [00:04:54]         How Did He Become Interested in Real Estate? [00:06:33]         How He Started a Christian Rap Label [00:10:43]         How He Failed to Adapt to the Changes in the Market? [00:12:42]         Why He was Never a Buyer's Agent in His Career [00:18:25]         The Principles He Used to Get 21 Listings in 74 Days [00:25:11]         The 8 Pillars to Success by Knolly Williams [00:30:39]         Why Did He Decide to Join eXp Realty? [00:37:06]         How He Built His Team After Joining eXp Realty [00:47:37]         One Thing He Wishes He Had Implemented Sooner to Accelerate His Journey? [00:52:46]         Where to Find Knolly Williams? [00:55:31] In This Episode You'll Learn: In this episode, Casanova talks with Knolly Williams. He shares how he started his entrepreneurial journey at the age of 13, the Process of Profit, how we started a successful Christian rap label and how he ended up losing everything. He also shares how he was able to turn things around and finding success in the real estate business, and how he is trying to help others achieve the same. Key Quotes:         “When I was 18, I cleaned up my act, came to Jesus, literally, and I've been on an entrepreneurial path since I was 13 years old...”         “I call it the Process of Profit. I like seeing, I like starting off with a dime and turn it into a dollar. It's just a lot of fun for me…”         “One of the myths in entrepreneurship is that we can do it all by ourselves, and the truth is nobody succeeds alone…”         By the time I was 28, I was making over a hundred grand a month, and by the time I was 29, I made my first million. I actually made $2 million that year. Our record label got picked up by EMI capital…         So, I ended up actually dead broke when the music industry switched to in the early 2000s, I couldn't keep up. I didn't adapt to the change, and I got left behind.         “There's eight pillars that you have to have in any business in order to succeed at a high level, and the very first pillar really is mindset...”         “Who taught you what you currently know about money? Does that person, or did that person earn the money you want to make? And if not, it's time to get better teachers…”         The eight pillars of success are mindset, activities, people, systems, tools, money, accountability, and training.         The four bodies are, you have a physical body, a mental body, an emotional body, and a spiritual body, and you want to be astute and adept in all four of your bodies.         “I always had this dream Cass of being able to serve people, without them having to pay for my services…”         One thing that I really wish I would have learned earlier is to work closer on developing myself Links/Resources:         The Millionaire Real Estate Agent by Gary Keller         The Power of Your Subconscious Mind by Dr. Joseph Murphy         Knolly.com       https://www.youtube.com/user/knollytraining Help us out? If you enjoy our podcast, please head over to Apple Podcasts and leave us a 5-star review. By doing so, you enable us to reach more people.