Podcasts about The Beach Boys

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American rock band

  • 2,316PODCASTS
  • 4,050EPISODES
  • 57mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 15, 2022LATEST
The Beach Boys

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Best podcasts about The Beach Boys

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Latest podcast episodes about The Beach Boys

Coast to Coast Hoops
Introducing: Blood on The Tracks - The Brian Wilson Story

Coast to Coast Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 2:43


Hi, Citizen Critic fans! We think you'll love the new season of Blood on the Tracks, which takes a deep dive into the life of Brian Wilson. You don't have to take our word for it, though. Check out the trailer and decide for yourself! About the show: In 1966, Brian Wilson planned to follow up the Beach Boys' groundbreaking album Pet Sounds with an even bigger musical statement. He was writing a teenage symphony to God. That album, Smile, was never finished. Instead, Brian slowly unraveled, as the pressure to make something profound weighed heavy on him. He worried that he wasn't good enough. He worried that he was a failure in the eyes of the record company, his band, his peers, and his own father. He thought his house was bugged. He thought the music he was making conjured some strange voodoo that had a disastrous impact on the real world. He became paranoid. He self-medicated with amphetamines, hash, and LSD. He held meetings in his swimming pool. He imagined people who weren't there. And eventually, in 1967, he went off the proverbial deep end. Did the real Brian Wilson ever resurface? Part true crime, part historical fiction, part spoken word lo-fi beat noir brought to you by Jake Brennan, and featuring the fictionalized voice Brian Wilson, BLOOD ON THE TRACKS sounds like nothing you've heard before. Because you can't push the needle into the red without leaving a little blood on the tracks. Listen to Blood on The Tracks: The Brian Wilson Story on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

About A Girl
Introducing: Blood on The Tracks - The Brian Wilson Story

About A Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 2:43


Hi, About A Girl fans! We think you'll love the new season of Blood on the Tracks, which takes a deep dive into the life of Brian Wilson. You don't have to take our word for it, though. Check out the trailer and decide for yourself! About the show: In 1966, Brian Wilson planned to follow up the Beach Boys' groundbreaking album Pet Sounds with an even bigger musical statement. He was writing a teenage symphony to God. That album, Smile, was never finished. Instead, Brian slowly unraveled, as the pressure to make something profound weighed heavy on him. He worried that he wasn't good enough. He worried that he was a failure in the eyes of the record company, his band, his peers, and his own father. He thought his house was bugged. He thought the music he was making conjured some strange voodoo that had a disastrous impact on the real world. He became paranoid. He self-medicated with amphetamines, hash, and LSD. He held meetings in his swimming pool. He imagined people who weren't there. And eventually, in 1967, he went off the proverbial deep end. Did the real Brian Wilson ever resurface? Part true crime, part historical fiction, part spoken word lo-fi beat noir brought to you by Jake Brennan, and featuring the fictionalized voice Brian Wilson, BLOOD ON THE TRACKS sounds like nothing you've heard before. Because you can't push the needle into the red without leaving a little blood on the tracks. Listen to Blood on The Tracks: The Brian Wilson Story on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll Podcast
Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll_165

Rare & Scratchy Rock 'N Roll Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 56:51


R&SRNR #_165 – “THE COMPLETE HIT SINGLES HISTORY OF JAN & DEAN” (Remastered) This is a remastered version of our prior episode _031, It celebrates the complete hit singles history of an act whose trademark tunes are indelibly associated with songs about surfing and fast cars. But there's much more to their musical achievements. They were innovative composers, singers, and producers. Long before their songs about riding the waves and racing dragsters, their early hits were mostly creative remakes of pop standards and other people's records. Eventually, some of their best-known material resulted from working with the Beach Boys. And while they were doing all that, this duo attended college so they could expand their career horizons. One studied graphic design and went on to create the artwork for best-selling rock and roll albums. The other was in medical school until a tragic auto accident ended that endeavor. Their names are William Jan Berry and Dean Ormsby Torrence – Jan & Dean. We'll trace their trajectory from an early hit about an exotic dancer to their permanent place in the pantheon of performers who exemplified the California rock and roll sound of the 1960s.

Dear Young Rocker
Introducing: Blood on The Tracks - The Brian Wilson Story

Dear Young Rocker

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 2:43


Hi, Dear Young Rocker fans! We think you'll love the new season of Blood on the Tracks, which takes a deep dive into the life of Brian Wilson. You don't have to take our word for it, though. Check out the trailer and decide for yourself! About the show: In 1966, Brian Wilson planned to follow up the Beach Boys' groundbreaking album Pet Sounds with an even bigger musical statement. He was writing a teenage symphony to God. That album, Smile, was never finished. Instead, Brian slowly unraveled, as the pressure to make something profound weighed heavy on him. He worried that he wasn't good enough. He worried that he was a failure in the eyes of the record company, his band, his peers, and his own father. He thought his house was bugged. He thought the music he was making conjured some strange voodoo that had a disastrous impact on the real world. He became paranoid. He self-medicated with amphetamines, hash, and LSD. He held meetings in his swimming pool. He imagined people who weren't there. And eventually, in 1967, he went off the proverbial deep end. Did the real Brian Wilson ever resurface? Part true crime, part historical fiction, part spoken word lo-fi beat noir brought to you by Jake Brennan, and featuring the fictionalized voice Brian Wilson, BLOOD ON THE TRACKS sounds like nothing you've heard before. Because you can't push the needle into the red without leaving a little blood on the tracks. Listen to Blood on The Tracks: The Brian Wilson Story on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Citizen Critic
Introducing: Blood on The Tracks - The Brian Wilson Story

Citizen Critic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 2:43


Hi, Citizen Critic fans! We think you'll love the new season of Blood on the Tracks, which takes a deep dive into the life of Brian Wilson. You don't have to take our word for it, though. Check out the trailer and decide for yourself! About the show: In 1966, Brian Wilson planned to follow up the Beach Boys' groundbreaking album Pet Sounds with an even bigger musical statement. He was writing a teenage symphony to God. That album, Smile, was never finished. Instead, Brian slowly unraveled, as the pressure to make something profound weighed heavy on him. He worried that he wasn't good enough. He worried that he was a failure in the eyes of the record company, his band, his peers, and his own father. He thought his house was bugged. He thought the music he was making conjured some strange voodoo that had a disastrous impact on the real world. He became paranoid. He self-medicated with amphetamines, hash, and LSD. He held meetings in his swimming pool. He imagined people who weren't there. And eventually, in 1967, he went off the proverbial deep end. Did the real Brian Wilson ever resurface? Part true crime, part historical fiction, part spoken word lo-fi beat noir brought to you by Jake Brennan, and featuring the fictionalized voice Brian Wilson, BLOOD ON THE TRACKS sounds like nothing you've heard before. Because you can't push the needle into the red without leaving a little blood on the tracks. Listen to Blood on The Tracks: The Brian Wilson Story on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blood on the Tracks
Brian Wilson Is Burning Up (The Brian Wilson Story, Chapter 1)

Blood on the Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 32:55


Things are pretty calm around here at the moment, but sometimes they get a little shaky. Where are we? We're inside the mind of Brian Douglas Wilson, of course, the genius behind the Beach Boys' unprecedented masterpiece Pet Sounds. There are lots of things in here...songs, melodies, ideas...but there are also many dark corners for things to lurk in. For people to lurk in. As Brian continues to work on the band's follow-up to Pet Sounds, a so-called teenage symphony to God called Smile, the dark corners of his mind come alive. That's when the vibrations turned from good...to bad.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Blood on the Tracks
Brian Wilson Is Seeing Vibrations (The Brian Wilson Story, Chapter 2)

Blood on the Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 31:25


Before the Beach Boys began to work on Smile, Brian Wilson was already expanding his mind with the aid of LSD. The drug proved to be a point of contention with other band members, who bristled at Brian's newfound mind-altering methodology. Brian's LSD intake didn't just spark arguments between the Beach Boys. LSD made a black-and-white appear in Technicolor for the first time. It made water taste like it fell straight from heaven. It made musical notation come alive, notes and staffs just floating in the air. But LSD also brought with it a rising feeling of anxiety. The walls got bigger. Every room was suffocating. And before too long...the voices began to speak inside Brian's head.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour
Catching A Wave 08-15-22

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 57:05


August 16th, 2022 marks the 45th anniversary of Elvis' passing.  We'll hear a couple of tunes of his along with some covers by Reverend Horton Heat, Terreur Twist, The ChuGuysters, The Cramps, The Surfaris, Phil Keaggy and Link Wray.  Plus, we talk Elvis with both Suzi Quatro (and hear an Elvis cover from her) and Wink Martindale in our Green Room Segment.  Beth Riley has another great deep track from The Beach Boys in her Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break.  Plus, there's also some awesome tunes from California Surf Incorporated, The Wave Chargers, The Surfrajettes and Jim and the Seadragons and of course we'll drop a coin in the Jammin' James Jukebox to hear our selection of the week!   Intro music bed: "Catch A Wave"- The Beach Boys   Terreur Twist- "Adam And Evil" Reverend Horton Heat- "Viva Las Vegas" Elvis Presley- "Slowly But Surely" Phil Keaggy- "I Want You, I Need You, I Love You" Link Wray- "Tiger Man" California Surf Incorporated- "Playground" (feat. Bobby Figueroa) The Wave Chargers- "Surf Motel" The Surfrajettes- "Priscilla"   Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break: The Beach Boys- "Only With You" Follow "Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break" HERE   Elvis Presley- "Beach Boy Blues" The Cramps- "Jailhouse Rock" The Surfaris- "Hound Dog"   "Green Room" segment: Wink Martindale on his favorite Elvis tune Elvis Presley- "Suspicious Minds" Suzi Quatro on her love of Elvis and talking to him on the phone Suzi Quatro- "All Shook Up"   Jammin' James Jukebox selection of the week: Sharon Marie- "Runaround Lover"   Jim and the Sea Dragons- "Attila" The ChuGuysters- "A Little Less Conversation"   Outro music bed: The Ventures- "Memphis"

The Story Song Podcast
SSP Classics: Seasons in the Sun by Terry Jacks

The Story Song Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 42:51


BONUS EPISODE: Hello to you, our trusted friends. Have some joy and fun in the sun with this classic episode of THE STORY SONG PODCAST. Join your hosts as they revisit their review of the 1973 #1 hit song, “Seasons in the Sun” by Terry Jacks — a song that sounds like it might be about summer. Can a happy-sounding song be really, really sad? Did the Beach Boys make the best decision of their career? And what was that trusted friend's name? Find out in this classic episode of THE STORY SONG PODCAST, and wind down the summer with a downer of a song.Continue the conversation; follow THE STORY SONG PODCAST on social media. Follow us on Twitter (@Story_Song), Instagram (storysongpodcast), and Facebook (thestorysongpodcast).THE STORY SONG PODCAST is a member of the Pantheon Podcast Network.“Seasons in the Sun” by Terry Jacks (from the album Seasons in the Sun) is available on Apple Music, Amazon Music, Tidal, Deezer, Pandora, Spotify, or wherever you listen to music.

Cooking Issues with Dave Arnold
No Tangent Tuesday: Beach Boys Bummer

Cooking Issues with Dave Arnold

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2022 60:13


Are the Beach Boys still worth seeing live? What are some good camping meals? What's the best cooling technique for sous vide? All this and more on another "No Tangent" Tuesday. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 3 | We Need Water @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 34:17


Beach Boys / Jay Leno / Anne Heche investigated felony DUI Newsom Water Proposal / Calling someone the wrong name // Newsom Water Proposal Part Deux // Thrift stores not so thrifty / Season changing by stores in CA / Halloween at Conway's// Irvine woman poisons husband

When Words Fail...Music Speaks
Ep.198 – Cover Wars with Paul Christiansen from Pathos and Logos (God Only Knows by The Beach Boys)

When Words Fail...Music Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 34:27


The Mail-In Podcast
How Do You Deal With Hard Stuff?

The Mail-In Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 62:10 Very Popular


Brett is back in town with Sally after a few weeks at home for a big episode of The Mail-In. We're tackling your problems so you don't have to (yet). Here's what we've got this week: - Where do we stand on the Beach Boys? - What's the etiquette for being home when someone is working on your crib? - Baby moons? Are we doing them? - Do I have to give the same honeymoon gift back to someone that gets married a month after me? - Summer fling is coming to and end and we both know it. How do we enjoy our time left? - Upstate NY recommendations in the fall? - Shower Thoughts

El sótano
El sótano - Playita Party - 11/08/22

El sótano

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 59:28


Guateque playero a ritmo de 60’s rocknroll. Una sesión en donde bailaremos en la arena, cogeremos olas, tocaremos bongos, abriremos cervezas y nos deleitaremos observando músculos, bañadores o preciosos bikinis. Playlist; (sintonía) THE BEACHCOMBERS “The wheelie” ANNETE “Beach party” CITY SURFERS “Beach ball”” WAYNE HOLLERS “Dancing in the sand” RENE AND RAY “Surfboard” BIKINI BEACH CAST “Bikini beach” SPINNERS “Surfer monkey” SURFSIDERS “When I grow up” LARRY BRIGHT “Surfin’ queen” BRUCE JOHNSTON “Maztland” THE FOUR DIMENSIONS “Sand surfin’” THE GONZOS “Church key” THE BIKINIS “Bikini” RICKY DEAN “Bikini” HOUND DOGS “Beach girl” THE SURFETTES “Sammy the sidewalk surfer” THE BEACH BOYS and THE HONEYS “Runaway with me” THE BEACH BOYS “Alley oop” RONNIE AND THE DAYTRONAS “Beach Boy” THE SUPERSTOCKS “Muscle beach party” DAVID GATES “Okie surfer” BOB KEENE ORCHESTRA “Twist and freeze” RICKY DEAN “Little Betty limbo” CLIFF RICHARDS “On the beach” BOBBY DARIN with SHORTY LONG ORCHESTRA “Beachcomber” DAVE MYERS and the SURFTONES “Aquavelva” Escuchar audio

The Leadership Podcast
TLP319: Positioning for the Future

The Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 48:50


David Smith is a wicked problem-solver, collaborative business leader, technologist, and innovative futurist. He has held executive roles in R&D, government, commercial, and academic organizations. David has been named one of the top seven global futurists in the Millennium issue of Business Week. In this conversation, David shares several concepts to help leaders keep up with the present and prepare for the future. He describes wicked problems, and how to bring a team together with the tools to solve them. He is one of two futurists who have been accurate for the first 22 years of the century and is still on track.     https://bit.ly/TLP-319   Key Takeaways [2:18] David and Jim first met in Austin and found they had a mutual friend in Steve Justice.[3:46] In David's youth, as a long-haired roadie, he ran audio for the Beach Boys, the Carpenters, and others. David shares a story from that era. [6:18] David solves wicked problems, which are complex problems that have no known solution path. He once had a team of about 200 people over a year make a 45-year wicked problem roadmap for high-energy-density storage for the military. We can store energy now, but not yet at the density that we need. [7:53] Sematech was formed to regain the semiconductor industry back in the United States. They did it. Dave was one of the co-leaders of the first industry roadmap done in the United States. They worked with semiconductor manufacturers, suppliers, academia, and the government to create the roadmap. The commercial sector, academic sector, and government sector acted as a technopolis to enact change. [9:16] Solving wicked problems involves pulling the various stakeholders of commerce, academics, and the government to work together. [10:31] David explains the process of seeing fifty years into the future. He was one of seven futurists who predicted that this century would be defined by bio. All technology is becoming biological. At 22 years in, he's been pretty accurate. Only one of the other futurists is accurate for today. All the other five have fallen off the table. David explains how he used a framework. [11:20] A leading futurist has changed his future every 14 to 20 months. That's not forecasting, it's predicting and then changing his prediction. David uses a method that includes six views of the future: as an extrapolator, a pattern analyst, a goal-setter, a counterpuncher, an intuiter, or an artist. Different techniques are used for each of the views. [12:27] Use people who can work in different views to optimize out errors. David shares a story of a satellite phone company that went to market using only an extrapolation view to forecast sales. In 12 months, they asked David to work with them and get them on track, because his multiple-view forecast of their numbers had been right. [15:32] How can global social issues be solved? David explains that his framework can be applied across the U.S. and even as far as Malaysia. People understand the value of different views. He tells why the front windshield of a car is larger than the rear window; where we've been is important but where we're going is more important. You need to know where you've been to be optimized for the future. [18:36] When David interviews people, he asks a standard set of questions and also roleplays. One roleplay involves the interviewee being asked to defend his actions against “one of the world's leading experts” who disagrees with what the interviewee is doing. That shows David the candidate's potential for dealing with human dynamics. It reveals competencies and capabilities. [21:46] David suggests something for leaders: They and everyone in their company need to know that we are in a time of lifelong learning and the way we learn is dramatically changing. David is constantly learning and constantly looking at how to learn. One of the six views of the future is counterpuncher. A counterpuncher does a great job of current awareness.  A counterpuncher works scenarios. [23:28] David looks for weak signals. There's a lag between inventing something at a university and getting it to the marketplace. David uses tools that let him see what research universities are doing. That gives him the advantage of seeing weak, early signals and spending more time researching. He networks with a lot of people in different industries and he's always learning. He connects the dots. [25:12] Leaders sometimes forget that other industries are having to solve many of the same types of problems. Dave suggests looking at horizontal convergence. Often you can connect the solutions and the data well between industries. Follow David on Twitter. He posts several times a day of early indicators of industries, trends, and research. [26:03] It's very important to understand that the world is not static. Ask people to help you learn to do new things and prepare for the future. David tells people around the world that he's an East Texas farm boy. He finds it a great way to get people comfortable talking with him. [27:06] Before going to a research university, David participated in a pilot education program with 21 students at a college outside of Dallas. It was a one-year inquiry program of learning from original source material without textbooks. It forced them to synthesize. Learning to synthesize, plus having great mentors, gave David the greatest advantage in his career. [29:24] We live with “systems of systems.” Your one mobile device has voice communication, data, photography, entertainment, GPS, etc. David suggests thinking of mentors as a system. One mentor for your current role, one mentor for understanding the politics of the company, and one mentor outside your company for understanding entrepreneurship. Make connections and cultivate them as you go. [31:34] Don't look for a mentor to hold your hand, but one to point to the mountain and let you choose how to climb it to reach the top. Ask for help if you need it, but you need to understand the path yourself. You want a mentor to help stretch your brain, your competencies, and your capabilities. Learn intangibles above technical skills. David would hope you mentor others below you, too. It's not one-way. [35:28] David's hiring advice: Hire people who understand the principle of group intelligence. It's one of the strongest things David looks for in capabilities. If a rockstar candidate does not work well with others, the impact of that candidate will not be sustainable or optimal. [36:23] David's six views of the future are one of the ways he builds group intelligence. When he hires people, he wants to see if they're the one who always has to be right or if they play well with others. [36:41] David recommends silent brainstorming to generate ideas. He explains why it brings out better ideas than brainstorming out loud, and how it works, using a customer example. [39:26] Wicked problems are solved using group intelligence, using a technopolis approach, and using the six views approach. The common theme is using the power of people and the power of group intelligence. [40:28] Participation in team sports is an indicator of group intelligence. David looks to see if candidates participate in group hackathons to develop a solution over a weekend with people you don't work with. David also roleplays to see how the candidates get their information and use group intelligence. [42:28] David agrees with Steve Justice that we need to stand in the future. David says he has to live in the future to survive today. A leader's job is to help get the roadmap in place for where the company wants to go. A map has multiple possible routes, and it's not necessarily the leader's role to pick the route and the detours. It's to set the vision and help them understand what the future goals are. [43:28] A leader's role is to help the organization put roadmaps together for technology, services, products, and capabilities. The roadmaps empower the organization to get to its goals. A 100% top-down leadership in today's global, connected world would be too complicated for one leader. He needs the group intelligence of his teams, suppliers, and other stakeholders to help build the roadmaps. [44:52] David's closing thoughts: Since the beginning of recorded data, the amount of data has doubled every two years. Because of the quantity of the data, most legacy tech systems will fail. People need to be in the mode of lifelong learning, or they will be left behind. Twenty years ago, we didn't have web developers or eCommerce. Coming up, robotics and autonomous systems will revolutionize the world. [48:19] Closing quote: “We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” — Albert Einstein.   Quotable Quotes “When we formed Sematech, our market share in the U.S. had fallen to about 30% globally. That's a danger point for us. Just like today, … you're hearing about how the U.S. must regain its semiconductor industry again. Well, we did it back then and it needs to be done again.” “[For] wicked problems, … you've got to pull these various stakeholders together. And then you have to use approaches to make sure that what you're doing is accurate. And what has caused many of these to fail is the use of only a couple of different … views to make it happen.” “I have a framework where we look at six different views of the future. You're an extrapolator, a pattern analyst, a goal-setter, a counter puncher, an intuiter, or an artist. What makes this system unique is that there are different techniques which go under each of those.” “When we try to tackle hard problems, … we use techniques that go across those different views. … When we do the working groups, I not only want people from the technopolis areas but I want people who have the ability to work in each of the different views of the future.” “Where we've been is important but where we're going is more important.” “One of the first things I want the listeners to understand is that we're in a time of life-long learning. And it's not just for leadership but everyone within your company needs to understand that we're in a time of lifelong learning. And the ways we learn are dramatically changing.” “When you [search], you rarely get any feedback from a university in the search results. But universities are doing a lot of the future science. There's usually a lead-lag relationship between when something's invented in a university before it gets to the … marketplace.” “I learn when I talk to people. … I ask questions. I put a scenario out there and say ‘Does it work here?' and try to understand the answer. The ability for me to be able to work across the different industries I do is, I am a dot-connector.” “Very often, we get so caught up in our vertical industry knowledge, we forget the other industries are having to solve many of the same problems. Maybe a different set of customers, but face the same types of problems. So you need to begin to look at … horizontal convergence.” “We've got to change or we would still be plowing fields with pieces of rock.”   Resources Mentioned Theleadershippodcast.com Sponsored by: Darley.com Rafti Advisors. LLC Self-Reliant Leadership. LLC David Smith on LinkedIn David Smith on Twitter In-Q-Tel CIA NSA SEMATECH Steve Justice Skunkworks The Beach Boys Carpenters Dell Bob Noyce Intel World Economic Forum Microsoft Cisco “What Only the CEO Can Do”, by A.G. Lafley, HBR Peter Drucker Autonomous Systems Corporate Competitor Podcast, with Don Yaeger  

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast
60 years of the sounds of summer with Mike Love of ‘The Beach Boys' at Rockford's Coronado Performing Arts Center

WGN - The Dave Plier Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022


What is your favorite Beach Boys song? The legendary Mike Love, founding member of ‘The Beach Boys',  joins WGN Radio's Dave Plier to talk about five decades of Good Vibrations, being inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame with ‘The Beatles', finding peace through meditation, touring, and their songs of the summer! Get tickets […]

The Dr. Greenthumb Podcast
#544 Talking Steven Seagal Movies, The Beach Boys, Dreams, & More! - The Dr. Greenthumb Show

The Dr. Greenthumb Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 114:55


Totally Rad Christmas!
Ghost of Christmas Rad: Time Life Treasury of Christmas

Totally Rad Christmas!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 75:49


What's up, dudes? We were visited by the Ghost of Christmas Rad to take us back to our very first episode! We relive the magic of my first ever episode where I'm joined by my two brothers, David and Danny to talk 1986/7's Time Life Treasury of Christmas. Crooners? Yup. Strings and brass? Definitely. Synths? To the max! So grab a hold of the Miami Vice-style jacket of the Ghost of Christmas Rad, jump in his Knight Industries Time Traveling Two Thousand (K.I.T.T.T.T.) Pontiac Firebird Trans Am, and drive to the past blasting this episode!

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour
Catching A Wave 08-08-22

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 57:03


Catching A Wave is full of more NEW tunes and classics this week!  We have a snippet of a conversation Beth Riley did with Jim Babjak of The Smithereens and his love of The Beach Boys in our Green Room segment.  Beth also has a cool deep track from The Beach Boys in her Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break and we'll drop a coin in the Jammin' James Jukebox to hear our selection of the week!  Plus, get ready for rockers from Magnatech, Dave Del Monte & The Cross County Boys, The Buttondowns, Travis Koester, The Raconteurs, JD McPherson, The Mach IV, The Slimetones, The Verbtones, The Routes, Surf Curse, Fat Kahoona and The Volcanics!   Intro music bed: "Catch A Wave"- The Beach Boys   Magnatech- "Impala '59" Dave Del Monte & The Cross County Boys- "Powerhouse" The Volcanics- "Whiplash" Fat Kahoona- "Red Sea Surfin'" Surf Curse- "TVI" The Mach IV- "Big Foot" JD McPherson- "It Shook Me Up" The Routes- "Pocket Calculator"   Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break: The Beach Boys- "Good To My Baby" Follow "Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break" HERE   Travis Koester- "Big Time" The Raconteurs- "The Bane Rendition" The Verbtones- "Summer Spell"   Green Room segment: Jim Babjak on The Beach Boys The Beach Boys- "Don't Worry Baby" The Smithereens- "Girl Don't Tell Me"   Jammin' James Jukebox selection of the week: Dick Dale- "St. Louis Blues"   The Buttondowns- "Way Out West" The Slimetones- "Summer Of Slime"   Outro music bed: Eddie Angel- "Mustang"

Smoking Section
S5 Ep8: LOCASH - I LOVE THIS LIFE

Smoking Section

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 51:50


Hit Group LOCASH chat about overcoming the hardships they had when first starting. Also about their new single with iconic group Beach Boys called "Beach Boys". 

Oltre la meditazione
Episodio 95: I pericoli della Meditazione Trascendentale

Oltre la meditazione

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 7:56


La Meditazione Trascendentale è una delle tecniche di meditazione più diffuse al Mondo, basata principalmente sulla recitazione silenziosa di un mantra per trascendere la mente ordinaria e accedere a un diverso stato di coscienza. Questa tecnica è stata creata da Maharishi Mahesh Yogi negli anni 50' e si è poi diffusa nel mondo grazie al supporto delle tante celebrità che l'hanno praticata, come i Beatles, i Beach Boys, Tom Hanks, Jennifer Lopez, Lady Gaga, Oprah Winfrey e tanti altri. Tante persone interessate alla meditazione spesso decidono di provare questa tecnica, proprio per via dell'incredibile fama che ha acquisito e dell'autorevolezza che ha costruito, viste anche le numerose ricerche scientifiche che ha potuto finanziare con i suoi fondi. In effetti la Meditazione Trascendentale è un approccio interessante ed è migliore di molti altri approcci moderni più superficiali, però allo stesso tempo nasconde dei grossi pericoli per la salute mentale di chi la pratica, che spesso vengono sottovalutati.

Whole 'Nuther Thing
Episode 693: Whole 'Nuther Thing August 7, 2022

Whole 'Nuther Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 115:41


"Can't you hear that motor turning, Automobile coming into styleComing down the road for a country mile or two ?So happy just to see you smile, underneath the sky of blueOn this new morning, new morning, on this new morning with you"Please join me on this "New Morning" along with The Smiths, Linda Ronstadt, Dennis Wilson, Aerosmith, Squeeze, Beach Boys, Moby Grape, Leon Russell, XTC, Boston, Talking Heads, Traveling Wilbury's, Delaney & Bonnie, Little Feat, Beatles, New Riders Of The Purple Sage, Joe Cocker, Byrds, Rolling Stones, Flying Burrito Brothers, The Band,  Commander Cody & Lost Planet Airmen and Bob Dylan...

Blood on the Tracks
Presenting Blood on The Tracks - The Brian Wilson Story

Blood on the Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 2:42


In 1966, Brian Wilson planned to follow up the Beach Boys' groundbreaking album Pet Sounds with an even bigger musical statement. He was writing a teenage symphony to God. That album, Smile, was never finished. Instead, Brian slowly unraveled, as the pressure to make something profound weighed heavy on him. He worried that he wasn't good enough. He worried that he was a failure in the eyes of the record company, his band, his peers, and his own father. He thought his house was bugged. He thought the music he was making conjured some strange voodoo that had a disastrous impact on the real world. He became paranoid. He self-medicated with amphetamines, hash, and LSD. He held meetings in his swimming pool. He imagined people who weren't there. And eventually, in 1967, he went off the proverbial deep end. Did the real Brian Wilson ever resurface? Part true crime, part historical fiction, part spoken word lo-fi beat noir brought to you by Jake Brennan, and featuring the fictionalized voice Brian Wilson, BLOOD ON THE TRACKS sounds like nothing you've heard before. Because you can't push the needle into the red without leaving a little blood on the tracks. Listen to BLOOD ON THE TRACKS: THE BRIAN WILSON STORY beginning August 15.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

THE TUESDAY ROCK SHOW
Episode 457: TODAY'S TASTER.........30 MINUTES OF THE BEACH BOYS

THE TUESDAY ROCK SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 29:00


30 minutes of non-stop hits by a featured band/artist originally played on Sunshine Radiowww.sunshineradioiow.com 

The Babylon Bee
The Bee Weekly: Primaries, Peach-gate, Pride & Prejudice, Prices

The Babylon Bee

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 64:59 Very Popular


Enjoy an 82% discount and 3 months free with the most trusted VPN provider, Private Internet Access at our link: https://privateinternetaccess.com/TheBabylonBee This week at The Babylon Bee, Kyle, Jarret, Christina, and Brandon talk about whether or not we are living in MAGA country after the primary results pour in, a woman made a bunch of resentful comics about her husband causing the internet to make peach memes, and an impassioned argument broke out over which Pride and Prejudice adaptation is the best. Also the prices are just too dang high! This episode is brought to you by our wonderful sponsors who you should absolutely check out: Get gold for these uncertain times: https://allegiancegold.com/bee Get prepared with The Babylon Bee and My Patriot Supply: http://preparewithbee.com Get help from Christian counseling today: https://www.betterhelp.com/babylonbee/ The Bee announces an upcoming Beach Boys parody video. Also, terrorists are getting drone striked while hanging out with the Taliban, Newsom declared a state of emergency over a disease that totally isn't gay, and Obi-Wan Kenobi is now bi for some reason. Okay. The Babylon Bee plays The Price Is Wrong, Bee where Kyle, Jarret, and Brandon try to guess the price of some random items we got from the store. There is also another exciting edition of Sizzler Facts, Bee Radio from Austin Robertson, and of course Hate Mail! Also, we find out what listeners would call their imaginary fat baby after putting out our latest Pregnant Man sketch. In the full length version of the podcast, Christina answers the Ten Questions and joins the other guys in reading the best subscriber submitted headlines and bonus hate mail!To get the full version of the podcast go to: http://babylonbee.com/plans

De Popcast van de Week
#102 — 'Smile' van The Beach Boys, het meest legendarische album (dat nooit verscheen)

De Popcast van de Week

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 30:12


Volgende week speelt Otto-Jan op de Lokerse Feesten. Omdat hij weet hoe moeilijk het is om een album te maken, verdiept hij zich graag in het verhaal van bands die daar ook wel eens mee worstelden. Smile van de Beach Boys is daar een schoolvoorbeeld van. Brian Wilson combineerde in de jaren 60 psychische problemen met diverse soorten drugs en dat bleek een lastige combo voor artiesten die een album proberen af te werken. Dit is het verhaal van een van de meest legendarische platen aller tijden. 

[КАМТУГЕЗА] на Radio ROKS
Рок-календар (04.08.2022)

[КАМТУГЕЗА] на Radio ROKS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 1:18


Народились: 1940 Ларрі Кнехтель (Beach Boys, The Mamas & the Papas, The Doors, Elvis Presley). Подія: 1967 Pink Floyd випустив The Piper At the Gates of Dawn.

Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast
Talking Happy Mondays, Artists Re-recording Their Own Music and RocDocs

Milk Crates and Turntables. A Music Discussion Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 157:50


On this episode Scott has Mark Smith from the Music Relish Podcast on to discuss the Happy Mondays, the 'Madchester" music scene of the mid 80's to early 90's,  artists re-recording their own music and RocDocs.

KNX In Depth
KNX In Depth: Monkeypox a national public health emergency--Brittney Griner sentenced to prison in Russia--Governor Newsom tells Hollywood to stop filming in conservative states--Beach Boys singer Mike Love talks rock and roll and touring again

KNX In Depth

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 45:58


Monkeypox is now being called a public health emergency by the federal government. California and a few other states already did the same so we go In Depth into what this means and if the tools are there to prevent the virus from spreading as fast as COVID.  Brittney Griner is off to a Russian prison. She was sentenced today. It's now up to the U.S. government to help free her.  China fires off missiles in the Taiwan Strait to show its anger over Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan.   Governor Newsom says if Hollywood studios are serious about their liberal values, they'll stop filming in conservative states. But will they listen to him or their wallets? We go In Depth.  DDT dumping in the ocean off Catalina Island might be far worse than what scientists initially believed.  You know the Beach Boys--icons of southern California and rock and roll. We talk to lead singer Mike Love later in the show as the group will be performing in LA this weekend.  To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
@Conwayshow - Mike Love - Lead Singer for the The Beach Boys

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 14:12


The Beach Boys are performing with The San Diego Symphony at the Rady Shell in Jacobus Park in San Diego this Saturday at 7:30pm and the Greek Theatre in LA this Sunday at 8:00pm.John Stamos and Mark McGrath will join them at The Greek Theatre.

The A1A Media Network
Island Time Radio Show- 08-01-22

The A1A Media Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 155:34


08-01-22 show- BB special #2 of 2. Interview with Jon Stebbins BB author. We focus on the Beach Boys "progressive era" from 1968 to 1974.Mark Woods with Tiki Tender drink recipes. Support this show http://supporter.acast.com/a1a-media-network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand
Hour 1 | Sheron Likes Us Grumpy @ConwayShow

Tim Conway Jr. on Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 33:33


Steve Gregory joins the show to share memorable moments of Vin Scully and updates on the ‘Stupid Bridge' known as the 6th Street Bridge // Tim plays audio of Vin Scully telling the snake story / Steve asks LA Mayor what's going on the 6th street bridge // Mike Love ‘Beach Boys' Joins the Show // More with Mike Love ‘Beach Boys' Joins the Show

The Fourteen Twenty Podcast
No Socks Or No Pants? ep. 221

The Fourteen Twenty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 83:55


The guys discuss their feelings on the Beach Boys, DeShaun Watson, an MLB trade deadline update, the Fourteen Twenty Nut Up Challenge sponsored by Manscaped, big time boxing events, some Would You Rather and a whole lot more. Sit back, grab a few beers and let's get into ‘er!And be sure to use Seat Geek and promo code 1420POD for all your ticket needs and you will get $20 off your first purchase and SeatGeek.com or on the SeatGeek app!Get all of your fan gear at FansEdge.com for all your fan gear today. Click on the link below and start shopping today. Every purchase helps out our little show as well #ad #sponsored https://fansedge.xk3g.net/c/3487725/613346/9672 And be sure to listen to us on the Newsly app subscribe at www.newsly.me using promo code 1420SP0RTS for a free months subscription

Smoking Section
S5 Ep8: LOCASH - I Love My Life

Smoking Section

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 53:44


Hit duo LOCASH chat about the struggles that they've overcome as a band as well as the success that they've had over the years. Also talked about their new single "Beach Boys" with The Beach Boys. 

Jonesy's Jukebox
Brian Wilson "One of the Prime Movers"

Jonesy's Jukebox

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 29:44 Very Popular


Brian Wilson visited Jonesy's Jukebox a few days before the release of his album "Smile" on September 24, 2004. This was an important time for Wilson, who re-emerged onto the world stage after completing the project that he had shelved in 1967. In the newly recorded introduction of this podcast, Jonesy recommends the recent documentary "Long Promised Road" which gives great insight into the genius of the Beach Boys' primary songwriter. Enjoy Steve Jones' candid conversation with one of the most revered musicians of modern times. Be sure to subscribe to Jonesy's Jukebox for free on your favorite podcast platform and get a different show each Monday.

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour
Catching A Wave 08-01-22

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 57:05


Talk about an "Action" packed show this hour on Catching A Wave!  From their upcoming "Go Action!!" album on Hi-Tide Recordings, we have new Satan's Pilgrims for you.  Plus, rockers from The Boss Martians, The Electric Heaters, Mark Malibu & The Wasagas, The Manakooras, The Bloat Floaters, Sant Anna Bay Coconuts, Stay Off The Dunes, Eskimo Lunettes, The Boss Martians and  Monty Norman (RIP 94 years old on July 11th, 2022).  We have a trio of tunes you'll "understand" (3 songs with "Understand" in the title) from Collective Soul, Los Straitjackets and The Untamed Youth.  Get ready for a trip in the Catching A Wave Time Machine for the week of June 29th, 1963 for radio station WQAM in Miami, FL.  Beth Riley has a great earworm from The Beach Boys in her Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break and we drop a coin in the Jammin' James Jukebox to hear our selection of the week!   Intro music bed: "Catch A Wave"- The Beach Boys   Monty Norman Orchestra- "James Bond Theme" The Electric Heaters- "Tainted Love" Mark Malibu & The Wasagas- "Super Minx" The Bloat Floaters- "Reverb Valhalla" The Manakooras- "Quiet Village"   "Understand" trio: Collective Soul- "Understanding" Los Straitjackets- "What's So Funny About Peace, Love & Understanding" The Untamed Youth- "You've Got To Understand"   Sant Anna Bay Coconuts- "Caught In The Curves" Satan's Pilgrims- "Go Action!!"   Catching A Wave Time Machine Week ending June 29th, 1963 for songs in the top 56 for 560 WQAM Miami, FL: #56 The Astronauts- "Baja" #5 Link Wray- "Jack The Ripper" #1 Jan & Dean- "Surf City"   Jammin' James Jukebox selection of the week: The Champs- "Train To Nowhere"   Stay Off The Dunes- "Beached Whale" Eskimo Lunettes- "Festival Mud" The Boss Martians- "Driftwood Beach"   Outro music bed: Eddie Angel- "Deuces Wild"

Inheritance Tracks
Carol Kirkwood

Inheritance Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 67:31


Surfin USA by The Beach Boys and Love Will Keep Us Alive by The Eagles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

While I'm still on hiatus, I invited questions from listeners. This is an hour-long podcast answering some of them. (Another hour-long Q&A for Patreon backers only will go up next week). Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ There is a Mixcloud of the music excerpted here which can be found at https://www.mixcloud.com/AndrewHickey/500-songs-supplemental-qa-edition/ Click below for a transcript: Hello and welcome to the Q&A  episode I'm doing while I'm working on creating a backlog. I'm making good progress on that, and still hoping and expecting to have episode 151 up some time in early August, though I don't have an exact date yet. I was quite surprised by the response to my request for questions, both at the amount of it and at where it came from. I initially expected to get a fair few comments on the main podcast, and a handful on the Patreon, and then I could do a reasonable-length Q&A podcast from the former and a shorter one from the latter. Instead, I only got a couple of questions on the main episode, but so many on the Patreon that I had to stop people asking only a day or so after posting the request for questions. So instead of doing one reasonable length podcast and one shorter one, I'm actually doing two longer ones. What I'm going to do is do all the questions asked publicly, plus all the questions that have been asked multiple times, in this one, then next week I'm going to put up the more niche questions just for Patreon backers. However, I'm not going to answer *all* of the questions. I got so many questions so quickly that there's not space to answer them all, and several of them were along the lines of "is artist X going to get an episode?" which is a question I generally don't answer -- though I will answer a couple of those if there's something interesting to say about them. But also, there are some I've not answered for another reason. As you may have noticed, I have a somewhat odd worldview, and look at the world from a different angle from most people sometimes. Now there were several questions where someone asked something that seems like a perfectly reasonable question, but contains a whole lot of hidden assumptions that that person hadn't even considered -- about music history, or about the process of writing and researching, or something else. Now, to answer that kind of question at all often means unpacking those hidden assumptions, which can sometimes make for an interesting answer -- after all, a lot of the podcast so far has been me telling people that what they thought they knew about music history was wrong -- but when it's a question being asked by an individual and you answer that way, it can sometimes, frankly, make you look like a horribly unpleasant person, or even a bully. "Don't you even know the most basic things about historical research? I do! You fool! Hey everyone else listening, this person thinks you do research in *this* way, but everyone knows you do it *that* way!" Now, that is never how I would intend such answers to come across -- nobody can be blamed for not knowing what they don't know -- but there are some questions where no matter how I phrased the answer, it came across sounding like that. I'll try to hold those over for future Q&A episodes if I can think of ways of unpicking the answers in such a way that I'm not being unconscionably rude to people who were asking perfectly reasonable questions. Some of the answers that follow might still sound a bit like that to be honest, but if you asked a question and my answer sounds like that to you, please know that it wasn't meant to. There's a lot to get through, so let's begin: Steve from Canada asks: “Which influential artist or group has been the most challenging to get information on in the last 50 podcasts? We know there has been a lot written about the Beatles, Beach Boys, Motown as an entity, the Monkees and the Rolling Stones, but you mentioned in a tweet that there's very little about some bands like the Turtles, who are an interesting story. I had never heard of Dino Valenti before this broadcast – but he appeared a lot in the last batch – so it got me curious. [Excerpt: The Move, “Useless Information”] In the last fifty episodes there's not been a single one that's made it to the podcast where it was at all difficult to get information. The problem with many of them is that there's *too much* information out there, rather than there not being enough. No matter how many books one reads on the Beatles, one can never read more than a fraction of them, and there's huge amounts of writing on the Rolling Stones, on Hendrix, on the Doors, on the Byrds... and when you're writing about those people, you *know* that you're going to miss out something or get something wrong, because there's one more book out there you haven't read which proves that one of the stories you're telling is false. This is one of the reasons the episodes have got so much longer, and taken so much more time. That wasn't the case in the first hundred episodes -- there were a lot of artists I covered there, like Gene and Eunice, or the Chords, or Jesse Belvin, or Vince Taylor who there's very little information about. And there are some coming up who there's far less information about than people in the last fifty episodes. But every episode since the Beatles has had a surfeit of information. There is one exception -- I wanted to do a full episode on "Rescue Me" by Fontella Bass, because it would be an interesting lens through which to look at how Chess coped with the change in Black musical styles in the sixties. But there was so little information available about her I ended up relegating it to a Patreon bonus episode, because she makes those earlier artists look well-documented. Which leads nicely into the next question. Nora Tillman asks "Forgive this question if you've answered it before: is there literally a list somewhere with 500 songs you've chosen? Has the list changed since you first composed it? Also, when did you first conceive of this list?" [Excerpt: John Reed and the D'Oyly Carte Opera Company, "As Someday it May Happen"] Many people have asked this question, or variations upon it. The answer is yes and no. I made a list when I started that had roughly two hundred songs I knew needed to be on there, plus about the same number again of artists who needed to be covered but whose precise songs I hadn't decided on. To make the initial list I pulled a list out of my own head, and then I also checked a couple of other five-hundred-song lists -- the ones put out by Rolling Stone magazine and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame -- not because I wanted to use their lists; I have very little time for rock critical orthodoxy, as most of my listeners will likely have realised by now, but because I wanted to double-check that I hadn't missed anything obvious out, and that if I was missing something off their lists, I knew *why* I was missing it. To take a ludicrous example, I wouldn't want to get to the end of the 1960s and have someone say "Wait a minute, what about the Beatles?" and think "I *knew* I'd forgotten something!" Then, at the start of each fifty-episode season, I put together a more rigorous list of the fifty songs coming up, in order. Those lists *can* still change with the research -- for example, very early on in the research for the podcast, I discovered that even though I was completely unfamiliar with "Ko Ko Mo" by Gene and Eunice, it was a hugely important and influential record at the time, and so I swapped that in for another song. Or more recently, I initially intended to have the Doors only have one episode, but when I realised how much I was having to include in that episode I decided to give them a second one. And sometimes things happen the other way -- I planned to do full episodes on Jackie Shane and Fontella Bass, but for both of them I couldn't find enough information to get a decent episode done, so they ended up being moved to Patreon episodes. But generally speaking that fifty-song list for a year's episodes is going to remain largely unchanged. I know where I'm going, I know what most of the major beats of the story are, but I'm giving myself enough flexibility to deviate if I find something I need to include. Connected with this, Rob Johnson asks how I can be confident I'll get back to some stories in later episodes. Well, like I say, I have a pretty much absolute idea of what I'm going to do in the next year, and there are a lot of individual episodes where I know the structure of the episode long before we get to it. As an example here... I don't want to give too much away, and I'm generally not going to be answering questions about "will artist X be appearing?", but Rob also asked about one artist. I can tell you that that artist is one who will not be getting a full episode -- and I already said in the Patreon episode about that artist that they won't -- but as I also said in that episode they *will* get a significant amount of time in another episode, which I now know is going to be 180, which will also deal with another artist from the same state with the same forename, even though it's actually about two English bands. I've had the structure of that episode planned out since literally before I started writing episode one. On the other hand, episode 190 is a song that wasn't originally going to be included at all. I was going to do a 1967 song by the same artist, but then found out that a fact I'd been going to use was disputed, which meant that track didn't need to be covered, but the artist still did, to finish off a story I'd started in a previous episode. Patrick asks:"I am currently in the middle of reading 1971: Never a Dull Moment by David Hepworth and I'm aware that Apple TV have produced a documentary on how music changed that year as well and I was wondering what your opinion on that subject matter? I imagine you will be going into some detail on future podcasts, but until recently I never knew people considered 1971 as a year that brought about those changes." [Excerpt: Rod Stewart, "Angel"] I've not yet read Hepworth's book, but that it's named after an album which came out in 1972 (which is the album that track we just heard came from) says something about how the idea that any one year can in itself be a turning point for music is a little overstated -- and the Apple documentary is based on Hepworth's book, so it's not really multiple people making that argument. Now, as it happens, 1971 is one of the break points for the podcast -- episodes 200 and 201 are both records from July 1971, and both records that one could argue were in their own way signifiers of turning points in rock music history. And as with 1967 it's going to have more than its fair share of records, as it bridges the gap of two seasons. But I think one could make similar arguments for many, many years, and 1971 is  not one of the most compelling cases. I can't say more before I read Hepworth's book, which won't be for a few months yet. I'm instinctively dubious of these "this year was the big year that changed everything" narratives, but Hepworth's a knowledgeable enough writer that I wouldn't want to dismiss his thesis without even reading the book. Roger Pannell asks I'm a fairly recent joiner-in too so you may have answered this before. What is the theme tune to the podcast please. [Excerpt: The Boswell Sisters, “Rock and Roll”] The theme song to the podcast is "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters. The version I use is not actually the version that was released as a single, but a very similar performance that was used in the film Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round in 1931. I chose it in part because it may well be the first ever record to contain the phrase "rock and roll" (though as I've said many times there's no first anything, and there are certainly many records which talk about rocking and/or rolling -- just none I know of with that phrase) so it evokes rock and roll history, partly because the recording is out of copyright, and partly just because I like the Boswell Sisters. Several people asked questions along the lines of this one from Christopher Burnett "Just curious if there's any future episodes planned on any non-UK or non-North American songs? The bonus episodes on the Mops and Kyu Sakamoto were fascinating." [Excerpt: Kyu Sakamoto, "Sukiyaki"] Sadly, there won't be as many episodes on musicians from outside the UK and North America as I'd like. The focus of the podcast is going to be firmly on British, American, Irish, and Canadian musicians, with a handful from other Anglophone countries like Australia and Jamaica. There *are* going to be a small number of episodes on non-Anglophone musicians, but very few. Sadly, any work of history which engages with injustices still replicates some of those injustices, and one of the big injustices in rock history is that most rock musicians have been very insular, and there has been very little influence from outside the Anglophone world, which means that I can't talk much about influential records made by musicians from elsewhere.  Also, in a lot of cases most of the writing about them is in other languages, and I'm shamefully monolingual (I have enough schoolboy French not to embarrass myself, but not enough to read a biography without a dictionary to hand, and that's it). There *will* be quite a few bonus episodes on musicians from non-Anglophone countries though, because this *is* something that I'm very aware of as a flaw, and if I can find ways of bringing the wider story into the podcast I will definitely do so, even if it means changing my plans somewhat, but I'm afraid they'll largely be confined to Patreon bonuses rather than mainline episodes. Ed Cunard asks "Is there a particular set of songs you're not looking forward to because you don't care for them, but intend to dive into due to their importance?" [Excerpt: Jackie Shane, "Don't Play That Song"] There are several, and there already have been some, but I'm not going to say what they are as part of anything to do with the podcast (sometimes I might talk about how much I hate a particular record on my personal Twitter account or something, but I try not to on the podcast's account, and I'm certainly not going to in an episode of the podcast itself). One of the things I try to do with the podcast is to put the case forward as to why records were important, why people liked them at the time, what they got out of them. I can't do that if I make it about my own personal tastes. I know for a fact that there are people who have come away from episodes on records I utterly despise saying "Wow! I never liked that record before, but I do now!" and that to me shows that I have succeeded -- I've widened people's appreciation for music they couldn't appreciate before. Of course, it's impossible to keep my own tastes from showing through totally, but even there people tend to notice much more my like or dislike for certain people rather than for their music, and I don't feel anything like as bad for showing that. So I have a policy generally of just never saying which records in the list I actually like and which I hate. You'll often be able to tell from things I talk about elsewhere, but I don't want anyone to listen to an episode and be prejudiced not only against the artist but against the episode  by knowing going in that I dislike them, and I also don't want anyone to feel like their favourite band is being given short shrift. There are several records coming up that I dislike myself but where I know people are excited about hearing the episode, and the last thing I want to do is have those people who are currently excited go in disappointed before they even hear it. Matt Murch asks: "Do you anticipate tackling the shift in rock toward harder, more seriously conceptual moves in 1969 into 1970, with acts like Led Zeppelin, The Who (again), Bowie, etc. or lighter soul/pop artists such as Donna Summer, Carly Simon or the Carpenters? Also, without giving too much away, is there anything surprising you've found in your research that you're excited to cover? [Excerpt: Robert Plant, "If I Were a Carpenter"] OK, for the first question... I don't want to say exactly who will and won't be covered in future episodes, because when I say "yes, X will be covered" or "no, Y will not be covered", it invites a lot of follow-up discussion along the lines of "why is X in there and not Y?" and I end up having to explain my working, when the episodes themselves are basically me explaining my working. What I will say is this... the attitude I'm taking towards who gets included and who gets excluded is, at least in part, influenced by an idea in cognitive linguistics called prototype theory. According to this theory, categories aren't strictly bounded like in Aristotelian thought -- things don't have strict essences that mean they definitely are or aren't members of categories. But rather, categories have fuzzy boundaries, and there are things at the centre that are the most typical examples of the category, and things at the border that are less typical. For example, a robin is a very "birdy" bird -- it's very near the centre of the category of bird, it has a lot of birdness -- while an ostrich is still a bird, but much less birdy, it's sort of in the fuzzy boundary area. When you ask people to name a bird, they're more likely to name a robin than an ostrich, and if you ask them “is an ostrich a bird?” they take longer to answer than they do when asked about robins. In the same way, a sofa is nearer the centre of the category of "furniture" than a wardrobe is. Now, I am using an exceptionally wide definition of what counts as rock music, but at the same time, in order for it to be a history of rock music, I do have to spend more time in the centre of the concept than around the periphery. My definition would encompass all the artists you name, but I'm pretty sure that everyone would agree that the first three artists you name are much closer to the centre of the concept of "rock music" than the last three. That's not to say anyone on either list is definitely getting covered or is definitely *not* getting covered -- while I have to spend more time in the centre than the periphery, I do have to spend some time on the periphery, and my hope is to cover as many subgenres and styles as I can -- but that should give an idea of how I'm approaching this. As for the second question -- there's relatively little that's surprising that I've uncovered in my research so far, but that's to be expected. The period from about 1965 through about 1975 is the most over-covered period of rock music history, and so the basic facts for almost every act are very, very well known to people with even a casual interest. For the stuff I'm doing in the next year or so, like the songs I've covered for the last year, it's unlikely that anything exciting will come up until very late in the research process, the times when I'm pulling everything together and notice one little detail that's out of place and pull on that thread and find the whole story unravelling. Which may well mean, of course, that there *are* no such surprising things. That's always a possibility in periods where we're looking at things that have been dealt with a million times before, and this next year may largely be me telling stories that have already been told. Which is still of value, because I'm putting them into a larger context of the already-released episodes, but we'll see if anything truly surprising happens. I certainly hope it does. James Kosmicki asks "Google Podcasts doesn't seem to have any of the first 100 episodes - are they listed under a different name perhaps?" [Excerpt: REM, "Disappear"] I get a number of questions like this, about various podcast apps and sites, and I'm afraid my answer is always the same -- there's nothing I can do about this, and it's something you'd have to take up with the site in question. Google Podcasts picks up episodes from the RSS feed I provide, the same as every other site or app. It's using the right feed, that feed has every episode in it, and other sites and apps are working OK with it. In general, I suggest that rather than streaming sites like Google Podcasts or Stitcher or Spotify, where the site acts as a middleman and they serve the podcast to you from their servers, people should use a dedicated podcast app like RadioPublic or Pocketcasts or gPodder, where rather than going from a library of podcast episodes that some third party has stored, you're downloading the files direct from the original server, but I understand that sometimes those apps are more difficult to use, especially for less tech-savvy people. But generally, if an episode is in some way faulty or missing on the 500songs.com webpage, that's something I can do something about. If it's showing up wrong on Spotify or Google Podcasts or Stitcher or whatever, that's a problem at their end. Sorry. Darren Johnson asks "were there any songs that surprised you? Which one made the biggest change between what you thought you knew and what you learned researching it?" [Excerpt: The Turtles, "Goodbye Surprise"] Well, there have been a few, in different ways. The most surprising thing for me actually was in the most recent episode when I discovered the true story behind the "bigger than Jesus" controversy during my reading. That was a story I'd known one way for my entire life -- literally I think I first read about that story when I was six or seven -- and it turned out that not one thing I'd read on the subject had explained what had really happened. But then there are other things like the story of "Ko Ko Mo", which was a record I wasn't even planning on covering at first, but which turned out to be one of the most important records of the fifties. But I actually get surprised relatively little by big-picture things. I'll often discover fun details or new connections between things I hadn't noticed before, but the basic outlines of the story never change that much -- I've been reading about music history literally since I learned how to read, and while I do a deep dive for each episode, it's very rare that I discover anything that totally changes my perspective. There is always a process of reevaluation going on, and a change in the emphases in my thought, so for example when I started the project I knew Johnny Otis would come up a fair bit in the early years, and knew he was a major figure, but was still not giving him the full credit he deserved in my head. The same goes for Jesse Belvin, and as far as background figures go Lester Sill and Milt Gabler. But all of these were people I already knew were important, i just hadn't connected all the dots in my head. I've also come to appreciate some musicians more than I did previously. But there are very few really major surprises, which is probably to be expected -- I got into this already knowing a *LOT*, because otherwise I wouldn't have thought this was a project I could take on. Tracey Germa -- and I'm sorry, I don't know if that's pronounced with a hard or soft G, so my apologies if I mispronounced it -- asks: "Hi Andrew. We love everything about the podcast, but are especially impressed with the way you couch your trigger warnings and how you embed social commentary into your analysis of the music. You have such a kind approach to understanding human experiences and at the same time you don't balk at saying the hard things some folks don't want to hear about their music heroes. So, the question is - where does your social justice/equity/inclusion/suffer no fools side come from? Your family? Your own experiences? School/training?” [Excerpt: Elvis Costello and the Attractions, "Little Triggers"] Well, firstly, I have to say that people do say  this kind of thing to me quite a lot, and I'm grateful when they say it, but I never really feel comfortable with it, because frankly I think I do very close to the absolute minimum, and I get by because of the horribly low expectations our society has for allocishet white men, which means that making even the tiniest effort possible to be a decent human being looks far more impressive by comparison than it actually is. I genuinely think I don't do a very good job of this at all, although I do try, and that's not false modesty there. But to accept the premise of the question for a moment, there are a couple of answers. My parents are both fairly progressive both politically and culturally,  for the time and place where they raised me. They both had strong political convictions, and while they didn't have access to much culture other than what was on TV or in charting records or what have you -- there was no bookshop or record shop in our town, and obviously no Internet back then -- they liked the stuff out of that mix that was forward-thinking, and so was anti-racist, accepting of queerness, and so on. From a very early age, I was listening to things like "Glad to be Gay" by the Tom Robinson Band. So from before I really even understood what those concepts were, I knew that the people I admired thought that homophobia and racism were bad things. I was also bullied a lot at school, because I was autistic and fat and wore glasses and a bunch of other reasons. So I hated bullying and never wanted to be a bully. I get very, very, *very* angry at cruelty and at abuses of power -- as almost all autistic people do, actually. And then, in my twenties and thirties, for a variety of reasons I ended up having a social circle that was predominantly queer and/or disabled and/or people with mental health difficulties. And when you're around people like that, and you don't want to be a bully, you learn to at least try to take their feelings into consideration, though I slipped up a great deal for a long time, and still don't get everything right. So that's the "social justice" side of things. The other side, the "understanding human experiences" side... well, everyone has done awful things at times, and I would hope that none of us would be judged by our worst behaviours. "Use every man to his desert and who should 'scape whipping?" and all that. But that doesn't mean those worst behaviours aren't bad, and that they don't hurt people, and denying that only compounds the injustice. People are complicated, societies are complicated, and everyone is capable of great good and great evil. In general I tend to avoid a lot of the worst things the musicians I talk about did, because the podcast *is* about the music, but when their behaviour affects the music, or when I would otherwise be in danger of giving a truly inaccurate picture of someone, I have to talk about those things. You can't talk about Jerry Lee Lewis without talking about how his third marriage derailed his career, you can't talk about Sam Cooke without talking about his death, and to treat those subjects honestly you have to talk about the reprehensible sides of their character. Of course, in the case of someone like Lewis, there seems to be little *but* a reprehensible side, while someone like Cooke could be a horrible, horrible person, but even the people he hurt the most also loved him dearly because of his admirable qualities. You *have* to cover both aspects of someone like him if you want to be honest, and if you're not going to be honest why bother trying to do history at all? Lester Dragstedt says (and I apologise if I mispronounced that): "I absolutely love this podcast and the perspective you bring. My only niggle is that the sound samples are mixed so low. When listening to your commentary about a song at voice level my fingers are always at the volume knob to turn up when the song comes in." [Excerpt: Bjork, "It's Oh So Quiet"] This is something that gets raised a lot, but it's not something that's ever going to change. When I started the podcast, I had the music levels higher, and got complaints about that, so I started mixing them lower. I then got complaints about *that*, so I did a poll of my Patreon backers to see what they thought, and by about a sixty-forty margin they wanted the levels to be lower, as they are now, rather than higher as they were earlier. Basically, there seem to be two groups of listeners. One group mostly listens with headphones, and doesn't like it when the music gets louder, because it hurts their ears. The other group mostly listens in their cars, and the music gets lost in the engine noise. That's a gross oversimplification, and there are headphone listeners who want the music louder and car listeners who want the music quieter, but the listenership does seem to split roughly that way, and there are slightly more headphone listeners. Now, it's literally *impossible* for me to please everyone, so I've given up trying with this, and it's *not* going to change. Partly because the majority of my backers voted one way, partly because it's just easier to leave things the way they are rather than mess with them given that no matter what I do someone will be unhappy, and partly because both Tilt when he edits the podcast and I when I listen back and tweak his edit are using headphones, and *we* don't want to hurt our ears either. Eric Peterson asks "if we are basically in 1967 that is when we start seeing Country artists like Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings - the Man who Survived the Day the Music Died - start to bring more rock songs into their recordings and start to set the ground work in many ways for Country Rock ... how do you envision bringing the role they play in the History of Rock and Roll into the podcast?" [Excerpt: The Del McCoury Band, "Nashville Cats"] I will of course be dealing with country rock as one of the subgenres I discuss -- though there's only one real country-rock track coming up in the next fifty, but there'll be more as I get into the seventies, and there are several artists coming up with at least some country influence. But I won't be looking at straight country musicians like Jennings or Cash except through the lens of rock musicians they inspired -- things like me talking about Johnny Cash briefly in the intro to the "Hey Joe" episode. I think Cocaine and Rhinestones is already doing a better job of covering country music than I ever could, and so those people will only touch the story tangentially. Nili Marcia says: "If one asks a person what's in that room it would not occur to one in 100 to mention the air that fills it. Something so ubiquitous as riff--I don't know what a riff actually is! Will you please define riff, preferably with examples." Now this is something I actually thought I'd explained way back in episode one, and I have a distinct memory of doing so, but I must have cut that part out -- maybe I recorded it so badly that part couldn't be salvaged, which happened sometimes in the early days -- because I just checked and there's no explanation there. I would have come back to this at some point if I hadn't been thinking all along that I'd covered it right at the start, because you're right, it is a term that needs definition. A riff is, simply, a repeated, prominent, instrumental figure. The term started out in jazz, and there it was a term for a phrase that would be passed back and forth between different instruments -- a trumpet might play a phrase, then a saxophone copy it, then back to the trumpet, then back to the saxophone. But quickly it became a term for a repeated figure that becomes the main accompaniment part of a song, over which an instrumentalist might solo or a singer might sing, but which you remember in its own right. A few examples of well-known riffs might include "Smoke on the Water" by Deep Purple: [Excerpt: Deep Purple, "Smoke on the Water"] "I Feel Fine" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Feel Fine"] "Last Train to Clarksville" by the Monkees: [Excerpt: The Monkees, "Last Train to Clarksville"] The bass part in “Under Pressure” by Queen and David Bowie: [Excerpt: Queen and David Bowie, “Under Pressure”] Or the Kingsmen's version of "Louie Louie": [Excerpt: The Kingsmen, "Louie Louie"] Basically, if you can think of a very short, prominent, instrumental idea that gets repeated over and over, that's a riff. Erik Pedersen says "I love the long episodes and I suspect you do too -- thoroughness. of this kind is something few get the opportunity to do -- but have you ever, after having written a long one, decided to cut them significantly? Are there audio outtakes you might string together one day?" [Excerpt: Bing Crosby and Les Paul, "It's Been a Long, Long Time"] I do like *having* done the long episodes, and sometimes I enjoy doing them, but other times I find it frustrating that an episode takes so long, because there are other stories I want to move on to. I'm trying for more of a balance over the next year, and we'll see how that works out. I want to tell the story in the depth it deserves, and the longer episodes allow me to do that, and to experiment with narrative styles and so on, but I also want to get the podcast finished before I die of old age. Almost every episode has stuff that gets cut, but it's usually in the writing or recording stage -- I'll realise a bit of the episode is boring and just skip it while I'm recording, or I'll cut out an anecdote or something because it looks like it's going to be a flabby episode and I want to tighten it up, or sometimes I'll realise that because of my mild speech impediments a sentence is literally unspeakable, and I'll rework it. It's very, very rare that I'll cut anything once it's been recorded, and if I do it's generally because when I listen back after it's been edited I'll realise I'm repeating myself or I made a mistake and need to cut a sentence because I said the wrong name, that sort of thing. I delete all the audio outtakes, but even if I didn't there would be nothing worth releasing. A few odd, out of context sentences, the occasional paragraph just repeating something I'd already said, a handful of actual incorrect facts, and a lot of me burping, or trying to say a difficult name three times in a row, or swearing when the phone rings in the middle of a long section. Lucy Hewitt says "Something that interests me, and that I'm sure you will cover is how listeners consume music and if that has an impact. In my lifetime we've moved from a record player which is fixed in one room to having a music collection with you wherever you go, and from hoping that the song you want to hear might be played on the radio to calling it up whenever you want. Add in the rise of music videos, and MTV, and the way in which people access music has changed a lot over the decades. But has that affected the music itself?" [Excerpt: Bow Wow Wow "C30 C60 C90 Go!"] It absolutely has affected the music itself in all sorts of ways, some of which I've touched on already and some of which I will deal with as we go through the story, though the story I'm telling will end around the time of Napster and so won't involve streaming services and so forth. But every technology change leads to a change in the sound of music in both obvious and non-obvious ways. When AM radio was the most dominant form of broadcasting, there was no point releasing singles in stereo, because at that time there were no stereo AM stations. The records also had to be very compressed, so the sound would cut through the noise and interference. Those records would often be very bass-heavy and have a very full, packed, sound. In the seventies, with the rise of eight-track players, you'd often end up with soft-rock and what would later get termed yacht rock having huge success. That music, which is very ethereal and full of high frequencies, is affected less negatively by some of the problems that came with eight-track players, like the tape stretching slightly. Then post-1974 and the OPEC oil crisis, vinyl became more expensive, which meant that records started being made much thinner, which meant you couldn't cut grooves as deeply, which meant you lost bass response, which again changed the sound of records – and also explains why when CDs came out, people started thinking they sounded better than records, because they *did* sound better than the stuff that was being pressed in the late seventies and early eighties, which was so thin it was almost transparent, even though they sounded nowhere near as good as the heavy vinyl pressings of the fifties and sixties. And then the amount of music one could pack into a CD encouraged longer tracks... A lot of eighties Hi-NRG and dance-pop music, like the records made by Stock, Aitken, and Waterman, has almost no bass but lots of skittering high-end percussion sounds -- tons of synthesised sleighbells and hi-hats and so on -- because a lot of disco equipment had frequency-activated lights, and the more high-end stuff was going on, the more the disco lights flashed... We'll look at a lot of these changes as we go along, but every single new format, every new way of playing an old format, every change in music technology, changes what music gets made quite dramatically. Lucas Hubert asks: “Black Sabbath being around the corner, how do you plan on dealing with Heavy Metal? I feel like for now, what is popular and what has had a big impact in Rock history coincide. But that kind of change with metal, no? (Plus, prog and metal are more based on albums than singles, I think.)” [Excerpt: Black Sabbath, “Sabbath Bloody Sabbath”] I plan on dealing with metal the same way I've been dealing with every other subgenre. We are, yes, getting into a period where influence and commercial success don't correlate quite as firmly as they did in the early years -- though really we've already been there for quite some time. I've done two episodes so far on the Byrds, a group who only had three top-twenty singles in the US and two in the UK, but only did a bonus episode on Herman's Hermits, who had fourteen in the US and seventeen in the UK. I covered Little Richard but didn't cover Pat Boone, even though Boone had the bigger hits with Richard's songs. In every subgenre there are going to be massive influences who had no hits, and people who had lots of hits but didn't really make much of a wider impact on music, and I'll be dealing with the former more than the latter. But also, I'll be dealing most with people who were influential *and* had lots of hits -- if nothing else because while influence and chart success aren't a one-to-one correlation, they're still somewhat correlated. So it's unlikely you'll see me cover your favourite Scandinavian Black Metal band who only released one album of which every copy was burned in a mysterious fire two days after release, but you can expect most of the huge names in metal to be covered. Though even there, simply because of the number of subgenres I'm going to cover, I'm going to miss some big ones. Related to the question about albums, Svennie asks “This might be a bit of a long winded question so just stick with me here. As the music you cover becomes more elaborate, and the albums become bigger in scale, how do you choose a song which you build the story around while also telling the story of that album? I ask this specifically with the White Album in mind, where you've essentially got four albums in one. To that end, what song would you feel defines the White Album?” [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Revolution #9”] Well, you'll see how I cover the White Album in episode one hundred and seventy-two -- we're actually going to have quite a long stretch with no Beatles songs covered because I'm going to backfill a lot of 1967 and then we're getting to the Beatles again towards the end of 1968, but it'll be another big one when we get there. But in the general case... the majority of albums to come still had singles released off them, and a lot of what I'm going to be looking at in the next year or two is still hit singles, even if the singles are by people known as album bands. Other times, a song wasn't a single, but maybe it was covered by someone else -- if I know I'm going to cover a rock band and I also know that one of the soul artists who would do rock covers as album tracks did a version of one of their songs, and I'm going to cover that soul artist, say, then if I do the song that artist covered I can mention it in the episode on the soul singer and tie the two episodes together a bit. In other cases there's a story behind a particular track that's more interesting than other tracks, or the track is itself a cover version of someone else's record, which lets me cover both artists in a single episode, or it's the title track of the album. A lot of people have asked me this question about how I'd deal with albums as we get to the late sixties and early seventies, but looking at the list of the next fifty episodes, there's actually only two where I had to think seriously about which song I chose from an album -- in one case, I chose the title track, in the other case I just chose the first song on the album (though in that case I may end up choosing another song from the same album if I end up finding a way to make that a more interesting episode). The other forty-eight were all very, very obvious choices. Gary Lucy asks “Do you keep up with contemporary music at all? If so, what have you been enjoying in 2022 so far…and if not, what was the most recent “new” album you really got into?” [Excerpt: Stew and the Negro Problem, "On the Stage of a Blank White Page"] I'm afraid I don't. Since I started doing the podcast, pretty much all of my listening time has been spent on going back to much older music, and even before that, when I was listening to then-new music it was generally stuff that was very much inspired by older music, bands like the Lemon Twigs, who probably count as the last new band I really got into with their album Do Hollywood, which came out in 2016 but which I think I heard in 2018. I'm also now of that age where 2018 seems like basically yesterday, and when I keep thinking "what relatively recent albums have I liked?" I think of things like The Reluctant Graveyard by Jeremy Messersmith, which is from 2010, or Ys by Joanna Newsom, which came out in 2006. Not because I haven't bought records released since then, but because my sense of time is so skewed that summer 1994 and summer 1995 feel like epochs apart, hugely different times in every way, but every time from about 2005 to 2020 is just "er... a couple of years ago? Maybe?" So without going through every record I've bought in the last twenty years and looking at the release date I couldn't tell you what still counts as contemporary and what's old enough to vote. I have recently listened a couple of times to an album by a band called Wet Leg, who are fairly new, but other than that I can't say. But probably the most recent albums to become part of my regular listening rotation are two albums which came out simultaneously in 2018 by Stew and the Negro Problem, Notes of a Native Song, which is a song cycle about James Baldwin and race in America, and The Total Bent, which is actually the soundtrack to a stage musical, and which I think many listeners to the podcast might find interesting, and which is what that last song excerpt was taken from. It's basically a riff on the idea of The Jazz Singer, but set in the Civil Rights era, and about a young politically-radical Black Gospel songwriter who writes songs for his conservative preacher father to sing, but who gets persuaded to become a rock and roll performer by a white British record producer who fetishises Black music. It has a *lot* to say about religion, race, and politics in America -- a couple of the song titles, to give you some idea, are "Jesus Ain't Sitting in the Back of the Bus" and "That's Why He's Jesus and You're Not, Whitey". It's a remarkable album, and it deals with enough of the same subjects I've covered here that I think any listeners will find it interesting. Unfortunately, it was released through the CDBaby store, which closed down a few months later, and unlike most albums released through there it doesn't seem to have made its way onto any of the streaming platforms or digital stores other than Apple Music, which rather limits its availability. I hope it comes out again soon. Alec Dann says “I haven't made it to the Sixties yet so pardon if you have covered this: what was the relationship between Sun and Stax in their heyday? Did musicians work in both studios?” [Excerpt: Booker T. and the MGs, "Green Onions"] I've covered this briefly in a couple of the episodes on Stax, but the short version is that Sun was declining just as Stax was picking up. Jim Stewart, who founded Stax, was inspired in part by Sam Phillips, and there was a certain amount of cross-fertilisation, but not that much. Obviously Rufus Thomas recorded for both labels, and there were a few other connections -- Billy Lee Riley, for example, who I did an episode on for his Sun work, also recorded at the Stax studio before going on to be a studio musician in LA, and it was actually at a Billy Lee Riley session that went badly that Booker T and the MGs recorded "Green Onions". Also, Sun had a disc-cutting machine and Stax didn't, so when they wanted to get an acetate cut to play for DJs they'd take it to Sun -- it was actually Scotty Moore, who was working for Sun as a general engineer and producer as well as playing RCA Elvis sessions by 1962, who cut the first acetate copy of "Green Onions". But in general the musicians playing at Stax were largely the next generation of musicians -- people who'd grown up listening to the records Sam Phillips had put out in the very early fifties by Black musicians, and with very little overlap. Roger Stevenson asks "This project is going to take the best part of 7 years to complete. Do you have contingency plans in case of major problems? And please look after yourself - this project is gong to be your legacy." [Excerpt: Bonzo Dog Doodah Band, "Button Up Your Overcoat"] I'm afraid there's not much I can do if major problems come up -- by major problems I'm talking about things that prevent me from making the podcast altogether, like being unable to think or write or talk. By its nature, the podcast is my writing and my research and my voice, and if I can't do those things... well, I can't do them. I *am* trying to build in some slack again -- that's why this month off has happened -- so I can deal with delays and short-term illnesses and other disruptions, but if it becomes impossible to do it becomes impossible to do, and there's nothing more I can do about it. Mark Lipson asks "I'd like to know which episodes you've released have been the most & least popular? And going forward, which episodes do you expect to be the most popular? Just curious to know what music most of your listeners listen to and are interested in." [Excerpt: Sly and the Family Stone, "Somebody's Watching You"] I'm afraid I honestly don't know. Most podcasters have extensive statistical tools available to them, which tell them which episodes are most popular, what demographics are listening to the podcast, where they are in the world, and all that kind of thing. They use that information to sell advertising spots, which is how they make most of their money. You can say "my podcast is mostly listened to by seventy-five year-olds who google for back pain relief -- the perfect demographic for your orthopedic mattresses" or "seven thousand people who downloaded my latest episode also fell for at least one email claiming to be from the wallet inspector last year, so my podcast is listened to by the ideal demographic for cryptocurrency investment". Now, I'm lucky enough to be making enough money from my Patreon supporters' generosity that I don't have to sell advertising, and I hope I never do have to. I said at the very start of the process that I would if it became necessary, but that I hoped to keep it ad-free, and people have frankly been so astonishingly generous I should never have to do ads -- though I do still reserve the right to change my mind if the support drops off. Now, my old podcast host gave me access to that data as standard. But when I had to quickly change providers, I decided that I wasn't going to install any stats packages to keep track of people. I can see a small amount of information about who actually visits the website, because wordpress.com gives you that information – not your identities but just how many people come from which countries, and what sites linked them. But if you're downloading the podcast through a podcast app, or listening through Spotify or Stitcher or wherever, I've deliberately chosen not to access that data. I don't need to know who my audience is, or which episodes they like the most -- and if I did, I have a horrible feeling I'd start trying to tailor the podcast to be more like what the existing listeners like, and by doing so lose the very things that make it unique. Once or twice a month I'll look at the major podcast charts, I check the Patreon every so often to see if there's been a massive change in subscriber numbers, but other than that I decided I'm just not going to spy on my listeners (though pretty much every other link in the chain does, I'm afraid, because these days the entire Internet is based on spying on people). So the only information I have is the auto-generated "most popular episodes" thing that comes up on the front page, which everyone can see, and which shows the episodes people who actually visit the site are listening to most in the last few days, but which doesn't count anything from more than a few days ago, and which doesn't count listens from any other source, and which I put there basically so new listeners can see which ones are popular. At the moment that's showing that the most listened episodes recently are the two most recent full episodes -- "Respect" and "All You Need is Love" -- the most recent of the Pledge Week episodes, episodes one and two, so people are starting at the beginning, and right now there's also the episodes on "Ooby Dooby", "Needles and Pins", "God Only Knows", "She Loves You" and "Hey Joe". But in a couple of days' time those last five will be totally different. And again, that's just the information from people actually visiting the podcast website. I've deliberately chosen not to know what people listening in any other way are doing -- so if you've decided to just stream that bit of the Four Tops episode where I do a bad Bob Dylan impression five thousand times in a row, you can rest assured I have no idea you're doing it and your secret is totally safe. Anyway, that's all I have time for in this episode. In a week or so I'll post a similar-length episode for Patreon backers only, and then a week or two after that the regular podcast will resume, with a story involving folk singers, jazz harmony, angelic visitations and the ghost of James Dean. See you then.

Saturday Live
Doon Mackichan

Saturday Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 85:19


Doon Mackichan joins Nikki Bedi and Rev Richard Coles. The actor, writer and comedian – and double Emmy winner - be talking about her latest comedy role set in a suburban street in Glasgow, how she did impressions to avoid the school bullies and her love of wild swimming. Loree Draude is one of the first women to fly combat jets in the U.S. Navy. She switched to start-ups in Silicon Valley, rediscovered her love of theatre and now has a one-woman show. Matt Rowland Hill grew up the son of a minister in an evangelical Christian church in South Wales, then lost his faith in his late teens and began his search for salvation elsewhere, turning to books and then to alcohol and drugs. Carol Kirkwood shares her Inheritance Tracks – Surfin' USA by The Beach Boys and Love Will Keep Us Alive by The Eagles. Mike Gayle was the first man to win Romantic Fiction's top award and was an Agony Uncle for girls' teen magazine Bliss before becoming a novelist. Two Doors Down is BBC Two on Tuesday nights at 10pm, and all five series are available to watch on the BBC iplayer. Loree Draude's show, I Feel the Need runs from 4th to 27th August at the Assembly Rooms - Powder Room in Edinburgh. Matt Rowland Hill's memoir, Original Sins is published by Chatto & Windus. Mike Gayle's book, The Museum of Ordinary People is published by Hodder & Stoughton.  Producer: Annette Wells Editor: Richard Hooper

Tune X Podcast
Episode 11: I hit the radio dial and turn it up all the way!

Tune X Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 77:43


We hit the Siriux XM radio dial, that is, and turn it to channel 105: The Beach Boys Channel! Lisa and Sean share their observations of this tragically temporary all-Beach Boys option on satellite radio, and they tune right in everywhere they go. Show Notes Petition to Make The Beach Boys Channel on Sirius XM ...click to read more

The Jason & Mindy Podcast
Zodiac Excuse

The Jason & Mindy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 75:14


STUPID THINGS WE DO TO LOOK COOL: ☞ Talking on speakerphone in public:  Why have a private conversation that invades everyone else's space? (Do it over text, like the rest of us…or at least turn it up so we can hear the other person better!) ☞ Taking pics of cash:  Rather than looking cool, this gives the impression of trying too hard. It's just as bad as bragging about how rich your parents are!) ☞ Boasting about not being on social media:  Just like despising popular trends, there's not much point in bragging about not being on social media. It doesn't make you “better” than anyone else. (Same thing about eating vegan?) ☞ Insisting on having the last word:  Sure, it gives you a momentarily exhilarating feeling, but it never, but it doesn't mean you've satisfactorily resolved the conflict. ☞ Using abusive swear words and insults:  Insults directed at a person's gender, orientation, physical or mental ability, or skin color not only decreases your cool factor, it actually makes you appear intolerant. (But…isn't that what Twitter was invented for?) ☞ Making fun of others' hobbies or interests: Laughing at someone else about what they enjoy because it's perceived as cheesy says more about the person poking fun than it does about the person showing an interest in something. (Yeah, [***co-host***]!) ☞ Using your zodiac sign as an excuse:  We've all heard someone do it: “Sorry, I couldn't help myself. I'm a stubborn Taurus”. Don't use your zodiac sign as an excuse to continue bad behavior. (So, what excuse should I use?) DID YOU KNOW? Super skinny people are more likely to be couch potatoes than those with a normal or high body mass index (BMI), a new study says. Researchers in China have found that it's not more activity and less food which keeps many people fitting into a size small. The author of the study says the researchers “expected to find that these (very thin) people are really active”, but the study found “They had lower food intakes and lower activity, as well as surprisingly higher-than-expected resting metabolic rates”. Entertainment News Question of the Podcast Fun Facts ✓ The English language is said to be one of the happiest languages in the world – the word “happy” is used 3 times more often than the word “sad”. ✓ The word “Goodbye” originally comes from an Old English phrase meaning “god be with you”. ON THE ROAD YET AGAIN: A CNN feature story is calling it “Classic Rock's Farewell Tour”. At arenas and stadiums across the world, never before has such a grizzled group of rock icons graced so many major stages at the same time. The problem? It's not likely to happen again. Here are the names and ages of some of the music superstars who are on the road this summer, some of them on “farewell” tours…others well, it just might turn out to be their farewell tours too… ⇒ Kiss – Gene Simmons (73 next month), Paul Stanley (70) ⇒ Carlos Santana (74) ⇒ Elton John (75) ⇒ Rod Stewart (77) ⇒ Eric Clapton (77) ⇒ Roger Waters [ex-Pink Floyd] (78) ⇒ The Who – Roger Daltrey (78), Pete Townshend (77) ⇒ The Rolling Stones – Mick Jagger (79), Keith Richards (78) ⇒ Brian Wilson [ex-Beach Boys] (80) ⇒ Paul McCartney (80) ⇒ Bob Dylan (81) ⇒ Ringo Starr (82) WATER COOLER QUESTION: Question:  65% of women have made their partner do THIS before going out. What is it? Answer:  Change their shoes Question:  25% of people admit they have stayed in a relationship because they liked THIS about their partner. What is it? Answer:  Their dog Mindy' Deep Thought Question Quote of the Podcast That's it for todays show! If you love what we do and want more of us check out our website http://lowtreestudios.com (lowtreestudios.com). The links provided in our show notes. Enjoy your evening and thank you for listening to the The Jason & Mindy Podcast where we feature topics that serve as an informative and entertaining break from life's daily grind. Lowtree...

Retour de plage
Brian Wilson, beach boy et génie californien

Retour de plage

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 115:57


durée : 01:55:57 - Retour de plage du jeudi 28 juillet 2022 - par : Thierry Jousse - Auteur, compositeur, interprète et producteur, Brian Wilson est à l'affiche de cet épisode de "Retour de plage", musicien surdoué et membre fondateur des Beach Boys. - réalisé par : Yassine Bouzar

Albumworms
The Cactus Blossoms - One Day

Albumworms

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 45:24


Sean and Chris discuss The Cactus Blossom's latest release One Day in a book club-like format. They discuss everything from blood harmonies to which food is best paired with this album. Follow Albumworms on social media: instagram.com/albumworms --- The Cactus Blossom, Jenny Lewis, Blood Harmony, Americana, Folk, Country, Surf Rock, Soft Rock, Music Discussion, Album Review, Vinyl Collector, Vinyl Enthusiast, The Beach Boys, Everly Brothers, Hank Williams, The Louvin Brothers, Bob Dylan, Book Club for Albums

Filmmaking Confidential
Musician Kristian Hoffman

Filmmaking Confidential

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 63:04


Kristian Hoffman ran away from his boyhood home in Santa Barbara, California, to New York City where he and his high school friend, Lance Loud, formed a band called The Mumps. This was quite soon after both had made dramatic appearances in what is now known as the first reality TV series: PBS' award winning "An American Family".Flourishing in the New York club scene in the late '70s, Lance and Kristian became obsessed with the New York Dolls and lead to Kristian drawing the infamous "Bendover Girl" which was included as an insert in the Doll's first LP.While still performing as Mumps, Lance and Kristian subsequently appeared in a show called "New Wave Vaudeville" , produced by Ann Magnuson, who was to prove a life-long collaborator with Kristian. Thus they met met the headliner Klaus Nomi, the eccentric legendary German counter-tenor mutant glam virtuoso visionary.  Kristian approached Klaus Nomi about forming a band. Kristian's collaboration with Klaus included writing several songs for him, including "Total Eclipse."Kristian made his mark on rock and roll history as the first musical director for chamber pop singer Rufus Wainwright's touring band, has played keyboards and written songs for the atmospheric torch band Congo Norvell, has produced, toured with, and written songs for punk/cabaret singer Abby Travis, toured and recorded as keyboardist for El Vez, the Mexican Elvis all over the U.S., and toured for five years with and played on several albums with Kinks founder and lead guitarist Dave Davies. Kristian's third solo album, called & because it consists mainly of duets with other musicians (including Russell Mael of Sparks, Rufus Wainwright, Maria McKee, El Vez, Paul Reubens, Anna Waronker, Lydia Lunch, Stew, and Ann Magnuson), was released to great critical acclaim. "Uncut" Magazine called it a "spectacular, operatic art rock power-pop album." Aquarian Weekly called it a "flawlessly crafted, ornately embellished pop opera," and the L.A. Weekly said "& is the record that every fan of the Beatles, the Beach Boys, the Kinks and great songcraft in general has been pining for. Frighteningly Excellent!"As for where this multifaceted singer/songwriter, musician, poet and artist will be headed next, it's a safe prediction that he has a surprise or two in store.

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour
Catching A Wave 07-25-22

Rockabilly & Blues Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 57:03


Summer is in full swing and this hour is full of hot tunes!  Beth Riley goes to the beach with a deep track by The Beach Boys in her Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break.  We also continue our year long 10th Anniversary celebration of their 29th album, That's Why God Made The Radio with another track from that one.  As always, we drop a coin in the Jammin' James Jukebox to hear our selection fo the week.  Plus, we've got songs from Beachcombers, The Eye Five, Los Daytonas, GO-GO Rillas, Robotron, Drifting Sand, Surfnado Tiki Squad, His Lordship, The Mellons, The ChuGuysters, The Fuzziyama Surfers, La Luz, The Sparks Boys, It's Only Roy, The Fathoms and Hipbone Slim!   Intro music bed: "Catch A Wave"- The Beach Boys   Hipbone Slim- "Legless" The Fuzziyama Surfers- "Fuzziyama Beat" Robotron- "Bizarr-o-tron" It's Only Roy- "Gentle Soul (I Can Still Hear You) La Luz- "The Pines (Instrumental)" The ChuGuysters- "Double Trap" The Mellons- "So Much To Say" The Sparks Boys- "Wipe Out"   Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break: The Beach Boys- "Goin' To The Beach" Follow "Surf's Up: Beth's Beach Boys Break" HERE   Los Daytonas- "Go T. Bucket!" GO-GO Rillas- "Rob The Banana Train" His Lordship- "I Live In The City" Surfnado Tiki Squad- "Burrito's Way"   10th Anniversary Celebration of The Beach Boys- That's Why God Made The Radio The Beach Boys- "Beaches In Mind"   The Eye Five- "Sun Song"   Jammin' James Jukebox selection of the week: The Eagles- "Pipeline"   Beachcombers- "Kahuna" Drifting Sand- "Best Summer Ever" The Fathoms- "Tracking Bigfoot"   Outro music bed: Eddie Angel- "Deuces Wild"

That Record Got Me High Podcast
S5E238 - Harry Nilsson 'The Point!' with Tony Kapel & Maitejosune Urrechaga

That Record Got Me High Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 56:16 Very Popular


Husband-and-wife bandmates Tony Kapel & Maitejosune Urrechaga (Pocket of Lollipops) bring us Harry Nilsson's wonderfully weird 1970 concept album 'The Point!' This strange and endearing collection of songs - which was accompanied by an animated film adaptation that aired a few weeks after the album's release on the ABC-TV network - is an often-overlooked gem that still resonates today. Songs featured in this episode: The Town - Harry Nilsson; Rainbow Swords, Skulls & Muscle Tones - Pocket Of Lollipops; Everything's Got 'Em, Without You, Me and My Arrow - Harry Nilsson; I'm Waiting For The Day - The Beach Boys; Poli High, Think About Your Troubles - Harry Nilsson; The Fool On The Hill - The Beatles; Life Line, Life Line (live at the BBC), Mucho Mungo/Mt. Elga - Harry Nilsson; Good Old Days - The Los Angeles Radio/TV Symphony Orchestra; P.O.V. Waltz, Are You Sleeping? - Harry Nilsson; Tiburon - Pocket Of Lollipops; As Time Goes By - Harry Nilsson (from A Little Touch of Schmilsson in the Night)

Living Mirrors with Dr. James Cooke
Tony Nader on Transcendental Meditation and Vedic philosophy | Living Mirrors #101

Living Mirrors with Dr. James Cooke

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 68:29


Tony Nader is a neuroscientist and leader of the Transcendental Meditation movement, one of the most influential spiritual organisations in the world.  Founded by Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the movement has had many prominent members, from the The Beatles, the Beach Boys and Mick Jagger in the 60s to Filmmakers David Lynch and Martin Scorsese, and comedians Eric Andre and Jerry Seinfeld.  Dr. Nader took over the leadership in 2008 after training as a doctor in his native Lebanon and gaining a PhD in neuroscience from MIT.  He is the author of several books that aim to synthesise the ancient Vedic teachings of northern India with our modern scientific understanding of ourselves and the world around us.  His books include Human Physiology: Expression of Veda and the Vedic Literature, Ramayana in Human Physiology and, most recently, One Unbounded Ocean of Consciousness in which he argues that consciousness is all that exists.  He also hosts a podcast titled Consciousness is All There is.  As many of you will know this is not a stance that I agree with but I believe it is important to explore these ideas given their popularity amongst people who have had unitive mystical experiences.

PopMaster
Heather Small, DeBarge and The Beach Boys

PopMaster

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 19:06


Steve plays Gill in this Thursday edition of the PopMaster Podcast with Ken Bruce.

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling
Okay! I Guess This Gal Can Do Everything! (with Vanessa Bayer)

Double Threat with Julie Klausner & Tom Scharpling

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 116:48


The one and only Vanessa Bayer (I Love That For You) joins Tom and Julie to watch the best home shopping clips of all time! Plus the world premiere of Mr. Baldwinvedere by Trixy Mercury, Tom gives Brett Covid, Brett phones in from quarantine, and Tom and Julie try to pit Engineer Margot against him. Also The Lumineers, Starbucks music, Wally Pipp, Pearl Harbor, why aren't there more Beach Boys songs about bodies washing up on the shore, Mike Love on Difficult People, Austin Butler as Elvis, favorite South Park characters, and Brett Kavanaugh at Morton's. CLIPS FROM TODAY'S EPISODE *Munster's Trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iw5T0V3_hlU *Don West Beanie Babies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-OqzEOs_DY *Flex-o-Ladder https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZhMfzc9RbU *Liza on HSN https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4udMQBtMzc *Look at that Horse https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sv5woNs9WRE ABORTION ADVOCACY RESOURCES https://www.podvoices.help BUY TICKETS TO DOUBLE THREAT LIVE! 2ND NEW YORK DATE ADDED! *September 28 2022 - Los Angeles - Lodge Room - https://www.lodgeroomhlp.com/shows/double-threat-podcast *October 21 2022 - Brooklyn - The Bell House - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/double-threat-hosted-by-julie-klausner-tom-scharpling-tickets-330645087357 JOIN FOREVER DOG PLUS FOR VIDEO EPISODES, AD-FREE EPISODES, & BONUS CONTENT: http://foreverdog.plus JOIN THE DOUBLE THREAT FAN GROUPS: *Discord https://discord.com/invite/PrcwsbuaJx *Reddit https://www.reddit.com/r/doublethreatfriends *Facebook https://www.facebook.com/groups/doublethreatfriends DOUBLE THREAT MERCH: https://www.teepublic.com/stores/double-threat SEND SUBMISSIONS TO: DoubleThreatPod@gmail.com FOLLOW DOUBLE THREAT: https://twitter.com/doublethreatpod https://www.instagram.com/doublethreatpod DOUBLE THREAT IS A FOREVER DOG PODCAST: https://foreverdogpodcasts.com/podcasts/double-threat Theme song by Mike Krol Artwork by Michael Kupperman Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Ricochet Podcast: Hot and Free (#601)

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022


This week, it’s another round of Question Time, this week with actual (OK, former) British person Charles C.W. Cooke sitting in for Peter Robinson, We cover Florida, guns, newspapers, — an entire smorgasbord of topics (what’s British for smorgasbord?). Music from this week’s episode: I Know There’s An Answer by The Beach Boys