Podcasts about Fines

  • 1,860PODCASTS
  • 2,871EPISODES
  • 29mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 21, 2023LATEST

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Fines

Show all podcasts related to fines

Latest podcast episodes about Fines

Noticentro
Jorge Álvarez Máynez, presentó ante el INE una queja por el uso de recursos públicos con fines electorales

Noticentro

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 1:56


Jorge Álvarez Máynez, presentó ante el INE una queja por el uso de recursos públicos con fines electoralesEl gabinete de seguridad en un comunicado dio a conocer los detalles de la captura de Gerardo “n” calificada como “en flagrancia delictiva”Claudia Sheinbaum publicó un video con la vista nocturna sobre la recién inaugurada calzada flotante, de 436 metros de longitudMás información en podcast

AP Audio Stories
Florida judge fines Trump, lawyer for 'frivolous' lawsuit

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 0:56


AP correspondent Donna Warder reports that Donald Trump is in trouble with a Florida court.

Dentistry: The Business Bite with Grace Rizza
Mastering Dental Insurance: Avoiding Audits and Fines

Dentistry: The Business Bite with Grace Rizza

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 23:35


Podcast Description: In this Dentistry's Growing with Grace event, Grace Rizza sits down with Amanda DeMoura, CEO and Founder of Essential Dental Services, to discuss the best ways to navigate dental insurance management. In this episode, Grace and Amanda discuss topics such as the biggest mistakes dental practices make when submitting insurance and how often dentists should conduct an accounts receivable analysis. Learn more about the importance of providing insurance verification to patients and why dental office managers can benefit from hiring a dental insurance expert by tuning in to “Mastering Dental Insurance: Avoiding Audits and Fines” with Amanda DeMoura. Meet Grace Rizza: Grace Rizza is the CEO and founder of Identity Dental Marketing, which serves practices nationwide with ethical, effective marketing solutions. Today the company has helped to propel over 1,500 businesses to new levels of success. In her tenure as a business owner, Grace has authored countless industry-specific articles, podcasts, and blogs. She has spoken at dozens of dental meetings, including the Chicago Dental Society Midwinter Meeting, The Hinman Dental Meeting and the Greater New York Dental Meeting. Meet Amanda DeMoura: With a range of clinical, practice management, consulting and educational settings, Amanda offers a well rounded dental background to assist any practice. What started as casually helping local dental practices become more profitable eventually grew into a business helping practices across the country. Amanda is a certified dental coder by the ADA and an educational dental content writer for various publications. She continues her education by attending conferences and courses on a consistent basis and has her Fellowship designation with The American Academy of Dental Office Managers.

Hacks & Wonks
Tackling Poverty with Misha Werschkul of the Washington State Budget & Policy Center

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 37:33


On this midweek show, Misha Werschkul of the Washington State Budget & Policy Center talks with Crystal about the opportunity this legislative session to align the laws and budget of the state with our values and provide bright futures for all Washingtonians. As legislators prepare to set the State Budget for the next two years, Crystal and Misha discuss how important issues like housing and homelessness are receiving a lot of attention in contrast with less fanfare around education, before diving into impactful cash assistance programs targeted at addressing the wealth gap such as Guaranteed Basic Income and baby bonds. They then turn to the subject of ending Legal Financial Obligations, as it is a practice of wealth taking from the least-resourced to fund our court system, and have a philosophical discussion on unpacking the question of - what does real public safety look like? Finally, they cover progress on much-needed reform of the tax code - the long-awaited launch of the Working Families Tax Credit, movement towards implementation of the capital gains tax, and the anticipated introduction of a wealth tax proposal. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Follow us on Twitter at @HacksWonks. Find the host, Crystal Fincher, on Twitter at @finchfrii, find our guest Misha Werschkul at @mishaanne and the Washington State Budget & Policy Center @budget_policy.   Misha Werschkul Misha (she/her) is a leading voice shaping the debate in Washington state on budget priorities and economic policies. She's a policy wonk at heart and a relentless believer in the importance of people joining together to make change. She has more than two decades of policy and legislative experience and is eager to build on this experience with an openness to new ideas and approaches, especially about how to bring racial equity into policymaking and organizational processes. You're most likely to find Misha working with partners to craft policy proposals and build coalitions around statewide progressive revenue, economic, and racial justice issues. She also serves on the board of directors of Balance Our Tax Code and the SEIU Benefits Group. In her spare time, Misha tries to be outside as much as possible. Some of her favorite activities are gardening in her taxpayer-supported neighborhood community garden, backpacking with friends in the publicly funded Olympic National Park, and paddleboarding in Lake Washington.   Resources Washington State Budget & Policy Center   2023 State of the State Address: Bold actions for building a stronger Washington | Washington Governor Jay Inslee   “Washington Should Tax the Rich to Save Our Public Schools” by Robert Cruickshank for The Stranger    “The U.S. Could Help Solve Its Poverty Problem with a Universal Basic Income” by Michael W. Howard for Scientific American   “How Tacoma's yearlong guaranteed income experiment fared” by Alexandra Yoon-Hendricks from The Seattle Times   HB 1045 - Creating the evergreen basic income pilot program   “To address wealth gap, WA to consider $4,000 ‘baby bonds'” by Alexandra Yoon-Hendricks from The Seattle Times   “Budget funds key first step in State Treasurer's wealth gap initiative” by Adam Johnson for Office of the State Treasurer   SB 5125 | HB 1094 - Creating the Washington future fund program   “A tragic Seattle story explains the decline of American welfare” by Shaun Scott for Crosscut    “Getting rid of legal financial obligations can protect the economic security of thousands of Washingtonians” by Evan Walker for Washington State Budget & Policy Center   “It's Time to Reform Washington's Harmful System of Fines and Fees” by Evan Walker & Andy Nicholas for Washington State Budget & Policy Center   “Beyond Policing: Investing in Offices of Neighborhood Safety" by Betsy Pearl for The Center for American Progress   “The Working Families Tax Credit will reduce hardship across Washington” by Margaret Babayan for Washington State Budget & Policy Center   Working Families Tax Credit Coalition   “In Washington State, the Left Won a Major Victory for Taxing the Rich” by Galen Herz for Jacobin   “Share the Wealth, Washington!” by Carolyn Brotherton for Economic Opportunity Institute   WA Possible - podcast about what is possible for economic justice in Washington state by Washington State Budget & Policy Center   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington state through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast to get the full versions of our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, the most helpful thing you can do is leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. Today I am excited to be welcoming Misha Werschkul, who's the Executive Director of the Washington State Budget and Policy Center - welcome. [00:01:01] Misha Werschkul: So glad to be with you, Crystal. Thanks for having me. [00:01:04] Crystal Fincher: Thanks for joining us. I just want to start off by talking about - a lot of people are familiar with the Washington Budget and Policy Center, but for those who aren't, what is it? What do you do? And what brought you to this work? [00:01:14] Misha Werschkul: Thanks so much for starting with that. The first thing that I just want to share is - at the Washington State Budget and Policy Center - we're a nonprofit advocacy organization, so we're not part of State government. We actually work doing research and analysis, work in coalition with other organizations. And really, our goal is to make sure that the laws and the budget of Washington State are in alignment with the values of our state and really setting up a bright future for all Washingtonians. So we primarily work on state policy, although we do a little bit of work on local issues from time to time and federal issues. And all of our work is, as I mentioned, in coalition partnership - so we work with other organizations that do grassroots organizing and power building, communications, more political work - and really work together to try to make sure that when the Legislature comes together, as they are right now, that they're doing the things that match the values in our community. So it's really actually super fun work that allows us to bring those skills of research and analysis in what we hope to be service for social justice. A little bit about me is just - I came to this work really through a path of advocacy work. So prior to being with the Budget and Policy Center, I worked with a labor union in our state that represents home care and nursing home workers, and had a chance to be a frontline lobbyist down in Olympia trying to advance the interests of the long-term care workforce. And I saw through that work the incredible impact of the Budget and Policy Center, the power of the team here, and the importance of working on structural issues like the state budget, tax policy, economic justice - and now get the chance to work still in collaboration and partnership with organizations like the labor union that I worked with. [00:03:12] Crystal Fincher: You talk about the structural impact that can be made - and so much of that is impacted at the state level. What are you looking to have accomplished in this legislative session that just started? [00:03:24] Misha Werschkul: We always talk about the most important piece of legislation that the Legislature tackles each year is the state budget. And that is hundreds of pages of decisions - embedded in the state budget - around what are we going to spend money on, and how are we going to collect the revenue that pays for those things. And so our state has been really in a good situation with being able to receive federal dollars through all of the COVID relief that has happened over the past few years. And we've been able to do a lot - our legislators have - to be able to invest in our communities and help, really, us weather a really horrific pandemic. And this year, the Legislature is going to be putting together the budget for the next two years, so the end of 2023 through 2025. And I would say, always, that the most important thing that they can do is put together a budget that really meets the needs of communities, reflects community input, and ideally collects the revenue to pay for those investments in an equitable way. So there's millions of things within the state budget that matter to folks all across our state, and that's something that we'll be watching super carefully this legislative session - and frankly, every legislative session. [00:04:44] Crystal Fincher: What are the most important things you believe are going to be the components of the budget that will make a positive impact for the state? [00:04:52] Misha Werschkul: Some of the things that are getting a lot of attention and are going to be really important are really what is the level of investment in housing and homelessness. That's something that - I live in Seattle - that is something we're talking about a lot in Seattle, but is also really an issue all across the state - folks in rural communities, other urban areas, suburban areas - dealing with the homelessness crisis and the lack of access to affordable housing. And so this year, the governor has proposed a really big investment in housing and homelessness services - much bigger than has been talked about in previous years - and really, I think, embraced the need for a statewide solution that really matches the scale of what the crisis is that folks are experiencing. And so we're going to be watching that really carefully to see what can be done in that area. The governor is also talking about behavioral health as an important area for investment, climate change. One area we'll be paying attention to at the Budget and Policy Center is education - that is actually the biggest part of the state budget - is funding for public schools. And we know that schools all across our communities - kids need to be invested in, right? And that that is something that is going to be important this year - special education, how are we supporting teachers, what are we really doing to make sure that kids' mental health are taken care of. There's a lot more to do in that area and a lot of conversation to be had in the next 100-ish days of the legislative session. [00:06:29] Crystal Fincher: Certainly a lot of conversation to be had. And while we have heard a lot of talk, fortunately, about taking action on housing and homelessness, we haven't heard as much about education after, surprisingly, seeing so many teachers and educators bringing to the fore the crisis, basically, that we're facing in terms of funding, special education resources, and the ability to really give kids the education that will equip them for their future and that we're constitutionally obligated to give them. What are the prospects for action and what do you think is possible this legislative session? [00:07:06] Misha Werschkul: I think the Legislature is going to step up and do something for our kids. So there hasn't been as much talk about it - there are a number of different challenges that the Legislature is grappling with, a number of different things the Legislature is dealing with. But ultimately, education is the most important thing when it comes to the state budget and the paramount duty of Washington State. And so last year there was investment in counselors and other types of support professionals in the schools - that's going to be rolling out and making a difference for kids this year, but more has to be done. And I think that that is an area where we're hearing folks - really from both political parties - talk about the need to invest in education. And so I'm actually pretty hopeful about what's going to be done in that area for kids all across the state because the need is really present. And as you mentioned, the calls that teachers made at the start of the school year, folks' experience of the first few months of the school year, kids back to school in January - the needs there are very visible. And I think legislators will listen to that. [00:08:23] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. You have also, and the Budget and Policy Center has done a lot of work and highlighted a lot of research about the importance of cash assistance policies in addressing poverty and strengthening communities. Starting with Guaranteed Basic Income, that we've heard a lot from Representative Liz Berry on - what is that? What kind of record does it have? And why is it important? [00:08:48] Misha Werschkul: I love that you're asking about this because I think this is actually one of the most important things the Legislature can and should act on this year. So the idea of Guaranteed Basic Income is really a concept that's really been brought forward by - historically by Black leaders, Black women, also by tribal governments - as a way to really recognize the inherent dignity of people and the fact that people can make the best choices with resources that can meet the needs of themselves individually, their families, and their communities. And it's really a rejection of the paternalistic approach of a lot of policy approaches where - too often - you have government agencies really making decisions on behalf of people and taking away that ability for people to make their own decisions. And so this concept of Guaranteed Basic Income has been around for a long time. There has been a dramatic emergence of local pilots of Guaranteed Basic Income programs all across the country in recent years - and huge successes of those programs. The Magnolia Mother's Trust is one of the first, the Stockton SEED [Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration] program - also those two pilot programs really sparked action in every part of our country, including right in Tacoma where there's been a pilot that Mayor Woodards led with United Way of Pierce County. And so we're seeing a lot of success historically and even in the last few years of really the approach of getting cash to people in a way that's not restrictive and that lets people make choices that meet their own needs and the needs of their families and communities. The opportunity this year - and what Representative Berry is talking about - is the opportunity to really move that from local pilots to state policy. And she's proposing a statewide pilot that is limited in certain ways in scope, but would be the first state in the country to really have a statewide program for Guaranteed Basic Income. And it's an opportunity to take all of the things that we know from all of the local pilots and the past work on Guaranteed Basic Income and really try it out in a new context of a state program. That bill has gotten a lot of excitement and energy, and hopefully we'll see it get all the way to the finish line this year because it really is, I think, a transformative way to think about the role of state government and a move away from what really are pretty failed paternalistic policies that we've had in the past towards - one, policies that recognize the inherent dignity and the ability of people to make choices for themselves. [00:11:52] Crystal Fincher: Another program that is really interesting and that you have talked about is the Baby Bonds savings program. What is that? [00:12:01] Misha Werschkul: Okay, so the Baby Bonds program is something that I think is complementary to Guaranteed Basic Income, and also complementary to other approaches like the Working Families Tax Credit and existing public benefits, like TANF [Temporary Assistance for Needy Families] and the Housing and Essential Needs program. So it's important to think about it as a complementary, not a replacement for any of these other programs. But the idea of Baby Bonds is really a concept that was developed by an economist, Darrick Hamilton, to think about how do we really address the issue of wealth disparities - primarily by race - that exists. And we know that little bits of money, changing people's income doesn't actually get to that core issue of how people build wealth over time and how people build wealth intergenerationally. So white folks like me, in a lot of cases, have been able to build wealth in our families that we passed down through generations. And I, for example, was able to go to college because my parents were able to help me pay for the cost of going to college. The idea of Baby Bonds is how could we really give every Washingtonian the opportunity to have that little additional seed investment to be able to invest in themselves and their future. And so the State Treasurer, Mike Pellicciotti, has championed this approach for our state. Other states are already moving forward on this, but the idea would be to create an account for every kid who's eligible - to be able to have a little bit of resources that grow over time that they could then use to invest in college, to invest in starting a business, or to invest in buying a home. And really start to move the needle on those intergenerational inequities around wealth. In and of itself, Baby Bonds isn't going to fix everything - it is a piece of the puzzle but is an important one. And it's been exciting to see bipartisan support for that proposal and a lot of energy from local communities to really think about really a proposal that isn't going to have a huge impact in 2024 or 2025, but is setting kids up for success over the long-term and giving people the access to opportunity. [00:14:31] Crystal Fincher: So this is an interesting area. So we talked about Guaranteed Basic Income, which is something that definitely has an immediate impact, Baby Bonds savings, which is a long-term impact - both of which are direct cash assistance. And we are so used to, in our society, and hearing pushback on - Well, just giving people cash, are they going to just waste it? How do we know that they're not going to spend it on different things? People are in poverty - as some people say - because they're bad at managing their money, so we can't just hand it over. We need to really prescribe how it can and can't be used. How do you battle that mindset and address those kinds of worries? [00:15:15] Misha Werschkul: I think for us at the Budget and Policy Center, it comes back to - what does the research say? And those narratives that exist are just not supported by anything that we see in the research. And so what we've seen is that programs that are out there that give people direct cash - that folks use it in ways that really do meet the needs of themselves and their communities. And I can't remember the number right now, but I feel like there's something like more than 100 local pilots that have operated around Guaranteed Basic Income in the last several years. And so we're not talking about just one example - we are talking about example after example after example. I also think it is actually really important to tackle those narratives a little bit head-on and talk about - where do those narratives come from, and why are they so compelling for some folks? And these ideas of - for example, with regards to the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program and welfare and the dialogues over the years around that program - the kind of myth of the welfare queen - that is a created story that serves a particular purpose. It's not rooted in any sort of reality and we have to actually talk about, we have to actually name those myths that are out there, name those narratives, and call them out for what they are. Because so often it's deeply rooted in racism, deeply rooted in classism and sexism. And to be able to - our hope at the Budget and Policy Center, and other folks play different roles in this, is that by really looking at actually what does the research say and what are the facts on the ground, that that will help to begin to dismantle these narratives that have been built over time. So that's our hope at the Budget and Policy Center - is showing the success of the local pilots, showing what works, and really building some different narratives out there that actually are more rooted in reality. [00:17:42] Crystal Fincher: So another thing that you've talked about that is really important is the impact of Legal Financial Obligations on poverty and people's ability to get out of poverty. What are Legal Financial Obligations and what can the Legislature do about it? [00:17:57] Misha Werschkul: This is such an important area that hasn't been actually talked about as much when it comes to the upcoming legislative session, so I'm really glad you're asking about it, Crystal. So Legal Financial Obligations are essentially fines and fees that are put on folks based on their interactions with the criminal legal system. And it is one of the primary ways that we actually currently fund our court system. It is probably obvious, as I'm saying this, how inequitable this system is and how ineffective it is, but I'll just elaborate just a little bit. So basically what happens is that folks who are interacting with the criminal legal system - through those interactions - are building up debt over time that oftentimes folks don't have the ability to pay, so that - and there's an expectation that folks will pay those debts in the future. Most of the time, as I said, folks don't have the ability to pay - the money can't be collected. And so really what you have is a situation where folks are shouldering this debt that carries with them after their interaction with the criminal legal system. And the courts don't get the resources that they need to actually fund their operations. So it's a super ineffective way to fund operations - based on trying to collect money from people who, for the most part, really don't have any money to pay those fines and fees. Our goal at the Budget and Policy Center, and in coalition with a lot of other organizations, is to really end the practice of Legal Financial Obligations. There are infinite number of better ways to fund our court systems than through the collection of fines and fees. So the goal - the big goal - is to actually end the practice of Legal Financial Obligations as a whole. Not surprisingly, that's not something that's likely to happen in one legislative session. We do have legislative champions who are working towards incremental changes to Legal Financial Obligations, a greater recognition of ability to pay in terms of how fees are assessed and collected - and there we hope to see some progress this legislative session. But in the work around trying to end poverty, people talk about not just the importance of giving people money to be able to afford their basic needs, but actually stopping the practice of wealth taking, which is basically what Legal Financial Obligations are - is another way that any resources that people have are taken from them and that folks are in a system of indebtedness based on an interaction that is already deeply racialized with the criminal legal system. So Representative Tarra Simmons is really leading a lot of that work in the Legislature, groups like Civil Survival and Living with Conviction - want to lift up their work. And I also will just, as I'm answering this question, take this opportunity to say I am so appreciative to be able to be here and share this information with you, and I'm also doing that work on behalf of an amazing team of folks at the Budget and Policy Center - so Evan Walker is the person on our team who leads the work on Legal Financial Obligations, Emily Vyhnanek and Tracy Yeung lead the work on direct cash assistance, and other folks are leading other pieces of the work. So I just want to take the opportunity to celebrate their deeper work in each of these areas and how they engage with our coalition partners, even though I'm the one here sharing it with you. [00:21:49] Crystal Fincher: And I really appreciate that, and appreciate the work of your entire team - and the work over years that you've been doing - this is not work that you or the Budget and Policy Center is new to. It's really been just a long-term labor, and so really appreciate that. And also just appreciate the importance in you working on issues like Guaranteed Basic Income, Legal Financial Obligations - because we're so used to hearing sometimes in common discourse - things like, If you do the crime, then you do the time. If you don't want something, you should follow the law. Now you got to pay up. And viewing it as we need to hold people accountable and really focusing on a lot of the punitive and punishment aspects of these things, when really we're all losing as a result of those - trying to implement these punitive policies are creating worse outcomes for everyone in every way. When you look at the percentage of our budgets going towards supporting the court systems and jails, clearly fines are not cutting it. And also we say that we want a safe community. We say that we want people to be able to make a mistake, to do their time, fulfill their obligation, and then become a productive member of society - we commonly hear. But we do things that really impair their ability to do that and trap them in cycles of criminalization and poverty - and it just is counterproductive and we wind up paying for it as a community. How do you address people who focus on the punitive aspects - and really wanting to hold people accountable or punish people - and not realizing the other impacts that come from that? [00:23:40] Misha Werschkul: I think that's such a big question and I don't know if I have the full answer to it. I will say I was listening to the governor's State of the State address, and he said some things that I really agreed with and then some things that I didn't agree with as much. But one thing he said that I thought was interesting was - he talked about public safety, which we know is a term that means certain things to, and maybe different things, to different people. And he talked about how we actually need to unpack what public safety is and recognize that there's a lot of different aspects of that. And then he actually talked about the work around gun responsibility as an aspect of public safety. And it got me thinking about - just these terms and how they're code, in a lot of ways, for certain things - like public safety is code for policing. And how can we actually really talk about public safety for all of us? And what does it actually look like for all of us to be safe in our communities? And policing - heavy policing - is clearly not providing safety for all of us. In fact, I don't think it's really providing safety for any of us. And if we can think about - what is that aspiration around safety and what does that value for us in our lives and for our families and communities? How do we actually build that together? And a lot of times that does mean a lot of different things - it actually means people having the resources to be able to afford their basic needs so that they can put food on the table, it means that people have shelter - that people are not homeless. It means talking about gun responsibility. And I think a lot of times we fall into, again, these sort of narrative traps of - Oh, yeah, like crime - punish - yeah, if you do the crime, you have to do the time. And sort of believe in a way that that is going to make us safer. And actually I don't know that - it doesn't. And so I think just - I don't know, I think we just have to have those conversations in a real way - because, as a white person, a white woman, doing this work, I did believe for a long time that having a police presence was a way that my safety was - was about my safety. But actually, as I unpack that - it's not true, even for me as the model person that the police are here, supposed to protect. And I think we have to just actually talk about that a little bit more and actually have a higher aspiration for safety for all of us, because sometimes it's like walking around certain parts of maybe cities with a heavy police presence might make someone feel - it might make someone feel a little bit safe in the immediate term, but I actually hope for something a lot more. I hope that we can get to a place where - I don't know - safety, just - it's not actually true safety. And so I'm just trying to get at - what is that higher aspiration of safety that we could be striving towards and building towards, and not feeling like our only definition of safety is having armed police officers walking around - to what - shoot someone if something happens? That actually doesn't make me feel super safe - to think about people wielding guns on the streets shooting people to protect me. And so I think that's just something we need to be talking about and grappling with. But I do think - I really appreciated Governor Inslee starting to peel open that conversation a little bit. Now, he then did go on - I want to acknowledge - to talk about the importance, I think he did go on to talk about the importance of investing in policing as well. So he still has that as part of his solution. But I think at least he was starting to unpack - what does public safety look like and maybe open up a different conversation. [00:28:34] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, I appreciate your thoughts on that. And unpacking what public safety looks like, unpacking what accountability looks like, and really trying to reduce harm all the way around. We don't want people to be victimized. We don't want people to be trapped in cycles that create and produce harm. What does accountability look like if it's not our court system and jails, which are not doing an effective job. What does public safety look like if it's not only police officers who, I think everyone agrees, can't do the job alone. If not, other models being more successful and effective. The final thing I want to talk about and cover today is what our tax code looks like. It is so foundational to everything in society. It is underneath, it impacts the revenue that we collect that enables every public service to be possible, which public services are possible, and to what degree. There's been lots of talk about how regressive our system has been, how much needs reform. Where do we stand on that? What needs to happen? And what's possible this legislative session? [00:29:56] Misha Werschkul: My favorite topic, Crystal - at the Budget and Policy Center, we love talking about taxes. And the reason is because it is super important how we collect revenue as a state and local government. And there are a lot of policy choices embedded in - a lot of values embedded in how we collect revenue. So I think probably most of your listeners know that Washington State has the most inequitable tax code in the country, meaning those with the lowest incomes pay the highest percentage of their income in state and local taxes. And in fact, we're way out of sync with most other states on this. So low income people in Washington State are paying basically double someone with a similar income in Oregon, simply because of the structure of our tax code. This is obviously a pretty bad deal for most Washingtonians. It's a super good deal for the wealthiest Washingtonians who are paying a minute share of their income in state and local taxes. And this is a big problem. This is not something that there's a quick and easy fix for, but there is some really exciting stuff happening. So in 2021, the Legislature took two big actions to start to make progress to reform our state tax code. One is they passed a capital gains tax to fund early learning investments in education. The other is they passed a Working Families Tax Credit set up to benefit 420,000 households in Washington State with direct cash sales tax refunds. Both of these policies are happening. So the Working Families Tax Credit launches February 1st. I'm so nerdy excited about this - it's not even funny. But starting very soon, people - 420,000 households - will be able to apply to be able to get a refund check of up to $1,200 in our state. We have been talking about this for so long, it feels like - and the day is finally almost here where this is happening. It is a step in the right direction of balancing our tax code in and of itself. It's not enough. It needs to be expanded. We'll be working this legislative session to try to expand eligibility to younger adults, so folks who are 18-24 and actually older adults as well - 65+ - who aren't currently eligible for the Working Families Tax Credit - to basically bring them in and allow them to be eligible. There's a great website called wataxcredit.org, I think - I hope it's org now - that has a ton of information about this. And I want to just share that out so folks know to spread the word because folks do need to actually proactively apply. One way to think about it is - really anybody who's eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit is going to be eligible for the Washington Working Families Tax Credit too. Plus anyone who files their taxes with an ITIN number who is being excluded right now from the EITC will be eligible for the Working Families Tax Credit. So I'm super excited. It's happening soon. There's going to be action in the Legislature on this, but more importantly, the policy is happening. Folks can get the money if they take the step to apply with Department of Revenue. Capital gains tax is being challenged, not surprisingly, by wealthy individuals who would pay the tax. They're trying to get the court to basically intervene and rule that the tax is unconstitutional. The State Supreme Court is hearing that case on January 26th and this is a wonky legal issue that needs to get sorted out before the tax can be fully implemented. And I could go on and on about the legal part of it, but I will stop because you actually asked about also what's happening this legislative session. And I will just pitch the efforts that some of our partners, especially Economic Opportunity Institute and Balance Our Tax Code, are leading with regards to a wealth tax and really thinking about big solutions that make a real difference in making our tax code more equitable. We have to get to the root of it, which is wealth. And so it's exciting to see this proposal coming forward this session that Representative Noel Frame has been a huge leader in. [00:35:01] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely and appreciate that. We will include the wataxcredit.org link in our episode notes to make it convenient for people to visit. And also thanks for mentioning your partners - we did have a conversation with Summer Stinson of the Economic Opportunity Institute, and she did talk a lot about that court case and how important it is to have a capital gains tax, what it really means, how few people it actually impacts - it is the wealthiest portion of the wealthy - and we'll see how this court case turns out. I really do appreciate you joining us today. If people want to learn more about the organization, where can they visit? [00:35:51] Misha Werschkul: Our website is www.budgetandpolicy.org so you can check us out on the website. We're also on social media - I'll share those links with you for the show notes hopefully. And I also will share - April Dickinson on our team has led the effort just to launch a new podcast called WA Possible that we hope is a great complement to Hacks & Wonks and a bit of a deeper dive into some of what could be possible when it comes to economic justice in Washington state. There's a great episode there talking about the Black Women Best framework that some national partners launched and some of the policies we talked about today, so just would share that as well. [00:36:37] Crystal Fincher: Thank you so much, and April Dickinson is awesome. Thank you for all the work. Thank you for joining us today and we'll talk to you all next time. [00:36:44] Misha Werschkul: Thank you so much Crystal - appreciate you. [00:36:46] Crystal Fincher: Thank you for listening to Hacks & Wonks, which is co-produced by Shannon Cheng and Bryce Cannatelli. You can follow Hacks & Wonks on Twitter @HacksWonks. You can catch Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts - just type "Hacks and Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to the podcast to get the full versions of our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in - talk to you next time.

The Clark Howard Podcast
01.17.23 The Transformation Of Higher Education / The Crimes & Fines of Wells Fargo

The Clark Howard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 26:42


Various factors are contributing to a shortage of college students, forcing many schools to cut tuitions and reevaluate their relevance. This as state supported trade, technical and community colleges are challenged to better align curriculum to the needs of the workplace. Clark discusses the transformation in higher education, its value, and your new negotiating power. Also, Clark has the latest installment of the crimes and fines of Wells Fargo - a “bank” you'd do well to forego. Transformation in Education: Segment 1 Ask Clark: Segment 2 Again With Wells Fargo: Segment 3 Ask Clark: Segment 4 Mentioned on the show: Best 529 College Savings Plans By State What Is a Roth 401(k) and How Does It Work? How To Get the Best Price Possible Shopping Online NYTimes: Wells Fargo to Pay $3.7 Billion Over Consumer Banking Violations WSJ-Wells Fargo Reaches $3.7 Billion Deal With Regulators Over Consumer Banking CFPB Orders Wells Fargo to Pay $3.7 Billion for Widespread Mismanagement of Auto Loans, Mortgages, and Deposit Accounts | Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Credit Karma Review: Free Credit Score and More at Your Fingertips Clark.com Community Clark.com resources Episode transcripts Clark.com daily money newsletter Consumer Action Center Free Helpline: 636-492-5275 Learn more about your ad choices: megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Berlin Briefing
17.01.2023 - Bus tickets, BB Gate, Fines, Odesaplatz

Berlin Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 6:51


Bus tickets BB Gate Fines Odesaplatz ** Please check out the show notes for the links to our sources. Donate: https://www.berlinbriefing.de/donate/ Twitter: @berlinbriefing Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BerlinBriefing/ Mastodon: https://podcasts.social/@berlinbriefing/ Mail: berlinbriefing@gmail.com

Source Daily
'I'd rather take the jail:' Amish refuse to pay buggy fines in court hearing; Martin Luther King Jr.'s Visits to Ohio; Remembering Mabel Freas

Source Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 7:35


'I'd rather take the jail:' Amish refuse to pay buggy fines in court hearing: https://www.richlandsource.com/news/id-rather-take-the-jail-amish-refuse-to-pay-buggy-fines-in-court-hearing/article_5d8a22a2-aa7a-5e02-b10e-e634c0cc9a23.html Miss Mabel's Miracle: Knox County woman turns 105: https://www.knoxpages.com/life_and_culture/miss-mabel-s-miracle-knox-county-woman-turns-105/article_51b89066-aa96-11e9-a194-f7df3a5efba2.html Today – Late last week, a group of eight Amish people refused to pay their fines for their violations of Ohio's new buggy law during a hearing in Ashland Municipal Court.Support the show: https://www.sourcemembers.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

OBBM Network
Farmers, Fines, and The Fight For Your Food: OBBM Business Roundtable

OBBM Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 26:10


James Lockridge is back to discuss the citations he recieved in 2022 from Code Compliance that ultimately resulted in significant fines. From 'illegal advertising' to 'certificates of occupancy' and more, these fines had to first be paid before he can go back to appeal their validity. It's time for Governor Abbott to get involved. This is a rally call to get our councils, boards, and representatives to go to bat for our local farmers, and for the Farm Bureaus to be supported. Here are the two previous podcast episodes:Ep1: The Plight of the Local Farmers: https://obbm.buzzsprout.com/131203/11993067-the-plight-of-local-farmers-obbm-business-roundtableEp2: Dallas Area Farmer Speaks Out:https://obbm.buzzsprout.com/131203/12031865-dallas-area-farmer-speaks-out-obbm-business-roundtable Here are the video episodes:E1:https://rumble.com/v247fp6-the-plight-of-local-farmers-obbm-business-roundtable.html?mref=4e7lj&mc=8san1E2:https://rumble.com/v2553j6-local-dallas-area-farmer-speaks-out-obbm-business-roundtable.html?mref=4e7lj&mc=8san1Contact James at 214-500-0871.Junkluggers of Irving, Denton, and Grapevine, 630-470-8307 https://MoveFreelyAmerica.orghttps://DFWVeteransChamber.orgTerrel Tipton, Insperity HR Services, 972-409-4316Wellness Institute, 469-939-8933Big Feet Creations, 469-450-7350OBBM Network Brands, https://obbmnetworkbrands.comOBBM Network Podcasts, https://obbmnetworkpodcasts.comFind OBBM Network TV:Roku: https://channelstore.roku.com/details/0dcc70f4c4ba3be9b69f39e76b94157c/offbeat-business-tvClouthub TV: https://clouthub.com/c/OBBMNetworkTVGab TV: https://tv.gab.com/channel/OBBMTelegram: https://t.me/OBBMNetworkSupport the show

Objection to the Rule
OTR January 8th, 2023: Eric Adam's Rats vs. Curtis Sliwa's Cats - Suspects Arrested for Washington Power Substation Attacks - European Union Fines Facebook Over Privacy Violations

Objection to the Rule

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 59:31


Jasmin and guest hosts Janet and Saman discuss Curtis Sliwa suggesting that feral cats tackle Mayor Adams' ongoing rat problem, the recent power substation attacks in Washington State and the disturbing rise in attacks on infrastructure in the US, and the European Union fining Meta/Facebook over privacy violations.

Daily Signal News
TOP NEWS | Who is Responsible for Moving the Classified Documents, Biden Meets with Japan's Prime Minister, Trump Org Must Pay $1.6 Million in Fines | Jan. 13

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 8:06


On today's Daily Signal Top News, we break down: Reporting on who was responsible for packing and moving then Vice President Biden's President Biden meets with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio KishidaRussia claims it took control of a Ukrainian city An NCAA athlete protestTrump Organization is ordered to pay $1.6 million in fines Relevant LinksBiden's whirlwind final days as vice president had aides scrambling to close his White House office: https://www.cnn.com/2023/01/12/politics/biden-documents-final-days-vice-president-aides-scramble/index.html Listen to other podcasts from The Daily Signal: https://www.dailysignal.com/podcasts/Get daily conservative news you can trust from our Morning Bell newsletter: DailySignal.com/morningbellsubscription Listen to more Heritage podcasts: https://www.heritage.org/podcastsSign up for The Agenda newsletter — the lowdown on top issues conservatives need to know about each week: https://www.heritage.org/agenda Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Imagen Noticias con Ciro Gómez Leyva
Tipo de cambio no debe ser usado para fines políticos: Páramo

Imagen Noticias con Ciro Gómez Leyva

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 3:31


#CiroEnImagen #DavidPáramo afirma que el tipo de cambio no debe ser usado para fines políticos y nos dice las razones por las cuáles el dólar se ha depreciado frente a todas las monedas, incluido el peso.

Gamble On
224: Fines in Ohio, Gronk's $10 million kick, NFL playoffs with Chris 'Beermakersfan' Prince

Gamble On

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 58:27


USBets.com Managing Editor Eric Raskin and Senior Analyst Jeff Edelstein analyze the Ohio commission fining the holy hell out of everyone, notable numbers out of New York and Maryland, and the pros and cons of FanDuel's Super Bowl commercial promo with Gronk, plus they talk to RotoGrinders and ScoresAndOdds insider Chris “Beermakersfan” Prince about his favorite Super Bowl futures team, his best bet on Chargers-Jaguars, and how he got into DFS in the first place. Find us on Twitter @US_Bets or go to USBets.com for more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CNN News Briefing
6 AM ET: Embarrassment for Biden, nurses strike over, ‘out of office' fines & more

CNN News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 4:29


It's not been a great week for President Joe Biden - we'll bring you details on the latest revelation around classified documents. The strike by 7,000 nurses in New York City is now over. We now know what cause the FAA's system outage that led to thousands of flight delays. Satellite photos confirm CNN reports of bodies piling up in China during this Covid-19 wave. Plus, a company that take ‘Out of Office' very seriously.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Closer Look with Rose Scott
Travel industry expert talks about FFA glitch; GBPI tracking new policy priorities; Local woman starts first body-positive fitness center

Closer Look with Rose Scott

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 50:52


Plus, travel industry expert Henry Harteveldt discusses the nationwide airline glitch that grounded several flights.Staci Fox, the president and CEO of Georgia Budget and Policy Institute, discusses GBPI's top policy priorities for 2023 and the institute's new report, “Regressive Revenue Perpetuates Poverty: Why Georgia's Fines and Fees Need Immediate Reform.”Abbey Griffith, the founder of Clarity Fitness Center, discusses weight loss risk and what inspired her to open Georgia's first body-positive fitness center.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Compliance into the Weeds
DFS Fines Coinbase

Compliance into the Weeds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 25:25


The award winning, Compliance into the Weeds is the only weekly podcast which takes a deep dive into a compliance related topic, literally going into the weeds to more fully explore a subject. In this episode, Matt and I take a look at the recent NY state Department of Financial Services sanction involving the crypto trading platform Coinbase, which just agreed to pay $50 million to the DFS and to spend another $50 million over the next two years to improve its compliance program. Some of the highlights include: ·      What was the fine and associated spending for?  ·      What did the Coinbase compliance program fail on? ·      How did Coinbase's explosive growth fuel a culture of non-compliance.  ·      How did Coinbase fall further and further behind?  ·      Why and how did the Coinbase solution worsen the problem?  ·      Why does a company need to start with solid foundation of clearly defined procedures?  ·      What is the role of an effective and efficient technology? ·      What are the lessons learned?  Resources Matt Kelly in Radical Compliance Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Attacking Third: A CBS Sports Soccer Podcast
NWSL bans four coaches and fines clubs | Debinha to Kansas City Current | NWSL 2023 Mock Draft (Soccer 1/10)

Attacking Third: A CBS Sports Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 82:11 Very Popular


Sandra Herrera and Lisa Roman run through the latest news and notes. The NWSL released a Corrective Action and Sanctions following the results of the joint investigation (5:16). This resulted in numerous former coaches and staff being banned and 6 different NWSL Clubs being fined. Debinha - the most sought-after NWSL Free Agent - signs with Kansas City Current (18:50). Plus, Portland Thorns promote Mike Norris as Head Coach. Meanwhile, Sophia Smith takes home US Female Player of the Year as the first black woman to ever win that award (37:02). In the second half of the show, Lisa and Sandra run through a 2023 NWSL Mock Draft (42:04). With the Draft on Thursday, January 12 at 6pm - watch on CBSSports HQ and Paramount+ - they run through the projected moves for each team in the first round (47:23). Full episode. Watch USWNT, NWSL and WSL games on P+" with a link to https://www.paramountplus.com/home/ Attacking Third is available for free on the Audacy app as well as Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow the Attacking Third team on Twitter: @AttackingThird, @SandHerrera_, @LRoman32 Visit the Attacking Third YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/attackingthird You can listen to Attacking Third on your smart speakers! Simply say "Alexa, play the latest episode of the Attacking Third podcast" or "Hey Google, play the latest episode of the Attacking Third podcast." For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Smart 7 Ireland Edition
The Standout 7 - HSE in crisis, Meta clocks up more Data Protection fines, Brazil bids farewell to Pele and TDs pelted with manure in Galway…

The Smart 7 Ireland Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 9:01


The Smart 7 Ireland Edition is the daily news podcast that gives you everything you need to know in 7 minutes, at 7am, 7 days a week… Consistently appearing in Ireland's Daily News charts, we're a trusted source for people every day. If you're enjoying it, please follow, share or even post a review, it all helps… Today's episode includes references to the following items:https://twitter.com/i/status/1610339514324766721https://www.rte.ie/radio/radio1/clips/22190953/https://twitter.com/i/status/1610700566715600898https://twitter.com/i/status/16110637x31403821078https://twitter.com/i/status/1610702163487100928 https://twitter.com/i/status/1610046058532405255 https://youtu.be/CpPIuBKub_o https://twitter.com/i/status/1610562544699150338 https://twitter.com/i/status/1611067508676562979https://twitter.com/i/status/1610158988712198145 https://twitter.com/i/status/1610034449034498048 https://twitter.com/i/status/1609883857381203969 https://twitter.com/i/status/1610602063846674434 Contact us over at Twitter or visit www.thesmart7.com Presented by Ciara Revins, written by Liam Thompson and produced by Daft Doris. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Ohio Politics Explained
Fines for sports betting ads and a surprise speaker

Ohio Politics Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 12:40


The race to become Speaker of the House took surprising turns in both Ohio and Washington, D.C. this week. Gov. Mike DeWine let cities ban flavored tobacco and took a swipe at sports betting companies. We break down what it all means in this week's episode of Ohio Politics Explained. A podcast from the USA TODAY Network Ohio Bureau that catches you up on the state's political news in 15 minutes or less. This week, host Anna Staver was joined by reporter Jessie Balmert.

Hashtag Trending
Hashtag Trending Jan 4 - South Korea fines Tesla; Smart toys and data collection; AirTag catches airline in a lie

Hashtag Trending

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 3:54


South Korea fines Tesla, experts warn about smart toys and data collection, and an Apple AirTag locates missing luggage and catches an airline in a lie.

Bill Baker and Jessica Show
Oregon fines, House speaker update, Snow Hill man sentenced, Oce

Bill Baker and Jessica Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 4:05


Highlights from The Hard Shoulder
Healy-Rae: Increase in fines for speeding 'the wrong approach'

Highlights from The Hard Shoulder

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 11:27


Research from the Road Safety Authority has raised concerns that increased fines may not be an effective way of curbing reckless driving, with the suggestion that drivers are of the belief that they were unlikely to be caught, due to a perception of “not enough [gardaí] policing the road.” Kieran was joined by Michael Healy Rae, Independent TD for Kerry and Shane Ross, Former Minister for Transport to discuss..

Simple English News Daily
Wednesday 4th January 2023. World News. Today: Palestine Israel criticism. Japan moving pay. Korea fines Tesla. Ukraine Russian base strike.

Simple English News Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 8:32


World News in 7 minutes. Wednesday 4th January 2023.Support us and read the transcripts at send7.org/transcriptsToday: Palestine Israel criticism. Japan moving payment. Korea fines Tesla. Ukraine Russian base strike. Pakistan saving energy. Australia helicopter crash. Bolivia protests. Mexico female supreme. US no speaker. Tanzania opposition ok. Malawi no school. Spain tobacco pays. Denmark bank robberies are history.With Stephen Devincenzi and Khadija Tahir.Please leave a rating on Apple podcasts or Spotify.Contact us at podcast@send7.org or send an audio message at speakpipe.com/send7If you enjoy the podcast please help to support us at send7.org/supportSEND7 (Simple English News Daily in 7 minutes) tells the most important world news stories in intermediate English. Every day, listen to the most important stories from every part of the world in slow, clear English. Whether you are an intermediate learner trying to improve your advanced, technical and business English, or if you are a native speaker who just wants to hear a summary of world news as fast as possible, join Stephen Devincenzi, Namitha Ragunath and Juliet Martin every morning. Transcripts can be found at send7.org/transcripts. Simple English News Daily is the perfect way to start your day, by practising your listening skills and understanding complicated stories in a simple way. It is also highly valuable for IELTS and TOEFL students. Students, teachers, and people with English as a second language, tell us that they listen to SEND7 because they can learn English through hard topics, but simple grammar. We believe that the best way to improve your spoken English is to immerse yourself in real-life content, such as what our podcast provides. SEND7 covers all news including politics, business, natural events and human rights. Whether it is happening in Europe, Africa, Asia, the Americas or Oceania, you will hear it on SEND7, and you will understand it. For more information visit send7.org/contact

Probable Causation
Episode 86: Elizabeth Luh on financial penalties

Probable Causation

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 42:27


Elizabeth Luh talks about the effects of financial penalties in the criminal justice system. “The Impact of Financial Sanctions: Regression Discontinuity Evidence from Driver Responsibility Fee Programs in Michigan and Texas” by Keith Finlay, Matthew Gross, Elizabeth Luh, and Michael Mueller-Smith. *** Probable Causation is part of Doleac Initiatives, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. If you enjoy the show, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution. Thank you for supporting our work! *** OTHER RESEARCH WE DISCUSS IN THIS EPISODE: “Drawing Blood from Stones: Legal Debt andSocial Inequality in the Contemporary United States” by Alexes Harris, Heather Evans, and Katherine Beckett. “Fines and Financial Wellbeing” by Steven Mello. [Working paper.] ”Does Punishment Compel Payment? Driver's License Suspensions and Fine Delinquency” by Ryan E. Kessler. [Working paper.] “Disparate Fine Collection: Evidence using Chicago Parking Tickets” by Elizabeth Luh. [Working paper.] “Punishment and Deterrence: Evidence from Drunk Driving” by Benjamin Hansen. “Learning from Law Enforcement” by Libor Dusek and Christian Traxler. “Criminalizing Poverty: The Consequences of Court Fees in a Randomized Experiment” by Devah Pager, Rebecca Goldstein, Helen Ho, and Bruce Western. “Measuring Child Exposure to the U.S. Justice System: Evidence from Longitudinal Links between Survey and Administrative Data” by Keith Finlay, Michael Mueller-Smith, and Brittany Street. “Criminal Court Fees, Earnings, and EExpenditures: A Multi-state RD Analysis of Survey and Administrative Data” by Carl Lieberman, Elizabeth Luh, and Michael Mueller-Smith. [Working paper available from the authors upon request.] “The (Non)Economics of Criminal Fines and Fees” by Tyler Giles. “A Proposal to End Regressive Taxation through Law Enforcement” by Michael Makowsky. “Revenue-Motivated Law Enforcement: Evidence, Consequences, and Policy Solutions” by Michael Makowsky.

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio
Halifax advocate wants fines increased for drivers who abuse accessible parking spots

Mainstreet Halifax \x96 CBC Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 21:27


Accessibility advocate Paul Vienneau sees a lot of drivers in downtown Halifax parking in spots reserved for people with disabilities. Sometimes they admit to him that they are fully able bodied. We hear from him and Victoria Horne, director of parking services with the Halifax Regional Municipality.

Fitzy & Wippa
Unusual Fines & Missing Important Dates (Best Of Fitzy & Wippa)

Fitzy & Wippa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 10:00


Last year, Fitzy & Wippa were blown away by all the driving fines they didn't know you could get. They also heard some unbelievable stories from listeners with one revealing how they forgot their own wedding day. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

L'heure du crime
INCONTOURNABLE : L'affaire Fabrice Da Silva

L'heure du crime

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 48:53


Fabrice Da Silva a été accusé, 2010, d'avoir, dans la nuit du 13 au 14 décembre, commandité le meurtre de Bandjougou Diawara, l'un de ses apporteurs d'affaires. Il a été condamné le 7 décembre 2019 à 22 ans de réclusion criminelle par la cour d'assises de la Seine-Saint-Denis. Problème : Fabrice Da Silva revendique son innocence et crie à l'erreur judiciaire... Son procès en appel vient d'être reporté. Invités : Michèle Fines, journaliste, Fabrice Da Silva, et Roger Marc Moreau, criminaliste.

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Afternoon Ag News: December 30, 2022 - CFTC fines CHS Hedging due to Washington rancher

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 2:30


See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Manuel López San Martín
"Presidencia de San Lázaro estaría siendo utilizada para fines políticos personales" 29 DIC 22

Manuel López San Martín

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 6:21


En entrevista con Juan Manuel Jiménez en ausencia de Manuel López San Martín para la Segunda Emisión de MVS Noticias, Hamlet Almaguer, diputado de Morena, habló sobre el cierre legislativo del 2022.

Putting the AP in hAPpy
Episode 218: 5 Free Vendor Validations US Entities Should Be Doing to Avoid Fraud, Compliance Fines and Bad Vendor Data

Putting the AP in hAPpy

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 34:05


If your company is a US entity, then there are at least five free validations that you should be doing when you onboard vendors.  Three of the five can help you with 1099 and 1042 distribution and filing – which ones are those?Keep listening. Check out my website www.debrarrichardson.com if you need help cleaning your vendor master file or implementing authentication techniques, internal controls, and best practices to prevent fraudulent payments, regulatory fines or bad vendor data. Subscribe today to be entered in the subscriber-only monthly drawing to win a free Putting the AP in hAPpy Coffee Mug.  Links mentioned in the podcast:   On-Demand Webinar:  5 Free Vendor Validations US Entities Should Be Doing https://debrarrichardson.com/webinarlisting/live-webinar-5-free-vendor-validations-us-entities-should-be-doing  Vendor Process Training Center: Vendor Process Training Sessions – Live Online and On Demand.  New Live Training Every Wednesday and Thursday.  Vendor Validation Reference List with Resources Links: www.debrarrichardson.com/vendor-validation-download Vendor Master File Clean-Up:  https://www.debrarrichardson.com/cleanupYouTube Channel:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqeoffeQu3pSXMV8fUIGNiw Prevent Fraudulent Payments.  Get Your Own Copy of the3 Step Vendor Setup and Maintenance Process eGuide.  (Includes Authentication Reference Template and Vendor Validation Reference List)More Podcasts/Blogs/Webinars www.debrarrichardson.comMore ideas?  Email me at debra@debrarrichardson.com Music Credit:  www.purple-planet.com

Ciro Gómez Leyva por la Mañana
Vacuna Abdala se adquirió por fines políticos y no de salud: doctor Francisco Moreno

Ciro Gómez Leyva por la Mañana

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 6:46


El infectólogo Francisco Moreno pidió a las autoridades de salubridad que permitan una apertura para tener acceso a vacunas y opciones para todas las personas y no sólo las que el gobierno federal permite. La vacuna Abdala, afirma, se adquirió con fines políticos y no de salud. Explica que no se debe recomendar una vacuna sin sustento de la Organización Mundial de la Salud.

The Big Five Podcast
Fines for 'no shows' at restaurants? Plus: Legault urges caution as the holidays approach

The Big Five Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 20:40


Guest host David Heurtel is joined by Sue Montgomery, former journalist and former mayor of CDN-NDG and Political analyst Karim Boulos. Should we be fining ‘no shows'? Customers who do not show up at the restaurant after reserving a table could be subject to a fine. The Association Restauration Québec (ARQ) wishes to be able to impose a “fine” on those who are conspicuous by their absence without having bothered to cancel. Christmas begins now and as we enter the festive weekend Legault is asking for caution at holiday gatherings… this follows his visit to Ste-Justine Hospital. Quebec's hospitals are overcrowded, particularly in paediatric wards.  Eric Girard recognizes that relations between the CAQ government and the English-speaking community "were not perfect in the first mandate”..... He says they want to do better moving forward. What do you think should be done to improve relations between Quebec and the anglo community?

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Business News Headlines 22 December 2022

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 10:34


You can feel it...right? No, we're not talking about the cold and blizzard that right now is impacting the Midwest and will soon head east but it's the Holiday Season and we wish you the best of the holidays from Chanukah to Christmas to Kwanzaa which begins on the 26th. Here are the headlines for the 22nd of December. Also, remember that you can hook up with us all day on Twitter @IOB_NewsHour and on Instagram.  Here's what we've got for you today: Recession or no recession? The strength of the US Economy is baffling;  Good Economic Data, it would seem is bad for Wall Street; Labor Shortages and Immigrants; Fines and Child Labor Laws; Tyson Foods to lose hundreds of employees and why; The Wall Street Report; We know what you were searching for on Wikipedia. Thanks for listening! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour.   

This Week in Startups - Audio
The inside story of Iger's Disney return, Epic Games record-breaking fines + ClimateCamp CEO | E1643

This Week in Startups - Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 70:07 Very Popular


First up, J+M break down Disney's "Battle of the Bobs" (2:59), before covering two record-breaking fines against Epic Games, and explaining "dark patterns." (20:35) Molly wraps the show by interviewing ClimateCamp CEO Stijn Gysemans on Scope 3 emissions tracking! (44:26) (0:00) J+M tee up today's topics! (2:59) WSJ report on the rift between Iger and Chapek at Disney (13:36) Squarespace - Use offer code TWIST to save 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain at https://Squarespace.com/TWIST (15:03) The role Christine McCarthy, Disney's CFO, played in bringing back Bob Iger (20:35) Epic Games receives two record-breaking fines from the FTC, understanding "dark patterns" and deceptive design (30:14) Blueground - Get up to $1000 off your booking at https://promos.theblueground.com/twist (31:40) Tangent continued: calling out the worst "dark design" offenders (44:26) ClimateCamp CEO Stijn Gysemans joins Molly Wood to chat target markets, Scope 3 emissions, and more! (51:29) Understanding how emissions are calculated, EU rules and regulations FOLLOW Jason: https://linktr.ee/calacanis FOLLOW Molly: https://twitter.com/mollywood FOLLOW Stijn: https://twitter.com/sgysemans Subscribe to our YouTube to watch all full episodes: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkkhmBWfS7pILYIk0izkc3A?sub_confirmation=1

Infection - The SURVIVAL PODCAST
Epic FTC Fines – Infection – The SURVIVAL PODCAST Episode 414

Infection - The SURVIVAL PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 68:15


Epic half-a-billion dollar FTC fine, Offensive Tweets, and more on this week's episode of Infection Podcast The post Epic FTC Fines – Infection – The SURVIVAL PODCAST Episode 414 appeared first on Infection - The SURVIVAL PODCAST.

AppleInsider Daily
12/20/2022: Paris Commercial Court fines Apple over 'abusive' App Store policy... and more news

AppleInsider Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 4:29 Very Popular


Tune in to our HomeKit Insider podcast covering the latest news, products, apps and everything you need for a smart home. Subscribe in Apple Podcasts, Overcast, or just search for HomeKit Insider wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/homekit-insider/id1515834398 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6NdU3vOKmP6pMpViTfM2ij Overcast: https://overcast.fm/itunes1515834398/homekit-insider Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5maXJlc2lkZS5mbS9ob21la2l0aW5zaWRlci9yc

Backwoods Life with Michael Lee
WYOMING POACHERS BUSTED! Huge Fines!

Backwoods Life with Michael Lee

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 43:23


On this episode Michael Lee is joined by Kevin Knighton and Anna Volger to catch up on deer season 2022 as well as Anna's "Snacks and Racks" segment. They trio then dives into a HUGE poaching bust in Wyoming where the fines are in the hundreds of thousands of dollars and prison time.

Media Sandwich
Ep. 43 - Epic Fines, Late Payments, and the Doctor's New Threads

Media Sandwich

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 37:16


Epic Games breaks the record for largest fine or penalty ever assessed by the FTC thanks to their predatory microtransaction mechanics on Fortnite, hashtag great job, crapburgers. Meanwhile, Oppenheimer and Barbie will release on the same day in summer of 2023, what a double-feature! Avatar: The Way of Water doesn't hit its projected opening weekend numbers, but that might be a good thing? Henry Cavill gets a real Charlie Brown football moment with Superman before announcing his real passion project. The comic book industry crumbles further into debt to freelancers who haven't been paid on time in months, while Amazon announces a video game adaptation for streaming television, Netflix symbolically repeats history by delivering a killing blow to their lackluster Blockbuster sitcom, and the new Dr. Who gets a brand new wardrobe that both cosplayers and Kyle will greatly appreciate.

Earth Wise
Getting Rid Of Hydrogen Sulfide | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 2:00


Hydrogen sulfide gas produces the characteristic smell of rotten eggs, sewers, stockyards, and landfills.  The petroleum industry produces thousands of tons of the stuff each year as a byproduct of the processes that remove sulfur from petroleum, natural gas, coal, and other products.  The industry faces substantial fines for emitting hydrogen sulfide, but remediation is […]

City Cast Las Vegas
How Traffic Tickets are Changing on Jan. 1

City Cast Las Vegas

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 21:02


Starting on January 1, a whole bunch of minor traffic offenses (like broken tail lights and expired vehicle registrations) will become decriminalized — so what does that mean for Nevadans? Dayvid sits down with Leisa Moseley, Nevada State Director at the Fines and Fees Justice Center, to talk about how criminal punishments for small traffic offenses can snowball into bigger (and much more expensive) issues, and how the passage of AB 116 could actually make our streets safer. Learn more about what's going on in the city with our daily newsletter, Hey Las Vegas. Sign up here: lasvegas.citycast.fm/newsletter We're also on social media! Follow us @CityCastVegas on Twitter and Instagram.  You can also call or text us at 702-514-0719 with your New Year's resolutions for the city, or any other hot takes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Lehto's Law
Country Club Tells Man to Park New Truck Indoors or Face Fines

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 14:40


The truck is a Rivian and is quite expensive. www.patreon.com/stevelehto

AP Audio Stories
TSA raising fines after finding record guns in carry-ons

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022 0:50


AP correspondent Lisa Dwyer reports on Airports Guns.

Today with Claire Byrne
Motorist Fines

Today with Claire Byrne

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 8:43


Janet Horner, Green party Councillor Dublin City Council

Softy & Dick Interviews
Mike Florio on Mike Leach, 49ers-Hawks, Referees, Saints Fines

Softy & Dick Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 13:34


Mike Florio of Pro Football Talk joins Dave Softy Mahler and Dick Fain to talk about all things NFL and Seahawks including Mike Leach, the 49ers, referees, and Saints fines.

Kevin Kietzman Has Issues
KKHI Weekend: Another KU Border Blowout, Drinkwitz Sign Fail, NFL's Huge Fines

Kevin Kietzman Has Issues

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 21:56


   Many of us thought this Border War was a return to the good old days of a real rivalry.  Instead, we got another KU beatdown over a former rival that doesn't belong on the same floor.  It was ugly, hideous and not entertaining.    That meant the most interesting thing to see was Mizzou football coach Eliah Drinkwitz holding up a sign about KU being cheaters.  It rang hollow.   Also this weekend, the NFL is serious about teams not faking injuries on the field by issuing massive fines to the Bengals and Saints.

The Daily Standup
How To Hold The PERFECT Daily Scrum Meeting!

The Daily Standup

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 10:56


How Do We Hold The PERFECT Daily Scrum Meeting! Here are guidelines that I use to make certain this happens; Daily Meeting 15 minutes or less per day - (30 seconds per person not to exceed 15 minutes) Same time same place same zoom or teams link everyday No pontificating to solve problems - problems that can be resolved in 30 seconds or less should be resolved No electronics of any kind - Yes this includes the Jira Board No Pen or paper to record - no output to the meeting Team rules/guidelines should be clearly posted Do not be late Fines go to a reputable charity Team stands in a circle Visitors around the outside as they do not participate Visitors follow the same rules to be present Always end on time Stick to the REAL three questions Allow exceptions for remote teams

Am I Wrong? Sports Podcast
EP.64: DEION SANDERS, TOP 3 WRS, PACKERS NEEDS, CELEBRATION FINES, AND MUCH MORE!

Am I Wrong? Sports Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 63:22


TUNE IN TO THIS EPISODE TO FIND OUT MORE ON DEION PRIMETIME SANDERS TAKING HIS HEAD COACHING TALENT TO COLORDO, WHO WE WOULD TAKE AS OUR TOP 3 WRS, WHAT THE PACKERS SHOULD DO TO GET BACK ON THE WINNING SIDE, AND MUCH MORE!

Advantage Connors
U.S. Team Advances; Tennis Gambling Fines; Dolphins update; Mauna Loa erupts; Balenciaga

Advantage Connors

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 37:57


Brett and Jimmy discuss the U.S. Men's team advancing in the World Cup, recent NFL Dolphins news, and the effect gambling has on sports. Later, they discuss the recent eruption of Hawaii's Mauna Loa volcano and Balenciaga's controversial ad campaign. Follow us on- Twitter- @AdvConnors @JimmyConnors @Brett_Connors IG- @AdvConnors @Bretterz @GolddoodIsabella @Finefocusla Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville
Zac requested a butt wax at 35,000 ft.

Woody and Jim - 1075 The River Nashville

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 38:15


Ricki has a picki boyfriend and has a gift giving problem. One last bit of bad attention for Ye and what he's done. Mike Vrabel leaving Titans? Google tells us the top gifts this year. Fines for kids using cell phones in class in Robertson County.

Lehto's Law
Woman's Truck Got Tickets and Fines While Towing Company 'Stored' It

Lehto's Law

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 11:45


The company is already in some sort of legal trouble. www.patreon.com/stevelehto

Marketplace All-in-One
Department of Transportation lights up airlines with millions in fines

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 7:52


The fines come following all the drama about flight delays and cancellations. Drew Matus of Metlife checks in with us regarding today’s market activity. The global pandemic ushered in another level of online shopping, which spelled doom for many malls across the nation – but one mall in Portland has adapted.