Podcasts about drug administration

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Substance used to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent disease

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  • Oct 19, 2021LATEST
drug administration

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Best podcasts about drug administration

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Latest podcast episodes about drug administration

Short Wave
COVID-19 boosters are here

Short Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 11:09


The United States is on the verge of dramatically expanding the availability of COVID-19 vaccine boosters to shore up people's immune systems. As NPR health correspondent Rob Stein reports, the Food and Drug Administration is poised to authorize the boosters of the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines. Still, many experts argue boosters aren't needed because the vaccines are working well and it would be unethical to give people in the U.S. extra shots when most of the world is still waiting for their first.

Up First
Saturday, October 16, 2021

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 14:56


A U.S. Food and Drug Administration panel recommends booster shots for those who got the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine. The killing of a British lawmaker is called an act of terrorism, and is prompting a review of security protocols. Ethiopia's civil war is entering a new phase, with civilians not only in the path of violence but also facing famine.

Montana Public Radio News
FDA issues recall for Parent's Choice Rice Baby Cereal

Montana Public Radio News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 0:46


The federal Food and Drug Administration is recalling three lots of Parent's Choice Rice Baby Cereal after a sample of the products tested above guidance for naturally occurring inorganic arsenic.

The FOX News Rundown
Evening Edition: FDA Panel Endorses Use Of Moderna Booster Shot, Could Johnson & Johnson Be Next?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 13:32


The Food and Drug Administration's vaccine advisory panel today endorsed the use of Moderna's COVID-19 booster shot for the elderly and others at high risk because of possible exposure at their jobs or they have underlying health factors. The vote was 19-0 but the recommendation is not final and will go before the FDA to issue an official decision. FOX's Eben Brown speaks to Dr. Marc Siegel, Professor Of Medicine at New York University Langone Medical Center and FOX News Medical Contributor, about the decision and the FDA panel's Friday meeting on the Johnson & Johnson's proposed booster.  

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Wednesday 10/13 - Hour 3

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 36:42


The one-week sale of an exclusive Firebaugh Eagles hoodie on the Buffalo Bills website has raised nearly $100k for the local high school thanks to alum Josh Allen. Casey Jones, Athletic Director at Firebaugh High School joins the show to discuss. Aboard a Blue Origin spaceship blasting off from West Texas, actor William Shatner becomes the oldest person to enter space at 90 years old. Over the next 2.5 years, the Food and Drug Administration aims to reduce Americans' consumption of sodium by 12%. A moment on dating and tacos. "Squid Game" is the new hot Halloween outfit.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D.: The COVID-19 Pandemic and What Comes Next

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 63:53


Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., has been one of the most visible commentators on the public health crisis. His insights and writings have helped shaped some of the country's understanding of the public health impacts of the pandemic since early in 2020. As the country continues to battle the pandemic—especially the emergent delta variant of the coronavirus—Gottlieb will visit the Club for the first time to discuss his new book, Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic. Gottlieb's new book outlines how the United States must prepare for future pandemics by learning from the mistakes made handling the COVID-19 outbreak, which has caused one of the greatest public health tragedies in American history. Gottlieb outlines his efforts in the early 2000s to develop a “Pandemic Influenza Plan” to ready the United States for the threat of a global pandemic, and how short the country came up when it was time to mount an effective response to the novel coronavirus. Further, Gottlieb identifies the early reasons why the United States was so underprepared for the pandemic, from failing to enlist the private sector in large-scale manufacturing of testing supplies and medical equipment to resolutely sticking to the narrative that COVID would go away on its own. As the United States heads into a critically important fall and winter that will determine whether we will finally end the pandemic, Gottlieb's book comes at a critical time. Please join us for a timely talk with a true expert on the pandemic about what we have learned so far, and what we must do to succeed in the months and years ahead. SPEAKERS Scott Gottlieb M.D., Former Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration; Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute; Author, Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic Mark Zitter Chair, The Zetema Project; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 5th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Millennium Live | A Digital Diary Podcast
Episode 137 | Future IT: Jim Rinaldi

Millennium Live | A Digital Diary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:55


Keynote Speaker James Rinaldi, Chief Information Technology Advisor of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory is sending rockets to Mars, and sharing valuable insights on the future of IT for the C-Suite. With $2.4T being spent on new tech, he asks, what does post-digital transformation look like? He expects blockchain, quantum computing, IoT, and intelligent RPAs to evolve in the coming years. Jim served as JPL's CIO for 14 years and before that, he served as the CIO for the US Food and Drug Administration.

Emagination Health & Wellness: Biblical Perspective on Nutrition, Physical, Mental and Spiritual Well-being

In this episode, Clement and Carolyn discuss the topic of Death.  Join us for this healthful discussion.  Music: “Happy”- Music by Aden.  Music:  https://www.purple-planet.com  “Folksy Days”Timestamps:·         Introduction (01:40)·         History of Halloween (06:40)·         Ye shall surely die (09:20)·         Death defined (16:11)·         What do they know? (19:29)·         Waiting (32:15)·         More biblical witnesses (39:40)·         Book of Life (40:45)·         David sleeps (48:40)·         Why is it important? (1:10:58)·         Conclusion (1:16:30)  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. See Disclaimer. ·       Support Us On Patreon:   www.patreon.com  ·         Leave a voicemail comment:  Veganemagination.com·         Subscribe to our email list:  Veganemagination.com·         Listen on   Spotify                    iTunes                                  iHeart                                    Stitcher                    Buzzsprout               Apple Podcast                    Podbay.fm               Google Podcast

Gist Healthcare Daily
Tuesday, October 12, 2021

Gist Healthcare Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 5:39


Merck asks the Food and Drug Administration to approve its antiviral COVID pill. Get ready for the wave of physician retirements. And there's a lot of activity among revenue cycle management companies.

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast
The Beginning of the End of the COVID Pandemic?

The CBN News Daily Rundown - Audio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021


Coronavirus cases and deaths are trending downward for two weeks straight and it appears the worst of the Delta variant may be over. Not only that, Pfizer is requesting that the Food and Drug Administration give emergency approval for a COVID vaccine for children 5-11 years old. Is this the beginning of the end of the pandemic? CBN News Medical Reporter Lorie Johnson joins the Rundown to talk about where we are in the fight against COVID as well as why medical experts think the upcoming flu season could be worse than normal. Also, it's been a deadly week in Afghanistan, with at least 100 people hurt or killed following the bombing of a Shiite mosque on Friday. This as religious minorities go underground in order to avoid deadly retaliation by the Taliban. Correspondent Brody Carter joins us to talk about a hearing held this week by the US Commission on International Religious Freedom on the state of religious minorities in that country.

The mindbodygreen Podcast
340: The connection between hormones & weight loss | Sara Gottfried, M.D.

The mindbodygreen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 46:19


Sara Gottfried, M.D.: “For women, testosterone is especially important for confidence, agency, and even risk-taking.” Gottfried, a Harvard-trained integrative medicine doctor and hormone expert, joins mbg co-CEO, Jason Wachob, to discuss how hormones affect your weight, plus: - How the keto diet can hinder your sleep - Why women should pay more attention to testosterone - How to successfully follow the keto diet for metabolic health - How to increase your growth hormone & why it matters - How to enhance your gut health with vitamin D Referenced in the episode: - Gottfried's book, Women, Food, And Hormones. - Data showing 88% of Americans are metabolically unhealthy, and an mbg article on what to do about it. - Research showing 45% pre-menopausal women had menstrual irregularity on the keto diet. - Research showing more than half of those with coronary artery disease have "normal" lipids. - Research showing women with higher testosterone more likely to choose risky careers. - mbg Podcast episode #294 and #197 with Jud Brewer, M.D., Ph.D. - mbg Podcast episode #293 with Mark Sisson. Don't forget to use the code PROBIOTICPOD at checkout to save 25% off your first month subscription of mbg's probiotic+. It's the only blend in the world with our unique combination of four strains to beat bloating, aid digestion, and reset your gut.* To learn more about the supplement Jason swears by, visit mindbodygreen.com/probioticpod. Enjoy this episode! Whether it's an article or podcast, we want to know what we can do to help here at mindbodygreen. Let us know at: podcast@mindbodygreen.com. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Boston Public Radio Podcast
BPR Full Show: A Tough Egg To Crack

Boston Public Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 164:24


Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including a federal judge siding with the Justice Department to block the restrictive Texas abortion law, current negotiations over a possible debt limit extension and what motivates Senator Kyrsten Sinema. Todd is the moderator of “Meet the Press,” host of “Meet the Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we talk with listeners about their thoughts on the early stages of the 2022 Massachusetts Governor race, including Donald Trump's endorsement of former state Rep. Geoff Diehl. Andrea Cabral talks about the terrible conditions at Rikers Island, and how the Justice Department could be doing more work for police reform. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville discusses school board fights over mask mandates, and protests against legacy admissions in some of the country's most elite universities. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is “Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders.” Dan Carpenter weighs in on why it is taking so long to approve the COVID-19 vaccine for children aged 5-11, as Pfizer officially asks the Food and Drug Administration to issue Emergency Use Authorization. Carpenter is a professor of government at Harvard University, and oversees The FDA Project, a theoretical, historical and statistical analysis of pharmaceutical regulation in the United States as it is carried out by the F.D.A. His most recent book is “Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790-1870.”  Corby Kummer talks about the impact of the pandemic on the restaurant industry, Guy Fieri's latest ventures and changing animal welfare laws that could raise egg prices in Massachusetts. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. We end the show by asking listeners their thoughts on the potential for higher egg prices, as laws increasing pen space for hens are set to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2022.

RNZ: Morning Report
Covid-19: Pfizer submits to FDA for child vaccines

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 3:05


To the US, Drug company Pfizer has submitted an emergency request for the authorisation of its Covid-19 vaccine for use in children aged from five to 11. The Food and Drug Administration has promised to move quickly on the request. New York correspondent Will Denselow spoke to Corin Dann.

Emagination Health & Wellness: Biblical Perspective on Nutrition, Physical, Mental and Spiritual Well-being

In this episode, Clement and Carolyn discuss the topic of Halloween.  Join us for this healthful discussion.  Music: “Happy”- Music by Aden.  Music:  https://www.purple-planet.com  “Folksy Days”Timestamps:·         Introduction (01:35)·         The Foundation (05:02)·         Celebrating Halloween (09:10)·         The origin of Halloween (12:46)·         Compromise (19:11)·         Name change (33:20)·         Conclusion (36:05)  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. See Disclaimer. ·       Support Us On Patreon:   www.patreon.com  ·         Leave a voicemail comment:  Veganemagination.com·         Subscribe to our email list:  Veganemagination.com·         Listen on   Spotify                    iTunes                                  iHeart                                    Stitcher                    Buzzsprout               Apple Podcast                    Podbay.fm               Google Podcast

The mindbodygreen Podcast
339: Melatonin, bedtime myths & why you should prepare for sleep in the morning | Ashley Jordan Ferira, Ph.D., R.D.

The mindbodygreen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 60:16


Ashley Jordan Ferira, Ph.D., R.D.: “If someone said they haven't consumed water in a few days, you'd be like, 'That's really bad.' The same should be with sleep.”  Ferira, mbg's Director of Scientific Affairs, joins mbg co-CEO, Jason Wachob, to discuss why winding down is crucial for your health, plus: - How to pre-game your sleep - Why we're all so wired at bedtime - How men & women differ when it comes to sleep - The best foods to promote calm & help you rest - The link between intermittent fasting & better sleep Referenced in the episode: - Data showing less than 7 hours of sleep associated with lower micronutrient intake. - Dry Farm Wines & Thrive Market wines. - Research on 80 mg lavender oil for stabilizing mood. - Listen to Ferira's episode on Clean Beauty School. - mbg article discussing why you should write your anxious thoughts down. Our restful ritual bundle+ has arrived! This duo of calm+ and sleep support+ can help ease overactive thoughts and help you wind down for bed—so that you fall asleep faster and wake up feeling restored.* Visit mindbodygreen.com/unwind to learn more, and use the code RESTPOD at checkout to take up to 20% off the bundle.  Enjoy this episode! Whether it's an article or podcast, we want to know what we can do to help here at mindbodygreen. Let us know at: podcast@mindbodygreen.com. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Johnson & Johnson asks FDA to approve its COVID-19 booster shot

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 5:03


In our news wrap Tuesday, Johnson & Johnson asked the Food and Drug Administration to allow boosters for its single-shot COVID-19 vaccine. The U.S. Coast Guard now says something dragged a pipeline that spilled oil off Southern California over the weekend. An independent commission in France estimates 330,000 children were sexually abused in the country's Roman Catholic Church over 70 years. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Thoughts on the Market
Special Episode: COVID-19 - Will Pills Change the Game?

Thoughts on the Market

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 10:10


New data on an oral antiviral treatment could have significant impact on the COVID treatment landscape. What's next for treatments, booster shots and child vaccines.----- Transcript -----Andrew Sheets Welcome to Thoughts on the Market. I'm Andrew Sheets, chief cross asset strategist for Morgan Stanley Research.Matthew Harrison And I'm Matthew Harrison, Biotechnology Analyst.Andrew Sheets And on this special edition of the podcast, we'll be talking about several new developments in the fight against COVID 19. It's Tuesday, October 5th at 3 p.m. in London,Matthew Harrison and it's 10:00 a.m. in New YorkAndrew Sheets So Matt. I really wanted to catch up with you today because there are a number of different storylines involving COVID 19 going on at the moment, from child vaccines to the situation with booster shots. But I suppose the headline story that's getting the most attention is data released last Friday on Merck's new oral COVID treatment pill Molnupiravir or I think I said that right. I'm sure I didn't. So maybe let's start there. What is this treatment and why does it matter?Matthew Harrison Yes. Thanks, Andrew. So Molnupiravir is an oral antiviral against COVID. The way it works is that it stops the virus from replicating effectively, and that reduces the amount of virus in someone's body. It was studied here in patients that were recently diagnosed with COVID 19. And it cut the rate of hospitalization in those patients by 50%. So those that didn't get treated with the drug went to hospital at a rate of 14%, and those that did get treated went to hospital rate of 7%. I think the thing I would want to highlight is that this is something you obviously take after you get infection and vaccines remain the primary way to prevent infection.Andrew Sheets So this is kind of one of the things I felt that was so fascinating when that news was announced. Because on the one hand, this seems like very good news, another treatment that appears highly effective against COVID 19. And yet the market reaction was actually to really punish many of the makers of the current COVID vaccines, so how much do you think this could influence the COVID treatment landscape? And do you think the market or people might be overreacting to some of the impact on whether or not people will still get vaccines or vaccines will remain important?Matthew Harrison Vaccines, their primary measure is prevention. Right? This is a drug to treat people once you get disease. But the hope is, and the way we get out of the pandemic, is still by vaccinating everybody to prevent disease from happening and disease from spreading. So, I think of this drug, along with antibodies as drugs that you use to treat people who either have breakthrough infections or those that aren't vaccinated. But you also have antibodies for people that are at higher risk, patients that might not be compliant with taking oral drugs. Or, you know, a whole another segment of the market that we haven't talked about is those that need to be protected either because they can't get a good response to the vaccine, because they're perhaps immunocompromised or otherwise, and those that need some sort of preventative treatment. Where Merck is studying this pill as a preventative treatment, but the antibodies are already authorized as preventative treatments. So, there's a different section of the landscape, I would say, for each of these drugs.Andrew Sheets So, Matt, what impact do these potentially positive results on a pill mean for vaccine hesitancy in the outlook for vaccinations?Matthew Harrison I think that's one of the things that the market is is struggling a lot with, and I think that's part of the reason you saw many of the vaccine stocks under pressure, right? There's definitely one segment of the market that thinks, if you have effective treatments, especially easy to use treatments like orals, that could give people another reason who don't want to have the vaccine to say, "Look, even if I do get sick, I do have an easy to take treatment." And so, on the margin, right, it may impact vaccination uptake, though the flip side is what I would say is I think what we're seeing in the U.S. is at least that you're seeing broad vaccination mandates and you and you are seeing those mandates lead to increases in vaccination, especially employer based mandates. And so, there are other factors driving vaccine uptake.Andrew Sheets So I think it's safe to say we care about the numbers here on this Thoughts of the Market podcast. Could you just run through the various costs of different treatments if we're thinking about vaccines, you know, potential thoughts on where an oral pill could be and then the antibody treatments, which are obviously another form of treatment that we're seeing being used. Just to give people some sense of how much the relative cost of each one of those things is.Matthew Harrison Yes, so vaccines per shot in the U.S., depending on manufacturer, run between $16.50 And $19.50 in the U.S. So a course of vaccination, let's say costs on average about $40. There are some administration fees and otherwise, but direct to drug costs. Merck has signed a contract with the US government for $1.2 Billion for 1.7 Million courses, so that runs about $700 per course for the oral right now. And then the U.S. government also has contracts with a variety of manufacturers for antibodies, which run about $2100 per course. So treatments are more expensive than vaccination and then usually with treatments, there are other associated medical costs which I didn't cover, and I don't have a great estimate for. But obviously, as those patients that might be getting treatments because they're also hospitalized, those costs are more significant.Andrew Sheets So I want to jump next to the topic of child vaccinations. Last week, Pfizer and BioNTech announced that they had submitted data to the Food and Drug Administration that their coronavirus vaccine is safe and effective in children ages 5-11. What do you think? Is the timeline ahead for the next steps here?Matthew Harrison Yes, right, so they have submitted preliminary data, but they have not submitted the final request for an emergency use authorization. The expectation here is that there will be some back and forth between Pfizer and the regulator to finalize the exact package of data after the FDA has reviewed the initial data. That will then trigger the final submission where they ask for the request for emergency use authorization. Most of us think that would occur sometime, let's say, in the next couple of weeks. And then historically right, the FDA, once they receive that final package, takes on order of two to three weeks to approve the EUA authorization. So, I think this ranges from maybe the earliest in late October towards sometime into early November.Andrew Sheets Matt, I also wanted to cover the issue of booster shots, which is the other kind of large development in the fight against COVID 19, and I think there's been a little bit of confusion on the topic. So, you know, what's the latest in terms of who is eligible for a booster in the U.S. and what the CDC is recommending?Matthew Harrison Originally the FDA had asked their external advisory committee whether or not boosters should be made available for everyone where the original vaccine was authorized, so that would be those 16 and up. The advisory committee then asked to narrow that slightly and specifically what the advisory committee asked was: those 65 years or older, as well as those at high risk, either because of underlying medical conditions or because of occupational hazard. So that would include, hospital workers or workers who are otherwise frontline workers in a high-risk scenario. The CDC has a separate committee called ACIP, which a few days later looked into this as well, and they had voted essentially for those at high medical risk and those 65 years and older. But they had said they were somewhat uncomfortable, and it was a very close vote to be clear, about those at increased occupational risk. After that meeting, the CDC themselves or the director of the CDC said that they believe the booster shot should be made available for all of those groups and essentially overrode the committee on the last piece around occupational risk. So right now, its 65 older, immunocompromised, those at high medical risk and those at high occupational risk.Andrew Sheets So Matt, the final thing I wanted to ask you about is one of the most positive things that seems to have come out of this this terrible pandemic is mRNA vaccination technology. It seems to be a type of medical technology that has really exceeded expectations for how quickly and how effectively a vaccine could be rolled out. Andrew Sheets So Matt, if you think about this technology looking ahead, what do you think are the applications that potentially could go beyond COVID? And also, at what point do you think some of these vaccinations might need to be updated and how difficult will that be?Matthew Harrison So in terms of applications and next steps for RNA, there's a wide variety of disease areas that they're looking at. But in general, the technology is being used to make missing proteins in your body, which occurs a lot with rare genetic diseases. To potentially help various tissues that may need certain proteins or enzymes to help them heal. And also looking at ways that you could, for example, with oncology patients that you could tell the body's own immune system for key flags or markers of the tumors versus normal tissue so that you could redirect the immune system to specifically go after the cancerous tumor. In terms of needing a updated COVID vaccine. I think that all depends on the variant outlook. Currently, what we see is just giving another dose of the current vaccine provides very good protection against Delta. And so, I think as we look out on the outlook, right, it's about if Delta combines with something else, then maybe there is the potential for an update. But the manufacturers are well primed for that, and that process is a couple months process, probably if they had to do that. So, they can adapt quickly.Andrew Sheets Something important to keep an eye on. As always, Matt, it's been great talking with you.Matthew Harrison Thanks, Andrew.Andrew Sheets As a reminder, if you enjoy Thoughts on the Market, please take a moment to rate and review us on the Apple Podcasts app. It helps more people find the show.

Charlottesville Community Engagement
October 5, 2021: Charlottesville City Council approves garden lease, $50,000 for B.U.C.K. Squad; RSWA planning for new paper-sort facility

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 17:21


In today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out:Fall is here, and with it, more moderate temperatures. While your HVAC takes a break, now is the perfect time to prepare for the cooler months. Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP, wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round! LEAP offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents, so, if you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!On today’s show:A private vendor will be setting up a community vaccination center at the Big Lots in Seminole SquareVDOT’s hired a new engineer to run the Culpeper District that includes our communityPlanning is underway to replace a machine that helps with paper and cardboard recycling in Albemarle and CharlottesvilleCity Council votes to join a regional tax board and to give $50,000 to a community policing effortPandemic updateThe Virginia Department of Health reports 1,428 new cases of COVID-19 this morning. Last night, the head of the Blue Ridge Health District had the beginnings of good news to report to City Council. “We’re beginning to see a slight downturn in our current infection rate,” said Dr. Denise Bonds. “For the first time last week we did not have any triple-digit days with regards to cases. They were all below 100.”Dr. Bonds said most of the cases are the delta variant and there are currently no signs of any other new strain. There is currently no universal recommendation that vaccinated individuals get booster shots, but they are available for people who had the Pfizer vaccine and who are older than 65 or people with underlying medical conditions. “We do ask that you schedule an appointment so we have enough Pfizer on board but they are available everywhere that we are vaccinating,” Bonds said. Beginning next week, a new site at Big Lots location in Seminole Square in the location where the University of Virginia was providing vaccines. “This is actually a vendor-run vaccination clinic,” Bonds said. “It’s a contract that our central office at [the Virginia Department of Health] has with an emergency response organization called Ashbritt.” An official announcement will be forthcoming regarding the new community vaccination center. Later this month on October 14 and October 15, a Food and Drug Administration panel will review data regarding the possibility of boosters for Moderna and Johnson and Johnson vaccines. (meeting announcement)“This will be emergency use authorization again and it will still even if its approved on that date will have to go to the CDC advisory committee,” Dr Bonds said.Dr. Bonds said the FDA has tentatively scheduled a meeting for October 26 to consider use of the Pfizer vaccine in children under the age of 12. New VDOT leader for Charlottesville areaWhen the Charlottesville-Albemarle Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Policy Board next meets, there will be a new person representing the Virginia Department of Transportation. Sean Nelson will become the new district engineer for VDOT’s Culpeper District, which spans nine counties.“I am honored to return to Culpeper District as the district engineer and look forward to working with our talented teams and valued community partners,” Nelson is quoted in a September 30 press release. “I was born and raised in Louisa and am now raising my family there. I am proud to come home and am committed to making a difference in this region.”Nelson’s last post was as the maintenance engineer for VDOT’s Richmond District. In the new job, he will be in charge of “construction, maintenance and operations maintenance, project development and business functions of nearly 10,500 lane miles.” VDOT manages road construction projects in all of those counties, including six projects being designed and built under one contract in Albemarle County. However, Charlottesville manages its own construction projects and has been the recipient of multiple projects under Smart Scale. Last month, Council signaled it would likely forgo $3.25 million in VDOT funds for the first phase of the West Main Streetscape and $4 million for the second phase. Both required a match of local funding, funding which will now be transferred to a $75 million project to renovate Buford Middle School. This summer, the Commonwealth Transportation Board approved $10.8 million for the third phase of West Main Street, which requires no match. It is unclear if that phase will move ahead. All of the phases were designed as part of a $2.85 million planning study overseen by Rhodeside & Harwell. Construction on the Belmont Bridge finally got underway this summer after many years of planning. There are many other open VDOT projects in Charlottesville that have not gone to construction. Council round-upLast night, Charlottesville City Council voted 4-1 to join a regional board that would administer cigarette taxes generated in outlying counties. Until this year, only cities have been able to levy such a tax, which generated $641,494 for Charlottesville in fiscal year 2020. The city gets $0.55 a pack. Mayor Nikuyah Walker voted against the item partially out of a concern it would penalize people who are low-income. “I know we discuss it from a public health platform but most people are not going to stop smoking because there’s an increased tax on it,” Walker said. The tax board would be administered by the Thomas Jefferson Planning District. David Blount is deputy director.“And right now we have six counties that have so far agreed to establish this board,” Blount said. “We know of one additional county in our region and even one in our town that is showing some interest in participating.” Counties can not charge more than 40 cents a pack. Council also agreed to donate $50,000 to the B.U.C.K. Squad for their community policing efforts on a 3 to 2 vote. Councilor Michael Payne joined Mayor Walker in voting against the measure out of concerns raised by the Public Housing Association of Residents and the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. “The B.U.C.K. Squad program is something really important, that model,” Payne said. “But I would just want to have very clear lockstep assurance that CRHA and PHAR are all on the same page regarding in terms of what they’re doing and not being 100 percent assured of that I’m going to vote no for that reason hoping that partnership can evolve and become successful.”Council also voted to establish a ground lease for the Botanical Garden of the Piedmont to operate in a section of McIntire Park. The group will be responsible for raising the funds to construct improvements called for in their schematic plan. “It’s very important for the nonprofit to obtain a lease so that they can complete their fundraising efforts,” said City Manager Chip Boyles. “The city does not have any funds in the [capital improvement program] for this project and therefore this would not be a project that would go under construction under city management.” The vote was 5-0. Time for another shout-out from a Patreon supporter!WTJU 91.1 FM is a different sort of radio station. It's dedicated to sharing the transcendent experience of music while raising funds from listeners across the world. From October 4th through 10th, WTJU airs its annual Jazz Marathon. Tune in for a deep dive into everything from bebop to blues. WTJU's Volunteer DJs will play the spectrum jazz – from Billie Holiday to Canonball Adderly to Pharoah Sanders. Plus live, local jazz performances throughout the week.  Visit wtju.org to learn more!At the end of their meeting last night, Charlottesville City Council held another lengthy discussion about the termination of Police Chief RaShall Brackney. I may or may not make it back to that item in a future installment of the newsletter. In addition to the police chief, Charlottesville continues to have many high-profile vacancies.  The position for Director of Elections is being advertised through October 15, 2021. Other openings include the director of Parks and Recreation as well as the Director of Public Works. The person who most recently held the latter position is David Brown, who only worked for Charlottesville for a year. Brown was honored by the Rivanna Solid Waste Authority at their meeting on September 28. Here’s the chair, Mike Gaffney.“And what is that old saying? David, we hardly knew ye,” Gaffney said. RSWA seeks tonnage increaseLet’s stick with the Rivanna Authorities for a moment. The Rivanna Solid Waste Authority has been experiencing higher volumes of tonnage received at the Ivy Materials Utilization Center. Material is sorted before sent out to other landfills. As a result, the RSWA is asking the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to increase the amount it can transfer each day to 450 tons, up from 300 tons. “We believe that by increasing our facility limit to 450 tons per day will not result in a great deal more traffic, but rather allow us to accept the few, large load, customers that are bringing us material from infrequent large projects (like the field turf replacement project or a UVA building demolition project that we’ve seen in the past couple of years,” reads the executive director’s report for the September meeting. RSWA Solid Waste Director Phil McKalips said that many times his agency does not know material is coming until it shows up. “We tend to find out about these projects when they come across the scale, so our ability to impact the planning of a project is usually far down the pipeline by the time we see it,” McKalips said.  McKalips said the RSWA has received a lot of waste material from the Southwood project in recent weeks. Recently an area where household waste had been discarded over the years was cleared and sent to the Ivy Materials Utilization Center. The increase would help on days when they exceed the 300 ton a day limit. “Whoever cleared the site mixed a lot of debris in with the soil so they had to bring it all out to us for disposal,” McKalips said. “We didn’t know that was coming ahead of time and all of a sudden we have 140 tons in a day to deal with.” McKalips said this material is not to be confused with areas that may have been contaminated with oil that leaked from storage tanks under trailers. That will be going through a separate process monitored by the DEQ.RSWA to conduct engineering study on new paper-sort facilityPlanning to reduce greenhouse gas emissions takes many forms. Albemarle County’s Climate Action Plan has a whole chapter on “sustainable materials management” which has multiple strategies to divert items from landfills. Strategy 5.1.3 is to “identify if there is a need to local additional paper/cardboard balers in Albemarle County.” That item is under review by the Rivanna Solid Waste Authority and McKalips gave a briefing.The RSWA operates a facility on Meade Avenue that sorts paper material brought to the Ivy Materials Utilization Center and the McIntire Recycling Center. “People put their recyclable materials in there and we take those back to the paper sort facility and we by and large bale all of those products,” McKalips said. “That allows us to save a lot of shipping costs in getting them to our vendors.”However, there are access issues with the site that have to be addressed. The property on which the facility is located on Meade Avenue is leased from Woolen Mills Self Storage but RSWA can only access it on property leased by Gerdau Metals Recycling. An access agreement has a 90-day termination clause and the bailing equipment is over 20 years old. “The thing has been well used and it’s getting near the end of its service life,” McKalips said. That’s prompted McKalips to see if there’s another option for the future. For instance, there’s not enough covered storage space to keep the material protected from rain and moisture that would make it unusable for recycling. The RSWA also collects paper material from other private collection sites such as at Kohl’s and Wal-Mart. That creates logistical issues with what to bale and when. “So this facility gets a lot of cardboard,” McKalips said. “That cardboard isn’t conducive to pushing that back into a trailer and pulling it out later so we leave it out front and then that’s one of the earliest products to get bailed. Having said that though, we have all [these] materials that need to be pulled back out, driven around the cardboard, and baled.”So with a future need, McKalips presented three options for the future. The first would renovate and expand on site and would have have a $2 million capital cost. The second would be to skip the local baling facility entirely and ship out to other entities. That would include no capital costs, but increase operating costs of $550,000 in the first year and $300,000 each year after. The third would be to build a new paper sort facility with two bailers.  “Obviously this is going to be the most expensive option,” McKalips said. “It was looking to be about $4.3 million in the feasibility study.” If the third option is pursued, McKalips said the next step is to work with Albemarle and Charlottesville to identify a potential site for the new location. They’ll need about three acres of land. Lance Stewart, Albemarle’s Director of Facilities and Environmental Services, said that he is hopeful to be able to work with city government to develop an approach to move forward with a new facility. “I think it’s a complex set of issues that hopefully we can come together on,” Stewart said. The presentation comes just as Albemarle and Charlottesville are about to start their budget cycle. The RSWA Board reached consensus to direct staff to move forward with the engineering study for a new facility. Thank you for reading! Please send on to someone else you think might be interested, and please let me know if you have any questions! This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Curiosity Daily
“Mini Brains” That Grew Eyes and How the FDA Saved Babies

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 9:46


Learn about stem cell “mini brains” that grew eyes and how the FDA prevented an epidemic of birth defects in the 1960s. Scientists grew stem cell 'mini brains' that developed mini-eyes on their own by Cameron Duke Gabriel, E., Albanna, W., Pasquini, G., Ramani, A., Josipovic, N., Mariappan, A., Schinzel, F., Karch, C. M., Bao, G., Gottardo, M., Suren, A. A., Hescheler, J., Nagel-Wolfrum, K., Persico, V., Rizzoli, S. O., Altmüller, J., Riparbelli, M. G., Callaini, G., Goureau, O., & Papantonis, A. (2021). Human brain organoids assemble functionally integrated bilateral optic vesicles. Cell Stem Cell. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.stem.2021.07.010  Starr, M. (2021). Scientists Grew Stem Cell “Mini Brains”. Then, The Brains Sort-of Developed Eyes. ScienceAlert. https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-used-stem-cells-to-make-mini-brains-they-grew-rudimentary-eyes  The FDA never approved thalidomide, and that saved American babies by Briana Brownell James, A. J. (2021, August 17). How a “stubborn” Canadian saved thousands of American babies from birth defects. Nationalpost; National Post. https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/how-a-stubborn-canadian-saved-thousands-of-american-babies-from-birth-defects  ‌Phillips, S. (2020, March 9). How a courageous physician-scientist saved the U.S. from a birth-defects catastrophe. Uchicagomedicine.org; UChicago Medicine. https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/forefront/biological-sciences-articles/courageous-physician-scientist-saved-the-us-from-a-birth-defects-catastrophe  ‌Office of the Commissioner. (2019). Frances O. Kelsey. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. https://www.fda.gov/about-fda/fda-history-exhibits/frances-oldham-kelsey-medical-reviewer-famous-averting-public-health-tragedy  ‌McNeill, L. (2017, May 8). The Woman Who Stood Between America and a Generation of “Thalidomide Babies.” Smithsonian Magazine; Smithsonian Magazine. https://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/woman-who-stood-between-america-and-epidemic-birth-defects-180963165/  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Vaccines and kids — what you need to know about COVID-19, flu

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 38:31


With flu season approaching, Mayo Clinic experts remind parents of the importance of vaccinating children for influenza and COVID-19 when possible. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)recommends everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated for flu each year. The CDC also says people who are eligible can be vaccinated for flu and COVID-19 at the same time. Currently, children ages 12 and older are permitted to get vaccinated for COVID-19 using the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine under terms of the Food and Drug Administration's emergency use authorization. Experts anticipate that the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine will soon be approved for emergency use authorization for children 5-11.On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Angela Mattke, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician and host of Ask The Mayo Mom, discusses children and vaccines with Dr. Robert Jacobson, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician. Dr. Jacobson co-chairs the AskMayoExpert Knowledge Content Board on Immunizations and Vaccinations, and he is medical director for Mayo Clinic's Primary Care in Southeast Minnesota Immunization Program.

KERA's Think
A Head Start On The Next Pandemic

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 33:35


Any preparations the world health community had in place to combat a global pandemic crumbled as the Covid variants spread. Dr. Scott Gottlieb is a former commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration and currently is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He joins host Krys Boyd to discuss what he calls a system-wide failure of government to control Covid-19, and what needs to happen to prepare for the next global health emergency. His book is “Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic.”

KQED's The California Report
Schools in Rural Northern California See Dangerous Effects of Wildfire Smoke

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 12:32


In the second part of NPR's California Newsroom investigation, Dirty Air, we traveled to rural Northern California. There's been a shocking increase in wildfire smoke, and unhealthy air recently in California, and it can be particularly damaging for children. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED The KNP Complex Fire and Windy Fire continue to grow as they scorch parts of Sequoia National Park. Thousands of firefighters are battling challenging conditions, including steep and rugged terrain. During a contentious meeting, the San Diego Unified School District Board of Education unanimously approved a COVID-19 vaccination mandate for eligible students and staff. The plan calls for younger students to be vaccinated as well, once the vaccine is approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

The Dirobi Health Show
Quantum Health and Crypto... With Dr. Jack Kruse

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 39:05


Crypto currency is not only here to stay, and a force to be reckoned with, it can have a significant effect on the health care industry.Leading the charge in this area is Dr. Jack Kruse.He is a member of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and Age Management Medicine Group.  Dr. Kruse has helped pioneer a totally new medical field - Quantum Mitochondrial Health - which has allowed him to help tens of thousands of patients and members to reverse chronic diseases and achieve optimal health. Building on his deep medical expertise, he has also built a vibrant community dedicated to helping people build critical thinking skills and to be able to see the world as it really is, challenging the myths and false conventional wisdom that prop up our health system, our financial system, our media and our governments.Listen in to learn about how Dr. Kruse is disrupting the industry with cutting edge thinking, and crypto currency.Find episode links, notes and artwork at:https://blog.dirobi.comThis show is for informational purposes only. None of the information in this podcast should be construed as dispensing medical advice. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

What the Hell Is Going On
WTH was behind our COVID failure? Dr. Scott Gottlieb on his new book “Uncontrolled Spread,” the catastrophic initial response, and the lessons learned from the COVID pandemic

What the Hell Is Going On

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 54:39


Since the United States recorded its first Covid-19 related fatality in February 2020, over half a million Americans have died from the virus, and an estimated 43 million total cases have been reported in the country. How was America so unprepared for this pandemic? And how can we ensure that we are prepared for the next public health disaster? Dr. Scott Gottlieb once again joined Marc and Dany to discuss his new book “Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic.” He also talks about the current reality of the Delta variant and what a future with endemic COVID may look like. Dr. Gottlieb is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He returned to AEI in 2019 after serving as the 23rd Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. He has a medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and did his residency in internal medicine at the Mount Sinai Medical Center. https://www.aei.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/Transcript-Final-WTH-Gottlieb-9.28.21.pdf (Download the transcript here. )

Emagination Health & Wellness: Biblical Perspective on Nutrition, Physical, Mental and Spiritual Well-being

In this episode, Clement and Carolyn discuss the topic of abortion.  This conversation is not like any that you have heard on the topic.  Join us for this healthful discussion.  Music: “Happy”- Music by Aden.  Music:  https://www.purple-planet.com  “Folksy Days”Timestamps:·         Introduction (04:33)·         Liberty to choose (13:25)·         Purchased by God (16:32)·         Judging vs Revealing (25:24)·         Ideas to decrease the abortion rate (30:31)·         Conclusion (41:09)  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. See Disclaimer. ·       Support Us On Patreon:   www.patreon.com  ·         Leave a voicemail comment:  Veganemagination.com·         Subscribe to our email list:  Veganemagination.com·         Listen on   Spotify                    iTunes                                  iHeart                                    Stitcher                    Buzzsprout               Apple Podcast                    Podbay.fm               Google Podcast

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.
146 - Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former FDA Commissioner, on Vaccine Mandates, Covid Vaccines for Kids, and His New Book “Uncontrolled Spread”

A Second Opinion with Senator Bill Frist, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 73:54


This episode is brought to you by MEDHOST, a Trusted EHR for Healthcare Facilities. To learn more, go to Medhost.com. Dr. Scott Gottlieb is the 23rd commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, serving from 2017 through 2019.  Today, he's a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, serves on the board of Pfizer, and is one of the most knowledgeable, sought-after experts on drug and device regulation and our nation's public health. He also has a new book out called, Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic.  In today's discussion, Dr. Gottlieb shares with us what he learned in writing this authoritative account, including everything that went wrong that left us excessively vulnerable to Covid-19, including how we over-focused on political failures and continue to overlook our nation's systemic shortcomings.  He gives an update on when we can expect Covid vaccine approval for kids, and what we need to do to be prepared for the next pandemic. Learn more about Dr. Gottlieb's new book, including where to buy it, here: www.uncontrolledspread.com/ A note for listeners: we are taking a short break and won't have a podcast next week on October 4th, but we'll be back in your feed on Monday, October 11th.

The FOX News Rundown
From Washington: Breaking Down The Border & Boosters

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 21:03


Segment A The Food and Drug Administration has given final approval to a third Pfizer COVID-19 shot for people over 65, those with certain health conditions, and people whose work puts them at risk of contracting the virus. President Biden warns that the 25 percent of Americans who have not yet gotten a vaccine are causing a lot of damage to the country. FOX News Medical Contributor Dr. Marc Siegel discusses the effort to convince more people to get the jab.    Segment B Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas recently announced the encampment under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas has been cleared, where thousands of Haitian migrants had been residing. President Biden says there is now an investigation into some border patrol agents on horseback who were reportedly swinging ropes at migrants, as Republican lawmakers say the situation at the border is out of hand. FOX News Correspondent Griff Jenkins explains.

KQED's The California Report
California Prepares to Issue Booster Shots to More Eligible Residents

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 16:16


Now that it's received approval from the Food and Drug Administration, and been endorsed by a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel, state health officials say they're ready to give COVID-19 booster shots to anyone who's eligible. Before it's widely distributed, the efficacy of a third dose of the Pfizer vaccine still needs to be reviewed by the Western States Scientific Safety Review Workgroup.  Movie fans will soon be able to enjoy a new museum in Los Angeles that is aimed specifically for them. The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures opens on Septemeber 30, and will provide guests with a rich, visual history of the filmmaking industry. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report During a visit to the site of KNP Complex Fire in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, Governor Gavin Newsom signed a $15 billion climate package. But how will the money be spent? Reporter: Laura Klivans, KQED The KNP Complex Fire and Windy Fire are both burning in Sequoia National Park. Fire crews are trying to protect the iconic trees there and so far, have been fairly successful. Reporter: Sorreath Hok, Valley Public Radio 

Mooch FM
Episode 57: Dr. Scott Gottlieb, Greg Isenberg & Anand Menon

Mooch FM

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 76:49


In this episode, Anthony is joined by Dr. Scott Gottlieb, twenty-third commissioner of the US Food and Drug Administration and resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, to discuss his new book ‘Uncontrolled Spread: Why Covid-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic' which shows how the Coronavirus and its variants were able to trounce America's pandemic preparations, and outlines the steps that must be taken to protect against the next outbreak. Greg Isenberg is the chief executive of Late Checkout and an advisor to Reddit and joins Anthony to explore what the future holds for startups, how he watched TikTok grow from infancy to a global phenomenon - and his favourite conspiracy theory on Reddit right now.Finally, Anand Menon, political scientist, professor and director of the UK in a Changing Europe initiative talks with Anthony about the US-Taiwan relationship, the difficult decisions facing Australia - and shares his Malbec of choice! Follow our guests on Twitter:https://twitter.com/ScottGottliebMD https://twitter.com/gregisenberg https://twitter.com/anandMenon1 Follow us:https://twitter.com/moochfm  https://twitter.com/scaramucci  Sign up for our newsletter at:www.mooch.fm Created & produced by Podcast Partners:www.podcastpartners.com 

Generations Radio
Shall Churches Force Vaccinations

Generations Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 32:00


As national governments are forcing vaccines on churches, some denominations are capitulating. But, shall we trust the FDA- Shall we trust an increasingly anti-christian medical and governmental cartel- The US Food and Drug Administration has purchased baby body parts in the most macabre fashion, to use in experimentation. Our trust is waning thin.----Warning- The Descriptions of the FDA's use of baby body parts may be too gory and horrific for children's ears.----This program includes-----1. The World View in 5 Minutes with Adam McManus -The remorse of Biden voters, Weatherman of 33 years fired for refusing COVID shot, Mass shooting at Tennessee supermarket-----2. Generations with Kevin Swanson

Charlottesville Community Engagement
September 23, 2021: Habitat provides Southwood details to Albemarle Supervisors

Charlottesville Community Engagement

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 16:38


In today’s Patreon-fueled shout-out: Fall is just around the corner, but the summer heat is sticking around a bit longer. Your local energy nonprofit, LEAP, wants you and yours to keep comfortable all year round! LEAP offers FREE home weatherization to income- and age-qualifying residents, so, if you’re age 60 or older, or have an annual household income of less than $74,950, you may qualify for a free energy assessment and home energy improvements such as insulation and air sealing. Sign up today to lower your energy bills, increase comfort, and reduce energy waste at home!On today’s show: The Albemarle Board of Supervisors gets an update on Habitat’s redevelopment of SouthwoodThe Blue Ridge Health District holds a town hall on the continuing pandemicSeveral new historic markers are on the docket today at the Virginia Department of HIstoric ResourcesAll of Virginia’s 132 school divisions are now open in person, according to a press release from Governor Ralph Northam. First Lady Pamela Northam just concluded a statewide tour of schools and the release includes a link to COVID-19 safety resources for parents and students. Most schools systems continue to list the number of COVID cases, including Amherst County, which was closed for part of September due to a high positivity rate.Today the Virginia Department of Health reports another 3,767 new cases and 54 new fatalities. The percent positivity has decreased to 9.7 percent. There are another 128 new cases reported in the Blue Ridge Health District and an additional COVID death. Last night, the Blue Ridge Health District held a town hall to talk about continuing resources in the days of Delta. “As we all know, it’s much more transmissible than previous variants than what we’ve experienced with COVID,” said Ryan MacKay, director of policy and planning for the district. “It’s also sort of coincided with the expiration of a lot of the mandates that had been in place for masks, distancing, limiting numbers at social gatherings, so we’ve had this combination.”MacKay said health officials meet with schools each week to minimize risk as much as possible. That involves case investigations to understand how further transmissions may have occurred. MacKay said this is also the time of year when there are other ailments that are very similar to COVID. “As we enter flu-season and we enter into what traditionally is more disease-spreading in congregate settings such as in schools, it’s going to make that a little bit more difficult,” MacKay said. “So the reason we’re asking schools and pediatricians to really work with families to really identify what is causing the illness. It’s critical because that minimizes the risk of spread and makes sure we can keep children where they need to be which is in classrooms and schools.” That means that children with any symptoms should stay home until COVID is ruled out. If the diagnosis is positive, 14 days of quarantine with no school activity or interaction with anyone. The Blue Ridge Health District is currently offering third-dose boosters to those who qualify.“Third doses for people who are immunocompromised began on August 13,” said Dr. Denise Bonds, director of the Blue Ridge Health District. “You don’t have to bring in any proof. You can self-declare and the best person to speak with is your primary care physician who can help you make that determination that you need that third dose.” Around the same time as the town hall, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized booster doses of the Pfizer vaccine for anyone over the age of 65 and well as those at high-risk of severe COVID. (press release)There is not yet a recommendation for those who got the Johnson and Johnson shots. More as we continue. Several proposed historic markers in the area are being considered today by the Board of the Virginia Department of Historic Resources at their meeting at Montpelier. One would recognize a 1950 court case that forced the University of Virginia to admit a Black man who had been denied a space because of his skin color. A three-judge panel heard the Swanson V. University of Virginia case in the former federal court on Market building that now houses the Central Branch of the Jefferson-Madison Regional Library. That’s where the marker will stand. Another is at Jackson Burley High School on Rose Hill Drive. The building opened in 1951 to unify several Black high schools across the area. “The 26-classroom building reflected an effort to provide “separate but equal” facilities in an era when lawsuits frequently challenged poor conditions in Black schools,” reads the proposed text. “The 1956 football team was undefeated and unscored on.”Jackson P. Burley High School was nominated for the National Register of Historic Places last year. The DHR Board will also consider a marker for Dr. W. W. Yen, the first international national to attend the University of Virginia. The Chinese national graduated in 1900 and went on to a career as a diplomat. His nomination is part of a contest held as part of Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month. Read the full nominations here. You’re reading Charlottesville Community Engagement. Time for two quick Patreon-shout-outs. One person wants you to know "We keep each other safe. Get vaccinated, wear a mask, wash your hands, and keep your distance."And in another one, one brand new Patreon supporter wants you to go out and read a local news story written by a local journalist. Whether it be the Daily Progress, Charlottesville Tomorrow, C-Ville Weekly, NBC29, CBS19, the community depends on a network of people writing about the community. Go learn about this place today!This summer, Habitat for Humanity of Greater Charlottesville has been updating various committees in Albemarle on their efforts to redevelop the Southwood Mobile Home Park as a mixed-use community. The Board of Supervisors approved the first phase of a rezoning in August 2019, and they got an update at their meeting on September 15. There are a lot of details, and if you want all of them, I recommend watching the full presentation. (watch)But here is a summary beginning with planner Megan Nedostup with the basic info. “Habitat acquired the property in 2007,” Nedostup said. “1,500 residents live there in 341 mobiles homes.”Supervisors adopted a resolution to work with Habitat on redevelopment in 2016 and an action plan in 2018 that included financial contributions from the county. “Involved with that approval we appropriated $675,000 to Southwood to assist with the rezoning application,” Nedostup said. “In 2019 the performance agreement was approved. $1.5 million for construction of 75 affordable units. $300,000 for 80 or Low-Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC). And $1.4 million over ten years in tax rebates.”The rezoning approved a total of 458 housing units on undeveloped land along Old Lynchburg Road. Site plans are coming in for each of the 12 blocks in this stage of the development. Piedmont Housing Alliance is building the LIHTC units and aim to exceed the total by constructing 121 apartments in three buildings. Nedostup said Habitat has met one milestone of the performance agreement and has received $100,000 for planning work. Another $300,000 payment for securing the LIHTC credits is being processed. “Milestone 1C included $200,000 when Habitat demonstrates it has secured funding for 57 affordable units and that one is in process,” Nedostup said. Other milestones are also in the process of being met. Outside of the performance agreement, Albemarle County also partnered with Habitat on a $1 million Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). In his presentation, Habitat CEO Dan Rosenweig showed a fly-through video of what the development will look like when it comes together. The idea has been to build a new community along new roadways. “We worked closely with Atlantic Builders to design a new product typology so that this streetscape created a really great walk from deeper into the neighborhood toward the neighborhood downtown,” Rosensweig said. “[These are] townhomes that are two stories in the front and then they take advantage of the grade to be three stories behind so what it appears are townhomes that are really human scale.”Rosensweig reminded the Board that the Planning Commission had had concerns about whether there would be enough affordable units in the first phase. “There was concern among Planning Commissioners about the ultimate amount of affordable housing in phase one and whether that would be enough housing to take care of the residents who exist at Southwood now as we move phase by phase but also to create new affordable housing in the region,” Rosensweig said. “I think we’ve done a pretty good job with 335 total units in phase one with 207 of them affordable,” Rosensweig said. “Habitat is going to build 86 of them. That’s going to be almost exclusively homeownership but there are some residents who will not LIHTC and who will not want to purchase a home, so we’ve committed to making some deeply affordable rentals available interspersed in the neighborhood as well.”Rosensweig said he estimated about 100 families will be rehoused as part of the first phase. Unfortunately, some families have had to be moved on a temporary basis due to poor environmental conditions that he said Habitat has inherited from the previous owner.“Instead of one or two mobile homes hooked up to a septic tank there were ten, and so those leach fields are extending into the areas of construction so out of an abundance of caution and safety for residents we are in the process of moving the first 25 families from the area immediately adjacent to the construction site to the other side of the mobile home park in trailers where there are served by sewer,” Rosensweig said. There are about fifty more families that will need to be rehoused due to the next phase of construction. Rosensweig said a rehousing task force has been formed to identify solutions. There are other environmental issues. “There’s also a remediation task force that has formed to deal with some of the things that were a little bit hard to dig,” Rosensweig said. “For example, the mobile home park has been on electric for many years but originally there was an oil tank installed under every trailer. As we started to move them, we expected one in ten to leak. If they were decent material to start with, they wouldn’t leak. But all ten of the first ones that we dug up leaked, which suggests to us that all 341 are going to be removed.” Rosensweig said Habitat has worked with Albemarle and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to remove the damaged sections of soil where it has been encountered. “It’s kind of like cutting out a tumor,”  Rosensweig said. “You remove the bad stuff and also dirt around it, stockpile it, and remove it. The site is pristine now but it has cost a lot more than we expected.” Rosensweig said the Board of Supervisors can expect to see the next phase of the rezoning. Habitat will ask to extend the rules for the existing zoning and its code of development across the whole park. “More like a zoning amendment than a rezoning,” Rosensweig said. The goal is to submit the application by mid-October. Supervisor Liz Palmer has been on the Board since 2014 and wanted to make sure all of the steps of the performance agreement are tracked. “I’m wondering going forward on future projects how we compare what we’re getting for the amount of money that we’re putting in because these numbers are hard to keep track of overtime.”Stacy Pethia, the county’s housing coordinator, said it is too early to be able to break down a cost-per-unit, but that will be available as the projects go through the many variables involved in a construction project.“The cost as we’ve learned over the past year continues to significantly change and has a significant impact on the project,” Pethia said. Rosenweig had an exact figure for the roughly $4 million in Albemarle’s investment.“That works out to about $19,000 a unit,” Rosensweig said. “The cost for each of our homes on average is probably looking because of COVID price spikes in the mid $200K’s and so your funding represents a little less than ten percent of each of the units.” This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at communityengagement.substack.com/subscribe

Another View The Radio Show Podcast
AV on Health: We're Still in a Pandemic!

Another View The Radio Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 54:00


An advisory panel to the Food and Drug Administration says "yes" to booster shots for people 65 and older along with those at high risk for severe illness, but "no" to widespread booster shots for those 12-65. Meanwhile, Pfizer says its vaccine is safe for kids between 5-12 years old. Hospital admissions for children with Covid are at the highest numbers since the CDC started tracking child admissions about a year ago. Schools are doing all they can to keep kids safe, but many schools have classes that have had to shut down because of Covid exposure. Yes - we are still in the pandemic! Dr. Keith Newby, Cardiologist and Director of Health Equity with Sentara, joins us with the latest on the Covid-19, booster shots and keeping our kids and ourselves safe.

Squawk Pod
Debt Default Drama; Theranos Texts on Trial; Smart Travels with The Points Guy

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 33:44


Fed Chair Jerome Powell signaled a rate hike and a stimulus taper, prompting a positive day on Wall Street. In Washington, Congress may be at a standstill to raise or suspend the debt limit, thus averting a government shutdown, and a debt default. Eric Cantor, former Republican House Majority Leader and CNBC's Ylan Mui discuss the debt ceiling and the possible economic fallout. The Food and Drug Administration authorized Pfizer and BioNTech's Covid-19 booster shots for people 65 and older and other vulnerable Americans six months after receiving the first two doses. Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes continues her trial, and CNBC's Yasmin Khorram has obtained 600 pages of Holmes's private texts with her ex-boyfriend Sunny Balwani. Khorram reveals details of their relationship, now in the courtroom spotlight. Plus, The Points Guy Brian Kelly offers his tips for making the most of a credit card, capitalizing on the best ways to leverage Amex and Chase points for travel. In this episode:Eric Cantor, @EricCantorBrian Kelly, @thepointsguyYlan Mui, @ylanmuiYasmin Khorram, @YasminKhorramJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkBecky Quick, @BeckyQuickAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkin

The Dirobi Health Show
The Magic of Collagen with Charlie Bailes

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 37:21


Collagen is a key element for optimal health. But our modern diets just don't provide as much as older, more natural diets provided.Listen in as I discuss collagen with Charlie Bailes, and expert in the field.Added product reviews section through an app and modified its css according to the design.Find episode links, notes and artwork at:https://blog.dirobi.comThis show is for informational purposes only. None of the information in this podcast should be construed as dispensing medical advice. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
Did Our Public Health Institutions Learn Anything From COVID? | Scott Gottlieb, MD

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 65:57


Former FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD joins us to review the mistakes, misrepresentations, and institutional barriers at the CDC and other public health institutions that hindered our response to the COVID-19 pandemic - along with the tactical steps we must take to defeat the next pandemic. We also discuss reforming the FDA approval process to allow medical innovation and why the drug price controls found in the Democrats' HR3 legislation will stop the next breakthrough drugs from emerging. Scott Gottlieb, MD, is the author of "Uncontrolled Spread: Why COVID-19 Crushed Us and How We Can Defeat the Next Pandemic." He is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. From 2017 to 2019 he served as the 23rd commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Gottlieb is also a special partner with the venture capital firm New Enterprise Associates and serves on the boards of Pfizer, Illumina, Aetion, and Tempus. Follow him on Twitter at @ScottGottliebMD.

The mindbodygreen Podcast
335: How does your brain store trauma? | Neurologist Scott Small, M.D.

The mindbodygreen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 35:46


Scott Small, M.D.: “One of the main purposes of sleep is to trim down our memories.” Small, a neurologist & Alzheimer's researcher, joins mbg co-CEO, Jason Wachob, to discuss how trauma affects your memory, plus: - How sleep keeps you from having "too much memory" - Why having a “bad memory” can sometimes benefit your mental health - How to make sure your brain has a balance of memory and forgetting - How fear memories impact your health & how to keep them at bay - How meaningful social connections can enhance your memory Referenced in the episode: - Small's book, Forgetting: The Benefits of Not Remembering. - Research from Francis Crick on why sleeping is for forgetting. - Columbia University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center website. - Research on the neurological differences between chimpanzees and bonobos. - Small's mbg article on how forgetting can boost creativity. Don't forget to use the code SLEEP25 for 25% off your first month subscription of mbg's best-selling sleep support+ supplement. Our science-backed formula helps you fall asleep faster, stay asleep longer, and wake up feeling rejuvenated.* To learn more about the supplement Jason swears by, visit mindbodygreen.com/SLEEP25. Enjoy this episode! Whether it's an article or podcast, we want to know what we can do to help here at mindbodygreen. Let us know at: podcast@mindbodygreen.com. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. 

Mayo Clinic Q&A
FDA panel makes recommendations on COVID-19 booster shots

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 23:00


On Friday, Sept. 17, the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) advisory panel rejected a proposal to give Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine boosters to the general public. But the panel recommend boosters for people aged 65 and older — and for other high-risk groups — six months after the initial vaccination series. That includes health care workers. The recommendation will go before the FDA for final approval. FDA approval is just one step in determining whether booster shots will be made available. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) will refine the recommendations for booster shots and provide guidance to health care providers, pharmacies and other COVID-19 vaccine providers. ACIP has scheduled a meeting for Sept. 22-23. "It's a bit of a complicated path," says Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic's Vaccine Research Group. "But we're exercising caution before we proceed into boosters for everyone, and the reason for that is because we do our best to follow the science." The FDA panel requested more safety data on the use of boosters.On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Poland discusses booster recommendations and other COVID-19 updates.

Emagination Health & Wellness: Biblical Perspective on Nutrition, Physical, Mental and Spiritual Well-being

In this episode, Clement and Carolyn conclude their discussion on the topic of solosexuality.  Join us for this healthful discussion.  Music: “Happy”- Music by Aden.  Music:  https://www.purple-planet.com  “Folksy Days”Timestamps:·         Thoughts matter (01:27)·         Is Solosex wrong ? (07:40)·         Are there spiritual benefits? (13:22)·         Conclusion (15:35)  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. See Disclaimer. ·       Support Us On Patreon:   www.patreon.com  ·         Leave a voicemail comment:  Veganemagination.com·         Subscribe to our email list:  Veganemagination.com·         Listen on   Spotify                    iTunes                                  iHeart                                    Stitcher                    Buzzsprout               Apple Podcast                    Podbay.fm               Google Podcast

Face the Nation on the Radio
EXTRA: Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb - Full Interview

Face the Nation on the Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 78:17


Face the Nation Moderator Margaret Brennan's full interview with the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, Dr. Scott Gottlieb. Portions of the interview aired on the September 19, 2021 Face the Nation broadcast.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Up First
Saturday, September 18, 2021

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 13:31


An expert panel of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration recommend against a booster shot of the Covid-19 vaccine for most U.S. adults. France has recalled its ambassadors to the U.S. and Australia, after being excluded from a deal to build nuclear-powered submarines for Australia. And Washington D.C. prepares for a rally today, as right-wing demonstrators protest the ongoing criminal cases linked to the January 6th attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
1 shot, 2 shots … 3 shots? 4?

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 22:53


Today, a group of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted to reject a plan from the White House to approve vaccine boosters for most Americans. That was followed up by a vote to approve boosters for people who are at serious risk of coronavirus disease or over the age of 65. We’ll talk about what makes the discussion around boosters so complicated. We’ll also talk about the Pentagon’s acknowledgment of a drone strike gone very wrong. Finally, we wrap up the show with a round of our favorite game, Half Full/Half Empty. Give now to support the show you love and to get the “Make Me Smart” banana pants and ringtones! Marketplace.org/givesmart. Here’s everything we talked about on the show today: “Pentagon acknowledges Aug. 29 drone strike in Afghanistan was a tragic mistake that killed 10 civilians” from The New York Times “FDA panel backs COVID-19 boosters only for elderly or high-risk Americans” from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch “Employers’ new strategy: Come for the work, stay for the college tuition” from Marketplace “More than 80 percent of Americans want their paycheck the day they earn it” from The Hill “Cup Noodle company introduces 4 soup-flavored sodas” from ABC7 Chicago “Will ‘South Park’ creators remake Colorado’s legendary Casa Bonita?” from Marketplace

Marketplace All-in-One
1 shot, 2 shots … 3 shots? 4?

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 22:53


Today, a group of advisers to the Food and Drug Administration voted to reject a plan from the White House to approve vaccine boosters for most Americans. That was followed up by a vote to approve boosters for people who are at serious risk of coronavirus disease or over the age of 65. We’ll talk about what makes the discussion around boosters so complicated. We’ll also talk about the Pentagon’s acknowledgment of a drone strike gone very wrong. Finally, we wrap up the show with a round of our favorite game, Half Full/Half Empty. Give now to support the show you love and to get the “Make Me Smart” banana pants and ringtones! Marketplace.org/givesmart. Here’s everything we talked about on the show today: “Pentagon acknowledges Aug. 29 drone strike in Afghanistan was a tragic mistake that killed 10 civilians” from The New York Times “FDA panel backs COVID-19 boosters only for elderly or high-risk Americans” from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch “Employers’ new strategy: Come for the work, stay for the college tuition” from Marketplace “More than 80 percent of Americans want their paycheck the day they earn it” from The Hill “Cup Noodle company introduces 4 soup-flavored sodas” from ABC7 Chicago “Will ‘South Park’ creators remake Colorado’s legendary Casa Bonita?” from Marketplace

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Key FDA advisory committee rejects COVID vaccine boosters for the general population

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 5:13


A key advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration overwhelmingly rejected vaccine boosters for the general U.S. population for now, but it voted unanimously in favor of giving boosters to those 65 and older as well as high risk individuals.The recommendations mark a pivotal moment in the debate around boosters. William Brangham joins Amna Nawaz to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

The Dirobi Health Show
Hitting the Health Reset Button. Detox, Restart, Level Up with Sara Banta!

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 38:53


Sara Banta is the owner of Accelerated Health Products in addition to the host of Accelerated Health Radio and TV.  She helps her clients and listeners reach their optimal state of health through proper frequency enhanced detox supplements, cutting edge technologies, and modalities.Her journey hit rock bottom about 15 years ago suffering from Crohn's disease, hormonal issues, PCOS and heavy metal toxicity.  After Western medicine couldn't give her answers or solutions, she discovered natural solutions that actually worked.  As she was on her journey, she was hit with her 9 year old son's diagnosis of leukemia.  It was that moment that she knew she had a bigger calling in life; to open people's eyes to the world of natural healing. Fast forward to today where she serves her clients and listeners with cutting edge protocols that combine Scalar frequency-based supplements, Chinese medicine, healing devices and much more to detox, reset and rebuild their Body, Mind and Spirit.See episode links and shownotes at:https://blog.dirobi.comThis show is for informational purposes only. None of the information in this podcast should be construed as dispensing medical advice. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Economist Radio
The Economist Asks: Scott Gottlieb

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 30:14


As President Biden pushes to get more Americans fully jabbed, Anne McElvoy asks the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration whether America's vaccine mandates will work. The author of “Uncontrolled Spread” discusses the failures in handling the covid-19 pandemic and the efficacy of booster shots. And, what is the best temperature to cook a steak?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Economist Asks
The Economist Asks: Scott Gottlieb

The Economist Asks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 30:14


As President Biden pushes to get more Americans fully jabbed, Anne McElvoy asks the former commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration whether America's vaccine mandates will work. The author of “Uncontrolled Spread” discusses the failures in handling the covid-19 pandemic and the efficacy of booster shots. And, what is the best temperature to cook a steak?Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Dirobi Health Show
Gamify Your Way to Superior Health with Matt Ferguson and the Life Extend App

The Dirobi Health Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 51:15


I am LOVING the Life Extend app! It's a simple, daily use app that helps me monitor the correct activities I need to do to "live long and prosper," but it's also deep, with millions of dollars of development behind it.Join me with developer Matt Fitzgerald as we discuss this unique and powerful app.Because the interview was conducted over video, there are things we are showing while we talk, so for audio only listeners I recommend downloading the free version of the app so you can follow along and see what we are referring to as we go.Download Life Extend here: https://lifeextend.app.link/PS5oKxGLAibSee all podcast episode posts with graphics, links, and other supporting material here:https://blog.dirobi.comThis show is for informational purposes only. None of the information in this podcast should be construed as dispensing medical advice. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

The mindbodygreen Podcast
332: How to know if your gut issue is something more serious | New York Times bestselling author Danielle Walker

The mindbodygreen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 43:00


Danielle Walker: “Your disease does not have to rule your life.” Walker, a New York Times bestselling author, joins mbg co-CEO, Jason Wachob, to discuss the signs your gut discomfort is a more severe issue, plus: - How to maintain a strict diet & still have fun with food - The biggest "watch-outs" to avoid if you're gluten-free - Advice for anyone struggling with an autoimmune disease - What she wished she knew when she was first diagnosed with ulcerative colitis - How a specific carbohydrate diet can potentially help your gut Referenced in the episode: - Walker's book, Food Saved Me. - Walker's website, Against All Grain. - mbg Podcast episode #125, with Jason Karp. - A study stating ~80% of patients diagnosed with autoimmune diseases are women. - Our explainer on autoimmune disease. Our glow from the inside out bundle+ has arrived! This powerhouse duo, cellular beauty+ and beauty & gut collagen+, helps reduce the size of wrinkles and fine lines while enhancing your skin's hydration, elasticity, and smoothness.* Visit mindbodygreen.com/glow to learn more, and use the code BEAUTYPOD at checkout to save 20% off your first month when you subscribe to the bundle. Enjoy this episode! Whether it's an article or podcast, we want to know what we can do to help here at mindbodygreen. Let us know at: podcast@mindbodygreen.com. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
All ya’ll need to get vaccinated

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 19:45


The White House isn’t messing around. Now that the COVID-19 vaccines have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration, the Joe Biden administration has ordered two-thirds of the American workforce to get the jab. We’ll discuss the latest round of vaccine mandates. Plus, an update on the abortion ban in Texas and the buy now, pay later boom — what can possibly go wrong? Finally, we fill our hollowed-out shells with Blue’s Clues and some fun facts about rats! Here’s everything we talked about today: “Biden is requiring the vast majority of federal workers to get vaccinated or face disciplinary measures” from The New York Times “Justice Department Sues Texas Over New Abortion Ban” from NPR “As ‘buy now, pay later’ surges, a third of U.S. users fall behind on payments” from Reuters “Deja vu as container ship runs aground in Suez Canal but is quickly refloated“ from Metro News Blue’s Clues Turns 25  “Beached Rat Carcasses Indicate Mass Rodent Death During Ida, Experts Say” from Gothamist “5 fun facts about rats | Explore | Awesome Activities & Fun Facts!” from CBC Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Up First
Thursday, September 9, 2021

Up First

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 13:16


President Biden will announce a new strategy Thursday to fight the Delta variant of the coronavirus. The administration has suffered a series of setbacks in handling the latest COVID surge. After a year and a half of the pandemic, what's left to try? A decision from the Food and Drug Administration could change the future of the e-cigarette industry. What factors are the FDA considering before making its decision? And a biotech company founder stands trial on charges she defrauded investors of millions and deceived patients.