Podcasts about labor department

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Best podcasts about labor department

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Latest podcast episodes about labor department

Reveal
The Bitter Work Behind Sugar

Reveal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 50:45


Sugar is a big part of Americans' daily diet, but we rarely ask where that sweet cane comes from.   In November, the United States announced that it will block all imports of raw sugar from one of those sources: the cane fields owned by the Central Romana Corp. in the Dominican Republic. U.S. Customs and Border Protection cited labor abuses in its decision. Sugar from Central Romana feeds into the supply chains of major U.S. brands, including Domino and Hershey.  The federal government's action follows a two-year investigation by Reveal and Mother Jones. Reporters Sandy Tolan and Euclides Cordero Nuel visited Haitian migrants in the Dominican Republic who do the backbreaking work of cutting sugarcane for little pay. Central Romana is the Dominican Republic's largest private employer and has strong links to two powerful Florida businessmen, Alfonso and Pepe Fanjul. The reporters speak to workers who have no access to government pensions, so they're forced to work in the fields into their 80s for as little as $3 a day. In the 1990s, Tolan reported on human trafficking and child labor in the Dominican sugar industry. Conditions improved following pressure on the government from local activists, human rights groups and the U.S. Labor Department. But major problems have persisted.   After Reveal's story first aired in fall 2021, Congress took action. Fifteen members of the House Ways and Means Committee called on federal agencies to formulate a plan to address what they called the “slave-like conditions” in the Dominican cane fields. Central Romana also took action: It bulldozed one of the worker camps our reporters visited, claiming it was part of an improvement program. Residents say that with very little warning, they were told to pack up their lives. Central Romana denies the U.S. government's recent findings that its cane cutters are working under forced labor conditions. This is an update of an episode that originally aired in September 2021.  Support Reveal's journalism at Revealnews.org/donatenow Subscribe to our weekly newsletter to get the scoop on new episodes at Revealnews.org/weekly Connect with us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram

Inside Politics
The jobs report conundrum

Inside Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 37:49


Fresh numbers from the Labor Department today show the US added a robust 263,00 jobs in November, proving the economy is strong and resilient to recession. But it also shows the Fed's effort to slow growth -- and inflation -- won't get easier any time soon. Plus: President Biden tries to rewrite the primary calendar by putting South Carolina first. Does that signal he's running again in 2024? And: With only four days left in the critical Georgia senate showdown, a brand-new CNN poll shows Democrat Raphael Warnock with a narrow lead over Republican Herschel Walker.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Marketplace Morning Report
It’s another better-than-expected day for the U.S. labor market

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 7:42


Job numbers from the Labor Department came in strong, and to help us make more sense of them, we are joined by Chris Low of FHN Financial. Elsewhere, the saga over Biden’s student loan forgiveness plan has reached the halls of the Supreme Court. Then, we examine the Fed’s balancing act of taming inflation while also trying to keep people working.

Marketplace All-in-One
It’s another better-than-expected day for the U.S. labor market

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 7:42


Job numbers from the Labor Department came in strong, and to help us make more sense of them, we are joined by Chris Low of FHN Financial. Elsewhere, the saga over Biden’s student loan forgiveness plan has reached the halls of the Supreme Court. Then, we examine the Fed’s balancing act of taming inflation while also trying to keep people working.

The Automotive Troublemaker w/ Paul J Daly and Kyle Mountsier
Kicking Off December W/: Hyundai, Kia, Ringless, Quitting, Metallica

The Automotive Troublemaker w/ Paul J Daly and Kyle Mountsier

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 15:12


December 1st doesn't disappoint as we talk about Hyundai and Kia crushing November, illegal voicemails, people quitting on quitting, and Metallica's new song (yep). Hyundai and Kia sales jumped a whopping 43% and 25% respectively as November deliveries set an all time sales record. Hyundai inventory was up 12% over last month and has more than doubled YoYThe public and the FCC rejoice as ringless voicemails have finally been declared illegal, ending an era of phone spam that annoyed everyone without even letting them know. The ringless calls are now covered by the same Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) rules which condemn calls without explicit customer consentFrequently used by telemarketers, political campaigns, and a good number of auto dealersIn June, a court awarded 2.5M in a class action suit against Moss Bros. Auto Group in Riverside, CA citing "aggressive unsolicited marketing" Job quitting has just hit a 17 month low, down to 2.6% as fewer workers voluntarily left their jobs according to the Labor Department's Job Openings and Labor Turnover SurveyRecent layoffs and inflation could be affecting employee sentiment and securityJobs market still remains historically strongT0 the joy of rural service departments across the country, Metallica has released its first single since 2016. Just half a day after Get the Daily Push Back email at https://www.asotu.com/ JOIN the conversation on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/asotu/ Read our most recent email at: https://www.asotu.com/media/push-back-email Share your positive dealer stories: https://www.asotu.com/positivity ASOTU Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/automotivestateoftheunion

SkyWatchTV Podcast
Five in Ten 12/1/22: Biden Wants Your 401K to Get Woke

SkyWatchTV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 19:00


The Labor Department quietly issued a new rule the evening before Thanksgiving, nudging 401K fund managers to invest in “companies committed to positive Environmental, Social and Governance actions.” 5) Türkiye losing patience with US support for Kurds; 4) Economic headwinds include looming rail strike and banks short of capital; 3) San Francisco PD says don't worry, armed robots won't carry guns—only explosives; 2) Biden pushing 401K fund managers to invest in ESG; 1) Five rental cars used by Biden's Secret Service detail went up in flames Monday morning, but Nantucket Fire Chief rules out foul play.

From Washington – FOX News Radio
Are American Airports Braced For The Holiday Rush?

From Washington – FOX News Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 34:36


The Wednesday before Thanksgiving has long been considered one of the busiest travel days of the year in the United States. The pandemic era stifled Americans from vacations and cross-country visits, yet today the travel volume projections suggest that this Thanksgiving week will demonstrate that travel has returned to pre-pandemic levels. Travel and small business analyst, Mark Murphy joins to discuss how remote work has transformed the traditional American travel habits around the holidays, how airlines have been preparing for a boom in travel, and how the easing of travel restrictions encouraged more Americans to plan trips this year. Later, he gives his insight on how to navigate the airport experience with less stress and explains when is the best time to book a flight.   During the pandemic, America saw a massive uptick in the country's unemployment rate due to nationwide lockdowns and layoffs. Though the US recovered when most Americans returned to work this year, a record number of young men in what the Labor Department deems their 'prime working age,' between roughly 25 and 54, remain unemployed or have neglected to enter the workforce entirely. American Enterprise Institute Wendt Chair Nicholas Eberstadt tackles this complex topic in his new book ‘Men Without Work: Post-Pandemic Edition'. He joins the Rundown to discuss the key reasons young men are turning away from the workforce, how this has a negative impact on society, and what can be done to address what he calls a “Great-Depression-scale-problem."   Plus, commentary by Fox and Friends Co-Host Steve Doocy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The FOX News Rundown
Are American Airports Braced For The Holiday Rush?

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 34:36


The Wednesday before Thanksgiving has long been considered one of the busiest travel days of the year in the United States. The pandemic era stifled Americans from vacations and cross-country visits, yet today the travel volume projections suggest that this Thanksgiving week will demonstrate that travel has returned to pre-pandemic levels. Travel and small business analyst, Mark Murphy joins to discuss how remote work has transformed the traditional American travel habits around the holidays, how airlines have been preparing for a boom in travel, and how the easing of travel restrictions encouraged more Americans to plan trips this year. Later, he gives his insight on how to navigate the airport experience with less stress and explains when is the best time to book a flight.   During the pandemic, America saw a massive uptick in the country's unemployment rate due to nationwide lockdowns and layoffs. Though the US recovered when most Americans returned to work this year, a record number of young men in what the Labor Department deems their 'prime working age,' between roughly 25 and 54, remain unemployed or have neglected to enter the workforce entirely. American Enterprise Institute Wendt Chair Nicholas Eberstadt tackles this complex topic in his new book ‘Men Without Work: Post-Pandemic Edition'. He joins the Rundown to discuss the key reasons young men are turning away from the workforce, how this has a negative impact on society, and what can be done to address what he calls a “Great-Depression-scale-problem."   Plus, commentary by Fox and Friends Co-Host Steve Doocy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketplace Minute
Global economy to avoid recession next year, report says - Midday - Marketplace Minute - November 22, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 1:50


The OECD says the global economy will grow 2.2%; E.U. approves rule requiring more women on corporate boards; Best Buy sales slow, but not as much as feared; U.S. Labor Department issues rule to allow pension managers to consider climate change To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Nov. 18, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 20:48


  Landaas & Company newsletter  November edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Art Rothschild Mike Hoelzl (with Max Hoelzl and Joel Dresang engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Nov. 14-18, 2022) Significant Economic Indicators & Reports Monday No major announcements Tuesday Inflation on the wholesale level continued to moderate in October. The Producer Price Index rose by 0.2% from September and was up 8% from the year before, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. The one-year gain was the sixth deceleration in seven months after reaching a high of 11.7% in March. The cost of services overall dropped in October, based on the index. The increase in the cost for goods was fueled by a 5.7% rise in gasoline prices. Excluding volatile costs for food, energy and trade services, the so-called core Producer Price Index rose 5.4% from October 2021, the lowest rate in 17 months. Wednesday Retail sales continued growing in October, rising 1.3% from September and up 0.8% when adjusted for inflation. Led by a 4% rise in sales at gas stations, which would include higher prices, 10 of the 13 retail categories registered gains in October. Compared to the year before, every category except electronics and appliance stores increased in sales, an 8.3% gain overall. Data from the Commerce Department indicate consumer spending keeps rising despite higher inflation and interest rates. Retail sales through October were up 32% from the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and up nearly 15% when adjusted for inflation. The Federal Reserve reported a slight decline in industrial production in October, the second setback in three months and the fourth in six months. A drop in oil and mining output contributed to the decline. Manufacturing production rose for the fourth month in a row. Total output stayed above its level in February 2020, just before the pandemic, for its 12th consecutive month. Industries' capacity utilization rate, an early indicator of inflation, edged down from September but remained above the 50-year average for the eighth month in a row. Thursday Housing construction data signaled continued softening in October, as the annual pace of building permits and housing starts receded. A report from the Commerce Department showed new authorizations and new construction for single-family houses at their lowest rates since the pandemic recession. Demand for housing has been slowing as mortgage rates have ratcheted up as a result of Federal Reserve interest rate increases. At the same time, the rate of housing units already under construction hit another record in October, reaching the highest level in data going back to 1970. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims rose for the fifth time in seven weeks, going 15% above the mark just before the pandemic. Labor Department data showed the four-week average at 221,000 new applications, which was still 40% below the 55-year average, suggesting the relative tightness of the labor market. Total claims rose nearly 2% in the latest week to almost 1.3 million, which was down from 2.6 million the year before. Friday The Conference Board said its leading economic indicators declined in October for the eighth consecutive month. The business research group said its index fell 0.8% from September and was down 3.2% in the latest six months. That was a reversal from a 0.5% increase in the previous six months. Based on the index, the Conference Board said the U.S. economy may already be in recession. If not, it forecast that a downturn would occur before the end of the year and last until mid-2023. Among the weakening gauges cited by the group were consumer outlook, inflation, interest rates, housing construction and manufacturing. The National Association of Realtors reported a drop in existing home sales in October, the ninth decline in as many months. The trade group blamed rising mortgage rates for sliding sales,

The Folo by Travel Weekly
The rise of travel agents as independent contractors

The Folo by Travel Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 24:18


This is the second half of a conversation that host Rebecca Tobin and retail reporter Jamie Biesiada with Jackie Friedman, the president of the host agency Nexion: a robust talk about the rise of the independent contractor is our podast episode today. A good deal of travel sales are handled by independent contractors, or ICs, and means that the advisor has their own business but affiliates with another, larger agency or a host agency for support, better commission tiers, training, marketing collateral and so on. One of the more surprising pandemic trends for agencies was a rise in the number of ICs, and Friedman has some thoughts on that; we'll get into it here. On the news front, the U.S. Department of Labor has proposed a rule that would make it tougher for companies to categorize workers as ICs; and this rule is intended to help classify workers who are akin to employees. Two links below explore about how this rule might impact travel agencies with lots of ICs and, of course, the ICs, themselves. This episode has been edited for length and clarity.   More on independent contractors: Travel advisors are the 'great' kind of busy: https://www.travelweekly.com/Travel-News/Travel-Agent-Issues/Avoya-growth-first-time-travel-advisors Host agency Avoya reports growth in first-time travel advisors https://www.travelweekly.com/Travel-News/Travel-Agent-Issues/Avoya-growth-first-time-travel-advisors ASTA formally suggests fees, blasts past membership goals https://www.travelweekly.com/Travel-News/Travel-Agent-Issues/ASTA-unveils-credo-at-Global-Convention Travel advisors are well positioned in the rebound from Covid-19 https://www.travelweekly.com/Travel-News/Travel-Agent-Issues/Avoya-growth-first-time-travel-advisors   Labor Department updates: Labor likely won't target travel agencies over status of ICs https://www.travelweekly.com/Travel-News/Travel-Agent-Issues/Labor-likely-wont-target-travel-agencies-over-status-of-ICs Department of Labor's criteria for determining IC status https://www.travelweekly.com/Mark-Pestronk/Labor-criteria-for-determining-IC-status  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Nov. 11, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 19:50


  Landaas & Company newsletter  November edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Steve Giles Kendall Bauer (with Max Hoelzl and Joel Dresang, engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Nov. 7-11, 2022) Significant Economic Indicators & Reports Monday The Federal Reserve reported that revolving consumer credit rose at an annual rate of 8.7% in September. The increase suggests consumer spending – which drives about two-thirds of the U.S. economy – remained resilient in the face of high inflation and rising interest rates. It also indicates consumers are financing more of their spending as government subsidies from the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic have dwindled and as wage increases have not kept up with inflation. The pace of credit card debt slowed from an 18% annual rate in August and was the slowest since May. The indicator took two years to recover from its pre-pandemic peak. It took a decade to recover from the financial collapse and the Great Recession. Tuesday No major releases Wednesday No major releases Thursday The broadest measure of inflation showed price increases easing in October, though they're still outpacing Federal Reserve Board targets. The Consumer Price Index gained 0.4% from September and 7.7% from October 2021. Shelter costs, the price of gasoline and food bills weighed heavily on the monthly increase, though food prices rose at the slowest pace since December, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. The year-to-year inflation rate marked four months of declines from 9.1% in June, which was the steepest pace since 1982. The core CPI, which excludes the volatile categories of food and energy, rose 0.3% from September, the lowest in three months. Compared to October 2021, the core CPI was up 6.3%, just under the 6.6% peak hit in September, the highest in 40 years. The Fed's long-range target for inflation is 2%. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims declined marginally for the second week in a row. Data from the Labor Department showed the four-week average still down 41% from its 55-year average but 14% above its low just before the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly 1.3 million Americans were claiming jobless benefits in the latest week, up 1% from the week before but down from 2.6 million the year before. Friday The University of Michigan said consumer sentiment declined from the end of October, losing about half of the gains made since slumping to an all-time low in June. Uncertainty from global factors and U.S. election outcomes mean continued instability for sentiment, which economists consider key to consumer spending. Survey respondents registered broad declines in their both their outlooks and their assessments of current conditions. Rising interest rates and high inflation dampened plans to buy big-ticket durable goods. Expectations for inflation were little changed at about 5% for a year from now and around 3% long term. MARKET CLOSINGS FOR THE WEEK Nasdaq – 11323, up 848 points or 8.1% Standard & Poor's 500 – 3993, up 222 points or 5.9% Dow Jones Industrial – 33748, up 1343 points or 4.1% 10-year U.S. Treasury Note – 3.81%, down 0.32 point Not a Landaas & Company client yet? Click here to learn more. More information and insight from Money Talk Money Talk Videos Follow us on Twitter. Landaas newsletter subscribers return to the newsletter via e-mail.

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer
Last pre-election labor report: 261K new jobs added in October

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 78:07


With elections just four days out, candidates are making their final pitches to voters. We speak with high-ranking House member Rep. James Clyburn about the future of House. Also, the U.S. economy is the top issue for most Americans as the latest economic report card from the Labor Department is now out. Also, former President Trump says he will “very probably” run for president again in 2024.To learn more about how CNN protects listener privacy, visit cnn.com/privacy

Marketplace All-in-One
U.S. labor market maintained its strength in October

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 7:45


The Labor Department’s newest jobs report beat expectations, and Chris Low of FHN Financial is here with us to talk about what it could mean for the Fed. Then, we discuss mass layoffs at Twitter. One of our producers illustrates the grind of the New York City rental market.

Marketplace Morning Report
U.S. labor market maintained its strength in October

Marketplace Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 7:45


The Labor Department’s newest jobs report beat expectations, and Chris Low of FHN Financial is here with us to talk about what it could mean for the Fed. Then, we discuss mass layoffs at Twitter. One of our producers illustrates the grind of the New York City rental market.

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Nov. 4, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 23:35


  Landaas & Company newsletter  November edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Dave Sandstrom Adam Baley (with Max Hoelzl, Joel Dresang, engineered by Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Oct. 31-Nov. 4, 2022) Significant Economic Indicators & Reports Monday no significant reports Tuesday The manufacturing sector expanded in October for the 29th month in a row, though at the slowest rate in that stretch, according to the Institute for Supply Management. The trade group's index, based on surveys of industry purchase managers, suggested further weakening in the sector with new orders contracting for the second month in a row. Employment grew after shrinking in September, though employers reported being more careful about adding to staff. As demand has receded, the group reported supplier deliveries have been the smoothest since 2009. The Commerce Department said construction spending rose slightly in September, aided by multi-family housing. At a seasonally adjusted annual rate of $1.8 trillion, expenditures were up 0.2% from the August pace and up 11% from the year before. Spending on residential construction was unchanged from August and up 13% from September 2021, although single-family unit spending declined for both periods. Expenditures on factory construction rose 8% from August and was up 43% from the year before. Job openings recovered some of their losses in August, suggesting continued strength in the labor market in September. Openings rose 4% to 10.7 million positions, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. It was the indicator's second rise in six months after posting a record 11.9 million openings in March. Demand for workers kept outpacing the number of unemployed jobseekers in September. The number of workers quitting their jobs – a measure of worker confidence – declined slightly for the fifth time in six months but remained historically elevated at 4.1 million. Wednesday no significant reports Thursday The U.S. trade deficit widened 11.6% in September to $73.3 billion, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported. Imports rose 1.5%, led by cell phones, semiconductors and pharmaceutical preparations. The value of exports declined 1.1% from August, led by soybeans and crude oil. Through three quarters, the trade gap expanded by 20% from the same time in 2021. Trade deficits detract from the gross domestic product, the chief measure of economic growth. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims declined for the first time in five weeks. Although the level remained 14% above the low point just before the COVID pandemic, it was 41% below the average since 1967. The Labor Department said 1.2 million Americans claimed jobless benefits in the latest week, up 2% from the week before but below the year-before level of 2.7 million claims. The Bureau of Labor Statistics said the annual rate of worker productivity rose in the third quarter by 0.3%, reversing a decline of 4.1% in the second quarter. Measuring year to year, though, third-quarter productivity sank 1.4% for the third consecutive decline — the first time that happened in data going back to 1982. Over the last four quarters, productivity fell because output, which rose 1.9%, didn't keep pace with hours worked, which rose 3.4%. Unit labor costs rose 6.1% from the third quarter of 2021, down from a 7.6% increase in the second quarter. The service sector of the U.S. economy grew in October at the slowest rate in 29 straight months of expansion, according to the Institute for Supply Management. The trade group said its survey of purchasing managers found reports of cooling growth and business activity amid hiring challenges and economic uncertainty. Managers surveyed cited fewer snags from supply chains and logistics compared to earlier in the year. The Commerce Department said the value of factory orders rose in September for the 18th time in 19 months,

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: GDP Turnaround, Mortgage Rate High Point, Faltering Rent Growth

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 6:55


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending October 29th, 2022... a turnaround for the U.S. GDP, a new high point for mortgage rates, and faltering rent growth.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic News We begin with economic news from this past week, and an encouraging report on the U.S. GDP. The government reported a 2.6% growth rate in the third quarter. It was better than the Dow Jones forecast of 2.3%, but is also thought to be a rebound from two quarters of negative growth. According to CNBC, the upside came from a decline in the trade deficit, along with stable consumer spending, higher government spending, and a rise in nonresidential fixed investment. (1)A positive GDP isn't eliminating concerns about a recession, especially if the Fed continues to aggressively raise interest rates to fight inflation. The PCE, which is the Fed's preferred inflation gauge shows a .5% increase in September, to an annual rate of 5.1%. That's for the core rate, which eliminates food and gas. The core rate for the well-publicized CPI, shows an annual rate of 6.6%. (2)(3)Initial jobless claims rose slightly last week. The Labor Department says they were up 3,000 to 217,000. The number of people already collecting benefits was up 55,000 to 1.44 million. (4) Economists are expecting a gradual increase in jobless numbers as the Fed continues to hike the Federal Funds rate.The housing market is feeling the impact of the slowdown. The Case-Shiller index shows that home prices were down for a second straight month. The 20-city index dropped 1.3% in August, while the national index was down 1.1%. The biggest price drops are happening along the West Coast, but the index shows they've gone down for every one of the 20 cities in the index. Year-over-year gains are still in the double digits however, at 13.1%, with Miami, Tampa and Charlotte topping the list for annual gains. (5)Sales are also down for both new and existing homes. The Commerce Department reports that new home sales were down 10.9% in September to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 603,000 homes. The drop follows a surprise surge in home sales the month before. Year-over-year, home sales are down 17.6%. (6) For existing homes, the National Association of Realtors says they were down 10.2% in September. MarketWatch says that buyers have become hesitant because of high home prices and interest rates. Sellers are also less likely to list, because they want to hold on to their low-interest loans. (7)Mortgage RatesAlthough some lenders hit the 7% mark weeks ago, Freddie Mac says the average rate for a 30-year fixed-rate loan is now 7.08%. For the 15-year, it's 6.36%. (8)In other news making headlines...Big Drop in Mortgage DemanLenders are taking a big hit because of high rates. The Mortgage Bankers Association says that home loan demand is close to half of what it was a year ago, and has fallen to its lowest level since 1997. Demand was down 2% last week, and was 42% lower than the same week last year. (9)There was a slight increase in demand for FHA loans thanks to lower rates and lower down payment requirements. Many borrowers are also choosing a riskier adjustable-rate loans because payments are lower at first. There are about four times the number of those loans right now compared to the start of the year. The National Association of Homebuilders also reports a jump in the number of people paying all cash for new homes. That number has been increasing for the last three quarters, and hit a 20-year high of 9.5%, or 14,000 sales, for the current quarter. (10)Rent Growth at a Standstill in Some MarketsRent growth has stalled for a second straight month, and has even declined slightly in some areas. The Real Deal reports that any drops are minimal, but after the rip-roaring growth we saw during the pandemic, the pullback might feel severe for people. (11) Data from Zumper shows that apartment prices were flat, or fell slightly, in nine of the 10 most expensive U.S. cities. Zumper's CEO, Anthemos Georgiades, described the decline as a “correction to prices that had become overinflated.” He says renter migration is slowing down as renters try to cut costs by living with friends or family. He says that could push rents lower if landlords are competing with each other for renters. RentCafe says we'll see 420,000 new apartments coming on line this year. That's a 50-year high for multi-family construction. But the Zumper report also warns tenants that they should not expect any drastic price drops until supply and demand are more closely matched.Rental Demand SlowsData from RealPage also shows that high rents have pushed apartment demand to a 13-year low. It dipped over the summer in the big cities like New York, Los Angeles, Houston, Dallas, and Chicago when it usually goes higher. Vacancies are also higher according to CoStar. That data shows an apartment vacancy rate that rose from 5.1% in the second quarter to 5.5% in the third. (12)UBS analyst Michael Goldsmith says: “It's a signal that rent can't continue at the same level it has sustained over the last couple of years. We've reached a point where renters are maybe willing to pull out of the market.”The market for single-family rentals is a whole different niche, which is cooling down slightly in some areas. For example, one real estate broker told the Phoenix Business Journal: “It's cooling down a bit, but only from a level of insanity. Now it's just a hot market.” (13)That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!If you'd like to find out more about single-family rentals, please join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to our market data, our experienced investment counselors, and our curated list of real estate professionals that can help you create a portfolio of income-producing rental homes.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/27/us-gdp-accelerated-at-2point6percent-pace-in-q3-better-than-expected-as-growth-turns-positive.html2 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/28/pce-inflation-september-2022-.html3 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/13/consumer-price-index-september-2022-.html4 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-jobless-claims-tick-up-in-latest-week-11666874248?mod=economic-report5 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-home-prices-fall-for-second-straight-month-in-august-case-shiller-11666703999?mod=economic-report6 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-new-home-sales-retreat-in-september-partially-reversing-surprising-gain-in-prior-month-11666794303?mod=economic-report7 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/decline-in-u-s-pending-home-sales-gathers-steam-in-september-11666965739?mod=economic-report8 -https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms9 - https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/26/mortgage-demand-from-homebuyers-is-nearly-half-what-it-was-in-2021.html10 -https://eyeonhousing.org/2022/10/all-cash-new-home-sales-outnumber-fha-backed-for-the-first-time-since-2007/11 -https://therealdeal.com/national/2022/10/25/rents-slide-or-stagnate-in-4-out-of-5-us-cities/12 -https://therealdeal.com/national/2022/10/25/soaring-rents-sink-apartment-demand-to-13-year-low/13 -https://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/news/2022/10/18/corelogic-single-family-rental-market-cooling.htm

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson
Our Current Economy is a Confused One

Inside Sources with Boyd Matheson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 10:15


Yesterday the Federal Reserve raised interest rates for the 4th time this year. But the Labor Department recently came out with some new data on labor costs, trade deficits, productivity, and jobless claims. Jeff Cox from CNBC joins the show to break everything down and explain what it all means for workers, employees, and the economy as a whole. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Oct. 28, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 23:12


  Landaas & Company newsletter  October edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Art Rothschild Tom Pappenfus (with Max Hoelzl and Joel Dresang, engineered by Kevin Lofy) Week in Review (Oct. 24-28) Significant Economic Indicators & Reports Monday No major releases Tuesday The year-to-year gain in housing prices slowed more in August than in any month in about three decades of data. The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller national home price index rose 13% from August 2021, down from a 15.6% increase in July. And though prices continued advancing at a double-digit pace, August marked the fifth straight month of deceleration since hitting a record high of 20.8% in March. A spokesman for the index said further slowing in price gains should be expected, considering how rising mortgage rates are affecting housing affordability. The Conference Board said its consumer confidence index dipped in October for the first time in three months as concerns grew about inflation. The business research group said holiday sales could be challenging and called consumers' short-term outlook “dismal.” The group said expectation levels suggested economic recession. At the same time, consumers surveyed increased plans for buying houses, cars and major appliances. Wednesday The annual rate of new home sales slowed nearly 11% in September, the third decline in four months, the Commerce Department reported. The volatile indicator was 18% behind its pace in September 2021. Southern states accounted for most of the slowing from August while the south and west were the only regions declining from the year before. Even though sales overall were off, the median price for a new house continued to climb, rising to $470,600 in September, up 14% from the year before. The median time new residences were on the market was one and a half months, the briefest in 47 years of data. Thursday Demand for long-lasting manufactured products rose 0.4% in September, the sixth gain in seven months. The Commerce Department said durable goods orders  through the first nine months of 2021 were up 11% from the same time in 2021. Orders for automobiles and commercial aircraft led the monthly increase, but excluding the volatile transportation category showed a 0.5% decline. Year to year, orders excluding transportation rose 8%. Core capital goods orders, a proxy for business investment, fell 0.7% from August and were up 9.5% from September 2021. The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims fell for the fourth week in a row, rising 14% above its low point just before the pandemic. The Labor Department reported the new-claim average was still 41% below the 55-year average, a reminder of the relatively tight labor market. In the latest week, 1.2 million Americans claimed jobless benefits, down 0.2% from the week before and down from 2.8 million the year before. The U.S. economy rose at an annual pace of 2.6% in the third quarter, reversing two previous quarters of shrinking. Adjusted for inflation, gross domestic product reached a record $20 trillion and was up 4.2% from the peak prior to the 2020 recession, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Consumer spending, which generates about 70% of economic activity, advanced at a slower pace than in the second quarter. Spending on housing declined at a 26% annual rate, the worst in six straight quarters of decline. The Federal Reserve Board's preferred measure of inflation rose 6.3% from the third quarter of 2021, the lowest since a 5.7% rate at the end of 2021 but still far beyond the long-term target of 2%. Friday The Bureau of Economic Analysis said consumer spending rose 0.6% in September, as personal income gained 0.4%. The personal saving rate continued to fall, dropping to 3.1% in September, dropping from a record high of 33.8% in April 2020. The personal consumption expenditures index, which the Fed follows for inflation, increased 6.2% in September,

Investing Insights
Where to Park Your Cash and Find Recession-Resistant Stocks

Investing Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 20:20 Very Popular


In today's episode, Ali Mogharabi, a senior equity analyst for Morningstar Research Services, explains the Labor Department's proposed rule about worker classification. And he reveals whether he thinks Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash stocks are a buy.Investing Insights is bringing you a mix of market news, insights from analysts, and personal finance tips. Timestamps0:06 Introduction  0:44 Stocks for a Recession 1:50 Wells Fargo missed the mark for third quarter earnings. 2:35 Delta airlines reported a strong third quarter.3:57 Should gig workers be considered employees?5:48 What is the main risk of the Biden administration's new proposal?8:37 What is the reaction from Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash?9:23 What does Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash stocks look like today?10:23 How to Make Your Cash Work Harder as Interest Rates Rise Read about topics from this episode.  10 Stocks for a RecessionRisk of DOL's Proposal and Reactions of Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash Stocks Exaggerated Opportunities Seen in the Industrial Sector Amid Economic Headwinds Looking Past Volatile Operating Losses, Wells Fargo Remains on Track in Q3 Best Financial-Services Companies to Own: 2022 Edition 3 Recession-Resistant Stocks What Is a Recession?Read what our team is writing:Susan Dziubinski Christine Benz Ali Mogharabi Ivanna Hampton Follow us on social media.Ivanna Hampton on Twitter: @IvannaHamptonFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/MorningstarInc/Twitter: https://twitter.com/MorningstarIncInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/morningstar... LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/5161/ 

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast
Money Talk Podcast, Friday Oct. 21, 2022

Landaas & Company Money Talk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 18:41


  Landaas & Company newsletter  October edition now available. Advisors on This Week's Show Kyle Tetting Steve Giles Adam Baley (with Max Hoelzl, Joel Dresang, engineered by Kevin Lofy, Jason Scuglik) Week in Review (Oct. 17-21, 2021) Significant Economic Indicators & Reports Monday No major announcements Tuesday The Federal Reserve reported that industrial production rose 0.4% in September and capacity utilization remained above its long-term average for the seventh month in a row. The capacity rate, the highest since March 2008, was another sign of inflation because traditionally companies raise prices as they run out of ability to keep up with orders. The monthly report showed production rebounding after a slight decline in August. Factories increased output for the third month in a row, although the pace of such growth slowed in the third quarter, and the production of consumer goods declined. The capacity rate for manufacturing remained above its 50-year average for the 12th month in a row. Wednesday The U.S. housing market continued to cool in September as the pace for both housing starts and building permits slowed from post-financial crisis highs reached earlier in the year. Figures from the Commerce Department showed new construction below its pre-pandemic rate for the third month in a row. Starts for single-family houses dipped to their lowest level since May 2020. Housing permits, an indicator of commitments to future homebuilding, rose from their pace in August but only for multi-family units. Single-family housing permits dropped for the seventh month in a row. And though new construction has been slowing, the report showed that the rate of houses under construction reached 1.7 million units in September, the highest in data going back to 1970. Thursday The four-week moving average for initial unemployment claims rose for the third week in a row and was 11% higher than its low point just before the pandemic. Still, the measure of employers' reluctance to let workers go was 43% behind the long-term average, dating back to 1967. According to Labor Department data, total jobless claims fell to 1.2 million in the latest week, down 2.5% from the week before. The year before, total claims reached 3.3 million. The pace of existing home sales continued sinking in September as mortgage rates rose.  Houses sold at an annual rate of 4.7 million, down 1.5% from August and down 24% from September 2021, the National Association of Realtors reported. It was the slowest pace in a decade. The trade group said despite weakened demand, inventories remained low. One in every four houses sold in September went for more than the asking price. The median price was $348,800, decreasing for the third month in a row from a record $413,800 in June. The median price in September was 8% higher than the year before, marking a record 127 consecutive months of year-to-year price increases. The Conference Board said its index of leading economic indicators declined 0.4% in September, deepening a negative trend that suggests a U.S. recession before the end of the year. The business research group said its index was down 2.8% in the last six months, following a 1.4% gain in the previous six. Citing high inflation, slowing job growth and rising interest rates, the group forecast a 1.4% economic expansion for 2022 with further slowing into the new year. Friday No major announcements MARKET CLOSINGS FOR THE WEEK Nasdaq – 10860, up 538 points or 5.2% Standard & Poor's 500 – 3753, up 170 points or 4.7% Dow Jones Industrial – 31083, up 1448 points or 4.9% 10-year U.S. Treasury Note – 4.21%, up 0.20 point Not a Landaas & Company client yet? Click here to learn more. More information and insight from Money Talk Money Talk Videos Follow us on Twitter. Landaas newsletter subscribers return to the newsletter via e-mail.

The Brian Lehrer Show
What's Next For the Gig Economy?

The Brian Lehrer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 27:40


A proposed Labor Department change gives employee status to millions of independent contractors. Rachel Cohen, Senior Policy Reporter at Vox, explains the implications of this potential shift and what it would mean for gig workers.

FTR State of Freight
Trucking Market Update - Week beginning October 17, 2022

FTR State of Freight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 22:54


In this week's episode of FTR's Trucking Market Update podcast, we look at some indicators related to the consumer sector, including retail and food service sales, inventories, and consumer inflation. Plus, we look at pricing at the producer level and at diesel prices and the spot market for truck freight as usual. We also briefly discuss a new Labor Department proposal on the classification of workers under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The Trucking Market Update is hosted by FTR's Vice President of Trucking, Avery Vise. As this information is presented, you are welcome to follow along and look at the graphs and indicators yourself by downloading the presentation. Download the PDF:https://freight.ftrintel.com/trucking-podcastSupport the show

3 On Your Side
Employers Struggling to Hire and Retain Employees

3 On Your Side

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 19:23


Are you looking for a job or maybe thinking of changing careers? You're not alone. The U.S. just added more than 260,000 jobs last month. And the Labor Department says average hourly earnings rose 5% from a year ago. So the labor market might look optimistic. But why are companies struggling to keep employees, and what are different industries doing to keep their staffing where they need to be? Today, we're talking to Doug Hall with SK Food Group. It's a national company that prepares and ships sandwiches and wraps. He tell us the ups and downs his industry has gone through hire and retain employees

Tangle
September's troubling inflation numbers.

Tangle

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 27:28


We're covering the latest inflation numbers from the Labor Department, what they mean, and who has gotten most of this right. Plus, a question about Israel's Iron Dome and if it could be used in Ukraine. Read Tangle's previous coverage on inflation here. You can read today's podcast here, today's “Under the Radar” story here, and today's “Have a nice day” story here. You can subscribe to Tangle by clicking here or drop something in our tip jar by clicking here. Our podcast is written by Isaac Saul and produced by Trevor Eichhorn. Music for the podcast was produced by Diet 75. Our newsletter is edited by Bailey Saul, Sean Brady, Ari Weitzman, and produced in conjunction with Tangle's social media manager Magdalena Bokowa, who also created our logo. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tanglenews/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tanglenews/support

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: Inflation Overload, Home Loan Double Whammy, Super-Sized Social Security COLA

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 6:08


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending October 14, 2022... another round of inflation overload, a double whammy for home loans, and the big news from Social Security.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review. Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week. Federal Reserve officials released the minutes of their last meeting which show they are more worried about inflation than they are about going overboard with rate hikes. They feel that inflation is “unacceptably high” and is not falling as fast as they anticipated. They raised the short-term rate three-quarters of a point at the last meeting to a range of 3 to 3.25%. It was the third super-sized rate hike in a row, and many economists are expecting another three-quarter point rate hike at the next meeting. (1)There were two inflation reports last week that will fan the flames for additional rate hikes. First, it was the producer price index which was up .4% in September. That was double what Wall Street economists had forecasted. The index had been down in July and August because gas prices were lower, but the latest number shows that overall inflation is still raging. The annual rate is down slightly from 8.7% to 8.5%. If you remove gas and food from the equation, the annual rate is 5.6%. (2) The monthly consumer price index was also released with a similar .4% gain in September. Economists had predicted a .3% gain. The yearly rate did slip down a bit – from 8.3% to 8.2%. It had peaked in June with an annual rate of 9.1%. The core rate shows a .6% monthly gain and a yearly “core” rate of 6.6%. As reported by MarketWatch, lower gas prices kept inflation in check toward the end of the summer, but economists don't expect them to go any lower, especially since the OPEC oil cartel is cutting production. Prices were higher for things like rent, medical care, education, furniture, new cars, and auto insurance. They were down for used cars, clothes and communication. (3)Jobless claims are still low, but they did rise for a third week in a row to their highest level since August. The Labor Department reported that initial claims were 9,000 applications higher to a total of about 228,000. Many of those claims were in Florida, however, where people are dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Ian. Continuing claims were also up slightly to 1.368 million. (4)Consumers appear to be feeling a little more confident about the economy despite the latest inflation reports. The University of Michigan's consumer sentiment survey shows it was up about a point, to a reading of 59.8. but that's only 9.8 points higher than an all-time low of 50 in June. (5)Mortgage RatesMortgage rates continue to move higher. It is breaking through the 7% level for some loan programs, but Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was 6.92%. The 15-year also moved higher to an average of 6.09%. (6)In other news making headlines...Double Whammy for BorrowersNot only do borrowers have to contend with higher mortgage rates, they are now having a tougher time qualifying for a loan. According to the Mortgage Bankers Association, lenders are tightening their standards which resulted in a 5.4% decline in the Mortgage Credit Availability Index for the month of September. (7) While lenders would like the business, they are more concerned about a weakening economy and the possibility of delinquencies. The MBA's Joel Kan says: “Credit availability fell to the lowest level since March 2013 – the seventh consecutive month of tightening.” He says: “There's a smaller appetite for lower credit scores and high loan-to-value loan programs.”Home Flippers Are Getting FlippedRising mortgage rates are flipping profits to the downside for many home flippers. As reported by The Real Deal, flippers were wildly successful not that long ago. At the beginning of the year, home-flipping made up 10% of all transactions. That's according to Attom Data Solutions. It fell to 8.2% during the second quarter. (8) Data from August shows that profit margins have slipped to 26% from about 31% a year ago. But they also now plummeting a lot more in some areas, like San Jose California. The report says flipping profits hit 45% in March and are now down to 6.5%. It also says that 42% of the homes sold on Opendoor are being sold for less than the iBuyer paid for them.Hard-money lender Noah Brocious told The Real Deal that flippers need to lower their expectations. He says: “Price it to sell. Today is not the time to get greedy.”Social Security Will Be Giving Retirees a HUGE RaiseRetirees will be getting a big raise in their Social Security checks next year. Officials announced that the Cost of Living Adjustment or COLA for 2023 will be a whopping 8.7%. That's even higher than the giant 5.9% that recipients got last year. (9) The increase will apply to about 70 million people who are on Social Security, and boost checks by an average of $140 per month. The cost of Medicare Part B will also get a little bit cheaper. It will be reduced from $170.10 to $164.90.That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!I also invite you to join RealWealth at newsforinvestors.com, if you haven't done so already. It's free to join and gives you complete access to all our education materials and market data, along with sample properties, and a list of recommended real estate professionals. Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/fed-saw-too-much-action-vs-high-inflation-as-less-risky-than-too-little-minutes-show-11665597813?mod=federal-reserve2 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/wholesale-prices-rise-for-first-time-in-three-months-and-show-inflation-still-raging-11665578458?mod=economic-report3 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-consumer-price-index-for-september-11665662566?mod=economic-report4 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-rise-to-highest-level-since-august-11665665081?mod=economic-report5 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/americans-inflation-expectations-rise-in-october-consumer-mood-stays-somber-11665756467?mod=economic-report6 -https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms7 -https://www.mba.org/news-and-research/newsroom/news/2022/10/11/mortgage-credit-availability-decreased-in-september8 -https://therealdeal.com/national/2022/10/11/mortgage-rates-reverse-home-flippers-fortunes/9 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/13/social-security-cola-will-be-8point7percent-in-2023-highest-increase-in-40-years.html

The FOX News Rundown
Democrats On Defense As Inflation Continues To Rise

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 31:58 Very Popular


The Labor Department's latest report on inflation showed that the Consumer Price Index is up 8.2 percent annually. The high inflation has put a lot of strain on American households, leaving many frustrated with the current administration's handling of the economy. FOX News Sunday Host Shannon Bream joins the Rundown to discuss the impact inflation could have on midterm elections. She also breaks down the tightening Pennsylvania Senate race and provides insight as to which issues matter most for other close races.   The balance of Congress after the midterms has been the focus of many political pundits, and some now forecast pockets of traditionally blue districts shifting red in the 2022 midterms. U.S. Representative Mayra Flores made waves this past June when she won a special election in Texas's 34th congressional district, flipping a South Texas seat red. GOP Congresswoman Mayra Flores joins the podcast to lay out what her top priorities for her district have been, including providing more economic opportunities and tightening border security. Later, she shares her confidence that her district will re-elect her come November.   Plus, commentary by David Bossie, President of Citizens United. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tech Path Podcast
808. CPI Data Report | Inflation Effects on Crypto Markets

Tech Path Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 42:09 Very Popular


Bitcoin (BTC) dropped to as low as $18,183 after the Consumer Price Index (CPI) data was released on Thursday. The Labor Department reported consumer prices in September rose 8.2% from the same month last year and 0.4% from August. Measured by "core CPI", which excludes volatile food and energy prices, U.S. consumer prices advanced to a 40-year high in September.~This episode is sponsored by Bybit~Receive up to a $500 Bonus upon depositing & signing up to Bybit.Join Now! - https://bit.ly/ByBitPBN2

Logistics Matters with DC VELOCITY
Guest: Dan Pellathy on new research on supply chain agility; The Labor Department proposes new rules governing independent contractors; Distribution centers go multilevel

Logistics Matters with DC VELOCITY

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 26:04


Our guest on this week's episode is  Dan Pellathy, an  assistant professor at Grand Valley State University. The past two years of pandemic and economic uncertainly revealed many weaknesses in our supply chains and pointed to the need for greater agility. But while everyone seeks supply chain agility, what is the reality in the market and are companies as diversified and resilient with their supply chains as they should be?  Pellathy and a team of supply chain researchers have studied the ROI of supply chain agility and have released their findings in an industry white paper (see the notes below to access the white paper).The Labor Department has proposed new rules for classifying contract workers. The new rules will probably reclassify many current independent contractors as employees of the companies for which they perform work. This could have a tremendous impact on independent truck drivers and gig workers who do last mile deliveries.For years, warehouses and distribution centers in countries where land is scarce, such as in Europe and Japan, have been built as multi-story facilities to better utilize the footprint of the available land. As companies in the U.S. move distribution closer to urban areas, they are looking to copy the multi-floor designs to better serve these urban markets with faster deliveries.DC Velocity's sister publication CSCMP's Supply Chain Quarterly  offers a podcast series called Supply Chain in the Fast Lane.  It is co-produced with the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals. The third season of eight episodes launched this past Tuesday with a new episode each week. The focus this season is on attracting and retaining labor in our supply chains.  Go to your favorite podcast platform to subscribe.Articles and resources mentioned in this episode:Grand Valley State UniversityDownload site for white paper on agility - University of TennesseeLabor Department proposes new rule on independent contractorsIndustry weighs impact of proposed independent contractor ruleMulti-story warehouses sprout in Chicago & New YorkVisit DCVelocity.com for the latest news. Visit Supply Chain QuarterlyListen to CSCMP and Supply Chain Quarterly's Supply Chain in the Fast Lane podcastListen to Supply Chain Quarterly's Top 10 Supply Chain Threats podcastSend feedback about this podcast to podcast@dcvelocity.com.Podcast sponsored by:  SignodeOther linksAbout DC VELOCITYSubscribe to DC VELOCITYSign up for our FREE newslettersAdvertise with DC VELOCITYTop 10 Supply Chain Management Podcasts

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller
AP: Majority Americans think misinfo is harmful; Latino leaders warn about misinformation and disinformation targeting Latinos communities -- Tech Law & Policy This Week

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 4:38


Hey everybody, I'm Joe Miller and here's what's going on in the world of tech law & policy this week. New coalition pushes to make DMs safe   Let's face it, DM's, whether they're encrypted or not, are no longer safe – if they ever were. Now, following the Supreme Court's decision in Dobbs overturning Roe v. Wade, law enforcement in states in which abortion is now illegal have been obtaining search warrants that require social media companies, like Facebook which recently gave police a Nebraska teen's personal conversation she'd had with her mom on WhatsApp regarding an abortion the teen allegedly had. There's an open letter you can sign that's hosted by the Fight for the Future Education Fund, which you can find in the show notes — it's a petition for social media companies to set end-to-end encryption on messaging apps as the default, rather than leaving them open to virtual surveillance not envisioned by the framers when they drafted the Fourth Amendment.   Virtual surveillance is out of control    And virtual, commercial surveillance is out of control across-the-board, which is likely the reason why the Federal Trade Commission extended the comment period for its advanced notice of proposed ruling on commercial surveillance. Should the FTC write new rules governing cybersecurity and surveillance? Well, you can weigh in until November 21st.   And what's an example of commercial surveillance that advocates and the FTC are concerned about? One example is the way in which customers can now surveil delivery workers in ways that weren't possible before, which Data & Society argues in a new report has turned porches and front door steps into workplaces. And we have a link to that report in the show notes as well.   Labor Department moves to prevent misclassifying gig workers   And the Labor Department has announced a proposed rule designed to limit the extent to which companies may classify gig workers as independent contractors. Many of these workers are doing gig work as their primary source of income, which effectively makes them full-time employees – they are contractors in name only.  The proposed Labor Department rule sets forth a new test for determining whether a gig worker is a contractor or employee – namely whether the worker is in business for themselves, or whether the employee's work is “integral” to the company's business. So under the proposed rule, a company like Uber would need to classify drivers as full-time employees rather than independent contractors so these workers can avail themselves of the health and other benefits companies often reserve only for their full-time employees. AP poll: majority of public thinks misinformation is harmful   Finally, a new AP poll finds that most Americans are finding it more difficult to know what they should believe. We're talking about 91% of adults finding misinformation to be a problem – with 80% of Democrats and 70% of Republicans finding that misinformation contributes to political polarization.    And the Texas representative for San Antonio Joaquin Castro, along with several Hispanic groups, including the National Hispanic Media Coalition, are warning about rampant misinformation targeting Latino communities that's often disseminated on chat apps like WhatsApp. This is happening amidst a new Washington Post-Ipsos poll that found Latinos, while 63% overall still support Democrats – that number is actually declining because Democrats now hold only a 27 point lead over Republicans, compared to 40 percent in the years leading up to President Biden's election.  To go deeper, you can find links to all of these stories in the show notes. Stay safe, stay informed, have a great week. Ciao.

WSJ What’s News
Core Inflation Hits Four-Decade High

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 16:35 Very Popular


P.M. Edition for Oct. 13. The U.S. economy continues to experience broad price pressures. Overall inflation rose 8.2% in September from a year ago, according to the Labor Department, and core inflation, which excludes the volatile categories of food and energy, rose 6.6%, the biggest increase since 1982. WSJ economics reporter Gwynn Guilford joins host Annmarie Fertoli to discuss. Plus, the House select committee investigating the January 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol votes to subpoena former President Donald Trump. Congressional reporter Siobhan Hughes has more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Daily Signal News
TOP NEWS | September CPI, Parkland Shooter Verdict, Jan. 6 Committee Subpoenas Trump| Oct. 13

Daily Signal News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 4:46


On today's Daily Signal Top News, we break down: The Labor Department released the September consumer price indexParkland shooter Nikolas Cruz gets a life sentenceThe Jan. 6 committee plans to vote to subpoena former President Donald Trump Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: Job Report Whiplash, Rent Payment Delays, Millennials' Dating Debt

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 6:17


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending October 8th, 2022... what the job market says about rate hikes, where renters need to “catch up” on their rent, and why dating has become somewhat of a financial burden for millennials.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week, and signs that the labor market is cooling off. On Tuesday, the Labor Department reported that the number of job openings fell substantially, from 11.2 million in July to 10.1 million in August. That represents the fourth time job openings have declined in the last five months and the second largest monthly drop ever. (1)The weekly unemployment report on Wednesday also shows that more people lined up for benefits. Initial claims jumped to a five-week high of 219,000, although they remain at historic lows. But the additional 29,000 applications are an indication of a slight rise in lay-offs. The number of ongoing unemployment claims was also higher. They rose 15,000 last week to 1.36 million. (2)Economists aren't reading too much into the unemployment report quite yet however. They say the higher numbers could be due to the way the government does seasonal adjustments, although they do expect layoffs to rise gradually as the Fed raises rates.Economists are also in the wait-and-see mode regarding job openings. Economist Stephen Stanley of Amherst Pierpont Securities told MarketWatch that he wants to see another significant monthly decline in job openings before he's convinced that the job market is loosening. And then on Friday, the government reported that companies hired an additional 263,000 employees. That's a 17-month low and brings the unemployment rate down to 3.5%, but it's the slowest rate of job growth since April 2021 so it still shows a hiring slowdown.The labor shortage has contributed to inflation as workers negotiate for higher pay, but those pay increases are also slowing down. Over the past year, they've declined from 5.2% to 5%. Economists expect the Fed to continue to raise rates until the number of job openings more closely matches the number of workers available to fill them. The Fed is predicting that unemployment will grow to 4.4% by the end of next year. An article in Construction Dive points out that the hot September jobs report is also “terrible” for construction. It says that unemployment for the industry as a whole dropped to 3.4% in September, which is below the national rate of 3.5%. And that means that workers have even more negotiating power for higher wages especially among hard-to-find skilled professionals. (5)Builders are pulling back on their output, however. The Commerce Department reports that construction spending was down .7% in August. Spending for single-family construction accounted for the steepest drop. It was down 2.9%. Spending on multi-family construction was up .4%. (6)Mortgage RatesLet's see where we are on mortgage rates. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was down slightly. It fell 4 basis points to 6.66%. The 15-year was down 6 points to 5.9%. (7) Realtor.com reports that home buyers have lost about $107,000 in buying power because of higher interest rates. (8)In other news making headlines…Renters Who Are Behind on their RentA new survey shows where renters are struggling the most to pay their rent. According to a report by MyEListing.com, 15% of renter households are behind on their rent right now. In some states, that number is closer to 25%. (9)It shows that South Dakota, Alabama, and New Jersey have the highest number of tenants who are not caught up on their rent. In South Dakota, it's 26% while Alabama and New Jersey are 25% and 24% respectively. As for the five cities with the highest number of renters who are not paid up, Miami tops the list at 25%. Houston, Philadelphia, New York and Chicago round out the top five.Millennials Are Going into Debt for LoveThe dating game is getting very expensive for millennials, and for other age groups as well. According to a Lendingtree survey, 22% of millennials and 19% of Gen Z'ers have gone into debt to pay for their dates. (10)Almost one in five said they're going on fewer dates because it's so expensive and 14% say they are spending less on dates. On average, men spend $104 on a first date while women spend $81.As for who should pay, in a heterosexual relationship, 54% of men say they should while 36% of women feel that way. Women are more likely to say that costs should be split, and some say whoever asks the other person for a date should pay.That's it for today. Check the show notes for links at newsforinvestors.com. While you are there, you can join RealWealth for free. You'll find a wide range of information on real estate investing and the creation of long-term wealth.And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review.Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke. Links:1 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/job-openings-drop-below-11-million-for-first-time-since-fall-labor-market-cooling-11664893013?mod=economic-report2 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-jump-to-five-week-high-of-219-000-sign-of-rising-layoffs-11665060026?mod=economic-report3 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-u-s-jobs-report-for-september-11665144196?mod=economy-politics4 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-u-s-jobs-report-for-september-11665144196?mod=economy-politics5 -https://www.constructiondive.com/news/fridays-hot-jobs-report-terrible-construction/633693/6 -https://www.reuters.com/markets/us/us-construction-spending-posts-biggest-drop-1-12-years-august-2022-10-03/7 -https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms8 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2022/10/06/happy-halloween-mortgage-rates-average-6669 -https://myelisting.com/commercial-real-estate-news/1304/rent-payments-burden-americans-the-most-in-these-cities-and-states/10 -https://www.cnbc.com/2022/10/10/millennials-going-into-debt-from-dating-lendingtree.html

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: Supreme Court refuses Trump request in Mar-a-Lago documents case

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 5:01


In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court refused former President Trump's request for an independent arbiter to examine classified White House documents found at his Mar-a-Lago estate, the U.S. Labor Department turned in another tough report on inflation at the retail level and the U.S. and Saudi Arabia traded tough talk over sharp cuts in oil output. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: Supreme Court refuses Trump request in Mar-a-Lago documents case

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 5:01


In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court refused former President Trump's request for an independent arbiter to examine classified White House documents found at his Mar-a-Lago estate, the U.S. Labor Department turned in another tough report on inflation at the retail level and the U.S. and Saudi Arabia traded tough talk over sharp cuts in oil output. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Rich Zeoli
Washington D.C. Has an Insider Trading Problem + Treasury Secretary Buffalo Bill

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 185:03


The Rich Zeoli Show- Full Show (10/13/22): 3:05pm- The House of Representatives' January 6th Select Committee has announced they will subpoena former President Donald Trump, hoping to question him on record about his involvement in the U.S. Capitol riot.   3:10pm- While appearing on Morning Joe, former MSNBC host Chris Matthews described requests for United States Senate candidate John Fetterman's health records as “reasonable.” On Tuesday, Fetterman spoke with NBC reporter Dasha Burns but declined to make his health records public.    3:25pm- Delivering remarks during his trip to Los Angeles, President Joe Biden emphasized the positive impact his Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has had on the economy while largely dismissing a new Labor Department report indicating that the consumer price index rose 6.6% year-to-year in September and increased by 6.3% from August's report.   3:45pm- According to a report from the Daily Wire and data collected from the Federal Reserve Board, credit card debt in America has increased by a “massive 18.1%” while total consumer debt has risen to a “record $4.68 trillion.”   4:05pm- Speaking during the House of Representatives' January 6th Select Committee, Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson said “it is our obligation to seek Donald Trump's testimony” regarding the Capitol riot. With a vote of nine to zero, the Committee has decided to subpoena former President Trump.    4:25pm- Appearing on CNBC, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen insisted that the United States economy is doing well—particularly when compared to countries in Europe. Wait. Does Yellen sound like Buffalo Bill?    4:40pm- During his interview with NBC reporter Dasha Burns, Senate candidate John Fetterman committed to participating in a scheduled debate with Dr. Mehmet Oz on October 25th but rejected the idea he should make his health records public following a May stroke. Senator Bob Casey Jr. took to MSNBC to condemn the continual questioning of Fetterman's health.    4:50pm- On Tuesday, New York City Mayor Eric Adams signed legislation that will effectively ban the possession of firearms in Time Square.  5:05pm- More and more kids are starting to identify as “cats”—and, perhaps equally alarming, some schools are encouraging the behavior by offering students litter boxes in place of traditional restrooms, according to Joe Rogan.   5:35pm- Senator Bernie Sanders appeared on MSNBC with host Mehdi Hassan to discuss the upcoming midterm elections, alleging that Republicans could potentially “undermine democracy” if they take control of the House and Senate. PLUS Megaphone Bernie makes his triumphant return to afternoons.   5:45pm- According to a new study from the Daily Wire, which relied on recently released Census Bureau data, “the more liberal a state is, the more likely it is to be home to income inequality.” While salaries in blue states are often higher, so are the costs of living.    6:05pm- An investigative report from the Wall Street Journal revealed a disturbing reality— “thousands of senior executive branch employees” own shares of companies “whose fates” are “directly affected” by their decision making.    6:30pm- In response to John Fetterman's poor performance in a recent NBC news interview, the ladies of The View incredibly decided to blame the interviewer…   6:55pm- Who Won Social Media? + Zeoli's Final Thought

Rich Zeoli
Biden Dismisses Awful Economic News as Inflation & Credit Card Debt Soar

Rich Zeoli

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 49:37


The Rich Zeoli Show- Hour 1:  3:05pm- The House of Representatives' January 6th Select Committee has announced they will subpoena former President Donald Trump, hoping to question him on record about his involvement in the U.S. Capitol riot.   3:10pm- While appearing on Morning Joe, former MSNBC host Chris Matthews described requests for United States Senate candidate John Fetterman's health records as “reasonable.” On Tuesday, Fetterman spoke with NBC reporter Dasha Burns but declined to make his health records public.    3:25pm- Delivering remarks during his trip to Los Angeles, President Joe Biden emphasized the positive impact his Bipartisan Infrastructure Law has had on the economy while largely dismissing a new Labor Department report indicating that the consumer price index rose 6.6% year-to-year in September and increased by 6.3% from August's report.   3:45pm- According to a report from the Daily Wire and data collected from the Federal Reserve Board, credit card debt in America has increased by a “massive 18.1%” while total consumer debt has risen to a “record $4.68 trillion.”

CEO Spotlight
New Labor Department proposal has potential to "gig em"

CEO Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 11:14


 Craig J. Lewis, Founder & CEO of Gigwage joins KRLD's David Johnson for this episode of CEO Spotlight.

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz
Inflation, Israel, And Intel Job Cuts (Podcast)

P&L With Paul Sweeney and Lisa Abramowicz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 42:56


Mandeep Singh, Senior Technology Analyst with Bloomberg Intelligence, joins the show to talk about the huge job cuts coming to Intel and Uber and Lyft shares sliding yesterday following Labor Department worker reclassification proposals. Vince Cignarella, Global Macro Strategist with Bloomberg News, and Anna Wong, Chief US Economist with Bloomberg Economics, join the show to discuss outlook for stocks, rising credit card balances, and Bloomberg Economic's preview of Fed Minutes, in which they warn of a wage-price spiral. Gary Shilling, President at A. Gary Shilling & Co. Inc., talks about the Fed and the global economy. Matt Winkler, Bloomberg editor-in-chief emeritus, joins the show to discuss his recent column on Israel's politics and economy. George Ferguson, Senior Aerospace/Defense and Airlines analyst with Bloomberg Intelligence, joins the show to talk about his recent research on Frontier Airlines, the airline industry, and outlook for upcoming earnings. Ken Shea, Senior Analyst: Beverages, Tobacco/Cannabis with Bloomberg Intelligence, joins the show to talk about Pepsi earnings, Monster Beverages sliding in the premarket, and outlook for food and beverage prices amid economic headwinds. Hosted by Paul Sweeney and Matt Miller.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch
Can California Boss Around the Nation's Farmers?

WSJ Opinion: Potomac Watch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 26:32


The Supreme Court hears a challenge to Proposition 12, a California law that says meat sold in the state must be produced under specific rules of animal confinement. But does the Constitution let California regulate farm production elsewhere? Plus, the Labor Department sets its sights on freelancers and the "gig economy." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Pete Kaliner Show
10-12-2022--Hour3: Freelancers are about to get screwed

The Pete Kaliner Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 32:09


President Joe Biden's Labor Department is about to reclassify millions of independent contractors as employees. The move is expected to blow up the "gig economy" prompting massive layoffs. Plus, US Senate candidate John Fetterman's appearance in an NBC interview prompts backlash against the reporter.  Get exclusive content here!: https://thepetekalinershow.com/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

EpochTV
Capitol Report (Oct. 11): Tulsi Gabbard Quits Democratic Party; Social Issues Impacting Voters

EpochTV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 23:56


Russia continues with its missile strikes on Tuesday after killing 19 in Ukraine Monday. What is the Group of Seven nations vowing to do, and what does the White House say about Russia's nuclear threats? Grim economic forecasts are coming from the International Monetary Fund and Bank of America. The U.S. job market could be slashed in half. The Biden administration's Labor Department proposes new labor rules to make it harder for companies to classify workers as independent contractors. A 20-year Democrat leaves the party: former 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard. The battle for the ballot inches closer—midterms are just four weeks away. What kinds of social and cultural issues are influencing voters this year? We'll hear from Matt Peterson. Colorado encouraged 30,000 non-citizens to vote. The state secretary's office said it was a mistake. What does it mean for the upcoming midterms? ⭕️Watch in-depth videos based on Truth & Tradition at Epoch TV

Closing Bell
Closing Bell: Wild Market Swings, CME CEO On Bond Market Volatility & The Gig Is Up 10/11/22

Closing Bell

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 46:30


Stocks taking investors on a rollercoaster ride. The major averages giving up big gains after The Bank of England warned pension funds they have just three days to rebalance positions. CME Group CEO Terry Duffy weighs in on how that will impact bond market volatility. Mukhlenkamp Fund is one of the few funds with positive returns over the last year. Portfolio Manager Jeff Muhlenkamp reveals his strategy for investing in this high inflation environment. Jefferies Sheila Kahyaoglu discusses the outlook for airlines after American raised its revenue guidance. Plus she reacts to Boeing's strong orders data and why she thinks the stock can nearly double from its current level. And Tusk Venture Partners Founder Bradley Tusk reacts to the new Labor Department proposal that could reclassify gig workers as employees instead of independent contracts and how that could impact stocks like Uber and Lyft.

Squawk on the Street
Markets Slump, Dimon's 20% Message, “Fedspeak” on Rate Hike Caution, and the Gig Is "Down" for Uber and Lyft 10/11/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 43:27


Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber discussed the challenges facing markets in the midst of a four-session losing streak. The anchors reacted to JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon's comments to CNBC: He said the S&P 500 could fall "another easy 20%." The Fed in the spotlight after two policymakers called for caution regarding interest rate hikes. Also in focus: Market bright spots, shares of Uber and Lyft tumble on news of a Labor Department proposal to change independent contractor rules, Meta gets downgraded and Russia reportedly added the company to its list of terrorists and extremists, how to play the chip stock slump, and the Bank of England expands bond buying to calm markets.

Marketplace Minute
Proposed federal worker rule could reshape gig economy - Midday - Marketplace Minute - October 11, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 1:50


Labor Department wants to expand definition of employee; Supreme Court considers California animal welfare law; Mexico sues Arizona gun dealers; GM to make solar panels, batteries To learn more about listener data and our privacy practices visit: https://www.audacyinc.com/privacy-policy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit https://podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Squawk Pod
The Labor Market, & The Venezuela Factor 10/7/22

Squawk Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 27:27 Very Popular


The Labor Department has reported that 263,000 jobs were added in September, and the unemployment rate fell to 3.5%. The numbers will likely encourage the Federal Reserve to stay the course, on their aggressive rate hike policy to curb inflation. In the aftermath of the OPEC+ decision to cut oil output by 2 million barrels a day, the U.S. is exploring an ease of its sanctions on Venezuela in an effort to both boost oil flows, ease domestic energy market pressures, and push Russia and Saudi Arabia out of South America.  Former CNBC anchor and current member of the Council on Foreign Relations Michelle Caruso-Cabrera breaks down President Biden's geopolitical strategy. Plus, President Biden has pardoned thousands of people convicted of marijuana possession, global investors remain concerned that Credit Suisse is having liquidity issues, and Elon Musk is working to avoid a trial with Twitter.  In this episode: Tsedal Neely @tsedalMichelle Caruso-Cabrera @MCaruso_CabreraBecky Quick @BeckyQuickJoe Kernen, @JoeSquawkAndrew Ross Sorkin, @andrewrsorkinCameron Costa, @CameronCostaNY

WSJ What’s News
Jobs Market Shows Signs of Cooling But Remains Tight

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 13:31 Very Popular


P.M. Edition for Oct. 7. U.S. employers added 263,000 jobs in September, and the unemployment rate fell to 3.5%, according to the Labor Department. But the latest jobs report led to a selloff on Wall Street, with investors concerned that it keeps the Federal Reserve on track to continue raising interest rates. National economics reporter Gabriel T. Rubin joins host Annmarie Fertoli to discuss the report, and how it is likely to impact the Fed's plans. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WSJ Minute Briefing
Mortgage Rates Tick Down Slightly

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 2:04 Very Popular


Initial jobless claims rose to 219,000 last week, Labor Department says. India probes cough syrup exports possibly linked to child deaths in Gambia. Nobel Prize in Literature awarded to French author Annie Ernaux. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Marketplace All-in-One
Labor Department calculates about $45 billion in pandemic unemployment fraud

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 6:43


The Labor Department also notes what kind of fraud, and where. The SEC has charged Boeing with misleading investors after two deadly crashes. The worlds of commercial and residential construction carry differing experiences within the economy.

What A Day
A Freight Knot

What A Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 21:21 Very Popular


Tens of thousands of railroad workers could go on strike Friday, even as top-level negotiators and Labor Department officials met in Washington yesterday to try to reach a deal to avert it. Max Alvarez, editor-in-chief of the non-profit Real News Network, joins us to discuss what's at stake, and why the dispute has reached this point.And in headlines: soldiers clashed at the border between Armenia and Azerbaijan, R. Kelly was convicted of multiple child pornography charges, and West Virginia lawmakers passed one of the strictest abortion bans in the country.Show Notes:Vote Save America: Fuck Bans Action Plan – https://votesaveamerica.com/roe/Real News Network: “Freight workers explain why a national railroad strike is looming” – https://tinyurl.com/2hmp663bCrooked Coffee is officially here. Our first blend, What A Morning, is available in medium and dark roasts. Wake up with your own bag at crooked.com/coffeeFollow us on Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/whataday/For a transcript of this episode, please visit crooked.com/whataday