Podcasts about Ethiopia

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Country in East Africa

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  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST
Ethiopia

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Latest podcast episodes about Ethiopia

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan
January 24: Genesis 25; Matthew 24; Esther 1; Acts 24

ESV: M'Cheyne Reading Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 16:56


With family: Genesis 25; Matthew 24 Genesis 25 (Listen) Abraham's Death and His Descendants 25 Abraham took another wife, whose name was Keturah. 2 She bore him Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak, and Shuah. 3 Jokshan fathered Sheba and Dedan. The sons of Dedan were Asshurim, Letushim, and Leummim. 4 The sons of Midian were Ephah, Epher, Hanoch, Abida, and Eldaah. All these were the children of Keturah. 5 Abraham gave all he had to Isaac. 6 But to the sons of his concubines Abraham gave gifts, and while he was still living he sent them away from his son Isaac, eastward to the east country. 7 These are the days of the years of Abraham's life, 175 years. 8 Abraham breathed his last and died in a good old age, an old man and full of years, and was gathered to his people. 9 Isaac and Ishmael his sons buried him in the cave of Machpelah, in the field of Ephron the son of Zohar the Hittite, east of Mamre, 10 the field that Abraham purchased from the Hittites. There Abraham was buried, with Sarah his wife. 11 After the death of Abraham, God blessed Isaac his son. And Isaac settled at Beer-lahai-roi. 12 These are the generations of Ishmael, Abraham's son, whom Hagar the Egyptian, Sarah's servant, bore to Abraham. 13 These are the names of the sons of Ishmael, named in the order of their birth: Nebaioth, the firstborn of Ishmael; and Kedar, Adbeel, Mibsam, 14 Mishma, Dumah, Massa, 15 Hadad, Tema, Jetur, Naphish, and Kedemah. 16 These are the sons of Ishmael and these are their names, by their villages and by their encampments, twelve princes according to their tribes. 17 (These are the years of the life of Ishmael: 137 years. He breathed his last and died, and was gathered to his people.) 18 They settled from Havilah to Shur, which is opposite Egypt in the direction of Assyria. He settled1 over against all his kinsmen. The Birth of Esau and Jacob 19 These are the generations of Isaac, Abraham's son: Abraham fathered Isaac, 20 and Isaac was forty years old when he took Rebekah, the daughter of Bethuel the Aramean of Paddan-aram, the sister of Laban the Aramean, to be his wife. 21 And Isaac prayed to the LORD for his wife, because she was barren. And the LORD granted his prayer, and Rebekah his wife conceived. 22 The children struggled together within her, and she said, “If it is thus, why is this happening to me?”2 So she went to inquire of the LORD. 23 And the LORD said to her,   “Two nations are in your womb,    and two peoples from within you3 shall be divided;  the one shall be stronger than the other,    the older shall serve the younger.” 24 When her days to give birth were completed, behold, there were twins in her womb. 25 The first came out red, all his body like a hairy cloak, so they called his name Esau. 26 Afterward his brother came out with his hand holding Esau's heel, so his name was called Jacob.4 Isaac was sixty years old when she bore them. 27 When the boys grew up, Esau was a skillful hunter, a man of the field, while Jacob was a quiet man, dwelling in tents. 28 Isaac loved Esau because he ate of his game, but Rebekah loved Jacob. Esau Sells His Birthright 29 Once when Jacob was cooking stew, Esau came in from the field, and he was exhausted. 30 And Esau said to Jacob, “Let me eat some of that red stew, for I am exhausted!” (Therefore his name was called Edom.5) 31 Jacob said, “Sell me your birthright now.” 32 Esau said, “I am about to die; of what use is a birthright to me?” 33 Jacob said, “Swear to me now.” So he swore to him and sold his birthright to Jacob. 34 Then Jacob gave Esau bread and lentil stew, and he ate and drank and rose and went his way. Thus Esau despised his birthright. Footnotes [1] 25:18 Hebrew fell [2] 25:22 Or why do I live? [3] 25:23 Or from birth [4] 25:26 Jacob means He takes by the heel, or He cheats [5] 25:30 Edom sounds like the Hebrew for red (ESV) Matthew 24 (Listen) Jesus Foretells Destruction of the Temple 24 Jesus left the temple and was going away, when his disciples came to point out to him the buildings of the temple. 2 But he answered them, “You see all these, do you not? Truly, I say to you, there will not be left here one stone upon another that will not be thrown down.” Signs of the End of the Age 3 As he sat on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to him privately, saying, “Tell us, when will these things be, and what will be the sign of your coming and of the end of the age?” 4 And Jesus answered them, “See that no one leads you astray. 5 For many will come in my name, saying, ‘I am the Christ,' and they will lead many astray. 6 And you will hear of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not alarmed, for this must take place, but the end is not yet. 7 For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom, and there will be famines and earthquakes in various places. 8 All these are but the beginning of the birth pains. 9 “Then they will deliver you up to tribulation and put you to death, and you will be hated by all nations for my name's sake. 10 And then many will fall away1 and betray one another and hate one another. 11 And many false prophets will arise and lead many astray. 12 And because lawlessness will be increased, the love of many will grow cold. 13 But the one who endures to the end will be saved. 14 And this gospel of the kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the whole world as a testimony to all nations, and then the end will come. The Abomination of Desolation 15 “So when you see the abomination of desolation spoken of by the prophet Daniel, standing in the holy place (let the reader understand), 16 then let those who are in Judea flee to the mountains. 17 Let the one who is on the housetop not go down to take what is in his house, 18 and let the one who is in the field not turn back to take his cloak. 19 And alas for women who are pregnant and for those who are nursing infants in those days! 20 Pray that your flight may not be in winter or on a Sabbath. 21 For then there will be great tribulation, such as has not been from the beginning of the world until now, no, and never will be. 22 And if those days had not been cut short, no human being would be saved. But for the sake of the elect those days will be cut short. 23 Then if anyone says to you, ‘Look, here is the Christ!' or ‘There he is!' do not believe it. 24 For false christs and false prophets will arise and perform great signs and wonders, so as to lead astray, if possible, even the elect. 25 See, I have told you beforehand. 26 So, if they say to you, ‘Look, he is in the wilderness,' do not go out. If they say, ‘Look, he is in the inner rooms,' do not believe it. 27 For as the lightning comes from the east and shines as far as the west, so will be the coming of the Son of Man. 28 Wherever the corpse is, there the vultures will gather. The Coming of the Son of Man 29 “Immediately after the tribulation of those days the sun will be darkened, and the moon will not give its light, and the stars will fall from heaven, and the powers of the heavens will be shaken. 30 Then will appear in heaven the sign of the Son of Man, and then all the tribes of the earth will mourn, and they will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven with power and great glory. 31 And he will send out his angels with a loud trumpet call, and they will gather his elect from the four winds, from one end of heaven to the other. The Lesson of the Fig Tree 32 “From the fig tree learn its lesson: as soon as its branch becomes tender and puts out its leaves, you know that summer is near. 33 So also, when you see all these things, you know that he is near, at the very gates. 34 Truly, I say to you, this generation will not pass away until all these things take place. 35 Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will not pass away. No One Knows That Day and Hour 36 “But concerning that day and hour no one knows, not even the angels of heaven, nor the Son,2 but the Father only. 37 For as were the days of Noah, so will be the coming of the Son of Man. 38 For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, 39 and they were unaware until the flood came and swept them all away, so will be the coming of the Son of Man. 40 Then two men will be in the field; one will be taken and one left. 41 Two women will be grinding at the mill; one will be taken and one left. 42 Therefore, stay awake, for you do not know on what day your Lord is coming. 43 But know this, that if the master of the house had known in what part of the night the thief was coming, he would have stayed awake and would not have let his house be broken into. 44 Therefore you also must be ready, for the Son of Man is coming at an hour you do not expect. 45 “Who then is the faithful and wise servant,3 whom his master has set over his household, to give them their food at the proper time? 46 Blessed is that servant whom his master will find so doing when he comes. 47 Truly, I say to you, he will set him over all his possessions. 48 But if that wicked servant says to himself, ‘My master is delayed,' 49 and begins to beat his fellow servants4 and eats and drinks with drunkards, 50 the master of that servant will come on a day when he does not expect him and at an hour he does not know 51 and will cut him in pieces and put him with the hypocrites. In that place there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. Footnotes [1] 24:10 Or stumble [2] 24:36 Some manuscripts omit nor the Son [3] 24:45 Or bondservant; also verses 46, 48, 50 [4] 24:49 Or bondservants (ESV) In private: Esther 1; Acts 24 Esther 1 (Listen) The King's Banquets 1 Now in the days of Ahasuerus, the Ahasuerus who reigned from India to Ethiopia over 127 provinces, 2 in those days when King Ahasuerus sat on his royal throne in Susa, the citadel, 3 in the third year of his reign he gave a feast for all his officials and servants. The army of Persia and Media and the nobles and governors of the provinces were before him, 4 while he showed the riches of his royal glory and the splendor and pomp of his greatness for many days, 180 days. 5 And when these days were completed, the king gave for all the people present in Susa the citadel, both great and small, a feast lasting for seven days in the court of the garden of the king's palace. 6 There were white cotton curtains and violet hangings fastened with cords of fine linen and purple to silver rods1 and marble pillars, and also couches of gold and silver on a mosaic pavement of porphyry, marble, mother-of-pearl, and precious stones. 7 Drinks were served in golden vessels, vessels of different kinds, and the royal wine was lavished according to the bounty of the king. 8 And drinking was according to this edict: “There is no compulsion.” For the king had given orders to all the staff of his palace to do as each man desired. 9 Queen Vashti also gave a feast for the women in the palace that belonged to King Ahasuerus. Queen Vashti's Refusal 10 On the seventh day, when the heart of the king was merry with wine, he commanded Mehuman, Biztha, Harbona, Bigtha and Abagtha, Zethar and Carkas, the seven eunuchs who served in the presence of King Ahasuerus, 11 to bring Queen Vashti before the king with her royal crown,2 in order to show the peoples and the princes her beauty, for she was lovely to look at. 12 But Queen Vashti refused to come at the king's command delivered by the eunuchs. At this the king became enraged, and his anger burned within him. 13 Then the king said to the wise men who knew the times (for this was the king's procedure toward all who were versed in law and judgment, 14 the men next to him being Carshena, Shethar, Admatha, Tarshish, Meres, Marsena, and Memucan, the seven princes of Persia and Media, who saw the king's face, and sat first in the kingdom): 15 “According to the law, what is to be done to Queen Vashti, because she has not performed the command of King Ahasuerus delivered by the eunuchs?” 16 Then Memucan said in the presence of the king and the officials, “Not only against the king has Queen Vashti done wrong, but also against all the officials and all the peoples who are in all the provinces of King Ahasuerus. 17 For the queen's behavior will be made known to all women, causing them to look at their husbands with contempt,3 since they will say, ‘King Ahasuerus commanded Queen Vashti to be brought before him, and she did not come.' 18 This very day the noble women of Persia and Media who have heard of the queen's behavior will say the same to all the king's officials, and there will be contempt and wrath in plenty. 19 If it please the king, let a royal order go out from him, and let it be written among the laws of the Persians and the Medes so that it may not be repealed, that Vashti is never again to come before King Ahasuerus. And let the king give her royal position to another who is better than she. 20 So when the decree made by the king is proclaimed throughout all his kingdom, for it is vast, all women will give honor to their husbands, high and low alike.” 21 This advice pleased the king and the princes, and the king did as Memucan proposed. 22 He sent letters to all the royal provinces, to every province in its own script and to every people in its own language, that every man be master in his own household and speak according to the language of his people. Footnotes [1] 1:6 Or rings [2] 1:11 Or headdress [3] 1:17 Hebrew to disdain their husbands in their eyes (ESV) Acts 24 (Listen) Paul Before Felix at Caesarea 24 And after five days the high priest Ananias came down with some elders and a spokesman, one Tertullus. They laid before the governor their case against Paul. 2 And when he had been summoned, Tertullus began to accuse him, saying: “Since through you we enjoy much peace, and since by your foresight, most excellent Felix, reforms are being made for this nation, 3 in every way and everywhere we accept this with all gratitude. 4 But, to detain1 you no further, I beg you in your kindness to hear us briefly. 5 For we have found this man a plague, one who stirs up riots among all the Jews throughout the world and is a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes. 6 He even tried to profane the temple, but we seized him.2 8 By examining him yourself you will be able to find out from him about everything of which we accuse him.” 9 The Jews also joined in the charge, affirming that all these things were so. 10 And when the governor had nodded to him to speak, Paul replied: “Knowing that for many years you have been a judge over this nation, I cheerfully make my defense. 11 You can verify that it is not more than twelve days since I went up to worship in Jerusalem, 12 and they did not find me disputing with anyone or stirring up a crowd, either in the temple or in the synagogues or in the city. 13 Neither can they prove to you what they now bring up against me. 14 But this I confess to you, that according to the Way, which they call a sect, I worship the God of our fathers, believing everything laid down by the Law and written in the Prophets, 15 having a hope in God, which these men themselves accept, that there will be a resurrection of both the just and the unjust. 16 So I always take pains to have a clear conscience toward both God and man. 17 Now after several years I came to bring alms to my nation and to present offerings. 18 While I was doing this, they found me purified in the temple, without any crowd or tumult. But some Jews from Asia—19 they ought to be here before you and to make an accusation, should they have anything against me. 20 Or else let these men themselves say what wrongdoing they found when I stood before the council, 21 other than this one thing that I cried out while standing among them: ‘It is with respect to the resurrection of the dead that I am on trial before you this day.'” Paul Kept in Custody 22 But Felix, having a rather accurate knowledge of the Way, put them off, saying, “When Lysias the tribune comes down, I will decide your case.” 23 Then he gave orders to the centurion that he should be kept in custody but have some liberty, and that none of his friends should be prevented from attending to his needs. 24 After some days Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish, and he sent for Paul and heard him speak about faith in Christ Jesus. 25 And as he reasoned about righteousness and self-control and the coming judgment, Felix was alarmed and said, “Go away for the present. When I get an opportunity I will summon you.” 26 At the same time he hoped that money would be given him by Paul. So he sent for him often and conversed with him. 27 When two years had elapsed, Felix was succeeded by Porcius Festus. And desiring to do the Jews a favor, Felix left Paul in prison. Footnotes [1] 24:4 Or weary [2] 24:6 Some manuscripts add and we would have judged him according to our law. 7But the chief captain Lysias came and with great violence took him out of our hands, 8commanding his accusers to come before you. (ESV)

Newshour
Ukraine tension: Urgent talks as invasion fears grow

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 47:19


The two top diplomats from the US and Russia have concluded brief negotiations in Geneva. The talks were designed to defuse the threat of war in Ukraine. Russia's foreign minister Sergei Lavrov said the talks with the US Secretary of State Antony Blinken were constructive. Also in the programme: We hear an extraordinary story of survival from Tonga after the volcanic eruption last Saturday. And scientists say the plant enset, which is a staple in Ethiopia, could be a new superfood and a lifesaver in the face of climate change. (Photo: U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken greets Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov before their meeting, in Geneva, Switzerland. Russian Foreign Ministry/Handout via Reuters)

UN News
News in Brief 21 January 2022

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022


Tigray: Eritrean refugees ‘scared and struggling to eat' says UNHCR Tonga: OCHA says access to safe water for half of population across island nation ‘a serious concern' Visit of UN Sudan rights' expert postponed by Government

Tales from the Crypt
Rabbit Hole Recap #183: Intel hopping in the Bitcoin mining game and Presidents meeting to talk Bitcoin

Tales from the Crypt

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 113:08


This week Marty and Matt discuss: - Intel to announce new bitcoin ASIC in feb - GRIID has signed a deal with Intel for their ASICs - BitMEX to acquire 268 year old German Bank - Taproot funds burned - mempool v2.3.0 - mercury wallet v0.5.9 - onionshare v2.5 - simple bitcoin wallet v2.4.27 - lightning pool v0.5.4-alpha - umbrel v0.4.11 - tdex v1.2.4 - El Salvador Gov is using pegasus spyware against journalists - Bukele meets withs Erdogan - UK Gov planning publicity campaign against encrypted communication - Ethiopia should turn to bitcoin - Congressional Hearing on Bitcoin - btcpolicy.org fact sheet focused on the hearing - Citadel Dispatch will no longer be on TFTC podcast feed going forward, search Citadel Dispatch in your favorite podcast app Shoutout to our sponsors: Cash App Unchained Capital Braiins HodlHodl Bitcoin 2022 - use the code TFTC for 10% off

The Katie Halper Show
Who Killed Martin Luther King Jr? with Eugene Puryear

The Katie Halper Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:19


Who actually killed Martin Luther King Jr? The answer may surprise you. Author, journalist and activist Eugene Puryear fills us in. Eugene Puryear is the author of "Shackled and Chained: Mass Incarceration in Capitalist America," a journalist at Breakthrough News and the host of the Punch Out podcast. Hear our patreon-only chat with Eugene about the latest in Ethiopia, what he learned when he went there, his father's role in the Civil Rights Movement, and the worst Happy MLK tweets here https://www.patreon.com/posts/patreon-with-khs-61390129

The John Batchelor Show
#Ethiopia: The US goes to Abiy. Gregory Copley @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 15:22


Photo:  Ethiopian Madonna #Ethiopia: The US goes to Abiy. Gregory Copley  @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/inside-biden-harris-white-house-africa-biden-officials-simon-ateba/

Do Go On
326 - Live Aid (with Joel Zammit)

Do Go On

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 183:21


This week we look at Live Aid, the monumental 1985 music concert watched by just under 2 billion people across the planet. Queen, U2, Madonna, Elton John, Paul McCartney, Run DMC, Phil Collins, David Bowie, Tina Turner and many more came together to raise money to fight famine in Ethiopia. The intentions were good, but where did the money go? Get tickets to Do Go On: The Quiz Show at The Melbourne Comedy Festival April 4, 11 + 18:https://www.comedyfestival.com.au/2022/shows/the-quiz-show Support the show and get rewards like bonus episodes: dogoonpod.com or patreon.com/DoGoOnPodCheck out Joel Zammit's Sanspants Radio podcasts: https://www.sanspantsradio.com/ Submit a topic idea directly to the hat: dogoonpod.com/Submit-a-Topic Twitter: @DoGoOnPodInstagram: @DoGoOnPodFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoOnPod/Email us: dogoonpod@gmail.com Check out our other podcasts:Book Cheat: https://play.acast.com/s/book-cheatPrime Mates: https://play.acast.com/s/prime-mates/Listen Now: https://play.acast.com/s/listen-now/ Our awesome theme song by Evan Munro-Smith and logo by Peader ThomasLIVE AID SET LIST:http://liveaid.free.fr/pages/liveaidtimesdetaileduk.html https://www.phillymag.com/news/2020/07/10/live-aid-history/ https://www.theguardian.com/music/2004/oct/17/popandrock5https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/oral-history-live-aid-ones-made-brighter-day-33-years-ago-174656465.html https://dangerousminds.net/comments/meet_david_weinstein_the_18-year-old_kid_who_opened_live_aidREFERENCES AND FURTHER READING See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History of Africa
Season 3 Episode 13 - The Battle of Anomabu

History of Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 24:47


In pursuit of rebellious nobles who gravely insulted his family and people, the asantehene Osei Bonsu invades the rival Fante Confederacy. After winning and unprecedented victory over the Fante, his army faces a soon to be recurring foe for the first time: the British Empire. Support the show (https://patreon.com/historyofafrica)

Human Circus: Journeys in the Medieval World
Prester John 8: Ambassador Mateus and his Many Doubters

Human Circus: Journeys in the Medieval World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 45:32


In the early years of the 16th-century, Ethiopia's regent, Eleni, sent an ambassador to Portugal to propose an alliance. She sent a man named Mateus. Unfortunately for Mateus, almost nobody believed him. If you like what you hear and want to chip in to support the podcast, my Patreon is here. I'm on Twitter @circus_human, Instagram @humancircuspod, and I have some things on Redbubble. Sources: Prester John: The Legend and its Sources, compiled and translated by Keagan Brewer. Taylor & Francis, 2019. The Commentaries of the Great Afonso Dalboquerque, Second Viceroy of India. Hakluyt Society, 1875.  Alvares, Francisco. Narrative of the Portuguese embassy to Abyssinia during the years 1520-1527. Hakluyt Society, 1881. Baldridge, Cates. Prisoners of Prester John: The Portuguese Mission to Ethiopia in Search of the Mythical King, 1520-1526. McFarland, 2012. Diffie, Bailey Wallys & Winius, George Davison. Foundations of the Portuguese Empire, 1415-1580. University of Minnesota Press, 1977. Eliav-Feldon, Miriam. Renaissance Impostors and Proofs of Identity. Palgrave-Macmillan, 2012. Knobler, Adam. Mythology and Diplomacy in the Age of Exploration. Brill, 2016. Krebs, Verena. Medieval Ethiopian Kingship, Craft, and Diplomacy with Latin Europe. Springer International, 2021. Rogers, Francis Millet. The Quest for Eastern Christians: Travels and Rumor in the Age of Discovery. University of Minnesota Press, 1962. Salvadore, Matteo. The African Prester John and the Birth of Ethiopian-European Relations, 1402-1555. Taylor & Francis, 2016. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The John Batchelor Show
11/11 #ClassicEthiopia: #Ethiopia: Abiy Ahmed "candid" with the Biden Administration. Gregory Copley, @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 14:18


Photo:  Force Publique Commander-in-Chief crossing the Baro River near Gambela 11/11  #ClassicEthiopia: #Ethiopia: Abiy Ahmed  "candid" with the Biden Administration. Gregory Copley, @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs (Originally aired January 11, 2022)  https://www.nytimes.com/1998/05/02/opinion/foreign-affairs-now-a-word-from-x.html

The John Batchelor Show
10/11 #ClassicEthiopia: Ethiopia is a battlefield of the powers. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 12:44


Photo:  Belgian Field Radio Station in Ethiopia 10/11   #ClassicEthiopia:  Ethiopia is a battlefield of the powers. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs @Gregory_Copley (Originally aired December 14, 2021)   https://centerforsecuritypolicy.org/drones-are-winning-the-war-in-ethiopia/

The John Batchelor Show
9/11 #ClassicEthiopia: Ethiopia battles for a Federal Union. @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 13:33


Photo:  Force Publique camouflaging a truck in Ethiopia 9/11  #ClassicEthiopia: Ethiopia battles for a Federal Union. @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs  @Gregory_Copley (Originally aired December 11, 2021)  https://www.ft.com/content/0a9a176c-f0d3-4ad4-8dad-e0de306371a6

The John Batchelor Show
7/11 #ClassicEthiopia: Tigray vs Ethiopia. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 11:44


Photo:  Fourteenth-century illustration showing the Christian King (Negus) of Aksum (King Armah also known as Al-Najashi) declining the request of a pagan Meccan delegation to forfeit the first Muslims who received refuge in the city of Axum following the First Hijra as the Prophet Muhammad told them to take refuge in Axum. 7/11  #ClassicEthiopia:  Tigray vs Ethiopia.  Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs   @Gregory_Copley  (Originally aired June 29, 2021)   https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/29/world/africa/Tigray-Ethiopia.html ..

The John Batchelor Show
6/11 #ClassicEthiopia: Ethiopia votes in the tumultuous Horn of Africa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 13:19


Photo:  Yared 6/11  #ClassicEthiopia: Ethiopia votes in the tumultuous Horn of Africa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley (Originally aired June 22, 2021.   https://www.ibtimes.com/counting-under-way-historic-ethiopia-election-3232292 ..

The John Batchelor Show
5/11 #ClassicEthiopia: Why does NATO side with Egypt over Ethiopia in the Blue Nile dispute? Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 14:29


Photo:  Haile Selassie and group 5/11  #ClassicEthiopia: Why does NATO side with Egypt over Ethiopia in the Blue Nile dispute? Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley (Originally aired June 15, 2021)  https://www.al-monitor.com/originals/2021/06/egypt-sudan-increase-pressure-ethiopia-over-nile-dam-crisis ..

The John Batchelor Show
4/11 ClassicEthiopia: (2/2) Ethiopia moves to reunite with Eritrea to build a power of 120 million in the Horn of Africa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 9:44


Photo:  Ethiopia - Front of a Double-Sided Diptych with Mary and Her Son, and Saint George 4/11   ClassicEthiopia: (2/2) Ethiopia moves to reunite with Eritrea to build a power of 120 million in the Horn of Africa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs   @Gregory_Copley (Originally aired June 9, 2021)  https://www.theafricareport.com/93867/eritrea-ethiopia-a-string-of-near-chances-to-fully-normalise-relations/

The John Batchelor Show
3/11 ClassicGregory: 1/2: Ethiopia moves to reunite with Eritrea to build a power of 120 million in the Horn of Africa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 10:54


Photo:   Tafari Dejazmatch Harrar 3/11   ClassicGregory: 1/2: Ethiopia moves to reunite with Eritrea to build a power of 120 million in the Horn of Africa. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley (Originally aired June 9, 2021)  https://www.theafricareport.com/93867/eritrea-ethiopia-a-string-of-near-chances-to-fully-normalise-relations/

The John Batchelor Show
2/11 #ClassicEthiopia: Fragile Egypt and the Red Sea Wars of Somalia, Ethiopia, Tigray and Eritrea. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 13:22


Photo:  Saio heights in Ethiopia 2/11   #ClassicEthiopia: Fragile Egypt and the Red Sea Wars of Somalia, Ethiopia, Tigray and Eritrea. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley  (Originally aired April 1, 2021)   https://menafn.com/1101769431/Why-Somalia-is-Important-for-Egypt-in-Nile-Dam-Crisis

The John Batchelor Show
1/11 #ClassicEthiopia: The troubles in fragmented and disdained Ethiopia. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 6:18


Photo:   1690 Coronelli Map of Ethiopia, Abyssinia, and the Source of the Blue Nile - Geographicus - Abissinia-coronelli-1690 1/11   #ClassicEthiopia: The troubles in fragmented and disdained Ethiopia. Gregory Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs. @Gregory_Copley  (Originally aired March 17, 2021) 

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #216: Is the CIA Creating a New Mujahideen in Ukraine?

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 69:27


On Conflicts of Interest #216, Kyle Anzalone breaks down the CIA program to train insurgents in Ukraine. While only few details of the program were revealed, since 2015, the CIA has hired a paramilitary to train Ukrainians in the US on insurgency tactics. While the program is presented as defensive, officials admit the program has been used to make battlefield gains inside Ukraine.  Kyle discusses the recent talks between Russia and NATO. Much like the meeting between the US and Russia, the dialog ended without agreement or much progress being made. However, Russia arrested several members of a hacking group at the request of the US - presenting an opening for more dialog.  Kyle updates the war in Ethiopia. With US drones and airstrikes, the Ethiopian government has turned back the Tigray People Liberation Front's advance. After halting the offensive, in a move that appears to be directed at ending the war, the Ethiopian government released several prisoners.. However, Ethiopia has not let up on its air war which, so far this year, has claimed the lives of over 100 Tigrayian civilians. Ethiopian leader Abiy spoke with Biden as Ethiopian drones targeted civilian camps.  Kyle explains the recent developments in the Yemen War. The UAE-backed Giants brigade made major gains against Houthi fighters in Maarib and Shabwah. However, the people of Yemen continue to flee to areas controlled by the Houthi as they are more stable and secure.  Kyle wraps up the show with a discussion of North Korea's recent missile tests. Since South Korea President Moon Jae-in announced a possible end to the Korean war, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has carried out three missile tests. The US reacted to the tests with new sanctions on North Korea.  Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Conflicts of Interest
Is the CIA Creating a New Mujahideen in Ukraine?

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 69:28


On Conflicts of Interest #216, Kyle Anzalone breaks down the CIA program to train insurgents in Ukraine. While only few details of the program were revealed, since 2015, the CIA has hired a paramilitary to train Ukrainians in the US on insurgency tactics. While the program is presented as defensive, officials admit the program has been used to make battlefield gains inside Ukraine.    Kyle discusses the recent talks between Russia and NATO. Much like the meeting between the US and Russia, the dialog ended without agreement or much progress being made. However, Russia arrested several members of a hacking group at the request of the US - presenting an opening for more dialog.    Kyle updates the war in Ethiopia. With US drones and airstrikes, the Ethiopian government has turned back the Tigray People Liberation Front's advance. After halting the offensive, in a move that appears to be directed at ending the war, the Ethiopian government released several prisoners.. However, Ethiopia has not let up on its airwar which, so far this year, has claimed the lives of over 100 Tigrayian civilians. Ethiopian leader Abiy spoke with Biden as Ethiopian drones targeted civilian camps.    Kyle explains the recent developments in the Yemen War. The UAE backed Giants brigade made major gains against Houthi fighters in Maarib and Shabwah. However, the people of Yemen continue to flee to areas controlled by the Houthi as they are more stable and secure.    Kyle wraps up the show with a discussion of North Korea's recent missile tests. Since South Korea President Moon Jae-in announced a possible end to the Korean war, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has carried out three missile tests. The US reacted to the tests with new sanctions on North Korea. 

Africa Today
Mali military organise support rally

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 23:25


Thousands show up at a rally in Bamako aimed at showing support for the military junta recently hit by sanction; The anti-corruption commission in Nigeria arrests a man who allegedly faked his own appointment as army chief of staff; We hear first-hand what it's like to live in Tigray as war rages around the region in Ethiopia. And we listen to telephone recordings depicting the dramatic final moments of President Ben Ali of Tunisia's government 11 years ago.

UN News
UN Catch-Up Dateline Geneva: Tech solutions to relieve typhoon-hit Philippines

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 15:41


In this week's show, the latest on the emergency relief effort in the Philippines after the terrible destruction caused by Super Typhoon Rai; deep concern about the blockade of medicines to Ethiopia's Tigray from the World Health Organization (WHO), a “landmark” judgment against a Syrian interrogator who's been found guilty of crimes against humanity, and Omicron on the African continent, where infections look to be plateauing, but not everywhere.

The John Batchelor Show
#Ethiopia: Abiy Ahmed "candid" with the Biden Administration. Gregory Copley, @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 14:18


Photo:  Abyssinian music and dances, 1934 #Ethiopia: Abiy Ahmed  "candid" with the Biden Administration. Gregory Copley, @Gregory_Copley, Defense & Foreign Affairs https://www.nytimes.com/1998/05/02/opinion/foreign-affairs-now-a-word-from-x.html Gregory R Copley, @Gregory_Copley, editor and publisher of Defense & Foreign Affairs.  

Church News
Ethiopia Addis Ababa Mission leaders speak about faithfully and flexibly serving the Lord amid trials and the pandemic

Church News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 54:36


Ethiopia's national capital and largest city, Addis Ababa, hosts a new mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, recently opened in summer 2020. The first leaders of this mission, President Robert Dudfield and Sister Darice Dudfield, join this episode of the Church News podcast to talk about missionary work in Ethiopia and all that has impacted it — including the pandemic and the recent civil unrest that has caused President and Sister Dudfield, along with their missionaries, to temporarily relocate to the neighboring country of Kenya. They are examples of serving the Lord faithfully and flexibly, as well as the blessings that come from serving in the Church and testifying of Jesus Christ. The Church News Podcast is a weekly podcast that invites listeners to make a journey of connection with members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints across the globe. Host Sarah Jane Weaver, reporter and editor for The Church News for a quarter-century, shares a unique view of the stories, events, and most important people who form this international faith. With each episode, listeners are asked to embark on a journey to learn from one another and ponder, “What do I know now?” because of the experience. Produced by KellieAnn Halvorsen. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The China in Africa Podcast
Taking Stock of Wang Yi's Tour of East Africa & Indian Ocean States

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 60:43


Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi is back in Beijing after wrapping up the customary first overseas trip of the year that always begins in Africa. Wang spent almost a week visiting five nations in East Africa and throughout the Indian Ocean where debt, infrastructure and great power rivalry with the U.S. were among the key issues on the agenda.University of Nairobi political science lecturer Oscar Otele closely followed Wang's tour and joins Eric & Cobus to discuss the key highlights, particularly during the Foreign Minister's stop in Kenya.JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @ChinaAfrProject | @stadenesqueJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Endtime Ministries | End of the Age | Irvin Baxter

Is the Ark of the covenant in Ethiopia? And the “Battle for Jerusalem and the Temple Mount” rages on! It is critical to understand the past, present and future of the world's most disputed piece of real estate, for this is the issue that will ignite the Battle of Armageddon. We will analyze these events on this edition of End of the Age!

UN News
News in Brief 10 January 2022

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 3:15


Ethiopia: Relief teams suspend operations in northwest Tigray Sudan: UN envoy announces talks with key civilian and military figures For 25th year in a row, Greenland ice sheet shrinks

I Need Answers: The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church: By D/n Dawit Muluneh

It seems everyone has an opinion on the conflict surrounding the Northern Region of Ethiopia.  Here, DN Dawit discusses how the events in the early stages motivated him to write his newly published book: Hopeless Romantic: The Untold History of Ethiopia.

Happy & Holy
Acts 9-10 | Nathan Worthington and Kristin Mockler Young

Happy & Holy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 83:11


Today, I'm joined by Nathan Worthington and Kristin Mockler Young, and we talk about the deep theology of Stephen's speech, meet Saul for the first time in a not-so-flattering light, and dig into the movement of the gospel to Ethiopia. Let's do it!Nate is a former pastor of 11 years who now works as a student advisor at a university in Phoenix, AZ where he gets to work with college students; a demographic near and dear to his heart given his own faith journey of faith and doubt. He has been lucky to call himself Ashley's husband for 13 years and they have two daughters, Emma and Grace. He can usually be spotted with an americano in one hand, a book in the other and a soccer ball at his feet. You can see what coffee he's currently enjoying on Instagram or kindly ratio his tweets at @NateWorthington.Kristin is a loud laugher and happy clapper whose love languages include coffee, GIFs and all that sparkles. She is the Community Pastor at Mosaic Church where she gets to preach, teach and love on people. She writes at TurningTheGem.com where she helps people find Jesus outside of religion or the limited perspectives they may have grown up with. She also laughs at herself on Instagram at @kristinmockleryoung. She is married to Peter, who started as one of her volunteers at church, and they have 2 daughters, Marlee & Margot.Are you disentangling your faith from the culture around you? The greatest tool in that journey for me was the Bible itself. You've probably noticed that here on the show we love the Bible, and we take it seriously - but not always literally, and that means that meaning can get a little complicated. But you don't have to let that overwhelm you. I've put together the Big Picture Toolkit to help you understand how all of Scripture fits together in one incredible story, learn some new questions to ask to get at meaning without getting overwhelmed, and see new connections between Old and New Testaments with a special Bible Reading Plan. If you're ready to get back to basics of your faith, the Bible is a great place to start, and the Big Picture Bible Toolkit can help. Grab yours today free at kateboyd.co/bible.

Global News Podcast
Controversy for tennis star Djokovic

Global News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 25:12


Photographs show the tennis player at events when his lawyers say he tested positive for Covid. It is unclear whether he knew he had Covid when the photos were taken. His lawyers argue he had been given an exemption for the Australian Open because of the confirmed case. We hear from a former Australian minister who says that that exemption doesn't exist. Also: an airstrike on a refugee camp in northern Ethiopia kills dozens, and how Turkmenistan hopes to close the "Gates of Hell".

VOMRadio
AFRICA: Increasing Christian Persecution

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 24:57


Across Africa, instability and the growing influence of radical Islamist ideology mean more persecution for our Christian brothers and sisters. Sean Paton and Jeremy Malkin oversee VOM's efforts to serve persecuted Christians across Africa. Listen as they share updates on how Christians are responding—especially in the Central African Republic and Ethiopia. Thousands of Christians have been displaced in CAR by a civil war in which Christians have at times found themselves specifically targeted and at other times been caught in the crossfire between different factions. Listen as Jeremy gives an update on their situation, tells of meeting them first hand and describes specific ways we can pray for them. Ethiopia has also experienced upheaval in the past year, which provided cover for targeting Christians by those opposed to the gospel in the region. Sean will tell us what Christians there are facing, and give ways to pray. You can be inspired to pray for Christians in these and other nations throughout 2022 when you request your free copy of the 2022 VOM Global Prayer Guide. Subscribe to the VOM Radio podcast so you never miss an episode!

How To Love Lit Podcast
Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!

How To Love Lit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 55:30


Homer - The Odyssey - Episode 1 - Greek Gods, Greek Heroes And One of The Oldest Epic Poems Of All Time!   Hi, I'm Christy Shriver and we're here to discuss books that have changed the world and have changed us.    And I'm Garry Shriver and this is the How to Love Lit Podcast.  This week we embark on a seafaring adventure across the seas and through time to the ancient world of the Greeks to meet  someone who some have said is the greatest poet to have ever lived- Homer- and his second epic- The Odyssey.      To be honest, I think I agree with that assessment.      That's high praise. How does one get to that level?    I know.  It really is.  I guess, one way of looking at it may be attrition- how many poets do we still read from 3000 years ago.  That's not a large club.   We certainly don't have anyone in the English language canon that is competitive, but it's more than Homer basically invented the coming of age novel with the Telemachaie; he invented the flawed hero, as I choose to understand Odysseus.  In many ways, his epics, although they are poems, are pre-runners to modern day novels.   They are pre-cursors to fantasy.  Heck, even the success of the Marvel movies to me suggest a thinly veiled nod to Homer.  What is Superman or Wonder Woman if not demi-gods?    Well, if I may weigh in, although I don't feel even remotely qualified to suggest someone is the greatest poet to have ever lived, but what impresses me the most is the level of psychological and archetypal insights into the nature of man that crosses through culture.  Of course, I've heard of a lot of the characters and several of the stories, but I was impressed by how relatable Odysseus is.  And although so many of his adventures at sea are fantastical- they feel like hyperbolic expressions of what I go through- For example, what is Scylla and Charybdis if not being caught between a rock and a hard place?  Another thing that fascinates me is the order he wrote them in- at least the order as we think them- the first one, The Iliad, and then some years later, as an older man, The Odyssey.  That's also psychologically interesting- The Iliad has its version of a hero- Achilles is idealistic, proud in large and obvious way, self-righteous, vindictive even.         It's young man's idea of heroism versus The Odyssey and its version of heroism- a much more nuanced.  He also gets revenge, but it's slow and not very reactionary- he plots, he lies, he bides his time- things we learn by life beating the hound out of us.      I think that is well said.  Studying Homer for me is also very intimidating historically.  There is so much history and culture- beyond just the language differences just between my world and Homer's- 2600 years- give or take.  The language is different.  The culture is different. The geography and the religion are literally worlds and worlds away, and I'm not very confident I can understand the context.  And if that weren't scary enough, when you realize that Homer may have been describing events that may have preceded him by perhaps another 400- 1000 years or so, depending on who you believe- I just get lost in the math.  I might as well be saying, “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away…”.   It's foreign and mysterious.  Lizzy asked me today as I was sitting on my computer reading some research on the Mycenaens what book I was working on and I said, “Research for ‘Homer's The Odyssey'” – to which she replied, “Sounds boring.”  And Lizzy listens to our podcasts!!  But on the screen of my computer were broken pieces of pottery and archeological data, not super-man and wonderwoman.    Ha!  Well, if you can't guilt-trip your family members into listening to you, even if you are boring, what hope do you have?  But, I totally understand where she's coming from, over the years, I've taught a lot of history from US to Europe to World, and the Ancient World, and I love it.  I will admit, though, even though a lot can be fascinating with the ancients, there's no doubt the farther back in time you go, it can be very difficult to conceptualize.  It is also a lot more guesswork.  Ancient Greece feels far away because it IS far away, and often we don't know what we're looking at when we see it. I hate to keep coming back to the arrogance of the present, but we really have to guard against looking at ancient peoples as primitive thinkers just because their technologies were not advanced.  I mean, honestly, which of us could survive one week on an island?  I think Survivor has proven that that's not happening.    Ha!  Those people always lose so much weight! Survivor also proves that the most cunning and deceptive you are- Odysseus style, the more likely you are to survive, but getting back to the historical side of it.  Did the Trojan war really happen?  And if it did, what was it?      That's a great question.  For years and years, even centuries- the greatest minds said no.  If Troy existed, we would know it.  And just for context, in case you are unfamiliar with the story, the story goes that there was a woman, today we call her Helen of Troy, but she wasn't Trojan, she was Greek, and she ran away with a young lover- named Paris- to a city called Troy across the ocean.  Her sister's husband, King Agamemnon, launched 1000 ships and all the Greek kings and heroes to get her back for her husband Menelaus.   The war to get Helen back took ten years before the Greeks were finally able to penetrate the wall, theoretically using a gigantic horse and a gimmick devised by Odysseus.  The story goes that Odysseus and a few others hid inside this gigantic horse.  Everyone else hid and pretended to return to Greece.  They left the horse there claiming that it was a gift to the god, Poseidon.  The Trojans brought the horse inside the gate, Odesseus came out, unlocked the gate and the Greeks sacked the city.    For forever, no one thought this place even existed with any real certainty.  We couldn't find it.   Until an outrageous and bombastic but exceedingly wealthy amateur self-proclaimed archeologist by the name of Heinrich Schliemann set out to find it in the 1860s and actually did.      Outrageous and bombastic sounds kind of like code for a schmuck?    Well, he did have a few personal issues as well as professional ones.  For one thing, he wasn't trained in archeology, so he just went around blasting everything he saw – to the point that- Historian Kenneth Harl has said that Schliemann's excavations did to Troy what the Greeks couldn't do, destroy and level the city walls to the ground.    Oh no, that's terrible.       Well, it really is and he destroyed a lot of history.  He wanted so badly to get to the jewels belonging to Helen of Troy that he actually blasted through the actual walls of the city.  But, that being said, there is something to the fact, that he actually found the walls of the city and was something no one had done before him.  He found tons of gold and all kinds of very important things- he claimed his loot belonged to people like King Priam and Agamemnon including a very important solid gold.  One of the most famous is still called The Mask of Agamennon.  This, of course, has mostly been debunked by actual archeologists who know how to properly date archeological finds, but that being said, he found stuff that is real and validated many of the events referenced by Homer, albeit in myth form.   And if you ever  have the opportunity to visit Athens, you can see the mask of Agamennon in the National Archeological Museum.  Anyway, The best historical sources we have suggest that the Trojan war actually happened and took place around 1183 BC.  Not everyone is willing to say it lasted ten years or that was fought on the scale the Homer describes with thousands of ships, but we now believe it did happen.    Well, we are less likely to believe it was sparked by petty gods and goddesses and fought by demi-gods fathered by goddesses who dip their children in magical rivers that make them mostly immortal.  But I will say, I wish they would find a mask of Helen.  I would love to see what the uncontested most beautiful woman in human history, daughter of Zeus.      True, Christy, there is so much I don't know about all the myths of the gods and goddesses, and before I started researching for this podcast seris, honestly, I thought the story of the Illiad was the story of the Greeks sacking Troy.  I have to admit I got my information from the movie Brad Pitt made called Troy.  There are so many gods and goddesses and furies and nymphs and creatures and shapeshifters.  It's overwhelming.      True, the Illiad ends with the death and funeral of the Trojan hero, Hector,  and his father very sadly begging for his body and returning it home- not the sack of Troy.  In other words, the Greeks haven't won.  That's a story you get from other places.  The Odyssey references the Trojan horse when Telemachus goes to visit his father's old war buddies, but there is not a Homeric version of the Brad Pitt movie.  I was disappointed to find that out myself.     Speaking of things that have proven disappointing about Homer, One of those things is that we don't know him or even if there IS a him.    I know this is controversial and not universally accepted, but I will say from the get-go, that I am of the persuasion that Homer was an actual person who actually composed both pieces.  Although I'm sure there was a collection of traditional myths, like we saw with the Iroquois confederacy that were passed down orally from generation to generation, I believe that there was a man named Homer who drew from the myths kind of like Shakespeare did in our English tradition from popular stories he knew people recognized, and he composed his own pieces- one being the Iliad- where he doesn't retell the entire story of the war, but focuses on one hero and one aspect of it- and the other being the Odyssey- where he again focuses on one person.  Obviously I'm not an archeologist or a university professor with a degree in classical studies and I'm not prepared or qualified to argue with anyone who is.  But, I've read enough from those who are to convince me of that.    Do we know anything about Homer at all, assuming as you do, that he existed?    Not really- to be honest.  Most traditions claim that he was blind, although I can't find any real compelling reason for that belief except there's a blind poet named Demodacus in the Odyssey that sings at the court of the Phaeacian king- which I wouldn't think means anything at all, except that the ancients themselves took it for something- so if they believed it, maybe it was so.  Oh, This is interesting, there is one tradition that believes Homer was a woman- based in large part to the prominence Homer gives women in the text- that's my favorite theory, but a minority view for sure.  No ancient scholars were making that claim.  Tradition, and by tradition, we're talking about a couple thousand of years- so that's a long time for a tradition to develop- but traditional views consider him to have been  a male bard, or what today we call a professional singer/songwriter.  No one really knows where he's from.  Although, at least seven different places claim him; the most convincing arguments, at least for me, suggest he came from islands that are actually closer to Turkey then mainland Greece- more specifically the island Chios which is in the Aegean sea but close to Smyrna, modern day Izmir.  But maybe he came from Ios or Cyme.        If you are not all that well acquainted with the geography of the Mediterranean Sea or the Aegean ocean, I'll try to create a mini-map in your mind's eye.  Think of the big Mediterranean sea being a like a giant lake, and mainland Greece jets kind of halfway between Turkey and Italy with all of these scattered islands everywhere that go with it.  So, the part of the water that is between Greece and Turkey we call the Aegean Sea.  I don't want to oversimplify to people who know their maps, but, I've learned over the last couple of years, it's harder for those of us who use GPS  all the time to see the world in terms of maps, the way we old-schoolers used to have to do all the time- no disrespect. I definitely love my GPS over a paper map- but there's the trade-off.   I guess a good linked-in question might be, do we need maps anymore?      Anyway, Ancient Troy or modern day Hissarlik is on the north side of this inlet.  If you go down about 120 towards the Mediterranean you run into Chios and Smyrna.  Both of these places are about 158 miles across the ocean from Athens.  So, today, by modern standards they don't take long to get from one to the other, but obviously if you make the gods make, like Odysseus did, it can take up to 10 years.  But, Garry, beyond the geography of Greece being so different from other parts of the world because it's so based around a culture of the sea, I have trouble understanding the different periods- the Bronze Age, the Iron Age, all that stuff.  Can you give us a two minute crash course?    Sure, well we usually call what you're talking about this age of the early Greek glory years where they built the big palaces with the gigantic walls with the gods and heroes that were larger than life- the Mycenaean civilization- and the dates for that, generally speaking, are between 1650-1200 BC.  We really don't think of the Myceans as having a writing system like we think of today-  they likely had some ways of using script perhaps to mark things for business, but the culture and stories were passed down by an oral tradition.  The most important city-states, at least this is what we think today, were some of the ones we see in the Odyssey for example Mycenae was home to the legendary King Agamemnon and Pylos was the home of King Nestor.  All of these city states worshiped the same gods and spoke the same language, but politically, they had different kings.  Kings had to be strong.  Piracy was a way of life and not even considered immoral.  We think today that these people were highly aggressive and warlike amongst themselves as well as against outsiders.  They also made their armor out of Bronze- hence the Bronze Age.  So, back to the Iliad, Helen, the most beautiful woman in the world, was the queen of Sparta.  If we referring back to your little mental map- Sparta, Mycenae and Pylos are on the other side of mainland Greece- the side closer to Italy.  The ruins from those cities show big walls and lots of wealth. Sparta is about 300 or so miles across the sea, pass the mainland and into the Aegean Ocean.  This would have been the warpath to Troy but honestly, we really don't know what happened and that is not even just about this particular war.  We don't know for sure what happened to any of these towns.  What we do know is something devastasted all of these beautiful city states.  They were burned to the ground and whatever happened caused this area to fall into a period called the Dark Age- because we know nothing about it.  Almost the only thing we really know is that during the Dark Age, there was a transition from Bronze weapons to the much stronger Iron ones.    The big changes and the big cultural movement that shaped the world- at least the Western world- like we think of today comes out of the next period- the one following the Dark Age. We call this one the Archaic period which we consider to be from 800-500BC.  This era as well as the next are where we get things we're familiar with like the Olympics, the new sophisticated writing system- the Greek alphabet- democracy- like we associate with Athens.  And to make things even more confusing, the big Greek guys that we think of- like Plato and Aristotle and the “Golden Age” do not coincide with Homer- they come much later.  So, it's a lot of history- for us on the American continent who are mostly immigrants from other parts of the world- be it Europe, Africa or Asia, it's more than we can really even conceptualize- our entire nation as we understand it as a nation is less than 250 years old.  If we add what we know of the Indigenous people like the Iroquois confederacy into our timeline -we still fall short by thousands of years- Dekcadeakoah wasn't born til 1200 AD, at least that's our best guess.  So- there's your historical context in the two minute nutshell.  Does that work?    Well of course, so- to summarize even more Homer, a man who comes this Archaic period 8th century BC,  was writing about people who claimed lived during the Mycenaean civilization a full 400 before his life time- so if we want to give Odysseus, the man, an age- he's like 3000 plus years old-  Like I said before- for me it is basically “A long time ago in an galaxy far far away”...and yet…it's not… I want to start out by reading the first page of Fagle's translation- and then let's jump into the story itself- because for me-and I mean to disrespect to history- you know I love history- but I think you will agree with me- that it's not the history of this story that has kept it around for 3000 years.  It's not the religion; it's not the culture.  Homer writes the story of our lives- all of our lives- and we keep coming back to it generation after generation for that reason.      Read page 77    Okay- Christy- I think there's one more thing I think we need to clarify- there are so many translations.  Does it matter?    Well, I think the answer to that is the same if you ask that question about translations of the Bible- whichever you like personally-- which I may add- if you want to compare when Odysseus lived with Biblical characters, Moses arguably lived about 200 years before Odysseus-my best guess from my looking at the most respected timelines for each of these guys – but I stand to be corrected -if you have an article that parallels the two histories, I'd love to see it- email it over.  The more important point- and in some sense this is true for any text- but it is especially true for ancient texts- it's not the nuance of the language that matters really at all.  It's the essence of the ideas of the stories- the universal truths.  Most of the millions who read these stories every year can't read the original Greek. And although those that can really talk about the beauty of  all that- that part is lost on us.   It's not the translation that is going to make or break the story.  The Rouse translation, which, by the way, is the one we used when I taught this text to freshmen in Wynne Arkansas, was the first one I knew and the only one I knew for a really long time.  I really like it because I know it.  But, the knock on it is that it's prose and the Odyssey was not written in prose.  It's by far one of the lesser respected ones today. A lot of people today prefer Robert Fagle's translation because his book is really easy to read but he tries to make it sound like poetry.     Well, for the record, I am using Rouse's translation. I picked up Fagles, but I ended up preferring Rouse's because I wanted to read the story in prose instead of verse, for me that's easier.  But just so I know, Christy, assuming we were Greek and could understand this as it was originally composed what would it be like.    Good question- not that anyone knows for sure- but the general understanding is that it was written in meter- dactylic hexameter to be exact.  DAH -duh-duh- One accented syllable with two unaccented syllables in a row and then each line would have six of these.  Now, this is just me, but I really compare these ancient bards to modern day rap artists.  The Bards that would go around singing these stories- would improvise- but would use the beat to kind of keep them on course- obviously it didn't sound like rap, but it's the same skill that we see rap artists do when they improvise and you wonder- how can they think of all those rhymes?  Well, the trick is to already have little phrases in your mind that you know will make your lines work.  In the case of the Greek bards, they would have these epithets, or phrases they would use to describe the names of different gods- these lines that keep repeating throughout- would help them keep up with the demands of the meter.  So what does that mean- that means when you hear them say, as we will “Bright-eyed Athena”- he's adding syllables to make the meter work.  If that makes sense.      So, the descriptions don't necessarily mean that her eyes are the most important thing about her- it's just to make the music work?     That's it exactly.  The thinking is we aren't supposed to read too much into those kinds of things.  Also, the bards themselves used a very specialized vocabulary which was a mixture of different Greek dialects in order to make it all work.   This is a tangent, but it's kind of interesting, there was a classical linguist named Milman Parry who really wanted to figure out how in the world Homer could memorize so many lines.  You know the Odyssey has over 12,000 lines.  Well, Parry, by studying modern day illiterate singer/songwriters in Bosnia.  He came to believe that Homer didn't memorize anything- he had these patterns, these phrases and names of the gods that he knew rhymed well and fit the pattern and he would just tell the story and improvise the language for every different audience- he'd end the lines with the phrases and patterns that rhymed.  Maybe like professional comedians who do comedy improv in “Who's line is it anyway?”  So, in my mind, a Greek bard is something between a cross between a rap artist and modern day improv comedian.     HA!  Well, there's some creative analogies, but I get it.  Honestly, the idea of improvising makes it cooler than if Homer just wrote a piece of writing and then just read/chanted/sang the same thing over and over again.  As a musician, it reminds me of what Jazz musicians do or even bands in general.  You know, and this is really going to sound nerdy, but every once in a while, I have some buddies that I've known from years ago- we all went to the same church at one time- but many have moved out of Memphis- but we get together about once a year and do something like this. We'll go to a friend's house with our instruments, bring up some good ole' rock and roll music that we like and just improvise.  We all know the songs, but the specific variations, solos- that sort of thing- will be just be stuff that we make up.    Parry thought a Homer show was exactly that- every time he performed The Odyssey it was totally new.  But again, this is all total speculation- no one knows.  It's just too long ago.  So- having said that, back to the question you asked, for most of our purposes none of this stuff really matters- the translation doesn't matter, that Homer may or may not even have been a person, or a male or a person with vision who wrote with letters at all- or that the text itself may not even have been a fixed text or a story with improvised performances- all of those things- all though interesting- are really not the reason we love these stories and teach them in the ninth grade- at least around here.  It's this Homeric universe- this fantastical story- this hyperbolic creation  that has magnified the human experience.  Homer gave us a  new way to conceptualize our world- and a way to feel about the events- both controllable and uncontrollable that plague our lives.  Every once in a while, someone shows up in the world that can produce such a space.  In some ways we could say that Tolkien did this with Middle Earth, that JK Rowling did it, that CS Lewis did it, even George Lucas did it- each of those artists conceptualize entirely new and different universes- and when we spend time in their work- whatever medium we use- can inhabit that universe.  We can understand our world better through their world- it's fantasy.  So, Homer was the first that we know of to do this at the scale in which he did.  This is not to say that there are not legends and stories that predate him- there most certainly are- but they don't exist, that I know of, in this full length single unit form- not like what we have with Homer.  But yet, there is more to it than even that, although that is quite a feat.    Homer defined reality for a large number of people for centuries- maybe even still- and I'm not sure those other writers that I just listed out can say that.  The Greeks for hundreds of years, were able to ground their reality on the backs of the principles, morals, the world view that was laid out in his work- The Illiad and The Odyssey.  It helped people answer basic questions like- how do I conduct myself in the world.        Let's look at those first lines again and go through them-    “Sing to me of the man, Muse, the man of twists and turns driven time and again off course, once he had plundered the hallowed heights of Troy.”    Christy, is Homer telling us his entire story in the first lines.    Yes- of course he is- first of all, I do want to point out that Homer does not take credit for his story.  He is going to say it was given to him from a Muse.  That's interesting and really Jungian- so, I'll let you speak to that since that's your cup of tea-    Ha!  Well, he's basically saying, it's not that he made up the story- but he found the story or the story found him-the Muse is the originator- the idea being that the story existed before him in some larger context- that there is something here greater than he is.    And of course, all religious traditions speak to this reality, but since you referenced Jung, so does psychology.  There is something greater… and that is his starting point.    Exactly, and then he brings up why we love Odysseus- he was a man of twist and turns.  You know James Joyce who wrote that incredibly complicated masterpiece Ulysses was asked why he wrote his masterpiece about Odysseus- Ulysses is the Roman way to say Odysseus- and he famously responded that he was the only complete man in literature.  Odysseus, as we are going to see is a different kind of hero.  In the Iliad which is the book that came first, the Achilles is a demi-god. He's perfect.  He is totally beautiful, totally powerful, totally honest- that is something he took pride in. He never had to lie, he never had to back down- he was bigger and stronger and could overpower anyone.  That's not Odysseus- he was amazing- for sure.  But he wasn't the absolute biggest- he had to rely on lies- he sacked cities but he also got sacked himself- he had twist and turns- and for two reasons- on the one hand, the gods had agendas that had nothing to do with him that affected his world, but also he, himself,  made choices that steered him way off course.      Odysseus is a hero- for sure-   he definitely gets all the women- haha- if you want to look at it that way- but he's the kind of hero- we as mere mortals might aspire to be.  His life didn't turn out the way he wanted it, but he still wins at life- and actually he gets to make choices that allow him to live the kind of life he ultimately figures out he wants for himself.    Exactly- and Homer shows us how to make that happen.  In this Homeric universe that is safely far away- full of monsters and goddesses and magic- we can test drive some of the things we'd like to do if we could.  In this magical place we see consequences for things like running your mouth when maybe you shouldn't. But we can get some good ideas at how to get back when we're being exploited- ways that are smarter than just running our mouth.   Maybe by watching Odysseus we can get ideas about how to correct the course of our personal odyssey, we can figure out success that looks like for ourselves in our mundane realities. At least, that's the idea.    And yet, Christy, it is magical and otherworldly with characters we don't know.  I'll just be honest, as a person who doesn't know a lot about mythology, am I going to get confused the farther into this I read?  So far, so good, but I'll admit I haven't finished the whole thing yet.    Again, back to Homer's brilliance- the answer is NO.  Homer is going to build a pantheon of gods that is manageable and knowable.  And this is brilliant.  Just like other polytheistic faiths there are hundreds of gods in the Greek pantheon- but how do you wrap your brain around 600 or so? Homer is going to reduce it to a few- the Olympians.  He's going to create a hierarchy we can understand and he's going to personalize the gods so that we can know them.  As we read the story, we meet them little by little.  We learn who they are, what they value, how they operate- and of course- how we appease them and stay out of trouble. First and foremost- we meet Zeus- he's the chief, the god of the sky- protector and father of all the other gods and humans.      We're also going to learn an important principle, that will explain a lot about life- both to us and the ancients- there are things that are in the hands of the gods, but there are also things that are in our control.  We can control what we can control but then there are times we can strive hard and still meet disaster.  Sometimes, we have offended the gods; sometimes they just like us- sometimes we are just victims of happenstance.      Yes- exactly- and how do we account for that?  Let's keep reading…    Page 78    So, we met Zeus- he's the god of the sky- now we get to meet Poseidon- he's the god of the sea- he's Zeus' brother, but he is way more unpredictable and volatile- hence the behavior of the sea.  The big three are Zeus, Poseidon and Hades- God of the Sky, God of the Sea and God of the underworld.  We meet all three in the Odyssey- and in some sense, this brings order to a universe.      There are powers out there- things we can't see but that determine our fate- but are also arbiters of justice.  There is also a spiritual battlefield- spirits- invisible forces, however you want to understand the world- energy forces larger than our own humanity can see through our natural senses- there is a story that is larger than our story, but we play a part.   Sometimes we are just a speck in humanity, but other times we are not invisible, even to these larger forces.    Of course, as we think through this, although, not many of us adopt Greek mythology as our spiritual worldview, there is a lot there, that most of the world still accepts as truth- even if you're a monotheist.    Exactly- those are the major big boys- but there are a few others that we're going to meet.  We meet Hermes pretty quickly and we quickly understand his role in the role- he is a messenger.  He's Zeus' son, but not with his wife, Hera.  Zeus is always getting in trouble with his wife because he has fidelity issues.  But Hermes, as we will quickly learn is in charge of messages.        After we meet the men, we will slowly meet some of the important women of Olympus.  The first one here is probably my favorite goddess- Athena, she might be everyone's favorite goddess. She's a virgin, not controlled by a man, ha- but a goddess of both wisdom and war.  She's awesome.    I don't know that she's everybodies- Aphrodite has fans.      Yeah- you're right- but she's a trouble-maker.  Aphrodite makes you like fall madly in love with someone you know is no good for you- or be sexually compelled to do behave improperly.    Some would say that's low impulse control.      Yes- but those would not be the ancient Greeks.  They would say it's Aphrodite's fault- you are listening to her- that was Helen of Troy's problem.  But back to Athena    Athena seems she likes Odysseus.      She DOES!!  And that's how Odysseus wins.  Someone is watching over him and he is sensitive to her leading.  Athena is the goddess of wisdom, and Odysseus is attuned to this sense of wisdom in the universe.  She speaks to him, guides him, and most importantly, Athena enables Odysseus to always keep his cool. Odysseus, we will see, with a few exceptions, is led by wisdom- not by lust,  not by uncontrollable rage- by god-given wisdom.  Seeing people as being visited by outside forces that inspire them one way or the other is not a bad way of understanding why people are the way they are- even if you don't believe in gods and goddesses- which for the record, I don't personally, but this is my understanding of the ancient Greek worldview.  In the Homeric Universe, men and women are led by one god or goddess for the most part- not by a variety of different ones.  We mentioned that Helen of Troy is attune to Aphrodite, the goddess of sexual love- that's who's giving her direction.  But Odysseus is attuned and sensitive to Athena.  Athena takes credit not for Odysseus' strength, although he is strong, not for his ability with a bow and arrow, which we'll see he's pretty good at that too, but she takes credit for his wisdom.  The Odyssey is a story of this collaboration- there are things that we can't control, but there are things we can, and if we control the things we can, the universe, a goddess or someone outside of ourselves can and will intervene on our behalf with grace and kindness.  It's a way to organize our thinking about how the universe works- a very old way of thinking about how the universe works.     Let's quote Zeus here- again from the Fagles translation- as he explains the responsibility of humans- at this point in the story- Poseidon is out of town, so to speak- he's off in Ethiopia receiving offerings by the hundreds.  And with him away, Athena will make her play to save Odysseus' life, but we also see this philosophy of the Greeks explained here in the beginning of how and why things work out the way they do.    Page 78      But now let me read what Athena says back to her father= here she demonstrates the role the gods play in the destinies of man    page 79-       And so we have our narrative hook.  The gods will intervene in the destinies of men.  Calypso has been holding Odysseus hostage.  Hermes is being sent with a message from the gods forcing Calypso to release Odysseus.  At the same time this is happening,  Athena will visit Telemachus' Odysseus' son back in their hometown, Ithaca.  Telemachus was a newborn when Odysseus' left.  He is now 20 years old.  For ten years Odysseus fought in Troy.  Then after angering Poseidon, he spent the next ten years wandering lost at sea.  Telemachus has been left to be raised by his mother and a man named Mentor (guess where got that word).  Anyway, there is trouble in Ithaca which we'll find out about next episode, but more importantly than that, it is time for Telemachus to take his own journey and go out into the world on his own.        The Odyssey can easily be divided into three parts- the first four books are about Telemachus' journey to visit all of his father's war buddies.  The second part is Odysseus wandering around the magical seas, and the third is what he finds when he gets back to Ithaca, how he finds his beautiful and faithful wife and what he sees in his palace estate.  The first part, which we'll tackle. Next episode is about the coming of age from a boy to a man. After that we'll look at what all these seas trials are all about and then finally, we'll discuss some ideas about the famous finale in our finale.    Well, it sounds like we have a plan.  You know, the Iliad is a pretty straight forward narrative- a linear timeline and a kind of tragic ending.  The Odyssey is written in circles.  It's winding with endless setbacks but it has a happy ending.      I think that's exactly the right way to look at it.  They are both charming and enduring books but for different reasons, my book club recently just finished reading the latest take on the Iliad.  Madeline Miller wrote a novel called The Song of Achilles from the perspective of Patroclus that we read and really liked, but it was sad too.   If we ever analyze the Iliad, we'll get into the appeal of that book- it certainly is there- but if we just look at what's appealing the Odyssey – I think the ending is definitely a factor- many of us know what it's like to offend the gods, experience the wrath of Poseidon, maybe even the lures of Aphrodite or Circe – we've also likely been jilted by suitors or friend-enemies- as we call them nowadays- we can live vicariously through this steady under pressure goddess led hero- and maybe be inspired to face down our monsters- maybe we can even do a little listening for Athena and learn to bide our time and wreck havoc on our foes if we need to.  But mostly, we all want that heart-warming reunion after a long absence with our loved-ones and own home- we want to rest in the prophecy that old Greek prophet Tiresias gave Odysseus during his visit to the underworld- that when our time comes death will steal upon us a gentle painless death, far from the seas it comes to take you down, borne down with the years in ripe old age with all your people there in blessed peace around you.”                                      

Africa Today
Nigerian motorbike gangs in deadly village raids

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 21:41


Dozens of residents have reportedly been killed by gunmen who raided several communities in the Anka and Bukkuyum areas of Nigeria's north-western Zamfara state.The UN says there have been airstrikes on a refugee camp in Tigray, Ethiopia which have killed three people and wounded four others.Plus, we speak to UNESCO World Heritage Centre's new boss, he talks abouts his goal to put Africa's natural beauty on the World Heritage Map.

The Katie Halper Show
Rania Khalek on The War On Ethiopia

The Katie Halper Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 64:23


Found our discussion with Rania about the two year anniversary of the killing of Qassam Suleimani here plus getting censored by Instagram here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/60843466) Beirut-based journalist Rania Khalek reports back from being on the ground in Ethiopia and shares what she learned and what the media is getting wrong about it.

Trumpet Hour
#661: Week in Review: Kazakhstan Uprising Opens Opportunity for Putin, and Much More

Trumpet Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 57:09


Kazakhstan has experienced a quite sudden, violent anti-government uprising, but government efforts to appease the public have failed. The president called on Russia for help, and Vladimir Putin rapidly deployed forces that are certain to boost his power in this former Soviet state. Sudan's prime minister resigned, giving into protests against the military-dominated rule and throwing the tumultuous nation into further uncertainty. Germany's new chancellor, Olaf Scholz, is embracing a stronger relationship with China, casting aside concerns over the Asian giant's policies and behavior. We also talk about China's new deal that reveals its plot to virtually take over Latin America, a possible weapons deal between Israel and Morocco, France's president “declaring war” on the unvaccinated, insurance companies reporting a 40 percent jump in premature non-COVID deaths, and Democrats hyperventilating over the January 6 “insurrection” anniversary. Links [00:38] Kazakhstan (10 minutes) “With Kazakhstan in Flames, Russia's Moving In” The Prophesied ‘Prince of Russia' [11:00] Sudan (10 minutes) Libya and Ethiopia in Prophecy [20:29] Germany and China (8 minutes) “The Great ‘Mart of Nations'” VIDEO: “Germany Going Underground” [28:15] January 6 Anniversary (10 minutes) “What Will Happen After Trump Regains Power” [37:55] China in Latin America (5 minutes) “Preparing to Storm America's Castle” [43:10] Israel and Morocco (5 minutes) “Deadly Flaw in Mideast Peace Deals” [48:17] France vs. Unvaccinated (3 minutes) “Macron Declares War on the Unvaccinated ‘to the Bitter End'” “Coronavirus and the Holy Roman Empire” [51:34] Premature Non-COVID Deaths (4 minutes) “America Is Suffering ‘Mass Formation Psychosis'”

Africa Today
Nigeria classifies bandits as terrorist groups

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 22:03


The Nigerian government has classified bandits responsible for kidnappings and attacks as 'terrorist groups', paving the way for harsher penalties for those arrested. Ivorian ministers without a Covid-19 test certificate are prevented from attending a cabinet meeting. Our correspondents in Ethiopia, Nigeria, and Kenya give us their predictions for 2022.

Simple Flying Aviation News Podcast

We've reached 100 episodes of the Simple Flying podcast, and in this episode your hosts Jo and Tom discuss, Paint flaking on Boeing 787s Japanese Boeing 747 potato flights Birds killed in Berlin Hi Fly's new speed record Boeing 737 MAX in Ethiopia & Indonesia

Joni and Friends Radio
Heart for the Disabled: Tamene and Tigist

Joni and Friends Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 4:00


Send your Valentine to Tamene and Tigist at Joni and Friends, PO Box 3333, Agoura Hills, CA 91376. See their photo at joniradio.org.

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts
COI #211: Israel Panics Over Critique of Apartheid Policies

The Libertarian Institute - All Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 76:12


On COI #211, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman discuss Israeli apartheid and why Tel Aviv's worries that awareness of their regime's brutality will spread this year. Kyle and Connor then update the JCPOA talks, the slight potential for peace on the Korean Peninsula, and the latest on tensions in Africa highlighting Sudan's unrest. Connor details how a prisoner's 141 day hunger strike is exposing Israel's longstanding policy of indefinitely locking up Palestinians without charges or trials. Israel is buying more U.S. arms and bombing the Gaza concentration camp. Tel Aviv's top diplomat is greatly concerned over the UN's coming investigations into Israeli war crimes.  Connor also updates the Vienna talks and Israel's latest threat to attack Iran without first warning the United States. Kyle talks South Korean President Moon Jae-in's efforts, before his term ends, to work with Pyongyang, Washington, and Beijing to bring about the Korean War's formal end. Kyle covers Sudan's ongoing turmoil since last year's military coup. The Sudanese President has stepped down and the protesters are now demanding an end to Khartoum's international military aid.  Kyle then breaks down the latest news on conflicts in various African countries including Somalia, the Congo, and Ethiopia. Odysee Rumble  Donate LBRY Credits bTTEiLoteVdMbLS7YqDVSZyjEY1eMgW7CP Donate Bitcoin 36PP4kT28jjUZcL44dXDonFwrVVDHntsrk Donate Bitcoin Cash Qp6gznu4xm97cj7j9vqepqxcfuctq2exvvqu7aamz6 Patreon Subscribe Star YouTube Facebook  Twitter  MeWe Apple Podcast  Amazon Music Google Podcasts Spotify iHeart Radio Support Our Sponsor Visit Paloma Verde and use code PEACE for 25% off our CBD  

Airplane Geeks Podcast
685 Aircraft Management

Airplane Geeks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 97:57


An air race champion and CEO of an aircraft management company describes the business. Also, flight cancellations, 737 MAX flights to resume in Ethiopia and Indonesia, more 5G drama, adaptive cycle engines for military applications.

Conflicts of Interest
Israel Panics Over Critique of Apartheid Policies

Conflicts of Interest

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 76:13


On COI #211, Kyle Anzalone and Connor Freeman discuss Israeli apartheid and why Tel Aviv's worries that awareness of their regime's brutality will spread this year. Kyle and Connor then update the JCPOA talks, the slight potential for peace on the Korean Peninsula, and the latest on tensions in Africa highlighting Sudan's unrest. Connor details how a prisoner's 141 day hunger strike is exposing Israel's longstanding policy of indefinitely locking up Palestinians without charges or trials. Israel is buying more U.S. arms and bombing the Gaza concentration camp. Tel Aviv's top diplomat is greatly concerned over the UN's coming investigations into Israeli war crimes.  Connor also updates the Vienna talks and Israel's latest threat to attack Iran without first warning the United States. Kyle talks South Korean President Moon Jae-in's efforts, before his term ends, to work with Pyongyang, Washington, and Beijing to bring about the Korean War's formal end. Kyle covers Sudan's ongoing turmoil since last year's military coup. The Sudanese President has stepped down and the protesters are now demanding an end to Khartoum's international military aid.  Kyle then breaks down the latest news on conflicts in various African countries including Somalia, the Congo, and Ethiopia.

Inside Running Podcast
218: Kristian from Norway returns

Inside Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 101:59


218: Kristian from Norway returns   Brad cross-trains through the week. Julian starts the week with a win at the Anglesea Roo Run. Kristian Ulriksen from Norway joins from Barcelona where he ran a road 5k PB at Cursa Del Nassos. He gives a lot of insight to the Ingebrigtsen/Norwegian way of training and some of his plans for the upcoming months. Road 5K World Records fell from Ethiopian duo Berihew Aregawi and Ejegayehu Taye. Berihew Aregawi broke Joshua Cheptegei's record in 12:49 while Ejegayehu Taye ran 14:19. World Athletics Report   San Silvestre Vallecana 10k on New Year's Eve taken out by Degitu Azimeraw of Ethiopia and Mohamad Katir of Spain. World Athletics Report   Stewy McSweyn runs off scratch at the Burnie Gift Mile TAL Results Listener Question asks what Australia's Distance Medley Relay would look like and Moose wonders what the hell is happening in intense Strava conversations that aren't English. Patreon Link: https://www.patreon.com/insiderunningpodcast Opening and Closing Music is Undercover of my Skin by Benny Walker. www.bennywalkermusic.com For shoes or running apparel contact Julian at: https://www.facebook.com/therunningcompanyballarat/ Join the conversation at: https://www.facebook.com/insiderunningpodcast/ To donate and show your support for the show: https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=9K9WQCZNA2KAN

The Readout
IRC CEO David Miliband “Global System Failure”

The Readout

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 30:31


International Rescue Committee (IRC) president and CEO David Miliband joins the podcast to discuss the IRC's Annual Emergency Watchlist report. According to the new report, the IRC finds global “system failure” driving record levels of humanitarian need and that Afghanistan, Ethiopia, and Yemen top the list of countries most at risk of deteriorating humanitarian crises in 2022.

All Of It
The World of 'Khat' in Ethiopia Examined in 'Faya Dayi'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 14:10


Filmmaker Jessica Beshir makes her feature-length debut with the documentary, "Faya Dayi." In the documentary Beshir returns to her birthplace, Ethiopia, to explore the world around 'khat,' a stimulant leaf, that is both culturally and religiously significant, but also the country's biggest cash crop. Beshir joins us to discuss the documentary, fresh off it earning a spot on the 2022 Oscar's Best Documentary Feature shortlist. "Faya Dayi" is available to stream on the Criterion Channel.

Your Brain on Facts
Very New Year

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 18:58


Happy new year!  Or is it?  It depends on which calendar you're using. Like what you hear?  Become a patron of the arts for as little as $2 a month!   Or buy the book or some merch.  Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Music: Kevin MacLeod, David Fesliyan.   Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram. Links to all the research resources are on the website.   On Monday this December 30th past, I clocked in at my retail jobs, put on my headset, and played the morning messages.  There was one from my manager telling us what to expect in terms of sales volume that day and one from corporate welcoming us to the first day of 2020.  The didn't get their dates mixed up.  December 30th 2019 was the first day of 2020 in a way that once crashed Twitter for hours.  My name…   When we think of the calendar, we think of it as singular and exclusive.  “The” calendar.  Sure, there were other calendars, but those were for old-timey people in old-timey times.  If you've ever listened to the show before, you'll know I'm about to disabuse you of that notion; it's kinda my schtick.  The calendar we think of as the end all and be all of organizing time into little squares is the Gregorian calendar, but it's just one of many that have been used and still are used today.   For example, at the time of this recording, it's currently the 27th day of the month of Tevet in the year 5782 for those who follow the Hebrew calendar.  The Hebrew calendar, also known as the Jewish calendar, was originally created before the year 10 CE.  It first used lunar months, which will surprise no one who has had to google when Passover or Easter are each year.  A standard Jewish year has twelve months; six twenty-nine-day months, and six thirty-day months, for a total of 354 days.  This is because the months follow the lunar orbit, which is on average 29.5 days.  Due to variations in the Jewish calendar, the year could also be 353 or 355 days.  It also used standard calendar years, but these two methods don't line up perfectly, and this posed a problem.  As time went on, the shorter lunar calendar would result in holy days shifting forward in time from year to year.  That simply wouldn't do as certain holidays have to be celebrated in a certain season, like Passover in the spring, Tu B'Shevat, the Jewish 'New Year for Trees,' which  needs to fall around the time that trees in the Middle East come out of their winter dormancy, or Sukkot, the festival that calls adherents to build and live in huts in their yard to commemorate Isrealites taking shelter in the wilderness, which is meant to fall in autumn.  So a thirteenth month had to be added every 3 to 4 years in order to make up for the difference.  Such a year is called a shanah meuberet ("pregnant year") in Hebrew; in English we call it a leap year, and it makes up all the lunar calendar's lost days.  The month is added to Adar, the last of the twelve months. On leap years we observe two Adars — Adar I and Adar II.  Today, the Hebrew calendar is used primarily to determine the dates for Jewish religious holidays and to select appropriate religious readings for the day.   Similar in usage is the Hijri calendar, or Islamic calendar.  It's based on lunar phases, using a system of 12 months and either 354 or 355 days every year.  The first Islamic year was 622 CE when the prophet Muhammad emigrated from Mecca to Medina, meaning today is the Jumada I 28, 1443 .  The Hijri calendar is used to identify Islamic holidays and festivals.  The Islamic New Year marks the journey of the prophet Muhammad from Mecca to Medina.  However, the occasion and the sacred month of Muharram are observed differently by the two largest branches of Islam, Shiite and Sunni.  Shiite pilgrims journey to their holiest sites to commemorate a seventh-century battle, while Sunnis fast to celebrate the victory of Moses over an Egyptian pharaoh.  Also known as the Persian calendar, it's the official calendar used in Iran and Afghanistan, and it's the most accurate calendar system going, but more on that later.   Further east you'll encounter the Buddhist calendar, which is used throughout Southeast Asia.  This uses the sidereal year, the time it takes Earth to orbit the sun, as the solar year.  Like other systems, the calendar does not try to stay in sync with this time measurement, but unlike the others, no extra days or months have been added, so the Buddhist calendar is slowly moving out of alignment at a pace of around one day every century.  Today, the traditional Buddhist lunisolar calendar is used mainly for Theravada Buddhist festivals, and no longer has the official calendar status anywhere. The Thai Buddhist Era, a renumbered Gregorian calendar, is the official calendar in Thailand.  The Buddhist calendar is based on an older Hindu calendar, of which there are actually three -- Vikram Samvat, Shaka Samvat, and Kali Yuga.  The Vikram Samvat is used in Nepal and some Indian states, and uses lunar months and the sidereal year to track time.  Sidereal means based on fixed stars and constellations, rather than celestial things on the move, like planets.  The Shaka Samvat, used officially in India and by Hindus in Java and Bali, has months based around the tropical zodiac signs rather than the sidereal year.  The Kali Yuga is a different sort of calendar altogether.  It meters out the last of the four stages (or ages or yugas) the world goes through as part of a 'cycle of yugas' (i.e. mahayuga) described in the Sanskrit scriptures. The Kali Yuga, began at midnight (00:00) on 18 February 3102 BCE,  is the final cycle within the 4-cycle Yuga era. The first cycle is the age of truth and perfection, the second cycle is the age of emperors and war, the third stage is the age of disease and discontent, and the third stage (the Kali Yuga) is the age of ignorance and darkness.  If you're worried because you already missed 5,000 years of the Yuga, don't fret; you have upwards of 467,000 years left.     You've probably heard of Chinese New Year, so you won't be surprised that there is a Chinese calendar.  According to this system, each month begins on the day when the moon is in the "new moon" phase. The beginning of a new year is also marked by the position of the moon and occurs when the moon is midway between the winter solstice and spring equinox.  China uses the Gregorian calendar for official things, but still uses the Chinese calendar is used to celebrate holidays.   You might be surprised to learn about the Ethiopian calendar.  The Ethiopian calendar is quite similar to the Julian calendar, the predecessor to the Gregorian calendar most countries use today.  Like the other calendars we've discussed, it's intertwined with the faith of the people.  The first day of the week for instance, called Ehud, translates as ‘the first day‘ in the ancient Ge'ez language, the liturgical language of the Ethiopian church.  It is meant to show that Ehud is the first day on which God started creating the heavens and the earth.  The calendar system starts with the idea that Adam and Eve lived in the Garden of Eden for seven years before they were banished for 5,500 for their sins.  Both the Gregorian and Ethiopian use the birthdate of Jesus Christ as a starting point, what Eddie Izzard called “the big BC/AD change-over,” though the Ethiopian Orthodox Church believes Jesus was born 7 years earlier than the Gregorian calendar says.  The Ethiopian calendar has 13 months in a year, 12 of which have 30 days. The last month, called Pagume, has five days, and six days in a leap year.   Not only do the months have names, so do the years.  The first year after an Ethiopian leap year is named the John year, and is followed by the Matthew year, then Mark, then Luke.  Sept. 11 marks the day of the new year in Ethiopia.  By this time, the lengthy rainy season has come to a close, leaving behind a countryside flourishing in yellow daisies. That's fitting because Enkutatash in Amharic, the native language of Ethiopia, translates to “gift of jewels.” To celebrate New Year's, Ethiopians sing songs unique to the day and exchange bouquets of flowers. Of course, there is plenty of eating and drinking, too.   So what about this Gregorian calendar I keep mentioning?  The Gregorian calendar was created in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII, who made some changes to the previously used Julian calendar.  Okay, so what was the Julian calendar?  It should shock no one that the Julian calendar was ordered by and named after Julius Caesar.  By the 40s BCE the Roman civic calendar was three months ahead of the solar calendar.  The Alexandrian astronomer Sosigenes, introduced the Egyptian solar calendar, taking the length of the solar year as 365 1/4 days.  The year was divided into 12 months, all of which had either 30 or 31 days except February, which contained 28 days in common (365 day) years and 29 in every fourth year (a leap year, of 366 days).  That 29th day wasn't February 29th, it was February 23rd a second time.  What a mess that would make, though that conflagration of confusion probably paled in comparison to to what Caesar did to align the civic and solar calendars--he added days to the year 46 BCE, so that it contained 445 days.  Unsurprisingly when you try to make such a large change to the daily lives of so many people in the days before electronic communication, it took over fifty years to get everybody on board.   Sosigenes had overestimated the length of the year by 11 minutes 14 seconds.  11 minutes doesn't mean much in a given year, but after, say, 1500 years, the seasons on your calendar no longer line up with the seasons of reality.  That matters when your most important holy day needs to happen at a certain time of year.  Enter Pope Gregory XIII, who wanted to stop Easter, which had been celebrated on March 21, from drifting any farther away from the spring Equinox.  Aloysus Lilius, the Italian scientist who developed the system Pope Gregory would unveil in 1582, realized that the addition of so many February 23rds made the calendar slightly too long. He devised a variation that adds leap days in years divisible by four, unless the year is also divisible by 100. If the year is also divisible by 400, a leap day is added regardless. [OS crash noise] Sorry about that.  While this formula may sound confusing, it did resolve the lag created by Caesar's earlier scheme—almost; Lilius' system was still off by 26 seconds.  As a result, in the years since Gregory introduced his calendar in 1582, a discrepancy of several hours has arisen.  We have some time before that really becomes an issue for the average person.  It will take until the year 4909 before the Gregorian calendar will be a full day ahead of the solar year.   Maths aside, not everyone was keen on Pope Gregory's plan.  His proclamation was what's known as a papal bull, an order that applies to the church by has no authority over non-Catholics.  That being said, the new calendar was quickly adopted by predominantly Catholic countries like Spain, Portugal and Italy, major world players at the time.  European Protestants, however, feared it was an attempt to silence their movement, a conspiracy to keep them down.  Maybe by making it hard to remember when meetings and protests were supposed to be, I'm not sure.  It wasn't until 1700 that Protestant Germany switched over, and England held out until 1752.  Those transitions didn't go smooth.  English citizens didn't take kindly to the act of Parliament that advanced their calendars from September 2 to September 14, overnight.  There are apocryphal tales of rioters in the streets, demanding that the government “give us our 11 days.” However, most historians now believe that these protests never occurred or were greatly exaggerated.  Some countries took even longer than Britain--the USSR didn't convert to the Gregorian calendar until 1918, even later than countries like Egypt and Japan.  On the other side of the Atlantic from the British non-protests, meanwhile, Benjamin Franklin welcomed the change, writing, “It is pleasant for an old man to be able to go to bed on September 2, and not have to get up until September 14.”   When Julius Caesar's reformed the calendar in 46 B.C., he established January 1 as the first of the year.  During the Middle Ages, however, European countries replaced it with days that carried greater religious significance, such as December 25 and March 25 (the Feast of the Annunciation).  I didn't google that one.  After my mom listens to this episode, she'll send me a gloriously incorrect speech-to-text message explaining it.  Different calendars mean different New Years days even now, and the ways in which people celebrate as as splendidly diverse as the people themselves.   The Coptic Egyptian Church celebrates the Coptic New Year (Anno Martyrus), or year of the martyrs on 11th of September. The Coptic calendar is the ancient Egyptian one of twelve 30-day months plus a "small" five-day month—six-day in a leap year.  The months retain their ancient Egyptian names which denote the gods and godesses of the Egyptians, and the year's three seasons, the inundation, cultivation, and harvest, are related to the Nile and the annual agricultural cycle.  But the Copts chose the year 284AD to mark the beginning of the calendar, since this year saw the seating of Diocletian as Rome's emperor and the consequent martyrdom of thousands upon thousands of Egypt's Christians.  Apart from the Church's celebration, Copts celebrate the New Year by eating red dates, which are in season, believing the red symbolises the martyrs' blood and the white date heart the martyrs' pure hearts.  Also, dates are delicious.    Bonus fact: You know that guy, Pope Francis?  He's not actually the pope.  The pope's proper title, according to the Vatican's website, is Bishop of Rome, Vicar of Jesus Christ, Successor of the Prince of the Apostles, Supreme Pontiff of the Universal Church, Primate of Italy, Archbishop and Metropolitan of the Roman Province, Sovereign of the State of Vatican City, Servant of the Servants of God.  'Pope' comes from the Italian 'papa.'  Francis is the Sancta Papa, the Holy Father.  The title of pope belongs to the head of the Coptic church.  So if anyone uses the rhetorical question “Is the pope Catholic?” to imply a ‘yes' answer, you have my authorization to bring the conversation to a screeching halt by saying “No.  No, he's not.”  Double points if you simply walk away without explaining yourself.

By Any Means Necessary
New Year, Same Challenges For Anti-Imperialist Movements

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 114:16


In this episode of By Any Means Necessary, hosts Sean Blackmon and Jacquie Luqman are joined by Dave Lindorff, investigative journalist, Editor of the online publication ThisCantBeHappening.net and 2019 winner of an “Izzy” Award for Outstanding Independent Media to discuss the Department of Defense's failure of another audit, the exorbitant amounts of money lost by the DoD and the amount of money going into the department during a time of so-called peace, and the continuous use of the Pentagon budget for weapons that have the potential to annihilate the world.In the second segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by K.J. Noh,a scholar, educator and journalist focusing on the political economy and geopolitics of the Asia-Pacific. He's also a member of Veterans for Peace, and senior correspondent with Flashpoints on KPFA to discuss the stark differences between US and Chinese responses to COVID-19 as evidenced by the lockdown in Xi'an, the United States' demonization of China for mounting a public-health-minded response to outbreaks as cases in the US mount, and the racist prosecution of ethnic Chinese scientists and academics under the China Initiative.In the third segment, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Josh Gomez, producer for By Any Means Necessary to discuss the recently released film Spider-Man: No Way Home, its themes of redemption and maturity, and how Marvel's Spider-Man compares to past iterations of the character.Later in the show, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Eugene Puryear, host of the Punch Out podcast on Breakthrough News and author of the book Shackled and Chained: Mass Incarceration in Capitalist America to discuss the resignation of Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and what it means for the future of Sudan as the Sudanese people fight for civilian control, the removal of Ethiopia from the AGOA free trade program and the impact that will have on Ethiopians, the political situation in Somalia and the instability caused by US imperialism in the horn of Africa and around the world, how the anti-imperialist movement should orient itself in the current conditions of imperialism, and the disgusting accumulation of wealth by the ten richest billionaires as millions suffer under the capitalist system.

The Next Trip - An Aviation and Travel Podcast
Boarding Pass 110: AvGeek Bill of Rights

The Next Trip - An Aviation and Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 60:58


We dive into the new year with our predictions for the top aviation stories of 2022.  Our main topic is the 777 and its ups and downs, pun intended, with PW4000 777's expected to return service while the 777x sees certification delays. We end the episode with our “demands” in our Avgeek Bill of Rights. Other topics discussed:Our last flights of 2021Omicron hits crews and causes cancelationsIndonesia and Ethiopia approve 737 Max operationsThe GE90-94B reaches 100,000 flight hoursJoin the conversation! https://www.nexttripnetwork.com/

eCommerce MasterPlan
JGS Ian Bentley put sustainability at the heart of Parker Clay - and they've doubled sales every year

eCommerce MasterPlan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 41:57


Ian Bentley is the Co-founder and CEO at Parker Clay. Parker Clay sells handcrafted leather goods made in Ethiopia and is on a mission to create a better bag for a better world. Something they're clearly doing well at as in 2021 they won the B Corp “Best for the World” award for their community impact efforts. Founded in 2014 they have been consistently doubling the business and now have a global team of over 200 people. A truly inspiring story. JGS This is the first of our 2022 January Growth Series - handpicked episodes selected to help you pull together the perfect plan for your business in 2022. We'll be releasing one every MONDAY and THURSDAY throughout January. Get all the links and resources we mention at https://ecommercemasterplan.com/podcast/?utm_source=captivate&utm_medium=episodenotes (eCommerceMasterPlan.com) This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis: Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy