Podcasts about Russian Empire

1721–1917 empire in Eurasia and North America

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Best podcasts about Russian Empire

Latest podcast episodes about Russian Empire

New Books in History
Andreea Kaltenbrunner, "For the Faith, Against the State: Old Calendarism in Romania (1924-1936)" (De Gruyter, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 34:03


In For the Faith, Against the State: Old Calendarism in Romania (1924-1936)* (De Gruyter, 2022), Andreea Kaltenbrunner uses Old Calendarism, a movement of orthodox believers against the introduction of a new church calendar, to show that the formation of the state and nation in "Greater Romania" also produced tensions among ethnic Romanians living in Bessarabia, which had been ruled by the the Russian Empire before 1919. While the new calendar was intended to signal Romania's symbolic orientation to the West, Old Calendarists perceived it as an imposed modernization and a departure from right-wing beliefs. The author examines the development of Old Calendarism and its suppression in the autumn of 1936 by the Romanian gendarmerie. The official church and the state lacked the initiatives and means to win peasants in the east of the country over to their Westernizing project. The price for the implementation of the symbolic reform was the turning away of the rural population of Bessarabia from the new state and from the official church, causing the to organize themselves through local networks and new religious movements. *Für den Glauben, gegen den Staat: Der Altkalendarismus in Rumänien (1924-1936) Roland Clark is a Reader in Modern European History at the University of Liverpool, a Senior Fellow with the Centre for Analysis of the Radical Right, and the Principal Investigator of an AHRC-funded project on European Fascist Movements. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Andreea Kaltenbrunner, "For the Faith, Against the State: Old Calendarism in Romania (1924-1936)" (De Gruyter, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 34:03


In For the Faith, Against the State: Old Calendarism in Romania (1924-1936)* (De Gruyter, 2022), Andreea Kaltenbrunner uses Old Calendarism, a movement of orthodox believers against the introduction of a new church calendar, to show that the formation of the state and nation in "Greater Romania" also produced tensions among ethnic Romanians living in Bessarabia, which had been ruled by the the Russian Empire before 1919. While the new calendar was intended to signal Romania's symbolic orientation to the West, Old Calendarists perceived it as an imposed modernization and a departure from right-wing beliefs. The author examines the development of Old Calendarism and its suppression in the autumn of 1936 by the Romanian gendarmerie. The official church and the state lacked the initiatives and means to win peasants in the east of the country over to their Westernizing project. The price for the implementation of the symbolic reform was the turning away of the rural population of Bessarabia from the new state and from the official church, causing the to organize themselves through local networks and new religious movements. *Für den Glauben, gegen den Staat: Der Altkalendarismus in Rumänien (1924-1936) Roland Clark is a Reader in Modern European History at the University of Liverpool, a Senior Fellow with the Centre for Analysis of the Radical Right, and the Principal Investigator of an AHRC-funded project on European Fascist Movements. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Haymarket Books Live
What is the Relevance of the Russian Revolution Today? A Debate w/ Kshama Sawant & Eric Blanc

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 79:11


Tune in for a debate between Kshama Sawant and Eric Blanc, on the relevance of the Russian Revolution Today. Few political questions from the 20th century were so fraught as how to understand the Russian Revolution. Inspiring example of workers throwing off the Tsarist yoke and rattling the foundations of capitalism, or well-spring of tyranny and the antithesis of the benighted values of ‘The West'? Even among its most ardent defenders debates raged about what lessons to draw from the experience of the revolution, and how (or whether) to replicate the organizational model of Lenin and the Bolshevik Party. Though these very questions animated several generations of activists and organizers on the Left in countries across the globe, how relevant are they for today's burgeoning socialist movement in a modern democratic state? What lessons can we apply to the current world situation? Taking as their starting point the ground-breaking contributions of Eric Blanc's Revolutionary Social Democracy, Blanc and Seattle's socialist city councilwoman Kshama Sawant will debate exactly what we can learn from the Russian Revolution for our contemporary struggles. Blanc and Sawant will be joined by Bryan Koulouris of Socialist Alternative, for a debate moderated by Bhaskar Sunkara. Get a copy of Revolutionary Social Democracy from Haymarket: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1907-revolutionary-social-democracy ———————————————————————————————— Speakers: Kshama Sawant is a Seattle city councilwoman and member of Socialist Alternative and the Democratic Socialists of America. Eric Blanc is the author of Revolutionary Social Democracy: Working-Class Politics Across the Russian Empire, 1882-1917, a member of Democratic Socialists of America, and an organizer with the Emergency Workplace Organizing Committee. Bryan Koulouris is the national organizer for Socialist Alternative, and an executive committee member of International Socialist Alternative Bhaskar Sunkara (moderator) is the founding editor of Jacobin and the author of The Socialist Manifesto: The Case for Radical Politics in an Era of Extreme Inequality. Watch the live event recording: Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

The Fight Site Podcast Network
TENGRIDOME Bonus: Ranting About Russia

The Fight Site Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2022 75:17


Iggy has been plenty busy for the last couple weeks, so he hasn't been able to really catch any of the fight events that happened, but seeing as he like many others has been cursed with living in interesting times, he has a lot of stories to tell about some OTHER events, particularly in regards to Russia, which he left almost immediately after it invaded Ukraine. Tune in as Iggy briefly explains what the hell's been happening to him for the past seven months and some of the reasons why. He also offers a brief overview of Russian history, particularly in the realm of some of its regions — such as his birthplace, the Republic of Buryatia, and the centuries-old tradition of Russian imperialism and chauvinism that still informs Kremlin's decisions. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/FightSitedotcom Support us on Patreon: patreon.com/fightsite If you wish to help us find Iggy a new home, please give these posts a read: https://www.thefight-site.com/home/reader-notice-fight-site-staff-member-needs-help-urgently https://www.thefight-site.com/home/reader-notice-fundraiser-update Support Iggy on Ko-Fi: https://ko-fi.com/iggytfs

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Is Anarchy Possible?

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 20:01


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

New Books in Economic and Business History
Ian W. Campbell, "Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 47:38


In Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917 (Cornell University Press, 2017), Ian W. Campbell investigates the connections between knowledge production and policy formation on the Kazak steppes of the Russian Empire. Hoping to better govern the region, tsarist officials were desperate to obtain reliable information about an unfamiliar environment and population. This thirst for knowledge created opportunities for Kazak intermediaries to represent themselves and their landscape to the tsarist state. Because tsarist officials were uncertain of what the steppe was, and disagreed on what could be made of it, Kazaks were able to be part of these debates, at times influencing the policies that were pursued.  Drawing on archival materials from Russia and Kazakhstan and a wide range of nineteenth-century periodicals in Russian and Kazak, Campbell tells a story that highlights the contingencies of and opportunities for cooperation with imperial rule. Kazak intermediaries were at first able to put forward their own idiosyncratic views on whether the steppe was to be Muslim or secular, whether it should be a center of stock-raising or of agriculture, and the extent to which local institutions needed to give way to imperial institutions. It was when the tsarist state was most confident in its knowledge of the steppe that it committed its gravest errors by alienating Kazak intermediaries and placing unbearable stresses on pastoral nomads. From the 1890s on, when the dominant visions in St. Petersburg were of large-scale peasant colonization of the steppe and its transformation into a hearth of sedentary agriculture, the same local knowledge that Kazaks had used to negotiate tsarist rule was transformed into a language of resistance. Maggie Freeman is a PhD student in the Department of Architecture at MIT. Her work focuses on histories of nomad-state relationships and uses of architecture in nomadic contexts, with a focus on the Middle East. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Ian W. Campbell, "Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 47:38


In Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917 (Cornell University Press, 2017), Ian W. Campbell investigates the connections between knowledge production and policy formation on the Kazak steppes of the Russian Empire. Hoping to better govern the region, tsarist officials were desperate to obtain reliable information about an unfamiliar environment and population. This thirst for knowledge created opportunities for Kazak intermediaries to represent themselves and their landscape to the tsarist state. Because tsarist officials were uncertain of what the steppe was, and disagreed on what could be made of it, Kazaks were able to be part of these debates, at times influencing the policies that were pursued.  Drawing on archival materials from Russia and Kazakhstan and a wide range of nineteenth-century periodicals in Russian and Kazak, Campbell tells a story that highlights the contingencies of and opportunities for cooperation with imperial rule. Kazak intermediaries were at first able to put forward their own idiosyncratic views on whether the steppe was to be Muslim or secular, whether it should be a center of stock-raising or of agriculture, and the extent to which local institutions needed to give way to imperial institutions. It was when the tsarist state was most confident in its knowledge of the steppe that it committed its gravest errors by alienating Kazak intermediaries and placing unbearable stresses on pastoral nomads. From the 1890s on, when the dominant visions in St. Petersburg were of large-scale peasant colonization of the steppe and its transformation into a hearth of sedentary agriculture, the same local knowledge that Kazaks had used to negotiate tsarist rule was transformed into a language of resistance. Maggie Freeman is a PhD student in the Department of Architecture at MIT. Her work focuses on histories of nomad-state relationships and uses of architecture in nomadic contexts, with a focus on the Middle East. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in History
Ian W. Campbell, "Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 47:38


In Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917 (Cornell University Press, 2017), Ian W. Campbell investigates the connections between knowledge production and policy formation on the Kazak steppes of the Russian Empire. Hoping to better govern the region, tsarist officials were desperate to obtain reliable information about an unfamiliar environment and population. This thirst for knowledge created opportunities for Kazak intermediaries to represent themselves and their landscape to the tsarist state. Because tsarist officials were uncertain of what the steppe was, and disagreed on what could be made of it, Kazaks were able to be part of these debates, at times influencing the policies that were pursued.  Drawing on archival materials from Russia and Kazakhstan and a wide range of nineteenth-century periodicals in Russian and Kazak, Campbell tells a story that highlights the contingencies of and opportunities for cooperation with imperial rule. Kazak intermediaries were at first able to put forward their own idiosyncratic views on whether the steppe was to be Muslim or secular, whether it should be a center of stock-raising or of agriculture, and the extent to which local institutions needed to give way to imperial institutions. It was when the tsarist state was most confident in its knowledge of the steppe that it committed its gravest errors by alienating Kazak intermediaries and placing unbearable stresses on pastoral nomads. From the 1890s on, when the dominant visions in St. Petersburg were of large-scale peasant colonization of the steppe and its transformation into a hearth of sedentary agriculture, the same local knowledge that Kazaks had used to negotiate tsarist rule was transformed into a language of resistance. Maggie Freeman is a PhD student in the Department of Architecture at MIT. Her work focuses on histories of nomad-state relationships and uses of architecture in nomadic contexts, with a focus on the Middle East. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Ian W. Campbell, "Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 47:38


In Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917 (Cornell University Press, 2017), Ian W. Campbell investigates the connections between knowledge production and policy formation on the Kazak steppes of the Russian Empire. Hoping to better govern the region, tsarist officials were desperate to obtain reliable information about an unfamiliar environment and population. This thirst for knowledge created opportunities for Kazak intermediaries to represent themselves and their landscape to the tsarist state. Because tsarist officials were uncertain of what the steppe was, and disagreed on what could be made of it, Kazaks were able to be part of these debates, at times influencing the policies that were pursued.  Drawing on archival materials from Russia and Kazakhstan and a wide range of nineteenth-century periodicals in Russian and Kazak, Campbell tells a story that highlights the contingencies of and opportunities for cooperation with imperial rule. Kazak intermediaries were at first able to put forward their own idiosyncratic views on whether the steppe was to be Muslim or secular, whether it should be a center of stock-raising or of agriculture, and the extent to which local institutions needed to give way to imperial institutions. It was when the tsarist state was most confident in its knowledge of the steppe that it committed its gravest errors by alienating Kazak intermediaries and placing unbearable stresses on pastoral nomads. From the 1890s on, when the dominant visions in St. Petersburg were of large-scale peasant colonization of the steppe and its transformation into a hearth of sedentary agriculture, the same local knowledge that Kazaks had used to negotiate tsarist rule was transformed into a language of resistance. Maggie Freeman is a PhD student in the Department of Architecture at MIT. Her work focuses on histories of nomad-state relationships and uses of architecture in nomadic contexts, with a focus on the Middle East. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Central Asian Studies
Ian W. Campbell, "Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Central Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 47:38


In Knowledge and the Ends of Empire: Kazak Intermediaries and Russian Rule on the Steppe, 1731-1917 (Cornell University Press, 2017), Ian W. Campbell investigates the connections between knowledge production and policy formation on the Kazak steppes of the Russian Empire. Hoping to better govern the region, tsarist officials were desperate to obtain reliable information about an unfamiliar environment and population. This thirst for knowledge created opportunities for Kazak intermediaries to represent themselves and their landscape to the tsarist state. Because tsarist officials were uncertain of what the steppe was, and disagreed on what could be made of it, Kazaks were able to be part of these debates, at times influencing the policies that were pursued.  Drawing on archival materials from Russia and Kazakhstan and a wide range of nineteenth-century periodicals in Russian and Kazak, Campbell tells a story that highlights the contingencies of and opportunities for cooperation with imperial rule. Kazak intermediaries were at first able to put forward their own idiosyncratic views on whether the steppe was to be Muslim or secular, whether it should be a center of stock-raising or of agriculture, and the extent to which local institutions needed to give way to imperial institutions. It was when the tsarist state was most confident in its knowledge of the steppe that it committed its gravest errors by alienating Kazak intermediaries and placing unbearable stresses on pastoral nomads. From the 1890s on, when the dominant visions in St. Petersburg were of large-scale peasant colonization of the steppe and its transformation into a hearth of sedentary agriculture, the same local knowledge that Kazaks had used to negotiate tsarist rule was transformed into a language of resistance. Maggie Freeman is a PhD student in the Department of Architecture at MIT. Her work focuses on histories of nomad-state relationships and uses of architecture in nomadic contexts, with a focus on the Middle East. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/central-asian-studies

Composers Datebook
Higdon welcomes Autumn

Composers Datebook

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 2:00 Very Popular


Synopsis As the season begins, we offer you this “Autumn Music” — a woodwind quintet by American composer Jennifer Higdon. Higdon says she wanted to write a companion piece to another famous woodwind quintet titled “Summer Music” by Samuel Barber. Higdon's “Autumn Music” was commissioned by Pi Kappa Lambda, the national music honorary society, and premiered at their 1994 national convention in Pittsburgh. “Autumn Music,” says Higdon, “is a sonic picture of the season of brilliant colors. The music of the first part represents the explosion of leaves and the crispness of the air of fall. As the music progresses, it becomes more spare and introspective, moving into a more melancholy and resigned feeling.” Jennifer Higdon was born in Brooklyn in 1962, and teaches at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Her chamber and orchestral pieces have been performed by ensembles coast to coast. She's also active as a performer and, as she explains, as an enthusiastic member of the audience: “I love exploring new works — my own pieces and the music of others — in a general audience setting, just to feel a communal reaction to new sounds. Music speaks to all age levels and all kinds of experiences in our lives. I think it can express anything and everything.” Music Played in Today's Program Jennifer Higdon (b. 1962): Autumn Music –Moran Woodwind Quintet (Crystal 754) On This Day Births 1875 - Lithuanian composer Mikolajus Ciurlionis, in Varena (then the Kaunas province of the Russian Empire; Julian date: Sept. 10); 1933 - Spanish composer Leonardo Balada, in Barcelona; 1961 - American composer Michael Torke, in Milwaukee, Wisc.; Deaths 1989 - American song composer Irving Berlin, age 101, in New York City; Premieres 1869 - Wagner: opera, "Das Rheingold," in Munich at the Hoftheater, Franz Wüllner conducting; The opera was performed at the Bavarian emperor Ludwig II's request, but against the composer's wishes; 1938 - Webern: String Quartet, Op. 28, at South Mountain, Pittsfield, Mass., during the Berkshire Chamber Music Festival; This work was commissioned for $750 by the American music patron, Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge; 1964 - Jerry Bock: musical "Fiddler On the Roof" opens on Broadway: It would run for 3,242 performances before closing; 1971 - Barber: "The Lovers" for solo voice and chorus (after a poem by Pablo Neruda), in Philadelphia; 1989 - Bernstein: "Arias and Barcarolles" (orchestrated version prepared by Bright Sheng), at the Tilles Center of Long Island University with the New York Chamber Symphony conducted by Gerard Schwarz and featuring vocalists Susan Graham and Kurt Ollmann; The first version of this work, for soloists and piano four-hands, premiered on May 9, 1988, at Equitable Center Auditorium in New York City; 1990 - James MacMillan: "The Beserking" (Piano Concerto), at Henry Wood Hall in Glasgow by pianist Peter Donohoue and the Royal Scottish Orchestra, Matthias Bamert conducting; 1990 - Christopher Rouse: "Jagannath" for orchestra, by the Houston Symphony Orchestra, Christoph Eschenbach conducting; 2000 - Philip Glass: “Tirol Concerto” for piano and orchestra, by Dennis Russell Davies (piano and conductor) with the Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra, at the 7th annual Klangspuren Festival in Schwaz, Tirol (Austria); 2000 - Zwilich: "Millennium Fantasy" for piano and orchestra, by the Cincinnati Symphony, Jesús Lopez-Cobos conducting with soloist Jeffrey Biegel; Others 1937 - During the Spanish Civil War, Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas conducts his 1935 composition “Homage to Federico Garcia Lorca” in Madrid while the city was under siege by Spanish fascist forces; The Spanish poet Lorca had been killed by the Falangists; Links and Resources On Jennifer Higdon On Barber's "Summer Music"

Values & Politics
Putin's Story is Crushing Our Green Story

Values & Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 28:55


Putin is attempting to take over some of the largest deposits of rare earths, lithium, manganese, coal, natural gas, iron, titanium, etc. in the world. Many of these minerals are needed for our green evolution. And yet, we chose to believe Putin is just a madman trying to restore the Russian Empire. Perhaps, both stories could be true. In either case, trillions of dollars of raw materials needed for our green evolution are at stake. Perhaps, that is one of the reasons our military is so supportive of Ukraine. Let's get the word out that we need the raw materials in Ukraine for our Green Evolution. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/whiteguy/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/whiteguy/support

The Authors Unite Show
Henry Shukman: Zen, Koans, Midnfulness and Awakening To Original Love

The Authors Unite Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 64:10


Henry Shukman (born 1962 in Oxford, Oxfordshire) is an English poet and writer. He was educated at the Dragon School, Oxford. His father was the historian Harold Shukman and his brother is the BBC News reporter David Shukman. He is of Jewish ancestry – his grandfather, David Shukman, was part of the Jewish community who lived in Baranow, Congress Poland which was then part of the Russian Empire, before emigrating and settling in the United Kingdom. This episode is brought to you by Authors Unite. Authors Unite provides you with all the resources you need to become a successful author. You can learn more about Authors Unite here: https://authorsunite.com/​​​​​​​​ Make sure to subscribe so you don't miss out on my future videos. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/authorsunite/support

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - What is Anarchism?

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 7:54


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Ukraine 242 Podcast
WHY RUSSIA & UKRAINE DIVERGE ON UKRAINE'S PLACE IN THE WORLD with COLLEEN LUCEY

Ukraine 242 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 29:00


Assistant Professor of Russian and Slavic Studies at the U. of Arizona Dr. Colleen Lucey discusses the historical relationship between Russia and Ukraine. She gives insight into why Ukrainians see themselves as independent and why Russia sees Ukrainians as belonging to the Russian Empire.A specialist in Russian literature and visual culture of the long nineteenth century, Dr. Lucey publishes on works by both canonical writers (Fyodor Dostoevsky, Lev Tolstoy) and the texts of their lesser-known contemporaries (Avdot'ia Panaeva, Nadezhda Khvoshchinskaia). In addition to the representation of commercial sex in literature and art, her research and teaching interests include the history of Russian theatre and performance (from the nineteenth century to the present), and Russian language instruction.

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - The Dictatorship at Work

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 20:29


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

99 ZU EINS
Episode 173: [ENG] Revolutionary Social democracy w/ Eric Blanc

99 ZU EINS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 54:00


Through extensive archival research in eight different languages, Revolutionary Social Democracy introduces readers to the politics and practices of socialists in Tsarist Russia's imperial borderlands. These parties fought for democracy and workers' power across the entire span of the Russian Empire—from the factories of Warsaw, to the oil fields of Baku, to the autonomous parliament of Finland. Eric Blanc's incisive study of these parties shows that the Russian Revolution was far less Russian than is commonly assumed. And the implications of this discovery challenge the long-held assumptions of historians, sociologists, and activists about the dynamics of revolutionary change under both autocratic and democratic conditions. Wir sind 99 ZU EINS! Ein Podcast mit Kommentaren zu aktuellen Geschehnissen, sowie Analysen und Interviews zu den wichtigsten politischen Aufgaben unserer Zeit.#leftisbest #linksbringts #machsmitlinks Wir brauchen eure Hilfe! So könnt ihr uns unterstützen: 1. Bitte abonniert unseren Kanal und liked unsere Videos. 2. Teil unseren content auf social media und folgt uns auch auf Twitter, Instagram und FB 3. Wenn ihr Zugang zu unserer Discord-Community, sowie exklusive After-Show Episoden und Einladungen in unsere Livestreams bekommen wollt, dann unterstützt uns doch bitte auf Patreon: www.patreon.com/99zueins 4. Wir empfangen auch Spenden unter: https://www.paypal.com/donate/?hostedbuttonid=NSABEZ5567QZE

Sofa King Podcast
A Sofa King Classic: Joseph Stalin

Sofa King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 86:13


Daves not here man .... This episode of the Sofa King Podcast is a discussion of the brutal regime of the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin. Born Josef Vissarionovich Djugashvili in December of 1878, he changed his name to Koba (a sort of Russian Robin Hood) and eventually settled on the new name of Stalin which meant “Man of Steel.” He was born to ordinary parents, but had a series of health complications as a child and a strange relationship with his mother, who wanted him to become a priest. If you've listened to our other podcasts about cult leaders, serial killers, and madmen, this childhood is the perfect recipe! Eventually, he went to the seminary study religion, but he ended up stopping. Some say he quit, others that he was expelled for lack of tuition, and some that he was booted for starting to join the early days of the Russian Revolution. Either way, he became an influential member of the early revolution, and he started leading guerrilla attacks and even famously robbed a bank to help fund the cause. Once Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin headed the revolution that brought down the Russian Empire and started the Soviet Union, Stalin's true colors started to show. He slowly consolidated a power-base of loyal people around him in government, so that when Lenin died, he was able to take power over the newly-formed nation. From here, he started his history of purges and death to his own people. He eliminated all political resistance via firing squads, gulags, and forced deportation, and he ruled the USSR with an iron grasp. He restructured the nation to be an industrial powerhouse instead of a farming-based economy, a decision which caused the greatest man-made famine in the history of humanity (thought to have killed between 7-10 million Ukrainians, Russians, and Soviets). How did so many Soviets starve to death while the country still made a profit selling foodstuffs to other nations? How many Soviets was Stalin responsible for killing? Was his death caused by natural causes, or was it an assassination? Was he a hero or one of the worst villains in history? Listen, laugh, learn.

History Notes
Soviet Ukraine in a Nutshell

History Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 7:32


When the Russian Empire collapsed in 1917 during World War I, the lands of today's Ukraine became a battleground of violence and instability until 1922. Multiple communities of former tsarist imperial subjects imagined the future in radically different ways. Written by Mayhill Fowler. Narration by Dr. Nicholas B. Breyfogle. A textual version of this video is available at origins.osu.edu/read/soviet-ukraine-nutshell

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Revolution and Dictatorship

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 11:40


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

jon atack, family & friends
Putin's guru and the new Russian Empire with Joe Szimhart

jon atack, family & friends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 54:45


Putin's advisor Alexander Dugin wants to reclaim Russia's empire through conquest. He hates science and technology and longs for the time of Ivan the Terrible. He'd like to stop the machines, destroy the Internet and return the Russians to serfdom. Yet the Russians celebrate and support him. A discussion with Joe Szimhart.

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - The Bolsheviki

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2022 25:26


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Wizard of Ads
War And Peace

Wizard of Ads

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 4:55


Before Gandhi, there was Tolstoy.When Leo Tolstoy was 54, he wrote a book about the ethical teachings1 of Jesus as revealed in the Sermon on the Mount. For the rest of his life, Tolstoy advocated the use of peaceful, non-violent forms of resistance in the struggle for social change. Gandhi – the person we associate with peaceful, non-violent resistance – was 12 years old when Tolstoy's book was published. Martin Luther King – the man who popularized peaceful, non-violent resistance in America – would not be born for another 45 years. In 1854, during the Crimean War, a British light brigade was ordered to charge the cannons of the Russian Empire.A “light brigade” carried only light weapons, such as sabers and pistols. Alfred Lord Tennyson wrote about this famous headlong charge toward certain death: Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. “Forward, the Light Brigade! Charge for the guns!” he said. Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. “Forward, the Light Brigade!” Was there a man dismayed? Not though the soldier knew Someone had blundered. Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die. Into the valley of Death Rode the six hundred. Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them Volleyed and thundered; Stormed at with shot and shell, Boldly they rode and well, Into the jaws of Death, Into the mouth of hell Rode the six hundred… Leo Tolstoy was a Russian artillery officer in that war and was forever changed by it.That war – the first modern war – led Tolstoy to the Sermon on the Mount and convinced him of the truth of Jesus' words. “Blessed are the peacemakers… blessed are the meek… blessed are the merciful…” Tolstoy was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize 3 times, but each time he wrote to the committee and asked them to remove his name from consideration. When the public grew angry that Tolstoy never received the Nobel, he confessed that he had privately rejected it and wrote, “First, it has saved me the predicament of managing so much money, because such money, in my opinion, only brings evil. Secondly, I felt very honored to receive such sympathy from people I have not even met.” Tolstoy was loved by everyone except religious leaders. Remember that book he wrote in 1882 about the ethical teachings of Jesus? It did not appear in Russia for 24 years because it was blocked by the Orthodox Church, the leaders of the Christian faith in Russia. They were worried that Tolstoy might have been talking about them when he wrote, “I sit on a man's back, choking him and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am very sorry for him and wish to ease his lot by all possible means – except by getting off his back.” The religious leaders became angry again when Tolstoy wrote, “Everyone thinks of changing the world, but no one thinks of changing himself.” Mark Twain, a contemporary of Tolstoy, may well have been making a joke about religious leaders in America when he wrote, “By trying, we can easily learn to endure adversity. Another man's, I mean.” Tolstoy saw Jesus and his teachings as gold surrounded by the mud of religiosity. He said,“Truth, like gold, is to be obtained not by its growth, but by washing away from it all that is not gold.” This reminds me of Michelangelo's description of how he carved an angel from a block of marble: “I just removed everything that was not angel.” I will leave you now, to consider all that you have been told, and wash the mud from the gold, and remove everything that is not angel. Roy H. Williams 1 Tolstoy's A Confession, (1882) was originally titled, An Introduction to a Criticism of Dogmatic Theology. NOTE: https://chatbooks.com/app/share/volume/1b8390691d0047598a78427e91dd6773?id=17734771&key=z6NSc6o6q29LtV9moMlZuUb8xWdLIW6umI68OJqZ (Dogmatic Theology) has

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Between February and October

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2022 16:28


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

CounterVortex Podcast
Ukraine: debunking Russia's war propaganda

CounterVortex Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 21:12


In Episode 136 of the CounterVortex podcast, Bill Weinberg debunks Vladimir Putin's "de-Nazification" propaganda for his invasion of Ukraine, a paramount example of the ultra-cynical phenomenon of paradoxical fascist pseudo-anti-fascism. Putin's stated justifications for the Ukraine war are either paranoid delusions or outright lies. His real objectives are to rebuild the Russian Empire, re-establish the Russian dictatorship, and exterminate Ukraine as a cultural and political entity. These are the open aims of Alexander Dugin, the intellectual mastermind of Putin's revanchist imperial project, and the political heir of Ivan Ilyin, the 20th century theorist of "Russian Fascism." Listen on SoundCloud or via Patreon. https://www.patreon.com/countervortex Production by Chris Rywalt We ask listeners to donate just $1 per weekly podcast via Patreon -- or $2 for our new special offer! We now have 45 subscribers. If you appreciate our work, please become Number 46!

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - The February Revolution

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 14:43


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Wetwired
Episode 15: Grand Tartaria, Free Energy, and the Great Mud Flood - Conspiracy Skeptic Podcast

Wetwired

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 92:58


Trying to tell the story of Tartaria in a way that believers hold it is extremely difficult. The biggest issue is that the story of Tartaria is wildly disorganized. There isn't any single universally agreed upon story to tell. No one seems to have earnestly tried to build the timeline. So I might be one of the first to attempt to codify the lost history of Tartaria. I think the lack of a coherent timeline could well be the reason that the story of Tartaria and the alleged subsequent cover up of what people think of as the “true history” is what makes it all so attractive. You can plug in an alternate telling of virtually any historical event that happened in the last thousand years. Since most people don't know much about the history of the Russian Empire in the 19th century or what life was like for a nomadic tribe in Central Asia in the 1700s —that vague knowledge of world history makes many people ripe to receive the retelling from anyone confidently making shit up as they go along. Add to all that the fact that many of the authors and YouTubers who are doing most of the driving will often disagree on some of the details or just their own flourishes and speculations as they go. There's a tremendous amount of riffing that people do in these videos. You'll hear a lot of these presenters say something along the lines of, “you know, I haven't actually thought about it like this until just now.” And then they proceed to rattle off some previously unexplored connection between the Tartarian Empire and a secret, global consortium of Jews who opposed it. This is a truly crowdsourced conspiracy story, with thousands and thousands of people writing it collectively and simultaneously. Music: Nihilore - In the Belly of the Whale (CC-BY-4.0) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ ⛬ For $3 a month, get an extra couple subscriber only episodes every month. We have a limited number of True Believer memberships available. patreon.com/wetwired Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/wetwiredpod

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Socialism

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 40:38


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 11

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 54:16


Episode 99:This week we're continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith[Part 1]Introduction[Part 2-5]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905[Part 6-8]2. From Reform to War, 1906-1917[Part 9-10]3. From February to October 1917Dual PowerLenin and the BolsheviksThe Aspirations of Soldiers and WorkersThe Provisional Government in Crisis[Part 11 - This Week]Revolution in the Village - 0:25The Nationalist Challenge - 10:43Class, Nation and Gender - 26:04[Part 12]3. From February to October 1917[Part 13 - 16?]4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power[Part 17 - 19?]5. War Communism[Part 20 - 22?]6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy[Part 23 - 26?]7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture[Part 27?]ConclusionFootnotes:55) 0:32Orlando Figes, Peasant Russia, Civil War: The Volga Countryside in Revolution, 1917–1921 (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989); John Channon, ‘The Peasantry in the Revolutions of 1917', in E. R. Frankel et al. (eds), Revolution in Russia: Reassessments of 1917 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992), 105–30.56) 2:41Graeme J. Gill, Peasants and Government in the Russian Revolution (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1979), 46–63, 75–88.57) 3:29J. L. H. Keep, The Russian Revolution: A Study in Mass Mobilization (New York: Norton, 1976), 179.58) 5:35Keep, Russian Revolution, 160.59) 7:52Channon, ‘The Landowners', in Service (ed.), Society and Politics in the Russian Revolution, 120–46.60) 8:47Aaron B. Retish, Russia's Peasants in Revolution and Civil War: Citizenship, Identity, and the Creation of the Soviet State, 1914–1922 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008); John Channon, ‘The Bolsheviks and the Peasantry: The Land Question during the First Eight Months of Soviet Rule', Slavonic and East European Review, 66:4 (1988), 593–624.61) 10:20V. V. Kabanov, Krest'ianskaia obshchina i kooperatsiia Rossii XX veka (Moscow: RAN, 1997), 81.62) 10:59Ronald G. Suny, ‘Nationalism and Class in the Russian Revolution: A Comparative Discussion', in Frankel et al. (eds), Revolution in Russia, 219–46; Ronald G. Suny, The Revenge of the Past: Nationalism, Revolution and the Collapse of the Soviet Union (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1993), ch. 2.63) 11:21Mark von Hagen, ‘The Great War and the Mobilization of Ethnicity in the Russian Empire', in B. R. Rubin and Jack Snyder (eds), Post-Soviet Political Order: Conflict and State Building (London: Routledge, 1998), 34–57.64) 12:58John Reshetar, The Ukrainian Revolution, 1917–1920 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1952); Bohdan Krawchenko, Social Change and National Consciousness in Twentieth-Century Ukraine (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1985), ch. 1.65) 15:35Steven L. Guthier, ‘The Popular Base of Ukrainian Nationalism in 1917', Slavic Review, 38:1 (1979).66) 16:11David G. Kirby, Finland in the Twentieth Century (London: Hurst, 1979), 46; Anthony F. Upton, The Finnish Revolution, 1917–1918 (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1980), ch. 6.67) 22:57Ronald G. Suny, The Making of the Georgian Nation (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1988), ch. 9.68) 24:06Tadeusz Świętochowski, Russian Azerbaijan, 1905–1920: The Shaping of National Identity in a Muslim Community (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985), ch. 4.69) 29:23Boris I. Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda and Anti-“Burzhui” Consciousness in 1917', Russian Review, 53 (1994), 183–96 (187–8).70) 29:44Donald J. Raleigh, Revolution on the Volga: 1917 in Saratov (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1986).71) 30:20T. A. Abrosimova, ‘Sotsialisticheskaia ideeia v massovom soznanii 1917g.', in Anatomiia revoliutsii. 1917 god v Rossii: massy, partii, vlast' (St Petersburg: Glagol', 1994), 176–87 (177).72) 30:46Steinberg, Voices, 17.73) 31:22Michael C. Hickey, ‘The Rise and Fall of Smolensk's Moderate Socialists: The Politics of Class and the Rhetoric of Crisis in 1917', in Donald J. Raleigh (ed.), Provincial Landscapes: Local Dimensions of Soviet Power, 1917–53 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001), 14–35.74) 32:57Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda', 190, 191.75) 32:49Kolonitskii, ‘Antibourgeois Propaganda', 189.76) 33:00Figes and Kolonitskii, Interpreting, 154.77) 34:00A. Ia. Livshin and I. B. Orlov, ‘Revolutsiia i spravedlivost': posleoktiabr'skie “pis'ma vo vlast' ”, in 1917 god v sud'bakh Rossii i mira: Oktiabr'skaia revoliutsiia (Moscow: RAN, 1998), 254, 255, 259.78) 34:12Howard White, ‘The Urban Middle Classes', in Service (ed.), Society and Politics in the Russian Revolution, 64–85.79) 34:35Bor'ba za massy v trekh revoliutsiiakh v Rossii: proletariat i srednie gorodskie sloi (Moscow: Mysl', 1981), 19.80) 35:18O. N. Znamenskii, Intelligentsiia nakanune velikogo oktiabria (fevral'-oktiabr' 1917g.) (Leningrad: Nauka, 1988), 8–9.81) 35:53Bor'ba za massy, 169.82) 36:45Michael C. Hickey, Competing Voices from the Russian Revolution (Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2011), 387.83) 38:05Michael Hickey, ‘Discourses of Public Identity and Liberalism in the February Revolution: Smolensk, Spring 1917', Russian Review, 55:4 (1996), 615–37 (620); V. V. Kanishchev, ‘ “Melkoburzhuaznaia kontrrevoliutsiia”: soprotivlenie gorodskikh srednikh sloev stanovleniiu “diktatury proletariata” (oktiab'r 1917–avgust 1918g.)', in 1917 god v sud'bakh Rossii i mira, 174–87.84) 39:14Stockdale, Paul Miliukov, 258.85) 40:53Revoliutsionnoe dvizhenie v avguste 1917g. (razgrom Kornilovskogo miatezha) (Moscow: Izd-vo AN SSSR, 1959), 407.86) 41:58V. F. Shishkin, Velikii oktiabr' i proletarskii moral' (Moscow: Mysl', 1976), 57.87) 42:18Steinberg, Voices, 113.88) 44:32O. Ryvkin, ‘ “Detskie gody” Komsomola', Molodaia gvardiia, 7–8 (1923), 239–53 (244); Krupskaya, ‘Reminiscences of Lenin'.89) 45:58Ruthchild, Equality and Revolution, 227.90) 46:36Engel, Women in Russiā, 135; Ruthchild, Equality, 231.91) 47:49Jane McDermid and Anna Hillyard, Women and Work in Russia, 1880–1930 (Harlow: Longman, 1998), 167.92) 48:31Engel, Women in Russia, 141.93) 49:01Sarah Badcock, ‘Women, Protest, and Revolution: Soldiers' Wives in Russia during 1917', International Review of Social History, 49 (2004), 47–70.94) 49:19Steinberg, Voices, 98.95) 50:03D. P. Koenker and W. G. Rosenberg, Strikes and Revolution in Russia, 1917 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1989), 314.96) 50:21Smith, Red Petrograd, 193.97) 51:37Z. Lilina, Soldaty tyla: zhenskii trud vo vremia i posle voiny (Perm': Izd-vo Petrogradskogo Soveta, 1918), 8.98) 51:59L. G. Protasov, Vserossiiskoe uchreditel'noe sobranie: istoriia rozhdeniia i gibeli (Moscow: ROSSPEN, 1997), 233.99) 52:31Beate Fieseler, ‘The Making of Russian Female Social Democrats, 1890–1917', International Review of Social History, 34 (1989), 193–226.

Historically Thinking: Conversations about historical knowledge and how we achieve it

The Dictator and His Daughter (c. 1934) On the morning of November 10, 1918, the overnight train from Berlin arrived in Warsaw station. One of its passengers was Josef Pilsudski. For twenty-six years he had been striving for the liberation of Poland from the Russian Empire, and its re-creation as an independent state and culture. Now, at the end of that train journey, he not only found himself at long last in a free Poland but surrounded by ever-growing crowds that saw him as the leader of the new nation.  Pilsudski did become the leader and defender of that nation, and in 1922 ceded dictatorial powers to democratically elected representatives. Yet just four years later this avowed champion of democracy, pluralism, and federalism seized power in a coup, and ruled Poland as a dictator to his death in 1935. He imprisoned his enemies, suppressed the press, ignored the legislature, and turned old friends against him. ”So much did his style of rule change,” writes my guest Joshua Zimmerman, “that he is often portrayed as if he were two entirely different men…Poland's greatest champion for freedom and independence…abandoned the principle of democracy as freedom bound by the rule of law.”  Joshua Zimmerman is is Eli and Diana Zborowski Chair in Holocaust Studies and East European Jewish History and Professor of History at Yeshiva University. Two of his previous books include The Polish Underground and the Jews: 1939-1945, and Poles, Jews and the Politics of Nationality: The Bund and the Polish Socialist Party in Late Tsarist Russia, 1892-1914. Given that, it was as close to inevitable as a historian could allow that his most recent book would be Josef Pilsudski: Founding Father of Modern Poland. For Further Investigation Joshua Zimmerman recommends, for further reading about Pilsudski, Waclaw Jedrzejewicz, Pilsudski. A Life for Poland (New York: Hippocrene Books, 1981) and Antony Polonsky, Politics in Independent Poland (1972) You might also consult Norman Davies, God's Playground: A History of Poland. Volume II relates the story from 1795 to the present. The Jozef Pilsudski Institute of America George Washington had his seasoning; Josef Pilsudski has mustard. Earlier podcasts that recall some of the themes in this conversation are my discussion with David Bell in Episode 176 about his book Men on Horseback: Charisma and Power in the Age of Revolutions. While it ends long before Pilsudski's life, he also was a man on horseback. Also my conversation with Rick Hernandez way back in Episode 65 on the first year of the Russian Revolution.

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Whose is the Power?

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 13:42


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

I Spied
Cloudy with a chance of Snowdon

I Spied

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 23:49


In part two of our dive into at possibly the greatest intelligence heist in history, we look at what Edward Snowdon got and what it means for the US and its allies. What does it mean for the US intelligence community, what effects has it had on the US' enemies and what might it mean for Five Eyes members like Australia? And with Snowdon now living in Moscow has it helped or hindered Putin in his bid to recreate the glory of the Russian Empire? Who knew a thumb drive could cause so much damage? See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Thoth-Hermes Podcast
S8-E20 – Finnish Occultism-Vesa Iitti

Thoth-Hermes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 111:03


Welcome to the Secrets of the Occult Tradition of Finland! In this episode, Rudolf speaks to Vesa Iitti, one of the authors of an astonishing book on Finnish Occultism, its history, which is about a hundred years old, just like the young state of Finland. And regarding H.P. Blavatsky: Indeed, her theosophic movement was one of the early Western occultist movements that took roots in Finland. Finland has long been viewed as the land of sorcerers and shamans. Exploring the rich history of Finnish occultism, Perttu Häkkinen and Vesa Iitti examine the significant figures and groups of Finland's occult world from the late 19th century to the present day. They begin with Pekka Ervast, known as the Rudolf Steiner of the North, who was a major figure in Theosophy before starting a Rosicrucian group called Ruusu-Risti, and they look at the Finnish disciples of G. I. Gurdjieff and the grim case of the cult of Tattarisuo. Investigating the relationship of nationalism and esotericism in Finland, the authors tell the stories of Sigurd Wettenhovi-Aspa, who thought that Finns were the root of all Western civilization, and of Yrjö von Grönhagen, who became a close friend of Heinrich Himmler and Karl Maria Wiligut. They also explore the history of Finnish parapsychology, the Finnish UFO craze, and the unique evolution of Freemasonry in Finland, showing how, when the Masonic order was banned, adherents created a number of other secret societies, such as the Carpenter's Order, the Hypotenuse Order, and the Brotherhood of February 17--which later became hubs for the OTO and AMORC. Unveiling both the light and dark sides of modern esotericism in Finland, the authors show how, because of its unique position as partially European and partially Russian, Finland's occult influence extends into the very heart of left-hand and right-hand occult groups and secret societies around the world. So, altogether, a wonderful discovery trip to a wonderful place, at the time of the year when the sun hardly ever sets in Europe's North. And in the intro, Inner Traditions Acquisitions Editor Jon Graham will also tell us why he was particularly interested to get that book translated into English. Book page on the Inner Traditions website Music played in this episode Of course, this week's music comes from Finland! And of course, as I, Rudolf, picked it, it is a mix of Hard Rock - typical Finnish stuff - and classical - well, this one typical Finnish stuff as well! 1) LEMPO - Korpiklaani The foundation of Korpiklaani in 2003 in Lahti, Finland brought the traditional folk music back to life. No one could have foreseen that such a large audience would be interested in Finnish and English mythological texts!www.korpiklaani.com (Track starts at 7:42) 2) FINLANDIA - Jean Sibelius Finlandia, Op. 26, is a tone poem by the Finnish composer Jean Sibelius. It was written in 1899 and revised in 1900. The piece was composed for the Press Celebrations of 1899, a covert protest against increasing censorship from the Russian Empire, and was the last of seven pieces performed as an accompaniment to a tableau depicting episodes from Finnish history. (Source wikipedia)   (Track starts at 59:42) 3) SANATON MAA - Korpiklaani (Track starts at 1:41:08) Intro and Outro Musicespecially written and recorded for the Thoth-Hermes Podcast by Chris Roberts

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - The Trade Union

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 28:02


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

The John Batchelor Show
#Ukraine: The Kremlin wants the Empire back. . Professor H.J. Mackinder, International Relations. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 14:43


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Ukraine:  The Kremlin wants the Russian Empire back. .  Professor H.J. Mackinder, International Relations. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/world-news/vladimir-putin-to-halt-gas-germany-fears-its-not-coming-back/articleshow/92774593.cms

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Reformer and Politician

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 27:32


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Bob Sirott
Ukraine-Russia crisis update: What is Putin saying about Russian forces?

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022


Leftist Reading
Leftist Reading: Russia in Revolution Part 8

Leftist Reading

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 38:06


Episode 96:This week we're continuing Russia in Revolution An Empire in Crisis 1890 - 1928 by S. A. Smith[Part 1]Introduction[Part 2-5]1. Roots of Revolution, 1880s–1905[Part 6-7]2. From Reform to War, 1906-1917Prospects for ReformOn the Eve of WarFirst World War[Part 8 - This Week]2. From Reform to War, 1906–1917Politics and the Economy - 0:40[Part 9 - 11?]3. From February to October 1917[Part 12 - 15?]4. Civil War and Bolshevik Power[Part 16 - 18?]5. War Communism[Part 19 - 21?]6. The New Economic Policy: Politics and the Economy[Part 22 - 25?]7. The New Economic Policy: Society and Culture[Part 26?]ConclusionFootnotes:91) 1:36Kolonitskii, Tragicheskaia erotika, 396.92) 2:17Hubertus Jahn, Patriotic Culture in Russia during World War I (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1995).93) 3:03Lohr, Nationalizing the Russian Empire.94) 3:28Jahn, Patriotic Culture.95) 8:51Gatrell, Russia's First World War, 42–3.96) 9:01E. N. Burdzhalov, Russia's Second Revolution: The February 1917 Uprising in Petrograd, trans. and ed. Donald J. Raleigh (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1987), 60.97) 9:58Porshneva, Mentalitet, 191.98) 10:28Lewis Siegelbaum, The Politics of Industrial Mobilization in Russia, 1914–1917: A Study of the War Industries Committees (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1983), 165.99) 10:42David R. Jones, ‘Imperial Russia's Forces at War', in A. R. Millett and W. Murray (eds), Military Effectiveness, vol. 1: The First World War (Boston: Unwyn Hyman, 1988), 249–328 (260).100) 11:05Gatrell, Russia's First World War, 45.101) 11:34Andrei Markevich and Mark Harrison, ‘Great War, Civil War, and Recovery: Russia's National Income, 1913–1928', Journal of Economic History, 71:3 (2011), 672–703.102) 12:35Gatrell, ‘Tsarist Russia at War', 693.103) 12:51Jones, ‘Imperial Russia's Forces', 271.104) 13:08Gatrell, Russia's First World War, 126.105) 13:27Gatrell, Russia's First World War, 136.106) 14:07Jones, ‘Imperial Russia's Forces', 260.107) 14:14Gatrell, ‘Poor Russia', 247.108) 14:26Yanni Kotsonis, States of Obligation: Taxes and Citizenship in the Russian Empire and Early Soviet Republic (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2014).109) 15:06Steven G. Marks, ‘War Finance (Russian Empire)', .110) 16:22Marks, ‘War Finance'.111) 17:31M. D. Karpachev, ‘Krizis prodovol'stvennogo snabzheniia v gody pervoi mirovoi voiny (po materialam Voronezhskoi gubernii)', Rossiiskaia istoriiia, 3 (2011), 66–81 (67).112) 19:17M. V. Os'kin, ‘Prodovol'stvennaia politika Rossii nakanune fevral'ia 1917 god: poisk vykhoda iz krizisa', Rossiiskaia istoriia, 3 (2001), 53–66 (55).113) 20:39S. G. Wheatcroft, ‘Agriculture', in Davies (ed.), From Tsarism, 93.114) 21:20I. I. Krott, ‘Sel'skoe khoziaistvo zapadnoi Sibiri, 1914–17gg.', Voprosy istorii, 11 (2011), 103–18.115) 23:01N. F. Ivantsova, Zapadno-sibirskoe krest'ianstvo v 1917—pervoi polovine 1918gg. (Moscow: Prometei, 1993), 71, 75.116) 23:39Mark Baker, ‘Rampaging Soldatki, Cowering Police, Bazaar Riots and Moral Economy: The Social Impact of the Great War in Kharkiv Province', Canadian-American Slavic Studies, 35: 2–3 (2001), 137–55 (141).117) 24:06D. V. Kovalev, Agrarnye preobrazovaniia i krest'ianstvo stolichnogo regiona v pervoi chetverti XX veka (Moscow: Moskovskii pedagogicheskiki gos. Universitet, 2004), 123.118) 24:38Peter Waldron, The End of Imperial Russia, 1855–1917 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 1997) 155. Tiutukhin states that there were about 800 rural disturbances between July 1914 and March 1917. S. V. Tiutukhin, ‘Pervaia mirovaia voina i revoliutsionnyi protsess v Rossii', in V. L. Mal'kov (ed.), Pervaia mirovaia voina: prolog XX veka (Moscow: Nauka, 1998), 236–49 (245).119) 24:45Shkaratan, Problemy, 219.120) 25:31Porshneva, Mentalitet, 165.121) 26:51Porshneva, Mentalitet, 201.122) 27:34A. S. Sidorov (ed.), Revoliutsionnoe dvizhenie posle sverzheniia samoderzhaviia (27 fevralia–14 aprelia 1917g.) (Moscow: RAN, 1957), 421.123) 28:05Iu. I. Kir'ianov, ‘Massovye vystupleniia na pochve dogorovizny v Rossii (1914–fevral' 1917g.', Otechestvennaia istoriia, 3 (1993), 3–18 (4).124) 28:28Kir'ianov, ‘Massovye', 8.125) 28:41Barbara Alpern Engel, ‘Not by Bread Alone: Subsistence Riots in Russia during World War One', Journal of Modern History, 69 (1997), 696–721.126) 29:03Engel, Women in Russiā, 133.127) 29:50Iu. I. Kir'ianov, Sotsial'no-politicheskii protest rabochikh Rossii v gody Pervoi mirovoi voiny. Iiul' 1914–fevral' 1917 gg. (Moscow: RAN, 2005).128) 30:49Porshneva, Mentalitet, 202.129) 31:02Iu. I. Korablev (ed.), Rabochee dvizhenie v Petrograde v 1912–1917gg. (Leningrad: Lenizdat, 1958), 484.130) 31:30Shkaratan, Problemy, 198, 210.131) 32:08McKean, St Petersburg, 394.132) 32:53Kir'ianov, Sotsial'no-politicheskii protest, 185.133) 33:12Michael Melancon, The Socialist Revolutionaries and the Russian Anti-War Movement, 1914–1917 (Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Press, 1990), 113–14.134) 34:16S. V. Tiutukhin, Men'shevizm: stranitsy istorii (Moscow: ROSSPEN, 2002), 307.135) 36:47Roger W. Pethybridge, Witnesses to the Russian Revolution (London: Allen Unwin, 1964), 76, 78.

The John Batchelor Show
#Londinium90AD: Gaius and Germanicus observe that NATO aims to defeat the Russian empire. Michael Vlahos. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 11:23


Photo: No known restrictions on publication. @Batchelorshow #Londinium90AD: Gaius and Germanicus observe that NATO aims to defeat the Russian empire. Michael Vlahos. #FriendsofHistoryDebatingSociety https://www.nato.int/strategic-concept/

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Can the Church Help You?

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 10:07


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Justice

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 49:37


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Jewish History Soundbites
Captain from Kovno: Rav Yitzchak Elchanan Spektor

Jewish History Soundbites

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 19, 2022 36:38 Very Popular


Perhaps the most acclaimed leader of Russian Jewry of the 19th century was Rav Yitzchak Elchanan Spektor (1817-1896). A long-time Rabbi of Kovno, his impact reached the far reaches of the Russian Empire and beyond. He served as the leading posek in all halachic matters, the arbiter of many disputes and lent his name to diverse causes such as the Kovno Persushim Kollel and Chovevei Zion. Exhibiting leadership on the burning issues of the day, he forged a relationship with the financial elite in St. Petersburg and with Czarist government officials lobbying on behalf of the general community.    For sponsorship opportunities about your favorite topics of Jewish history contact Yehuda at:  yehuda@yehudageberer.com   Subscribe To Our Podcast on:    PodBean: https://jsoundbites.podbean.com/   Follow us on Twitter or Instagram at @Jsoundbites You can email Yehuda at yehuda@yehudageberer.com

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Church and School

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 6:20


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

New Books in History
Catherine Gibson, "Geographies of Nationhood: Cartography, Science, and Society in the Russian Imperial Baltic" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 62:09


Geographies of Nationhood: Cartography, Science, and Society in the Russian Imperial Baltic (Oxford UP, 2022) examines the meteoric rise of ethnographic mapmaking in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as a form of visual and material culture that gave expression to territorialised visions of nationhood. In the Russian Empire's Baltic provinces, the development of ethnographic cartography, as part of the broader field of statistical data visualisation, progressively became a tool that lent legitimacy and an experiential dimension to nationalist arguments, as well as a wide range of alternative spatial configurations that rendered the inhabitants of the Baltic as part of local, imperial, and global geographies.  Catherine Gibson argues that map production and the spread of cartographic literacy as a mass phenomenon in Baltic society transformed how people made sense of linguistic, ethnic, and religious similarities and differences by imbuing them with an alleged scientific objectivity that was later used to determine the political structuring of the Baltic region and beyond. Geographies of Nationhood treads new ground by expanding the focus beyond elites to include a diverse range of mapmakers, such as local bureaucrats, commercial enterprises, clergymen, family members, teachers, and landowners. It shifts the focus from imperial learned and military institutions to examine the proliferation of mapmaking across diverse sites in the Empire, including the provincial administration, local learned societies, private homes, and schools. Understanding ethnographic maps in the social context of their production, circulation, consumption, and reception is crucial for assessing their impact as powerful shapers of popular geographical conceptions of nationhood, state-building, and border-drawing. Catherine Gibson is a historian of modern eastern Europe, currently a research fellow at the University of Tartu in Estonia. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Catherine Gibson, "Geographies of Nationhood: Cartography, Science, and Society in the Russian Imperial Baltic" (Oxford UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 62:09


Geographies of Nationhood: Cartography, Science, and Society in the Russian Imperial Baltic (Oxford UP, 2022) examines the meteoric rise of ethnographic mapmaking in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries as a form of visual and material culture that gave expression to territorialised visions of nationhood. In the Russian Empire's Baltic provinces, the development of ethnographic cartography, as part of the broader field of statistical data visualisation, progressively became a tool that lent legitimacy and an experiential dimension to nationalist arguments, as well as a wide range of alternative spatial configurations that rendered the inhabitants of the Baltic as part of local, imperial, and global geographies.  Catherine Gibson argues that map production and the spread of cartographic literacy as a mass phenomenon in Baltic society transformed how people made sense of linguistic, ethnic, and religious similarities and differences by imbuing them with an alleged scientific objectivity that was later used to determine the political structuring of the Baltic region and beyond. Geographies of Nationhood treads new ground by expanding the focus beyond elites to include a diverse range of mapmakers, such as local bureaucrats, commercial enterprises, clergymen, family members, teachers, and landowners. It shifts the focus from imperial learned and military institutions to examine the proliferation of mapmaking across diverse sites in the Empire, including the provincial administration, local learned societies, private homes, and schools. Understanding ethnographic maps in the social context of their production, circulation, consumption, and reception is crucial for assessing their impact as powerful shapers of popular geographical conceptions of nationhood, state-building, and border-drawing. Catherine Gibson is a historian of modern eastern Europe, currently a research fellow at the University of Tartu in Estonia. Steven Seegel is Professor of Slavic and Eurasian Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - War

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 24:42


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Audible Anarchism
Alexander Berkman: What is Communist Anarchism? - Unemployment

Audible Anarchism

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 11:08


Read for Audible Anarchist by Gregory Pankow https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC69G... Link to text https://theanarchistlibrary.org/libra... Alexander Berkman (November 21, 1870 – June 28, 1936) was a leading member of the anarchist movement in the early 20th century, famous for both his political activism and his writing. Berkman was born in Vilna in the Russian Empire (present-day Vilnius, Lithuania) and immigrated to the United States in 1888. He lived in New York City, where he became involved in the anarchist movement. He was the one-time lover and lifelong friend of anarchist Emma Goldman. In 1892, undertaking an act of propaganda of the deed, Berkman made an unsuccessful attempt to assassinate businessman Henry Clay Frick, for which he served 14 years in prison.

Revolutions
10.95- Russian Empire Soviet Empire

Revolutions

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 33:38 Very Popular


Tbh, it's bit like one of those "circle five differences in these two pictures that otherwise seem identical" games.