Podcasts about disease control

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Prevent and minimize the occurrence of diseases

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Best podcasts about disease control

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Latest podcast episodes about disease control

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Federalist Society's Teleforum: Litigation Update: Eviction Moratoria

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


On September 1, 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention took a step into nationwide housing policy, and issued a nationwide ban on evictions. With the order, the federal agency invoked a little-known WWII-era statute that empowered the agency to “make and enforce such regulations” that “are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, […]

AMATEUR NATION
Episode 143: “Amateur Nation: You Chose…Poorly”

AMATEUR NATION

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 33:24


THIS WEEK:*Voting for President Coloring Book, wearing useless masks, getting untested vaccines, buying an electric car…amateurs, you choose poorly.*The CDC, the Center for DISEASE Control not only veers out of their lane, but crosses over the double yellow, jumps the median and drives into oncoming traffic.*“Parental burnout” in the US is highest in the world and I say the American public education system has something to do with that.The electric car push is just as big a scam and hoax as the plandemic and mask and vax mandates. PLUS:*On “A La Carte”: DYK: “trans” now means “biological”. Because someone in amateur nation said it, so now it's a thing. In other news, Salma Hayek and I are engaged! And Facebook invents “hate speech”, and late night TV goes full segregation!*On “3 Pro Things”: Shaq, an old school metal pick, and a college professor sues the university where he works because wouldn't be a racist.Get podcast previews and other fun content every Thursday at 7 a.m. Eastern! Subscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wuyAWqGet the book! https://amzn.to/2qWAOlz 
Facebook: https://facebook.com/lousantinientertainment 
Instagram: @lou.santini3     
Website: www.lousantini.com

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Lessons from Concurrent Pandemics of COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:06


Join us for an important intergenerational conversation with LGBTQ Asians and Pacific Islanders and their allies. Our panelists will share QTAPI stories and experiences of the dual pandemics of HIV/AIDS and COVID-19; their histories as Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States; their past and current roles in community organizing and the political process; as well as other issues that are part of the current cultural and political shifts and relevant to the experiences of QTAPI individuals. Meet the Speakers Ignatius Bau was the HIV prevention program coordinator at the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum in the mid-1990s, and served as a member of the President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS and advisory groups about HIV/AIDS for the federal Office of Minority Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Institutes for Health. He also has served on the board of directors for the Gay Asian Pacific Alliance Community HIV Project, Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center, National Minority AIDS Project, and Funders for LGBTQ Issues. Cecilia Chung is the senior director of strategic initiatives and evaluation at Transgender Law Center, a health commissioner of San Francisco and an internationally recognized civil rights leader in the LGBT and HIV community. Chung has served as the co-chair of GNP+ and is currently a member of the WHO Advisory Council of Women Living with HIV. Vince Crisostomo is a gay Chamorro (Pacific Islander) long-term HIV/AIDS survivor who believes in the healing power of community and has dedicated more than 30 years to HIV/AIDS activism and LGBTQ communities. He is passionate about bringing health care to all and social justice equity to people of every sexual identity, HIV status, gender, race and age. Crisostomo is SFAF's director of aging services and previously managed the Elizabeth Taylor 50 Plus Network for long-term HIV survivors. He co-chaired the HIV & Aging Work Group and was an active member of the Mayor's Long-Term Care Coordinating Council. Crisostomo has led a number of grassroots HIV advocacy and LGBTQ organizations in the United States and overseas. He was executive director of the Coalition of Asia Pacific Regional Networks on HIV/AIDS, founded the Pacific Island Jurisdiction AIDS Action Group, and served as a United Nations NGO delegate for the Asia Pacific. In 2019, having won the popular vote, he was community grand marshall for San Francisco Pride. In July 2021, he was appointed to the San Francisco Human Rights Commission's LGBTQI+ Advisory Committee. NOTES This is a free program; any voluntary donations made during registration will support the production of our online programs. A complimentary lunch will be provided before the program for in-person attendees. The Commonwealth Club thanks Gilead Sciences, Inc. for its generous support of The Michelle Meow Show.  Program presented in partnership with GAPA Theatre, The Connection at the San Francisco Community Health Center, the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, and The Commonwealth Club of California. This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, nonprofit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. SPEAKERS Ignatius Bau Former HIV Prevention Program Coordinator, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum; Former Member, President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS Cecilia Chung Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives and Evaluation, Transgender Law Center; Health Commissioner, San Francisco Vince Crisostomo Director of Aging Services, San Francisco AIDS Foundation Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Host and Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 6th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 70 - HIV Prevention

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 22:10


Episode 70: HIV Prevention. Prevention is key in controlling HIV-AIDS. Listen to ways to prevent HIV, mainly by using condoms, PrEP and PEP.Introduction: HIV and AIDSBy Robert Dunn, MS3.Introduction: The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that is primarily transmitted via sex, needles or from mother to fetus. Once infected, the virus increases in its copies and decreases the individual's CD4+ cell count, thus leading to an immunocompromised state known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Once with AIDS, the patient is susceptible to opportunistic infections. Prevention from AIDS includes several options. Condoms for safe sex practices are the least invasive and most readily accessible option for all patients. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is also an option for men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women. If the patient is also exposed to HIV, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) may also be an option to prevent infection but must be administer ideally 1-2 hours after exposure but no later than 72 hours after. Today we will briefly discuss how to prevent HIV infection.This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home.___________________________HIV Series IV: HIV Prevention. By Robert Dunn, MS3.Participation by Huda Quanungo, MS3; Bahar Hamidi, MS3; and Hector Arreaza, MD.  HIV PreventionIntroductionThe Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that is primarily transmitted via sex, needles or from mother to fetus. Once infected, the virus increases in its copies and decreases the individual's CD4+ cell count, thus leading to an immunocompromised state known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Once with AIDS, the patient is susceptible to opportunistic infections. Prevention from AIDS includes several options. Condoms for safe sex practices are the least invasive and most readily accessible option for all patients. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is also an option for men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women. If the patient is also exposed to HIV, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) may also be an option to prevent infection, but it must be administered ideally 1-2 hours after exposure but no later than 72 hours after. We will concentrate in prevention during this episode.   What is HIV?The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus. When the virus gains access to our body via cuts on the skin or mucosa:The virus injects its 10kb sized RNA genome into our cells. The RNA is transcribed to DNA via viral reverse transcriptase and is incorporated into our cellular DNA genome. This causes our cells to become a virus producer. Viral proteins translated in the cell are transported to the edge of the cell and can bud off into new viruses without lysing the cell.  Acute HIV symptoms. Some potential early symptoms of HIV can include fever, chills, rash, night sweats, muscle aches, sore throat, fatigue, lymphadenopathy, and mouth ulcers. The most common acute symptom is NO SYMPTOM. Many people do not feel sick with the acute infection of HIV. Some people can live years with HIV in “clinical latency” without knowing they are infected, but they can still be contagious during this time. As viral load (the amount of virus copies you have in your blood stream) increases, the CD4+ cells that contribute to our adaptive immunity continues to fall. That's why the best test during this period is not going to be HIV antibody but you should test for antigens. Specifically, the 4th Generation HIV test, which tests for both antibody and p24 antigens.Chronic symptoms. Once patients begin to present with opportunistic infections (i.e. Pneumocystis pneumonia – PCP), or have a CD4 count below 200, the patient is considered to have Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and makes them susceptible to more serious infections. Without treatment, patients with AIDS typically survive about 3 years. Epidemiology of HIVHIV incidence: In 2019, there were 34,800 new HIV infections in the United States. This is an 8% decline from 2015. Amongst age groups: Age 25-34 had the highest rate of incidence (30.1 per 100,000)Age 35-44 had the second highest rate (16.5 per 100,000)Age 45-54 remained stableAge 13-24 had decreasing rates of incidence Amongst ethnic groups: Black/African-American groups has the highest rate of incidence (42.1 per 100,000)Hispanic/Latino had the second highest rate (21.7 per 100,000)Person of multiple races had the third highest (18.4 per 100,000) Amongst sex: Males had the highest rate of incidence (21 per 100,000)Females had the lowest rate of incidence (4.5 per 100,000) HIV Prevalence:In 2019, 1.2 million people (Ages 13 and older) in the US have HIV and 13% of them do not even know it. In 2020, there were an estimated 1.5 million people worldwide that acquired a new HIV infection. This is a 30% decline since 2020. An estimated 66% are receiving some HIV care and 57% were virally suppressed. Mortality: In 2019, there were 15,815 deaths among adults and adolescents diagnosed with HIV in the US. Preventative ScreeningThe USPSTF gives a Grade A recommendation for HIV screening for: Pregnant people and everyone between 15-65 years of age. All pregnant people at any point of their pregnancy, including those who present in labor or delivery and have an unknown status of HIV.The USPSTF only recommends a one-time screening and shows no benefit of repeat screening thereafter. Women may also be screened for subsequent pregnanciesAlso screen all Adolescents and adults ages 15-65.  An effective approach is routine opt-out HIV screening. This approach includes HIV screening as part of the standard preventive tests. This approach removes the stigma associated with HIV testing, it promotes earlier diagnosis and treatment, reduces risk of transmission, and it is cost-effective. The determination for repeated screening of individuals should take into account the following risk factors: -Men who have sex with men (MSM)-Individuals who live in areas with high prevalence of HIVIncluding attending to tuberculosis clinics, stay in a correctional facility, or homelessness-Injection drug use-Transactional/commercial sex work-1 or more new sexual partners -History of previous STIs Annual screening for HIV is reasonable, however, clinicians may want to screen patients every 3-6 months if they have an increased risk of HIV.  CondomsA simple and very effective method in HIV prevention is the use of condoms for safe sex practices. In 2009, the American College of Physicians (ACP) and the HIV medicine Association called for the wider availability of condoms and education to minimize HIV transmission. A meta-analysis of 12 HIV studies amongst heterosexual couples demonstrated the use of condoms in all penetrative sex acts reduced the risk of HIV transmission 7.4 times in comparison to those who never used condoms. Other studies show a 90-95% effectiveness in HIV prevention when “consistently” using condoms. A Cochrane review shoed that the use of a male latex condom in all acts of penetrative vaginal sex reduced HIV incidence by 80%. Overall, condoms are effective in HIV prevention.Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)Truvada and Descovy:Another option for prevention amongst HIV negative individuals is the use of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). It is an anti-retroviral pill that is taken daily to maintain a steady-state level of the medication in the blood stream. The medication specifically a combination of 2 antiretroviral medications – Tenofovir and Emtricitabine. Both medications are nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) that work by blocking the viral reverse transcriptase from HIV and prevent the enzyme from copying the RNA genome into DNA. Therefore, it stops viral replications. There are 2 formulations of PrEP: Truvada and Descovy. Truvada's primary side effects are renal and bone toxicity with long-term use. Descovy's primary side effects are mild weight gain and dyslipidemia. Truvada is the most commonly prescribed PrEP because it has the most data since it has been around the longest. However, extra consideration should be taken for: Adolescents should weigh at least 35 kg before being prescribed PrEPDescovy may be preferred for adolescents by the prescribing physician as it is not associated with reduction in bone density, as Truvada is. Estimated GFR between 30 – 60Truvada is associated with acute and chronic kidney disease whereas Descovy is safe for patients with a GFR greater than 30Patients with osteoporosisTruvada is associated with bone toxicity, whereas Descovy is not. It is important to note that PrEP has only been studied in men or people who were assigned men at birth. So, its efficacy in vaginal sex and with vaginal fluids cannot be generalized at this time. Future of PrEP: In May 2020, the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 083 randomized trial demonstrated the potential of an injectable PrEP. Carbotegravir, is an integrase inhibitor, which prevents the HIV integrase from incorporating the HIV genome into the cellular genome. This study demonstrated its efficacy as PrEP in comparison to Truvada with few new infections (13 versus 39, respectively). Carbotegravir would be given via injection once every 8 weeks. In September 2021, the pharmaceutical company Moderna will begin 2 human clinical trials for an HIV vaccine that use mRNA technology. Previous studies conducted with non-mRNA vaccines demonstrated that B cells can be stimulated to create antibodies against HIV. Since HIV becomes integrated in the cellular genome within 72 hours of transmission, a high level of antibodies must be produced and present in the body to offer an adequate level of immunity. Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)If an individual is exposed to blood or bodily fluids with high risk of HIV via percutaneous, mucus membrane or nonintact skin route, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) may be an option. PEP is indicated when the HIV status of the exposure source is unknown and are awaiting test results, or if the exposure source is HIV positive. Therapy should be started within 1 or 2 hours of exposure and it is not effective after 72 hours of initial exposure. The recommended duration of therapy is 4 weeks but no evidence has been shown for an optimal duration. Occupational exposure. There are 2 regimens for PEP: Truvada with Dolutegravir Truvada  with Raltegravir Both Doltegravir and Raltegravir are integrase inhibitors which block the integration of the viral genome into the cellular DNA. The regiments are chosen based on efficacy, side effects, patient convenience, and completion rates. Dolutegravir is chosen because it is given once daily. While Raltegravir is taken twice daily, most experience with PEP has been with Raltegravir. Other risk with Raltegravir are potential skeletal muscle toxicity and systemic-cutaneous reactions resembling Steven-Johnson syndrome. One final word about prevention of vertical transmission is making sure pregnant women are treated during pregnancy and if the baby is delivered from a patient whose viral load is “detectable”, the baby needs to be treated, but we'll let that topic for another time to discuss. Joke: What do you call the patient zero of HIV? First Aids.HIV incidence is decreasing thanks to many prevention measures taken globally, and we discussed screening, condoms, PrEP and PEP as part of this prevention efforts. Stay tuned for more relevant medical information in our next episode. ____ Now we conclude our episode number 70 “HIV Prevention.” Robert, Huda and Bahar explained some ways to prevent HIV, mainly by screening those at risk, using condoms, PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis) and PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis). Let's also remember that having a monogamous relationship and avoiding high risk sexual behaviors confer significant protection against HIV. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RBresidency@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Robert Dunn, Huda Quanungo, and Bahar Hamidi. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week!   References:About HIV. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC.gov, June 1, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/whatishiv.html . Accessed September 21, 2021. Simon V, Ho DD, Abdool Karim Q. HIV/AIDS epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, and treatment. Lancet. 2006 Aug 5;368(9534):489-504. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69157-5. PMID: 16890836; PMCID: PMC2913538. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16890836/]   US Statistics. HIV.gov, June 2, 2021. https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/statistics . Accessed September 21, 2021.  The global HIV/AIDS Epidemic. HIV.gov, June 25, 2021. https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/global-statistics. Accessed September 21, 2021.  Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Screening. U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, June 11, 2019. https://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/recommendation/human-immunodeficiency-virus-hiv-infection-screening. Accessed September 21, 2021.  Holmes KK, Levine R, Weaver M. Effectiveness of condoms in preventing sexually transmitted infections. Bull World Health Organ. 2004 Jun;82(6):454-61. PMID: 15356939; PMCID: PMC2622864. [https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/15356939/] Weller S, Davis K. Condom effectiveness in reducing heterosexual HIV transmission. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(1):CD003255. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD003255. PMID: 11869658. [https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD003255/full] Mayer, Kenneth H, MD, and Douglas Krakower, MD. Administration of pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV infection. UpToDate, June 24, 2020. Accessed September 21, 2021. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/administration-of-pre-exposure-prophylaxis-against-hiv-infection?search=8)%09Administration%20of%20pre-exposure%20prophylaxis%20against%20HIV%20infection&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1] Zachary, Kimon C, MD. Management of health care personnel exposed to HIV. UpToDate, June 07, 2019. Accessed September 21, 2021. [https://www.uptodate.com/contents/management-of-health-care-personnel-exposed-to-hiv?search=9)%09Management%20of%20health%20care%20personnel%20exposed%20to%20HIV&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~150&usage_type=default&display_rank=1]

Public Health Review Morning Edition
47: State of the COVID-19 Response

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 6:25


Dr. Nirav Shah, ASTHO President and Director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, addresses the state of the campaign against COVID-19; Kim Martin, ASTHO's Director of Immunizations, says more approved booster formulas would be welcomed additions to the pandemic response; and ASTHO continues to gather workforce input for its PHWins survey. FDA News Release: FDA to Hold Advisory Committee Meetings to Discuss Emergency Use Authorization for Booster Doses and COVID-19 Vaccines for Younger Children CDC Webpage: Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices Website: Public Health Departments Need 80,000 New Employees. But That's Not Enough for Another Pandemic

Teleforum
Litigation Update: Eviction Moratoria

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 22:55


On September 1, 2020, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention took a step into nationwide housing policy, and issued a nationwide ban on evictions. With the order, the federal agency invoked a little-known WWII-era statute that empowered the agency to “make and enforce such regulations” that “are necessary to prevent the introduction, transmission, or spread of communicable diseases from foreign countries into the States or possessions, or from one State or possession into any other State or possession.” The agency asserted that evictions presented a unique and unacceptable danger to the public in light of Covid-19.CDC’s order was challenged almost immediately by a variety of public interest groups on a variety of statutory and constitutional grounds. At the heart of these challenges was an objection to the agency’s determination that property owners could be forced to turn over their real property to tenants who refused to pay rent.The order was, in months-long increments, in existence for most of the past year. Meanwhile, several district courts and the Sixth Circuit invalidated the moratorium, but only with respect to individual litigants. After one trip to the Supreme Court, another extension, and a final stop back at the Supreme Court, the moratorium ended. However, related rules issued by agencies like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, as well as local eviction moratoria, continue around the country.This litigation update by Caleb Kruckenberg of the New Civil Liberties Alliance, which filed the first challenge to the CDC order, discusses the origins of the moratorium, including relevant Congressional action (and inaction), the legal challenges to the moratorium, recent and possible future extensions of the moratorium, and why this case was bound for resolution by the Supreme Court. Featuring:Caleb Kruckenberg, Litigation Counsel, New Civil Liberties Alliance

True Crime Creepers
Cyntoia Brown and the Murder of Johnny Allen

True Crime Creepers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 83:30


16 year old Cyntoia Brown needed money, and she only knew one way to get it: sex work. But after 43 year old Johnny Allen picked her up at a Sonic and brought her back to his house,  she shot and killed him. She was arrested for murder, and the prosecution argued that she'd shot him with the intent to rob him. They said she was cruel and merciless and evil. But after facts about her life and the events leading up to the crime came out, people started to wonder: who was the real victim in this situation? Resources:Services Available to Victims of Human TraffickingHighlighted Organization:FASD CommunitiesSources:ArticlesFox 17 News | What Cyntoia Brown-Long would say to Johnny Allen's family (Stacy Case)The Famous People | Johnny Michael AllenCenters for Disease Control and Prevention | FASDsKnox News | Here's What Cyntoia Brown-Long Is Doing 2 Years After She Walked Out of a Tennessee PrisonBookFree Cyntoia: My Search for Redemption in the American Prison System DocumentariesNetflix | From Murder to Mercy  Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/truecrimecreepers)

Progressive Commentary Hour
Progressive Commentary Hour - Dr. Jessica Rose

Progressive Commentary Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:39


mRNA vaccine injuries and deaths in the CDC's vaccine adverse events database Dr. Jessica Rose is an immunologist and molecular biologist who has specialized in computational biology and the bio-mechanisms behind pathogenic infections. Her research and publications include investigating hepatitis B, cytomegalovirus, HIV, and anthrax. Dr. Rose is a graduate of the University of Newfoundland and Labrador, and received her doctorate from Bar Illan University in Israel. Dr Rose has now written and co-authored several important papers analyzing the data of Covid-19 vaccine injuries and deaths reported in the Centers for Disease Control's Vaccine Adverse Events Reporting System  or VAERS. She also has a paper pending publication co-authored with Dr. Peter McCullough who will be guest on the program on Friday. Jessica is also a surfing instructor and Israel's national champion for women's long-board surfing. 

Queens of Social Work
The Cycle of Domestic Violence

Queens of Social Work

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 41:59


October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month here in the United States and today we will be talking about what it is and  what we can do to stop it. We'll be sharing some resources for you to use or pass on to someone you may know.  This is a sensitive subject and it may trigger some of you. Please feel free to skip this episode or skip parts that may be hard to hear. Unfortunately domestic violence is one of the social ills that spans all across the world and this will be an ongoing discussion. We have a responsibility to share with you what we know so that if you or someone you know has this experience they can seek support. According to the World Health Organization, about 1 in 3 women worldwide have been subjected to either physical and or sexual intimate partner violence in their lifetime. According to the U.S Centers for Disease Control 1 in 7 men will experience physical violence by their intimate partner at some point during their lifetime and about 1 in 6 men will experience sexual violence in their lifetime. We haven't really spoken in depth about sexual violence here on the show, but we will and this will be an ongoing conversation.Our guest Queens S is a Licensed  Clinical Social Worker who has over 10 years of experience in the field of Social Work supporting survivors of trauma through an anti-racist and anti-oppression lens. Queen S is an expert in training development and facilitation, curriculum design and career development coaching, all grounded in an understanding of the network of social supports provided by New York City for people who have experienced homelessness, poverty and other trauma. Resources: Safe Horizon Domestic violence hotline (NYC): 1-800-621–HOPE (4673)Family Justice Centers in all 5 boroughs (https://www1.nyc.gov/site/ocdv/programs/family-justice-centers.page)VIP - Violence Intervention Program (VIP) Mujeres- Latinx (https://www.vipmujeres.org/)Turning Point- Muslim Women (https://tpny.org/)HotPeachPages. NetNational Domestic Violence Hotline: 800.799.SAFE (7233)

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 598 (10-11-21): The Flu and Water

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (5:02).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 10-8-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of October 25, 2021.  This revised episode from November 2017 is part of a series this fall of episodes on water connections to the human body and human biology. We start with a public health mystery sound.  Have a listen for about 35 seconds, and see if you can guess what seasonal, precautionary procedure is taking place.  And here's a hint: thinking feverishlycould influence your answer. SOUNDS and VOICES - ~36 sec “Any problems with any vaccines before?”“No.”“Feeling OK today?  No fever or anything like that?”“No.”“And no allergies to foods or medications that you're aware of?”“No.”  …“So, you know, a little bit of arm soreness; that's probably the most of it.  Redness, irritation.   Might be kind of tired for a day or so, or even a low-grade fever or a headache is possible and normal.  If that were to happen, whatever you take for a headache is fine.  Any questions about anything?”“No.”“All right.” …“All right, leave that bandage on for about 10 minutes or so, and take it off anytime you remember after that.  And here's your copy for your records.  Thanks.”“Thank you.”“Have a good day.”If you guessed, a flu shot, you're right!  You heard an influenza vaccination being given in October 2017 at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg.  Flu season arrives every year with colder weather, bringing the potential to cause fever, body aches, and other symptoms, some quite serious or even fatal.  The flu affects millions of people in the United States each year, and health agencies like U.S. Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention and the Virginia Department of Health encourage vaccination for everyone older than six months, with some exceptions. But what does the flu have to do with water?  Consider these three connections. First, drinking plenty of fluids is a commonly prescribed treatment for flu sufferers in order to help prevent dehydration resulting from increased body temperature and other responses to the viral infection.  Infants, children, and the elderly are particularly at risk for dehydration. Second, the flu virus is transmitted between humans by respiratory droplets, and researchers have found that transmission is affected by air temperature and humidity. Specifically, transmission occurs more easily in cold, dry air, such as is typically found during fall and winter in temperate areas like Virginia. Third, waterfowl and shorebirds are among the various kinds of birds that harbor avian flu viruses, and water contaminated with aquatic birds' waste can potentially harbor avian flu for some time.  Understanding the factors related to the occurrence and transmission of avian viruses—including the role of contaminated water—is important in monitoring avian flu and its potential to spread to other birds, mammals, or humans. Flu season is upon us, and the CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine by the end of October.  So if you hear this… VOICE - ~3 sec – “Are you here for a flu shot?” …now you'll have not only a health connection for the flu, but some hydrological ones, too. Thanks to staff of Kroger Pharmacy and Hokie Wellness for lending their voices to this episode. We close with some music for, or rather, against the flu.  Here's about 30 seconds of “Shots,” written by Wilson Stern and performed in a 2014, flu-shot-promoting video by the University of Florida's Student Health Care Center. MUSIC - ~28 sec Lyrics:“Last year less than half the population got their flu shot.  Why you wanna be stuck at home with a fever when you could be making this party hot?”“I heard that shot made you ill.”“Naw, son, that news ain't for real.  It tells your body what the virus looks like, so it knows how to deal”“Why you tellin' me this?  I got my flu shot last year.”“This virus mutates constantly, we got new strains here.”“Shots, shots, shots, shots….” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode replaces Episode 393, 11-6-17, which has been archived. The influenza vaccination heard in this episode was performed October 24, 2017, at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, by staff of Kroger Pharmacies, assisted by staff from Virginia Tech's Hokie Wellness program.  Virginia Water Radio thanks those staff people for their willingness to be recorded. The audio excerpt of “Shots,” copyright by Wilson Stern, was taken from the 2014 University of Florida Student Health Care Center video “Flu Shots,” copyright by the University of Florida; used with permission of Wilson Stern and the University of Florida's Division of Media Properties.  The 2 min./4 sec. video is available online at http://shcc.ufl.edu/services/primary-care/flu/flu-shots-music-video-lyrics/.   More information about Wilson Stern and the group Hail! Cassius Neptune is available online at https://www.reverbnation.com/hailcassiusneptune.Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Colorized, negative-stained transmission electron microscopic image of influenza virus particles, known as virions.   Public domain photo taken in 1973 by Dr. F. A. Murphy, accessed from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Public Image Library, online at https://phil.cdc.gov/Details.aspx?pid=10072.Illustration of influenza infection, from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “Images of Influenza Viruses,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/images.htm.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection weekly map of flu activity, as of 10/2/21.  Map accessed online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/usmap.htm, 10/11/21.U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chart of work to develop the annual flu virus vaccine, with data for 2020-21.   Image accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/freeresources/graphics/infographics.htm. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT TYPES AND NAMES OF INFLUENZA VIRUSESThe following information is quoted from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Protection (CDC), “Types of Influenza Viruses,” November 18, 2019, online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/viruses/types.htm.“There are four types of influenza viruses: A, B, C and D.   Human influenza A and B viruses cause seasonal epidemics of disease (known as the flu season) almost every winter in the United States.  Influenza A viruses are the only influenza viruses known to cause flu pandemics, i.e., global epidemics of flu disease.  A pandemic can occur when a new and very different influenza A virus emerges that both infects people and has the ability to spread efficiently between people.  Influenza type C infections generally cause mild illness and are not thought to cause human flu epidemics.  Influenza D viruses primarily affect cattle and are not known to infect or cause illness in people. ”Influenza A viruses are divided into subtypes based on two proteins on the surface of the virus: the hemagglutinin (H) and the neuraminidase (N).  There are 18 different hemagglutinin subtypes and 11 different neuraminidase subtypes (H1 through H18 and N1 through N11 respectively).  …Current sub-types of influenza A viruses that routinely circulate in people include: A (H1N1) and A (H3N2).  In the spring of 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1) virus emerged to cause illness in people. … “Currently circulating influenza A(H1N1) viruses are related to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 virus that emerged in the spring of 2009 and caused a flu pandemic ( see CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu website for more information).  This virus, scientifically called the ‘A(H1N1)pdm09 virus,' and more generally called ‘2009 H1N1,' has continued to circulate seasonally since then.  These H1N1 viruses have undergone relatively small genetic changes and changes to their antigenic properties (i.e., the properties of the virus that affect immunity) over time.“Of all the influenza viruses that routinely circulate and cause illness in people, influenza A(H3N2) viruses tend to change more rapidly, both genetically and antigenically. … “Influenza B viruses are not divided into subtypes, but instead are further classified into two lineages: B/Yamagata and B/Victoria. …Influenza B viruses generally change more slowly in terms of their genetic and antigenic properties than influenza A viruses, especially influenza A(H3N2) viruses.  Influenza surveillance data from recent years shows co-circulation of influenza B viruses from both lineages in the United States and around the world.  However, the proportion of influenza B viruses from each lineage that circulate can vary by geographic location.“CDC follows an internationally accepted naming convention for influenza viruses.  This convention was accepted by WHO [World Health Organization] in 1979 and published in February 1980 in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 58(4):585-591 (1980) (see A revision of the system of nomenclature for influenza viruses: a WHO Memorandum[854 KB, 7 pages]).  The approach uses the following components: *the antigenic type (e.g., A, B, C); *the host of origin (e.g., swine, equine, chicken, etc.; for human-origin viruses, no host of origin designation is given); *geographical origin (e.g., Denver, Taiwan, etc.); *strain number (e.g., 15, 7, etc.); *year of isolation (e.g., 57, 2009, etc.); *for influenza A viruses, the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase antigen description in parentheses (e.g., (H1N1). “One influenza A (H1N1), A (H3N2), and one or two influenza B viruses (depending on the vaccine) are included in each year's influenza vaccines.” SOURCES Used for Audio Antonia E. Dalziel et al., “Persistence of Low Pathogenic Influenza A Virus in Water: A Systematic Review and Quantitative Meta-Analysis,” PLOS One, 10/13/16, online at http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0161929.  Anice C. Lowen and John Steel, “Roles of Humidity and Temperature in Shaping Influenza Seasonality,” Journal of Virology, Vol. 88/No. 14, July 2014, pages 7692-7695; online at http://jvi.asm.org/content/88/14/7692.full (subscription may be required for access). Anice C. Lowen et al., “Influenza Virus Transmission Is Dependent on Relative Humidity and Temperature,” PLOS, 10/19/07, online at http://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.0030151. Public Library of Science, “Higher indoor humidity inactivates flu virus particles,” posted by Science Daily, 2/27/13, online at https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130227183456.htm. David Robson, The Real Reason Germs Spread in Winter, BBC Future, 10/19/15. Jeffery K. Taugenberger and David M. Morens, “1918 Influenza: The Mother of All Pandemics,” Emerging Infectious Diseases (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), Vol. 12/No. 1, January 2006, online at https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/1/05-0979_article. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):“Chemical Disinfectants,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/disinfection/disinfection-methods/chemical.html;“Flu Activity and Surveillance,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/fluactivitysurv.htm(includes a weekly nationwide map of flu activity);“The Flu: Caring for Someone Sick at Home,” online (as PDF) at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/general/influenza_flu_homecare_guide.pdf;“Flu Season,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season.htm;“How Flu Spreads,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm;“Influenza (Flu),” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.html;“Influenza in Animals,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/other_flu.htm (information on flu in bats, birds, dogs, swine, and other animals);“Information on Avian Influenza,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/avianflu/;“National Influeza Vaccination Week,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/resource-center/nivw/index.htm;“Prevent Seasonal Flu,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/index.html;“Who Should and Who Should NOT Get a Flu Vaccination,” online at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/whoshouldvax.htm. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Pandemic Influenza Fact Sheet for the Water Sector, 2009. Virginia Department of Health, “Epidemiology Fact Sheets/Influenza,” September 2018, online at http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/epidemiology/epidemiology-fact-sheets/influenza/. World Health Organization (WHO), “Influenza (Avian and other zoonotic),” November 13, 2018, online at https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/influenza-(avian-and-other-zoonotic). For More Information about Water an

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Breaking Bad Science
Episode 70 - Viruses not just COVID

Breaking Bad Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 41:00


We'd love to hear from you (feedback@breakingbadscience.com)Look us up on social media Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/385282925919540Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/breakingbadsciencepodcast/Website: http://www.breakingbadscience.com/Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscienceFor the last year plus we've been living in a world in which COVID seems like something we discuss every day. We've even done several episodes on it. I guess I've just sort of adjusted to the idea that everyone truly understands what a virus is, what they're made of, how they differ from one another, and why we deal with some much more regularly than others. That is not a real reasonable thought. Join hosts Shanti and Danny as we take a step back and discuss viruses themselves and highlight a few others relevant here in the US and the rest of the world. ReferencesInstitute for Molecular Biosciences; What's the Difference Between Bacteria and Viruses. The University of Queensland. 20-Apr-2020. https://imb.uq.edu.au/article/2020/04/difference-between-bacteria-and-virusesBerthold, E.; What are Archaea?. Australian Academy of Science. 27-Jul-2018. https://www.science.org.au/curious/earth-environment/what-are-archaeaCarroll, L.; Deaths due to West Nile Virus are on the Rise - How to Stay Safe. Today. 27-Sep-2021. https://www.today.com/health/west-nile-virus-2021-how-safe-deaths-rise-some-spots-t232267Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Dengue. CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/dengue/index.htmlCenter for Disease Control and Prevention; Genital Herpes Basic Fact Sheet. CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes.htmCenter for Disease Control and Prevention; Plague Ecology and Transmission. CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/plague/transmission/index.htmlSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/breakingbadscience?fan_landing=true)

Science is Gray
Effective Altruism and Measuring the Effects of Our Vegan Activism w/Casey Taft PhD

Science is Gray

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 43:19


You've probably heard of the Effective Altruism (AE) movement before, and the effort to apply effective altruism to animal advocacy work and reducing suffering of animals. But do you know what it actually is? And is effective altruism all it's really cracked up to be?? I have seen countless debates within the animal advocacy movement about what the "best" type of activism is, with many people pushing everyone to do one single thing. In the last few years things like animal welfare legislation (focused on bigger cages, and "humane slaughter") and reducitarianism have been pushed on the movement by several well-known AE philanthropists and non profits as the end-all-be-all of evidence based "effective activism". But can we even measure the effects of our vegan and animal rights activism in the first place? How do we know what will really end speciesism, save animals, and turn the world vegan in the future? And what role should science and data actually play in social justice movements and especially animal rights work? I discuss all that and more in this episode with Casey Taft who wrote the brilliant book 'Motivational Methods for Vegan Advocacy: A Clinical Psychology Perspective'. Casey Taft is the co-founder and manager of Vegan Publishers and is a Professor of Psychiatry at Boston University School of Medicine. He is an internationally recognized researcher in the areas of trauma and the family, winning prestigious awards for his work from the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, the Institute on Violence, Abuse and Trauma, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He has published over 100 journal articles, book chapters, and scientific reports, and has consulted with the United Nations on preventing violence and abuse globally. He sees the prevention of violence towards animals as a natural extension of this work.

Curiosity Daily
School Should Start Later, Daydreaming Perks, Hycean Planets

Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 13:51


Learn about why high school starts too early; why daydreaming might be a good sign; and finding life on Hycean planets. High school starts too early in all but 3 US states — but things are changing by Steffie Drucker  Roy, S. (2014, August 26). AAP Recommends Delaying School Start Times to Combat Teen Sleep... Sleep Review. https://www.sleepreviewmag.com/sleep-health/demographics/age/aap-recommends-delaying-school-start-times-combat-teen-sleep-deprivation/   CDC. (2020, May 29). Schools Start Too Early. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/sleep/features/schools-start-too-early.html   National Teacher and Principal Survey (NTPS). (2017). Ed.gov; National Center for Education Statistics. https://nces.ed.gov/surveys/ntps/tables/ntps1718_table_05_s1s.asp   Jacobs, F. (2021, August 27). Here's how early school begins – and why it is bad for students. Big Think; Big Think. https://bigthink.com/strange-maps/heres-how-early-school-begins-and-why-it-is-bad-for-students   Sleep for Teenagers | Sleep Foundation. (2009, April 17). Sleep Foundation. https://www.sleepfoundation.org/teens-and-sleep  Daydreaming Might Be a Sign of an Efficient Brain by Reuben Westmaas Daydreaming is Good. It Means You're Smart | News Center. (2017). Gatech.edu. https://www.news.gatech.edu/news/2017/10/24/daydreaming-good-it-means-youre-smart  ‌Godwin, C. A., Hunter, M. A., Bezdek, M. A., Lieberman, G., Elkin-Frankston, S., Romero, V. L., Witkiewitz, K., Clark, V. P., & Schumacher, E. H. (2017). Functional connectivity within and between intrinsic brain networks correlates with trait mind wandering. Neuropsychologia, 103, 140–153. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.07.006  A wandering mind reveals mental processes and priorities. (2012). Wisc.edu. https://news.wisc.edu/a-wandering-mind-reveals-mental-processes-and-priorities/  ‌Levinson, D. B., Smallwood, J., & Davidson, R. J. (2012). The Persistence of Thought. Psychological Science, 23(4), 375–380. https://doi.org/10.1177/0956797611431465  Forget Earth-like planets — it's time to look for alien life on Hycean planets by Briana Brownell  New class of habitable exoplanets are “a big step forward” in the search for life. (2021, August 26). University of Cambridge. https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/new-class-of-habitable-exoplanets-are-a-big-step-forward-in-the-search-for-life  ‌Madhusudhan, N., Piette, A. A. A., & Constantinou, S. (2021). Habitability and Biosignatures of Hycean Worlds. The Astrophysical Journal, 918(1), 1. https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/abfd9c  Follow Curiosity Daily on your favorite podcast app to learn something new every day withCody Gough andAshley Hamer. Still curious? Get exclusive science shows, nature documentaries, and more real-life entertainment on discovery+! Go to https://discoveryplus.com/curiosity to start your 7-day free trial. discovery+ is currently only available for US subscribers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Dreamcatchers
BioCurious - Understanding Biorhythm in Women - Kayla Osterhoff

Dreamcatchers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 50:18


The routine of society leans on favoring those who can keep up consistently. However, why exactly do we experience burnout? How do we get over this hurdle? Kayla Osterhoff talks about her astonishing discovery on how we can address our productivity issues by understanding our biological design. Kayla is a Neuropsychophysiologist and world-renowned Women's Health Expert who is passionate about empowering women to step into the leadership roles that they are born for! Kayla is formally trained across the health sciences with a bachelor of science in health ecology, master of science in public health, and currently pursuing her doctoral degree in the field of neuropsychophysiology. Formerly, she served as a Health Scientist for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and spent several years prior working in the clinical setting. The last several years of her career have been dedicated to researching women's neurology, psychology and physiology. Kayla's investigative efforts into the brains and minds of women led her to a major discovery about women's unique cognitive and leadership abilities.In this episode, Kayla shares tips in understanding our hormonal rhythm, how a women's operating system differs, and how we can utilize the benefits of our biological phases to unleash our peak performance. Join us and listen in! [00:01 - 05:19] Opening Segment Welcoming Kayla to the showKayla shares her educational career in biology[05:20 - 15:31] Understanding the Body's Operating System How our bodies react to the environment The partnership between the brain and the mindHow biorhythm influences women's brainsThe effects of hormonal changes influence the operating system[15:32 - 48:41] Reaching Your Peak through Biological Design MasteryHow women can navigate and match the environment with itThe four phases of a woman's hormonal cycleUtilizing the superpowers to unleash peak performancePartnering with your body to avoid burnout[48:42 - 50:19] Closing SegmentListen to your body and understand what it needsConnect with Kayla!Closing wordsTweetable Quotes:“The whole thing, the through line is anatomy and physiology. It's understanding how this human operating system works, and how to optimize it.” - Kayla Osterhoff“And I understand that my body is just not a tool for me to use. It's my partner. And so I have to treat my partner really well and stay in a healthy relationship with my partner so that we can both thrive.” - Kayla OsterhoffConnect with Kayla:Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/biocurious_kayla/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/kayla-osterhoff/ LEAVE A REVIEW + help someone who wants to explode their business growth by sharing this episode or click here to listen to our previous episodes. Dreamcatchers is an inclusive organization that targets people's interest in being more instead of a certain demographic. We have people from all walks of life at many different ages. Find out more at www.dreamsshouldbereal.com. Find out more about Jerome at www.d3v3loping.com or www.myersmethods.com.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Oct. 9, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the newly-inaugurated government in the Horn of Africa state of Ethiopia; Mali has accused France of training terrorists inside the West African nation; France has been criticized for its colonial legacy at a joint conference held with African countries; and NATO is preparing to deepen its intervention in Africa under the guise of combatting Islamic extremism. In the second hour we hear a briefing from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director General, Dr. John Nkengasong, on the current state of the COVID-19 pandemic on the continent. Finally, we review some of the most pressing and burning issues in Africa and the international community.

The Documentary Podcast
The Story of Aids: 1. The beginning

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 50:35


We return to the beginning of the global Aids crisis and explore the personal and political struggles of the epidemic, as it unfolded in two very different countries – the United States and South Africa – and hear stories from people who fought through it, and survived. The series begins in the USA, where 40 years ago the Centers for Disease Control published a memo flagging a rare pneumonia found in five previously healthy, young gay men in California. Two of the men had died. These would be the first recorded cases of Aids in the world – a disease which would go on to kill 35 million people.

Second Chance Cinema
Outbreak (Be Kind, Rewind Edition!)

Second Chance Cinema

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 63:40


Outbreak is a 1995 American medical disaster film directed by Wolfgang Petersen and based on Richard Preston's 1994 nonfiction book The Hot Zone. The film stars Dustin Hoffman, Rene Russo, Morgan Freeman and Donald Sutherland, and co-stars Cuba Gooding Jr., Kevin Spacey and Patrick Dempsey. The film focuses on an outbreak of a fictional ebolavirus and orthomyxoviridae-like Motaba virus, in Zaire and later in a small town in California. It is primarily set in the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the fictional town of Cedar Creek, California. Outbreak's plot speculates how far military and civilian agencies might go to contain the spread of a deadly, contagious disease. A real-life outbreak of the Ebola virus was occurring in Zaire when the film was released.

Dying to Ask
Simone Biles And Jordan Chiles On How To Live Forward

Dying to Ask

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 33:54


Olympic gymnast Simone Biles has four gymnastics moves named after her. She's the G.O.A.T (greatest of all time) despite what she went through in Tokyo. And to many, she's the greatest because of what she did in Tokyo. Simone Biles' greatest legacy may be the fact that she went public with her mental health challenges brought on by the pressure of the Olympics and the public attention of the Larry Nassar sex abuse scandal. Biles let people everywhere know that it's OK to not be OK. In doing so, she started a global conversation on mental health and anxiety that clearly needed to be had after the world has shared in a brutal pandemic experience. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates four in 10 adults this year are dealing with anxiety or a full-blown depressive disorder. And that's just the people who've reached out for help. The reality is likely much higher given the stress of pandemic life. Biles proved sometimes you have to step back in order to step back in. And, say it with me, that's OK. This fall, Biles and many of her teammates and gymnastics friends are touring the country with the "Gold Over America Tour." She's proving you can move forward, despite any challenges you face. She and her Tokyo teammate Jordan Chiles are my guests in this week's episode. On this Dying to Ask: How to keep going when the whole world knows your business How to live forward when the world wants to look back And what it's like to be on a tour bus with Simone Biles and Jordan Chiles

Marijuana Tomorrow
Episode 76 - Cannabis in the workplace questions? We've got weed answers...

Marijuana Tomorrow

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 70:16


This week we'll take a look at the latest comments from Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, as he says key Senators have an agreement not to advance cannabis banking reform, before legalization.  And then we'll take a look at cannabis in the workplace as both the Wall Street Journal AND the Centers for Disease Control weigh in with some questions about the new normal, workers comp claims and when is it appropriate to consume with a client? We'll be discussing all these stories and more on the BEST cannabis podcast in the business... As we like to say around here, “Everyone knows what happened in marijuana today, but you need to know what's happening in Marijuana Tomorrow!”   ----more---- Segment 1 - Majority Leader Schumer's Got A Brand New Deal https://www.marijuanamoment.net/chuck-schumer-says-key-senators-have-agreement-not-to-advance-marijuana-banking-reform-before-legalization/ ----more---- Segment 2 - Cannabis in the workplace? The WSJ and CDC have some questions... and we've got the weed answers!! https://www.wsj.com/articles/is-it-ever-ok-to-get-stoned-with-a-client-and-other-questions-as-pot-comes-to-work-11632907802   https://blogs.cdc.gov/niosh-science-blog/2021/09/30/wci-cannabis/ ----more---- This episode of Marijuana Tomorrow is brought to you by Cannabeta Realty.

Public Health Review Morning Edition
42: New Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome Report

Public Health Review Morning Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 7:20


Dr. Nirav Shah, ASTHO President and Director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, discusses concerns of workshop participants about the way Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) decisions are communicated; Ericka McGowan, ASTHO's Senior Director of Emerging Infectious Disease, writes a blog article sharing seven things to know about vaccines for pregnant people; Priyanka Surio, ASTHO's Senior Director for Public Health Data Modernization and Informatics, reviews a new report assessing data collection related to Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome; and ASTHO promotes key job openings. The National Academies Webpage: FDA EUA Workshop ASTHO Blog Article: Pregnancy, breastfeeding, and COVID-19 vaccines – Seven things to know ASTHO Report: Strengthening health agencies' Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome surveillance through consensus-driven data standards and practices ASTHO Webpage: Job opportunities in public health and at ASTHO

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Dr Ina Park and Log Off Movement's Celine Bernhardt-Lanier and Aliza Kopans

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 116:10


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more On Today's Show 32 minute News Recap Dr Ina Park begins at 34 mins  From InaPark.net : I was born and raised in the San Francisco Bay Area.  My parents are immigrants from South Korea who had an arranged marriage and ended up actually liking each other.  Being a first-generation Asian kid in the US, the extent of my sex education from my parents was, “don't have sex before you get married or we will kick you out of the house.” (In case you are wondering, I was already sexually active by the time I received this advice) My career in sexual health began as a peer educator at the University of California-Berkeley, where I dressed up as a giant condom and performed a live demo with a prophylactic and a banana on the steps of Sproul Hall.  After that there was no looking back: sexual health, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and HIV prevention have been a steady presence in my life ever since.  After receiving my medical degree from UCLA, I completed residency in Family Medicine at Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles.  I then followed my husband to the University of Minnesota-School of Public Health for my master's degree. I possess a deep love for Minnesota, but two winters there was enough for me.  I settled back in California, where I completed a fellowship in Sexually Transmitted Diseases at the UC San Francisco School of Medicine (UCSF).  After all this training it was time to get a real job.  I'm now an Associate Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at UCSF.  I also serve as the Medical Director of the California Prevention Training Center and a Medical Consultant for the Division of STD Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  A few years ago, I decided that my time on this earth would be best spent making people feel better about their sex lives, reducing stigma around STIs, conducting good science and sharing it with the world as best I can.  So I decided to try my hand at writing a book about STIs, Strange Bedfellows, and someone (who is not related to me) thought it was good enough to publish.  Writing a book is similar to pregnancy and childbirth; it's a hell of a lot harder than it looks, and when it's over you need a few years to forget how bad it was before you can think of doing it again.  I live in Berkeley with my husband and two sons.  If I had more time, I would plant vegetables, pickle them, knit and brew bone broth.  I don't do any of those things.  I do practice yoga, and feebly attempt to meditate from time to time, but most of my waking hours are spent parenting and thinking about syphilis.   If you'd like me to come and speak to your group about my book or generally about the topic of sex and STIs or sexual health, please contact me here Buy Strange Bedfellows ------------------------------------------------------------- 1:22 At LOG OFF, we are passionate about lowering social media's impact on mental health while teaching teenage users and their parents about how to navigate the vast inner -workings of life on social media. Celine Bernhardt-Lanier is a Franco-American  high school senior and the CEO of LOG OFF. In 2020, she launched a digital wellbeing initiative by helping teens connect better with others, their true selves, and nature as a means to promote healthier use of technology. A teen leader on the boards of Fairplay and LookUp.live, Celine is a certified digital wellness educator with the Digital Wellness Institute, and a guest student of Stanford University's Digital Wellness course. She is the creator of a digital wellbeing resource for parents, adult professionals and youth; She also is the author of an article on “Nomophobia” and digital wellbeing in the United States and Spain. Celine also is a global speaker and moderator through podcasts, youth summits, and other events for youth and adult audiences worldwide. Aliza Kopans is a first-year at Brown University and a Digital Wellness Youth Activist serving on Fairplay's Action Network Advisory Board and LookUp.Live's Teen Leadership Council. Co-creator of "Dear Parents," a digital well-being resource from teens to parents and co-founder of "Tech(nically) Politics," a youth-led movement aimed at changing governmental regulations of digital spaces, Aliza is dedicated to creating change towards a human—not screen—focused world. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page

In Conversation
This Week In Conversation: Evictions And Utilities

In Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 39:32


If you're a renter trying to keep a roof over your head or a landlord relying on housing income, these last few months have been particularly unsettling. The federal moratorium on evictions has ended, and even with financial assistance available, it's a confusing and stressful time. On this week's “In Conversation,” we discussed the current state of evictions and utility shutoffs in Louisville and Kentucky at large.  In August, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the latest moratorium on evictions, put in place by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help renters who had income loss because of COVID-19. There is no longer a state or federal law that prevents evictions because of COVID-19, but there is money residents can apply for to help pay their rent and utilities. We talked about that and unpacked some of the legal tangles tenants and landlords have to wade through.

UF Health Podcasts
CDC bans dog importations from certain countries

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


This summer, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspended the importation of…

UF Health Podcasts
CDC bans dog importations from certain countries

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021


This summer, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suspended the importation of…

20-Minute Health Talk
How our environment shapes our health

20-Minute Health Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 20:50


What goes on in our home, neighborhoods and community all have a major impact on our health. Chronic issues like diabetes and heart disease are more prevalent in vulnerable communities, which also tend to face more environmental challenges. Northwell is hosting the 1st Annual Raise Health Forum on Oct. 5, 2021. This free virtual event will cast a light on issues including Health Equity, Women's Health and Environmental Health.  Debbie Salas-Lopez, MD, Stacey Rosen, MD, and Jacqueline Moline, MD, will each host panels addressing these issues and the role health systems can play. Register at https://raisehealth21.app.rsvpify.com/  Full agenda: 11:00 am ET - Why We're Here Michael Dowling, President & CEO, Northwell Health 11:05 am ET - Welcome & Introduction David Battinelli, MD, SVP and Chief Medical Officer, Northwell Health 11:10 am ET - By the Numbers: Social Determinants of Health This data-driven presentation will highlight the numbers and metrics behind the Social Determinants of Health as driven by environmental, social, and gender-based inputs. Kulleni Gebreyes, Director of Health Equity Institute, Deloitte 11:20 am ET - Reaching the Hard to Reach: Equitable Healthcare Access, and the Role of Community Leadership This cross-sector conversation will explore how and why certain communities are harder to engage around healthcare delivery, and share best practices that both faith and community leaders and private sector leaders are using to gain trust and unlock healthcare delivery in our communities. Taking a particular look through the lens of Covid-19, especially around testing, treatment, clinical trials, and vaccine access and delivery, it will ask the question: what does this mean for engaging communities around other health risk factors, and for health equity outcomes overall? Marcus Osborne, Senior Vice President, Walmart Health, Walmart Megan Callahan, President, Healthcare, Lyft Rev. Dr. Malcolm Byrd, Pastor, Chief of Protocol, Mother AME Zion Church Moderator: Jennifer Mieres, MD, Senior Vice President, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer, Northwell Health 11:40 am ET - Breaking the Mold in Women's Health For too long, our medical establishment and practices have failed to make the distinction in treating males and females in a number of areas, including clinical trials, treatment prescriptions, physician education, and more. This conversation will explore the uniqueness of women's health, and how we should be treating the patient based on key differences between the sexes, the implications for the healthcare community, and how the medical field can and should implement changes moving forward. Janine Clayton, MD, FARVO, Director, Office of Research on Women's Health, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Nancy Brown, Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association Moderator: Stacey Ellyn Rosen, MD, Senior Vice President, Women's Health, Katz Institute for Women's Health, Northwell Health 12:00 pm ET - The World Around Us: How our Environment is Shaping our Health The physical environment is a key contributor to our health — the air we breathe, the food we ingest, and even the design of our physical spaces all contribute to our health outcomes. In an ever changing climate and environmental landscape, how can stakeholders take measures to ensure we are maximizing community health? Karen Hacker, MD, MPH, Director, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Whitney Austin Gray, PhD, WELL AP, LEED AP, SVP of Research, International WELL Building Institute Corey Stern, Partner, Levy Konigsberg Moderator: Jacqueline Moline, MD, MSc, FACP, FACOEM, Senior Vice President, Occupational Medicine, Epidemiology and Prevention, Northwell Health 12:20 pm ET - The Power of Innovation: How Technology Will Power the Future of Health Across health equity, women's health, and environmental health, we know that the solutions we seek will be powered by the same approach and mindset that has powered the medical field for centuries: the innovation mindset. How can cutting-edge technology and new approaches to healthcare help ensure a positive future for the health of our communities? Ann Aerts, Head of the Novartis Foundation, Novartis Shez Partovi, Chief Innovation & Strategy Officer, Royal Philips Deena Shakir, Partner, Lux Capital Moderator: Debbie Salas-Lopez, MD, MPH, Senior Vice President, Community and Population Health, Northwell Health 12:45 pm ET - The Patient Story Highlighting the racial and ethnic disparities in healthcare. Michelle R. Connell Hosted by: Zenobia Brown, MD, MPH, Vice President and Medical Director, Population Health, Northwell Health 12:55 pm ET - Raise Health Michael Dowling, President & CEO, Northwell Health

Coronavirus: Everything You Need to Know
CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky COVID Update

Coronavirus: Everything You Need to Know

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 27:20


Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rochelle Walensky joins Dr. Marc Siegel and offers insight into the CDC's decisions on COVID boosters, the importance of masking and vaccines, and the role mandates have in helping stay ahead of the spread of the virus and its variants.

Mayo Clinic Q&A
Vaccines and kids — what you need to know about COVID-19, flu

Mayo Clinic Q&A

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 38:31


With flu season approaching, Mayo Clinic experts remind parents of the importance of vaccinating children for influenza and COVID-19 when possible. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)recommends everyone 6 months and older get vaccinated for flu each year. The CDC also says people who are eligible can be vaccinated for flu and COVID-19 at the same time. Currently, children ages 12 and older are permitted to get vaccinated for COVID-19 using the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine under terms of the Food and Drug Administration's emergency use authorization. Experts anticipate that the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine will soon be approved for emergency use authorization for children 5-11.On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Angela Mattke, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician and host of Ask The Mayo Mom, discusses children and vaccines with Dr. Robert Jacobson, a Mayo Clinic pediatrician. Dr. Jacobson co-chairs the AskMayoExpert Knowledge Content Board on Immunizations and Vaccinations, and he is medical director for Mayo Clinic's Primary Care in Southeast Minnesota Immunization Program.

PBS NewsHour - Full Show
September 30, 2021 - PBS NewsHour full episode

PBS NewsHour - Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 52:59


Thursday on the NewsHour, Congress passes a key government funding measure, but Democrats remain divided over critical legislative negotiations. The Centers for Disease Control issues an urgent appeal to pregnant Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19. As Mozambique battles an ISIS-affiliated insurgency, we examine the drivers of the conflict and the few options left for everyday citizens. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Health
Only 32% of pregnant Americans are vaccinated, with divide worsening along racial lines

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 5:20


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued its most urgent appeal for pregnant individuals to get the COVID-19 vaccine. New CDC data shows that pregnant people are twice as likely to be hospitalized due to the virus. Just 32% of pregnant Americans are currently vaccinated, and the racial disparities are stark. Amna Nawaz explores the issue with gynecologist Dr. Joia Crear-Perry. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Only 32% of pregnant Americans are vaccinated, with divide worsening along racial lines

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 5:20


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued its most urgent appeal for pregnant individuals to get the COVID-19 vaccine. New CDC data shows that pregnant people are twice as likely to be hospitalized due to the virus. Just 32% of pregnant Americans are currently vaccinated, and the racial disparities are stark. Amna Nawaz explores the issue with gynecologist Dr. Joia Crear-Perry. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Teleforum
Litigation Update: Alabama Association of Realtors v. HHS

Teleforum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 50:53


On August 26, 2021, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled in Alabama Association of Realtors v. HHS that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had exceeded its authority in issuing a nationwide ban on evictions. Brett Shumate, counsel of record for the Alabama Association of Realtors, joins us to discuss the litigation, the implications of the Supreme Court's decision, and other pending cases involving the CDC's eviction moratorium.Featuring: -- Brett Shumate, Partner, Jones Day -- Moderator: Daniel Suhr, Senior Attorney, Liberty Justice Center

The Forum Podcasts
Students discuss wearing masks in class

The Forum Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 8:50


Recorded and Edited by Forum Staff Reporter Brooklyn Covington, featuring Adrianna Franco and Wyatt Bringhurst. As classes move back to in person for the Fall semester, masks are required in all shared, indoor spaces on campus for all individuals (vaccinated or not) consistent with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations, according to Westminster's new mask and vaccine requirements page. Westminster College requires everyone, including contractors and visitors, to follow its guidelines when on campus, according to its coronavirus (COVID-19) resources page. Wyatt Bringhurst, a senior business management major, came to Westminster as a transfer student in Fall 2020. Bringhurst said he was skeptical at first about coming back to campus when Dr. Glenn Smith, the dean of students and vice president for student affairs, released an announcement on Aug. 5 of the current mask and vaccine requirement before the Fall semester started.

FAACT's Roundtable
Ep. 86: Food Allergy Life - How to Pack Emergency Go and Stay Bags

FAACT's Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 22:19


Floods, fires, and hurricanes dominated the news of summer 2021. But those with food allergies need to remain prepared for natural disasters and emergencies since access to safe foods may be challenging. We sit down with Kristin M. Osborne, FAACT's Vice President of Education, to explore how to create your own custom bag to grab-and-go if you need to leave your home quickly or if you need to shelter in place.To keep you in the know, below are helpful links:Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Family Emergency Kit Checklist FAACT's College Resource CenterYou can find the FAACT Roundtable Podcast on Pandora, Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google Podcast, Stitcher,  iHeart Radio, Podcast Chaser, Deezer, and Listen Notes.Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, & Pinterest.Sponsored by: DBV Technologies

CEimpact Podcast
The Science of Masks

CEimpact Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 30:20


Anti-mask and anti-vaccine fervor are causing an overload of the healthcare system and leading to increased mortality and morbidity. Three publications recently released, including a randomized controlled trial, evaluate community masking on COVID-19 spread.Redeem your CPE or CME credit here! References and resources: Abaluck J, Kwong L, Styczynski A, et al. The Impact of Community Masking on COVID-19: A Cluster-Randomized Trial in Bangladesh. Available at: https://www.poverty-action.org/publication/impact-community-masking-covid-19-cluster-randomized-trial-bangladesh. Bazant M, Bush J. A guideline to limit indoor airborne transmission of COVID-19. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Apr 2021, 118 (17) e2018995118; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2018995118. Center for Disease Control. Morbidity and mortality weekly report: MMWR. [Atlanta, GA]: US Dept of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control. Sept 10, 2021.Continuing Education Information:Learning Objectives: 1. Describe the Abaluck et al trial, including benefits and applications2. Describe the evidence base for public health interventions, including difficulties for randomized controlled studies0.05 CEU | 0.5 HrsACPE UAN: 0107-0000-21-338-H01-PInitial release date: 09/28/21Expiration date: 09/28/22Complete CPE & CME details can be found here!

Cannabis Talk 101
Young adult cannabis consumers are nearly twice as likely to suffer from a heart attack.

Cannabis Talk 101

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 60:29


Researchers analyzed health data from over 33,000 adults ages 18 to 44 included in US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of the 17% of adults who reported using cannabis within the previous month, 1.3% later had a heart attack while only 0.8% of non-cannabis users reported the same. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Comfortable Being Uncomfortable
Is there a Racial Disparity in Media Coverage of Minorities Gone Missing?

Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 71:00


After a couple of weeks off, the crew of CBU are back and guess who is back! In Episode 19 (not heard due to technical difficulties in recording), Rob has joined back from an almost year long vacation and brings a his new Rob's Rant segment to the show! All in all, the crew discuss the major concern from many Americans regarding the coverage of the missing Gabby Petito and comparison of the lack of coverage for missing minorities over the years. It's call Comfortable Being Uncomfortable for a reason... so tune in. Disclaimer: Rob's Rant segment covers his own personal views and opinions regarding the COVID-19 Vaccine. Rob is not a certified physician and is not portraying one. All COVID-19 facts and information should be reviewed on the Center for Disease Control website. Thank you! Catch all of the live showings at https://www.facebook.com/comfortable2uncomfortable.talk/ Sundays at 12PM Eastern! #comfortablebeinguncomfortable --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: R&B star R. Kelly found guilty of racketeering, immoral acts across state lines

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 4:35


A federal jury in New York found rhythm and blues star R. Kelly guilty of racketeering and crossing state lines for immoral acts. President Joe Biden defended giving booster shots for COVID-19 now that the Centers for Disease Control has approved Pfizer's third dose for certain groups. At least two-thirds of Britain's gas stations are out of fuel due to a shortage of truckers and panic buying. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - World
News Wrap: R&B star R. Kelly found guilty of racketeering, immoral acts across state lines

PBS NewsHour - World

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 4:35


A federal jury in New York found rhythm and blues star R. Kelly guilty of racketeering and crossing state lines for immoral acts. President Joe Biden defended giving booster shots for COVID-19 now that the Centers for Disease Control has approved Pfizer's third dose for certain groups. At least two-thirds of Britain's gas stations are out of fuel due to a shortage of truckers and panic buying. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Sept. 25, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the visit of Rwandan President Paul Kagame to the northern region of Mozambique; South African President Cyril Ramaphosa has delivered an address to the nation in observance of Heritage Day; the World Health Organization has announced that COVAX will decline its COVID-19 vaccines by 25%; and a Chinese executive for a high tech company has been released from Canadian custody in a prisoner exchange. In the second hour we will listen to addresses delivered at the United Nations General Assembly 76th Session held during the week. Speeches by the Secretary General, the Deputy Prime Minister of Ethiopia and the President of Tanzania are reviewed. Finally, we hear a report from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director General Dr. John Nkengasong.

The FOX News Rundown
Fox News Rundown Extra: Dr. Scott Gottlieb On The Mistakes Made During Coronavirus Pandemic

The FOX News Rundown

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 22:28


This week, Pfizer announced that a lower dose for its COVID vaccine is safe and effective for children ages 5-11. The company says it will seek FDA approval. Earlier this week, host Jessica Rosenthal spoke with former FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb who weighed in on children under the age of 12 being eligible for the vaccine and the FDA's recent decision regarding booster shots. Dr. Gottlieb also talked about his new book "Uncontrolled Spread." The conversation was too long and we could not include everything from the original conversation with Dr. Gottlieb. On today's Fox News Rundown Extra you'll hear more about his new book, that includes criticism of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and why he thinks they were not the right agency to fully rely on to handle this pandemic. He explains some of the mistake the CDC made throughout the pandemic including their failure to deploy a diagnostic test at scale in the beginning of the coronavirus crisis. He also explains how the CDC's 6-feet requirement guidance was the single most costly recommendation in the entire pandemic. Plus, he shares how we can avoid these mistakes in the future.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
News Wrap: CDC approves boosters for older, high-risk Americans and frontline workers

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 6:33


In our news wrap Friday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved booster shots for older and high-risk Americans, adding frontline workers to the list. Vice President Kamala Harris had her own COVID scare moments before an interview with ABC's "The View." A migrant encampment in Del Rio, Texas where thousands of Haitian migrants had converged this week has now been cleared. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Rio Bravo qWeek
Episode 67 - Covid, Food, and HIV

Rio Bravo qWeek

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 19:03


Episode 67: Covid, Food, and HIV.  Medical students discuss the relationship between high cholesterol and COVID-19, the effect of food order in postprandial glucose and insulin, and HIV history. Moderated by Hector Arreaza, MD.  During this episode you will listen to three medical students discussing some topics that they found interesting during their family medicine rotation. All the credit goes to them because they read these topics and provided a very good summary. I hope you enjoy it.____________________High Cholesterol and COVID-19By Milan Hinesman, MS3, Ross University School of MedicineGiven the current state of the world, there's been a lot more attention to COVID-19 presentation, risks, and treatment. One study conducted by Dr. Kun Zhang and collaborators shows that there may be a relationship between higher total cholesterol levels and ApoB levels to increased risk of COVID-19 infection[1]. Dr. Zhang used a mendelian randomization from the UK Biobank data to test for lipid effects on COVID susceptibility and severity. The study performed analysis of data from the host genetics initiative consisting of more than 14,000 cases and more than one million controls showing a potential positive causal effect between high total cholesterol and ApoB and COVID susceptibility. A mendelian randomization is a process of taking genes which functions are already known and measuring their response to exposure to a disease in observational studies[2]. In short, high cholesterol and high ApoB are linked to COVID-19 infection.This is Rio Bravo qWeek, your weekly dose of knowledge brought to you by the Rio Bravo Family Medicine Residency Program from Bakersfield, California. Our program is affiliated with UCLA, and it's sponsored by Clinica Sierra Vista, Let Us Be Your Healthcare Home. __________________________Impact of food order on glucose after meals.   By Yvette Singh, MS3, American University of the CaribbeanIn the management of diabetes, health care providers usually assess glycemic control with fasting plasma glucose and pre-prandial glucose measurements, as well as by measuring Hemoglobin A1c. Therapeutic goals for Hemoglobin A1c and pre-prandial glucose levels have been established based on the results of controlled clinical trials. Unfortunately, many patients with diabetes fail to achieve their glycemic goals. Elevated glucose after eating may be the cause of poor glycemic control leading to vascular complications. Postprandial hyperglycemia is one of the earliest abnormalities of glucose homeostasis associated with type 2 diabetes. This is one of the important therapeutic targets for glycemic control. Current studies show that the amount and timing of carbs in the diet primarily influence blood glucose levels. Other studies also show that eating whey protein before meals, as well as changing the macronutrients in meals, reduces postprandial glucose levels; however, these studies did not have patients with type 2 diabetes. The main author of this study was Alpana P. Shukla and many other collaborators. The title is Food Order Has a Significant Impact on Postprandial Glucose and Insulin Levels, published by the American Diabetes Association on Diabetes Care in July 2015.This study was performed to analyze the order of food consumption with vegetables, protein and carbohydrates and its effects on postprandial glucose in overweight/obese patients with type 2 diabetes being treated with metformin. Subjects were studied for 1 week. They were given a meal with the same number of calories, after fasting for 12 hours: 55g protein, 68g carbs, and 16g fat. They were asked to eat carbs first, then to eat vegetables and protein fifteen minutes later. This order was reversed during the second week. Their postprandial glucose and insulin levels were measured at 30/60/120 mins after meals. The statistical studies showed an average post prandial glucose decrease by more than 25% when protein was consumed first. As well as the average post prandial insulin levels decreased by more than 40%. These results demonstrated that the timing of carbs during a meal has a significant impact on glucose and insulin levels comparable to some pharmacological agents. Reduced insulin excretion with this meal pattern may also improve insulin sensitivity. This may help patients with type 2 diabetes control their HbA1c, and possibly help reverse early diabetes. Educating patients about this approach is not controlling how much they are eating or restricting their diet so patients will likely comply with this recommendation. Eat your protein first!The potential problems of this study are that it was a small sample size (11 patients), limited food types, and insulin was measured only up to 120 minutes after meals. Further studies are needed to demonstrate the full effectiveness of this recommendation.___________________HIV Series Part I: HIV HistoryBy Robert Dunn, MS3, Ross University School of Medicine This is an HIV series for the Rio Bravo qWeek Podcast. The following episodes will include some of the history of HIV, transmissibility, the PARTNER-1 and PARTNER-2 studies, and will finalize with a full episode on HIV prevention. Today we are starting with HIV history.Prejudice against those with HIV stems from the history surrounding the virus. Between 1981-1983, cases of rare infections like Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) and aggressive cancers like Kaposi Sarcoma were appearing predominantly amongst gay men and injection drug users.  Even children were presenting with AIDS creating misconceptions of how the disease was transmitted by touch. By 1982, this syndrome was referred to as the Gay-Related Immunodeficiency (GRID), which we now know as AIDS. Some History of HIVThe start of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was thought to have started in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 1920 when the virus crossed species to humans and gave its ability to infect humans[4]. In 1981, five young gay men in Los Angeles, California, presented with a rare lung infection called Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). Two other groups of men also presented with a rare and aggressive cancer called Kaposi Sarcoma, in New York and California. By December of the same year, the first case of PCP was found in an injection drug user. And by the end of the year, there were 270 reported cases of this severe immunodeficiency and about 121 of them had already died from it, almost 50%. In 1982, due to the prevalence of these rare diseases being present among gay men, the syndrome was called the Gay-Related Immune Deficiency (GRID). The CDC later officially called the disease the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The term “gay cancer” was used in Venezuela before AIDS was known.In 1983, the disease was found in both women and children. In May 1983, in a joint conference between the Pasteur Institute in France and the National Cancer Institute, they announced that LAV and HTLV-III were the same virus and the cause of AIDS.In 1985, Ryan White, a teenager with hemophilia was banned from school when he was diagnosed with HIV after he received contaminated blood products. Ryan later died at 18 years old due to AIDS-related illnesses. At the same time, the FDA licensed the first commercial blood test to detect HIV. A foundation was later created to provide primary care and medications for low-income HIV patients.In 1987, the first antiretroviral drug, Zidovudine (AZT) was approved by the FDA to treat for HIV. In 1991, the famous basketball player Magic Johnson announced he tested positive for HIV and retired immediately. After his retirement he planned to educate young people about the virus which helped dispel stereotypes. Also in 1991, the famous singer of Queen announced he had AIDS and died the next day.In 1993, the movie Philadelphia with Tom Hanks promoted further discussion about HIV and AIDS. In June 1995, the first protease inhibitor was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which started the era for Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART). This brought down the rate of AIDS-related deaths and hospitalizations by 60-80%. Of special note, in 1986, the FDA passed the policy to ban all men who had sex with men (MSM) from 1977 onward, from donating blood or plasma to avoid the risk of transmitting HIV or Hepatitis A. This policy was amended in December 2015, when the revised policy said any MSM within the last 12 months, would need to wait at least 1 year before donating blood. In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, the FDA amended it its policy once more to decrease the wait time to 3 months form the last time the man had sex with another man.____________________________Conclusion: Now we conclude our episode number 67 “Covid, Food, and HIV.” Kudos to Milan, Yvette and Robert, they presented relevant information for our practice of medicine. They taught us that high cholesterol is a risk for COVID-19 infection; Also, when you eat proteins first, your glucose and insulin after meals are lower than when you eat carbs first; and you will be hearing from Robert for a couple episodes regarding HIV. Today he gave us a little piece of HIV history. Even without trying, every night you go to bed being a little wiser.Thanks for listening to Rio Bravo qWeek. If you have any feedback about this podcast, contact us by email RBresidency@clinicasierravista.org, or visit our website riobravofmrp.org/qweek. This podcast was created with educational purposes only. Visit your primary care physician for additional medical advice. This week we thank Hector Arreaza, Milan Hinesman, Yvette Singh, and Robert Dunn. Audio edition: Suraj Amrutia. See you next week! _____________________References:Zhang, K. Dong, S. Guo, et. al., Causal Associations Between Blood Lipids and COVID-19 Risk: A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study. Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, originally published on September 9, 2021. https://doi.org/10.1161/ATVBAHA.121.316324. What is Mendelian Randomization and How Can it be Used as a Tool for Medicine and Public Health? Opportunities and Challenges, Webinar announcement given by Professor George Davey Smith on November 27, 2018. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/genomics/events/precision_med_pop.htm Alpana P. Shukla, Radu G. Iliescu, Catherine E. Thomas and Louis J. Aronne, Food Order Has a Significant Impact on Postprandial Glucose and Insulin Levels, Diabetes Care 2015 Jul; 38(7): e98-e99. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc15-0429. History of HIV and AIDS Overview. Avert, October 10, 2019. https://www.avert.org/professionals/history-hiv-aids/overview. Accessed on September 21, 2021. Shaw, Maggie. FDA's Revised Blood Donation Guidance for Gay Men Still Courts Controversy. AJMC, April 3, 2020. https://ajmc.com/view/fdas-revised-blood-donation-guidance-for-gay-men-still-courts-controvery. Accessed on September 21, 2021. BAYER, R. (2015), Science, Politics, and the End of the Lifelong Gay Blood Donor Ban. Milbank Quarterly, 93: 230-233. https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-0009.12114. Ways HIV can be Transmitted. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, April 21, 2021. https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/hiv-transmission/ways-people-get-hiv.html. Accessed on September 21, 2021.

PBS NewsHour - Health
How 'fits and starts' of booster science, rollout may affect U.S. vaccination goals

PBS NewsHour - Health

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 5:49


An advisory panel for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday recommended the Pfizer booster shots for people 65 and older, nursing home residents, and younger adults with underlying health issues. For a deeper look at that decision, Amna Nawaz is joined by Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo. She is a physician, epidemiologist and professor at the University of California, San Francisco. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How 'fits and starts' of booster science, rollout may affect U.S. vaccination goals

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 5:49


An advisory panel for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday recommended the Pfizer booster shots for people 65 and older, nursing home residents, and younger adults with underlying health issues. For a deeper look at that decision, Amna Nawaz is joined by Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo. She is a physician, epidemiologist and professor at the University of California, San Francisco. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Pushing The Limits
DNA Testing and Analysis for Disease Prevention and Health Optimisation with Kashif Khan

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 62:02


Health optimisation often involves a good diet, sleep, and exercise. But do we know how to implement practices that are compatible with our bodies? For some people, intense exercise can lead to more oxidative stress and inflammation! Not only that, some of us take medication and pills to treat pain and hormones, but are these really helping?   Small actions today can lead to big problems in the future.     Kashif Khan from The DNA Company joins us in this episode to talk about how understanding our DNA can help us make better choices for our health. Diseases can be prevented with healthy habits. But before you try any DNA testing, you should understand the nuances within the genetic industry. With Kashif's advice, you can learn to choose a provider that can help you take actionable steps. If you want to know more about the science behind DNA testing for health optimisation, then this episode is for you!   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity, or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, then contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again, but I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful, third party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of aging while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Discover how our bodies are a whole system of processes and how our genes can be affected by many factors such as lifestyle and behaviour. Learn the differences in DNA testing companies and how you can get the best value out of your reports. Understand how to boost your immunity and prevent diseases!      Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  Harness the power of NAD and NMN for anti-aging and longevity with NMN Bio.  A new program, BoostCamp, is coming this September at Peak Wellness! Past episodes with Dr Mansoor Mohammed: Episode 181 - Understanding Your Genetic Hormone Pathways Episode 160 - Understanding Your Own DNA   Connect with Kashif: LinkedIn I Twitter I Facebook      Know how you can change your lifestyle based on your genes. Learn more on The DNA Company.  Tiny Habits by Dr. BJ Fogg Books by Peter Diamandis and Steven Kotler The Future Is Faster Than You Think  Bold Abundance    Episode Highlights [04:09] Understanding What Your DNA Means Every process in your body is being driven by genetic instructions. Kashif's company set out to make these instructions more actionable for their clients. You can do a quick online search of ‘DNA testing near me' and get many hits, but you won't get the results you want out of these. Many of our diseases are preventable; consistently making the wrong choices can lead us to develop these illnesses.     Those choices will not be the same for everyone. You can look at your genetics to see what the right choices are for you.  [08:11] Know What You're Testing For Most companies offering DNA testing tend to make conclusions based on a single gene. However, the body is more complex than that.  Many of these DNA tests don't really dive deep into your health. To make their business model profitable, many businesses in the genetic industry sell their patient's data to pharmaceutical companies. The genetic industry has been used as a data collection machine. Kashif's vision for their company is to turn this situation around and derive key insights for their consumers.  [12:35] The Role of Hormones in Health  Kashif observes that their company has had the biggest impact on women's healthcare.  This is due to the massive gap between what women need and what is provided by traditional healthcare.  There is a widespread belief that women are supposed to have hormone-related issues like PMS. However, this should not be the case. Tune in to the full episode to find out how Kashif helped pinpoint his niece's hormone issues using DNA testing and analysis. [19:26] Covering Up the Symptoms The healthcare industry tends to look at a problem in isolation and try to treat it with medication.  Treating hormonal issues is not as simplistic as prescribing pills for the hormones a patient lacks. Listen to the full episode to hear more insights on this topic! For instance, we're led to believe that women are prone to breast cancer when they reach menopause. However, this condition is preventable.      [24:01] Applying AI to DNA Testing Kashif's company found it challenging to train clinicians to interpret results from DNA testing.  To remedy this problem, they are using AI technology to create personalised reports and recommendations.  As a result, their reports are now much more comprehensive. It even analyses your mood and behaviour—crucial factors when it comes to dealing with your health. [30:05] Understanding Your Mood and Behaviour   Lisa's high adrenaline and lack of dopamine receptors manifest in an action-oriented behaviour.  Kashif shares that having low dopamine receptors can also lead to addiction or depression. That's because you are predisposed to not experience reward and pleasure.  Curious to know how your genes affect your mood? Find out how DNA testing can shed a light on this in the full episode!  You can view your gene expressions two-fold: a weakness and a superpower. For instance, you may think that you are irritable. But that also makes you detail-oriented. [35:50] Change Takes Effort Kashif's company is focused on solving and preventing problems.  People may get great recommendations, but the real challenge lies in implementation and change.  Community and accountability are important to help people stay on track. Group accountability with people in similar situations can increase motivation and persistence.  [42:21] Prevention is the Key The current healthcare system is based on a reactive model rather than a preventive one.  Diseases can be prevented; we don't need to reach a point of crisis until we take action.  In the US, the Center for Disease Control created a Diabetes Prevention Program, the first of its kind in the country.  [47:31] Health at the Cellular Level Diseases are born from inflammation, which is based on cellular health. Cellular health depends on the body's capacity for detoxification and oxidative stress.  Simple activities like golfing can have long term effects. Kashif shares that golfers may be in danger of inhaling pesticides in golf courses.  Exercise may work for some people. However, people with weaker SOD2 are prone to oxidative stress and more toxicity in the blood.  Your genetics will dictate what kind and how much exercise you should do. Listen to the full episode to learn more! [56:34] The Future of Healthcare  Beyond DNA testing and analysis, it's important to have someone knowledgeable on your end. They can help patients get the most value out of the reports. New technologies tend to go through different phases. These involve deception, disruption, dematerialisation, demonetisation, and democratisation.  The technology in the genetic industry is becoming more accessible. It is now near the latter phases of technology development.    7 Powerful Quotes ‘We didn't go study DNA. There's enough science out there already. We studied people. We said, “Let's start at what's wrong with this person? What are they expressing as a symptom? Let's drill down genetically to see where is the system failing.”' ‘Of all the things we do, female hormone health is where we had the biggest impact. Not because we're the greatest, but because it's the worst experience in current healthcare.' ‘The DNA world looks at things in terms of disease. So you can speak at it that way. But there's so much more to it than that if you know how to interpret it.' ‘We believe coaching is primarily around accountability. So we have coaches we train that understand the reports, that can help.' ‘We're all coming out of the same model, I suppose this reactive healthcare model. Really, we're inventing the future of healthcare.‘ ‘That's only then when you have that persistence and the resilience to actually go through with these changes that you're actually going to get new results.' ‘This reactive system that we're living in at the moment and the current model is just bloody bandaids on festering wounds.'   About Kashif Kashif Khan is the founder and CEO of The DNA Company, a functional genomics company. They help people understand their unique genetic code and how to unlock their physical potential. If you're looking for ‘DNA testing near me', their company is the one to call. They ensure actionable advice through a comprehensive genomic profile.  Kashif is also the co-founder and CEO of Younutrients. Their company provides supplement formulations personalised to people's unique needs. In addition, he is also an investor and serial entrepreneur. He has helped build, scale, and run several businesses across different industries. He has advised early-stage startups and Fortune 500 companies including the Royal Bank of Canada and Cirque du Soleil.  Interested in Kashif's work? Check out The DNA Company.  You can also reach out to Kashif on LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook.          Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can be inspired to search for ‘DNA testing near me' and optimise their health.  Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa

Hacks & Wonks
Chat with Hugo Garcia, Burien City Council Candidate

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 40:10


Today on the show Hugo Garcia, City Council candidate for the city of Burien, joins Crystal to discuss the planning for growth and justice in a rapidly changing city, how to create more housing and ensure residents are able to afford to live in a city, and the vital importance of parks and public spaces. Fun fact from today's episode: Burien has more than 350 acres of parks. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's guest, Hugo Garcia, at @hugo4burien. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com.   Resources “Latino candidates triumph after Burien's nasty campaign” by Lilly Fowler from Crosscut: https://crosscut.com/2017/11/burien-election-city-council-pedro-olguin-jimmy-matta-racism  “Inequality by design: How redlining continues to shape our economy” by Amy Scott from Marketplace: https://www.marketplace.org/2020/04/16/inequality-by-design-how-redlining-continues-to-shape-our-economy/  “How Planning and Zoning Contribute to Inequitable Development, Neighborhood Health, and Environmental Justice” by Wilson et.al in Environmental Justice: http://www.ced.berkeley.edu/downloads/pubs/faculty/hutson_2008_environ-health.pdf  “In Washington state, housing is the question and the answer” by Shaun Scott for Crosscut: https://crosscut.com/opinion/2020/11/washington-state-housing-question-and-answer  “What is sweat equity?” from Habitat for Humanity: https://www.habitat.org/stories/what-is-sweat-equity  “Can Beacon Hill win the fight for quieter skies and a healthier neighborhood?” by Manola Secaira from Crosscut: https://crosscut.com/2019/06/can-beacon-hill-win-fight-quieter-skies-and-healthier-neighborhood  “Parks and Health” from the Centers for Disease Control: https://www.cdc.gov/healthyplaces/parks_trails/#health  “Near Roadway Air Pollution and Health: Frequently Asked Questions” from the Environmental Protection Agency: https://www.epa.gov/sites/default/files/2015-11/documents/420f14044_0.pdf    Transcript

Best of Today
Dr Anthony Fauci on America Opening Up

Best of Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 6:31


The US is easing its coronavirus travel restrictions, reopening to passengers from the UK, EU and other nations. The precise new rules have yet to be announced with the US Centre for Disease Control or CDC still to approve the AstraZeneca vaccine. Nick Robinson asks Dr Anthony Fauci, the President's Chief Medical Adviser, why this decision has been made now.

This Podcast Will Kill You
Ep 82 Anthrax: The Hardcore Spore

This Podcast Will Kill You

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 114:26


Twenty years ago this month, letters containing Bacillus anthracis spores were mailed to various politicians and news media offices in the US, resulting in illness, death, and a widespread fear that transformed anthrax from an agricultural disease or occupational hazard into a potential weapon of bioterrorism. In this episode, we explore the many dimensions of anthrax, from the different ways B. anthracis can cause disease to the incredibly long and varied history of the pathogen, a history of which bioterrorism is only a very recent part. Adding to anthrax's multifaceted nature is the fact that B. anthracis is an environmental pathogen, one that can greatly impact livestock and wild animals, which requires collaboration across fields to effectively identify and control anthrax outbreaks. To help us explore this pathogen from a One Health perspective, we were so thrilled to chat with Dr. Johanna Salzer, Veterinary Medical Officer in the Bacterial Special Pathogens Branch at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who filled us in on the veterinary side of anthrax, and Morgan Walker, spatial epidemiologist at the University of Florida, who talked us through the environmental factors that affect B. anthracis distribution and emergence. Tune in for a much more than surface-level look at this spore-forming pathogen. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay
Nicki Minaj vs the CDC and Wellness with Devi Brown

Higher Learning with Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 104:00


Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay lament the end of days as Nicki Minaj and the barbs take on the Center for Disease Control (4:02), then balance things out with some positivity as author and host of the Dropping Gems podcast Devi Brown stopped by to give some steps towards true healing (18:25). Oh yeah, and Diddy owes Jermaine Dupri an apology (51:11).  Hosts: Van Lathan and Rachel Lindsay  Guest: Devi Brown Producers: Trudy Joseph and Donnie Beacham Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Post Reports
Delta's stress test on schools

Post Reports

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 20:01


The Biden administration has made in-person learning a priority for this school year. Now that most kids are back in school, the question on everyone's mind is: Will it last? Read more:By now almost all students are back to learning in person. But what some school districts are calling vague guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has led to widely varying coronavirus protocols — only some districts are requiring masks, while others may not be properly notifying parents of positive cases at their kids' schools. With the delta variant surging, many parents, teachers and experts are frustrated with this patchwork response. Health and policy reporter Yasmeen Abutaleb shares how schools have fared in the first weeks of classes, and why the guidance from the White House isn't more prescriptive.