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American news magazine and website based in New York City

  • 2,631PODCASTS
  • 3,867EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 1, 2021LATEST
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Best podcasts about time magazine

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Latest podcast episodes about time magazine

Homemade
Chef José Andrés on Paella, Philanthropy and Mastering Your Fire

Homemade

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 36:20


This week on Homemade, host Sabrina Medora is joined by a true force of positivity in the culinary world. Chef José Andrés is known just as much for his generosity as he is for his recipes: Through founding World Central Kitchen, José and a dedicated team are able to arrive quickly in areas where natural disasters have occurred to cook and deliver meals to those in need. Thus, he's been named one of Time Magazine's 100 Most Influential People, been nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize and has been honored under President Obama as an ambassador for citizenship and naturalization. On today's show, you'll hear how Chef Andrés cooks with his wife and children, why World Central Kitchen has made remarkable strides during the pandemic, and how he lent a hand in creating a specific emoji on your smartphone!  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Ultimate Health Podcast
444: How to Free Your Mind and Live a Full & Meaningful Life | Dr. Steven Hayes

The Ultimate Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 108:38


Watch the full video interview on YouTube here: https://bit.ly/drstevenhayes444 Dr. Steven Hayes (@StevenCHayes) is a professor of psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. An author of 46 books and nearly 675 scientific articles, he is especially known for his work on "Acceptance and Commitment Therapy" or “ACT” which is one of the most widely used and researched new methods of psychological intervention over the last 20 years. Steve is ranked among the most cited psychologists in the word. His popular book Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life was written up in a 5 page story in Time Magazine and was for a time the bestselling self-help book in the United States. Steve's book, A Liberated Mind released to wide acclaim. In this episode, we discuss: Steve dedicated his life to becoming a psychologist The development of his panic disorder later in life Recalling his out of body experience What is Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)? The trouble with avoidance Give your mind a name Try using one-word repetition Psychological flexibility has six processes The selfish version of mindfulness At what age do negative thoughts start in kids? The problem with clinging to the positive Teaching kids situational awareness Are you on a hero's journey or are you writing a tragedy? The two different vagal systems How to pivot towards what matters You're emotions aren't unsafe The emotion of confidence Overcoming speech anxiety Using mindful awareness to beat anxiety Living with a liberated mind Seeking an ACT therapist Show sponsors: AquaOmega

Love What You Love
Episode 53: Podcasting with Alie Ward

Love What You Love

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 47:51


I freaking love podcasts. I love them. I subscribe to way too many to keep up with, I'm always on the lookout for new ones, and in January 2020, I got back into podcasting myself after 10 years focusing on historical fiction. Did I mention I love podcasts? Here's the cool thing: this week's guest hosts one of my very favorite podcasts! Alie Ward is an Emmy Award-winning science communicator. She's a writer, producer, and correspondent on too many dang shows to list (but I will, in the show notes!)  But her passion project is her comedic science show Ologies, named one of Time Magazine's top 50 podcasts! It was so fun to geek out with Alie about podcasting. In this episode, we talk releasing perfectionism; west coast vs east coast podcasts; strategic Chardonnay at an Emmy Awards after party; why failure isn't to be feared; finding your authentic voice; and so much more. Alie is a Daytime Emmy Award-winning science correspondent for CBS's "The Henry Ford's Innovation Nation with Mo Rocca,” and host of “Did I Mention Invention?” on the CW. She acts as a consulting producer on Netflix's “Ada Twist, Scientist,” produced by Michelle and Barack Obama-helmed Higher Ground. She has also recently consulted on their series “Waffles & Mochi,” as well as shows for HBO Max and Amazon Studios. She also appears on Netflix's science series “Brainchild” and Science Channel's "How to Build Everything.”    Find Alie: https://www.alieward.com https://www.alieward.com/ologies https://www.instagram.com/alieward https://twitter.com/alieward https://www.instagram.com/Ologies https://twitter.com/Ologies    Alie's favorite nonprofits: International Myeloma Foundation https://www.myeloma.org Over 100 nonprofits supported by Ologies, in honor of her guests: https://www.alieward.com/ologies-gives-back  *** My favorite podcasts (right now): Completely Arbortrary https://arbortrarypod.com/ Ear Biscuits https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ear-biscuits/id717407884 Echoes of India: A History Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/echoes-of-india-a-history-podcast/id1442080847 Fall of Civilizations Podcast https://fallofcivilizationspodcast.com/ Ologies https://www.alieward.com/ologies The Anthropocene Reviewed https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/anthropocene-reviewed The British History Podcast https://www.thebritishhistorypodcast.com/ The History of English https://historyofenglishpodcast.com/ The Lubber's Hole https://lubbershole.podbean.com/   My favorite nonprofits: Humane Society Silicon Valley https://hssv.org Southern Poverty Law Center https://www.splcenter.org Town Cats of Morgan Hill https://towncats.org World Central Kitchen https://wck.org   *** We're on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/lovewhatyoulovepod  Hang out with me at https://instagram.com/lovewhatyoulovepod or https://twitter.com/whatyoulovepod  LWYL merch! https://society6.com/lovewhatyoulovepod Need transcripts? Contact Emily White at The Wordary Emily@TheWordary.com  Check out my books at https://juliekrose.com  LWYL Music: Inspiring Hope by Pink-Sounds https://audiojungle.net/user/pink-sounds 

FratChat Podcast
Season 4 Ep#8: Things To Be Thankful For In 2021

FratChat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 65:28


It's Thanksgiving in America and the world is in chaos. But that doesn't mean this year hasn't brought plenty of great things to be thankful for! From legal weed to Zoom therapy, find out why 2021 is at least better than 2020, this week on the FratChat Podcast! Get 20% OFF + Free Shipping on all MANSCAPED products with promo code FRATCHAT at MANSCAPED.com! Follow us on all social media: Instagram: http://Instagram.com/FratChatPodcast Facebook: http://Facebook.com/FratChatPodcast Twitter: http://Twitter.com/FratChatPodcast Follow Carlos and CMO! Carlos on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/CarlosDoesTheWorld CMO on Instagram: http://Instagram.com/Chris.Moore.Comedy

The Takeaway
Multiple Guilty Verdicts for the Murder of Ahmaud Arbery 2021-11-29

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 46:33


Multiple Guilty Verdicts for the Murder of Ahmaud Arbery Nicole Lewis, senior editor of Jurisprudence at Slate, discusses guilty verdicts in Ahmaud Arbery murder case. The Omicron Variant and Vaccine Inequity Dr. Bhakti Hansoti, an associate professor of emergency medicine and international health at Johns Hopkins University and Bloomberg School of Public Health will join us to discuss the latest. Eating Leftovers in Style Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful joins The Takeaway to talk about how to make use of leftovers in style. And we also talk with him about his pasta, cascatelli, which was recently named by Time Magazine as one of the 100 best inventions of 2021. Rev. Dr. Jacqueline Lewis Talks About 'Fierce Love' She is the author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness That Can Heal the World and the host of the “Love.Period.” Podcast and she left our listeners with a timely message about the power of love and radical acceptance.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

The Takeaway
Multiple Guilty Verdicts for the Murder of Ahmaud Arbery 2021-11-29

The Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 46:33


Multiple Guilty Verdicts for the Murder of Ahmaud Arbery Nicole Lewis, senior editor of Jurisprudence at Slate, discusses guilty verdicts in Ahmaud Arbery murder case. The Omicron Variant and Vaccine Inequity Dr. Bhakti Hansoti, an associate professor of emergency medicine and international health at Johns Hopkins University and Bloomberg School of Public Health will join us to discuss the latest. Eating Leftovers in Style Dan Pashman, host of The Sporkful joins The Takeaway to talk about how to make use of leftovers in style. And we also talk with him about his pasta, cascatelli, which was recently named by Time Magazine as one of the 100 best inventions of 2021. Rev. Dr. Jacqueline Lewis Talks About 'Fierce Love' She is the author of Fierce Love: A Bold Path to Ferocious Courage and Rule-Breaking Kindness That Can Heal the World and the host of the “Love.Period.” Podcast and she left our listeners with a timely message about the power of love and radical acceptance.  For transcripts, see individual segment pages. 

Libromania
Jess Walter

Libromania

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 72:32


Walter is the author of seven novels, one book of short stories and one nonfiction book. His work has been selected three times for Best American Short Stories as well as the Pushcart Prize and Best American Nonrequired Reading. He's been published in, Harper's, Esquire, McSweeney's, Tin House, Ploughshares, the New York Times, the Washington Post and many others.He began his writing career in 1987 as a reporter for his hometown newspaper, The Spokesman-Review where he was a finalist for the 1992 Pulitzer Prize as part of a team covering the shootout and standoff at Ruby Ridge, in Northern Idaho. Eventually he wrote about this in his first book, Every Knee Shall Bow, in 1995. He has also worked as a screenwriter and has taught graduate creative writing at the University of Iowa, Pacific University, Eastern Washington and Pacific Lutheran.Walter has twice won the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award (for The Zero and We Live in Water), the Washington State Book Award (The Cold Millions) and was a finalist for the L.A. Times Book Prize (The Zero) and the PEN/USA Award in both fiction (The Zero) and nonfiction (Every Knee Shall Bow). His novel Beautiful Ruins was a #1 New York Times bestseller and spent more than a year on the bestseller list. It was also Esquire's Book of the Year and NPR Fresh Air's Novel of the Year. The Financial Lives of the Poets was Time Magazine's#2 novel of the year and Walter's story collection, We Live in Water, was longlisted for the Story Prize and the Frank O'Connor Short Story Award. Walter's latest novel is the national bestseller, The Cold Millions, A BOOK OF HISTROICAL FICTION “Featuring an unforgettable cast of cops and tramps, suffragists and socialists, madams and murderers, The Cold Millions is a tour de force from a “writer who has planted himself firmly in the first rank of American authors” (Boston Globe). See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Work From Home Show
S2Ep47: How Working From Home Can Impact Our Ocean's Fate with Dr. Sylvia A. Earle

The Work From Home Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 20:29


For a long time we thought of the oceans as expendable. As places we could dump trash and other items and not have to worry about them ever again. But then we became more educated and realized that, as Dr. Sylvia Earle put so well in her first book, our fate and the ocean's are one. The pandemic causing us to shift so hard toward working from home has definitely impacted our world, and our oceans. Adam and Naresh are joined by Dr. Earle to discuss what's happening today, whether we're doing enough to save our planet moving forward, and whether the work from home movement is helping the cause. Sylvia is the Founder of Deep Ocean Exploration and the Sylvia Earle Alliance (S.E.A.) & Mission Blue Research; National Geographic Society Explorer in Residence; First female Chief Scientist of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Time Magazine's Hero for the Planet in 1998; subject of the Emmy® Award Winning Netflix documentary, Mission Blue and Seaspiracy, and bestselling author of The World Is Blue: How Our Fate and the Ocean's Are One and the new book NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC OCEAN: A Global Odyssey. Website: www.Mission-Blue.org www.Patreon.com/WorkFromHomeShow www.WorkFromHomeShow.com

Finding Family
5. Matthew Barnett: The Dream Center

Finding Family

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 49:15


Matthew Barnett is co-founder of the Dream Center, a best-selling author, and pastor of what Time Magazine considers one of the three largest churches in America, the Angelus Temple. Through the Dream Center, each month more than 50,000 people access free services that include.... transitional housing for homeless families, veterans and youth emancipating from foster care, 1-3 year recovery programs for Men and Women Rescue program from human trafficking victims, Hunger/poverty relief outreaches, Foster Care Invention Program, and Adult Education and GED program. Learn more about their work at dreamcenterfoundation.org Follow on Instagram @ladreamcenter ________ Follow along and learn more about Finding Family at www.findingfamilypodcast.com Follow Julie on Instagram HERE and Chris HERE --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/finding-family/message

The Superset
36: Tonal Makes Time Magazine's 'Best Inventions' List plus our interview with Brandt Belson

The Superset

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 29:47


Tonal kicks off Gratitude Week. Tips on how to replace a move plus changes to the app. A complete rundown of all the new content. Coaches Jackson, Paul, and Nicolette have thoughtful posts to unpack. Tonal makes Time Magazine's list of best inventions. Rob Webb sits down with Venture Beat. Sacramento is getting a Tonal showroom. An article on Medium has some bad info about Tonal. Lance Bass loves his Tonal. Boxing champ Gervonta Davis is training with a Tonal. Tonal Talks focused on the Tonal Strength Institue and how to navigate the holidays. The December Challenge features Tony Hortons's 20-In-20. All this plus our interview with Brandt Belson!

Below the Line with James Beshara
#122 — Transformations from Good to Great — Jim Collins

Below the Line with James Beshara

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 154:27


Today's episode is with one of the greatest business authors ever, Jim Collins. Jim is one of the most inspirational figures in James' career. Not only did he inspire James, but he also is one of James' fathers, favorite authors. This has formed a bond at a young age between the two and has helped form many ideas in James' head. James and Jim cover many topics today, in one of our longest podcasts ever recorded, they talk about a wide range of VERY useful topics for founders and creators. From, breaking down Jim's personal rubric on writing a book to how an idea turns into a book. Jim explains why it is important to keep turning the flywheel even when you feel like abandoning it. James and Jim, also speak about how great leadership, can take a company, far beyond what is projected on paper. Jim also explains the difference between Good and Great. To conclude the episode, Jim speaks about luck and how not only good luck is inevitable but so is bad luck, he explains how not all time in life is equal and how you should zoom in on the good luck and reevaluate the bad luck. Find out more about Jim Collins here: https://twitter.com/level5leaders https://www.jimcollins.com/ Buy Jim's new book, "Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap and Others Don't" Here: https://www.amazon.com/Good-Great-Some-Companies-Others/dp/0066620996 https://bit.ly/Go_BelowtheLine Hit the show hotline and leave a question or comment for the show at 424-272-6640, email James questions directly at askbelowtheline@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter @ twitter.com/gobelowtheline Support Our Sponsors Magic Mind https://magicmind.co (Use Code BTL at Checkout for 20% off) About your host, James: James Beshara is a founder, investor, advisor, author, podcaster, and encourager based in Los Angeles, California. James has created startups for the last 12 years, selling one (Tilt, acquired by Airbnb), and invested in a few multi-billion dollar startups to date. He has spoken at places such as Y-Combinator, Harvard Business School, Stanford University, TechCrunch Disrupt, and has been featured in outlets like the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, and Time Magazine. He's been featured in Forbes, Time, and Inc Magazine's “30 Under 30” lists and advises startups all around the world. All of this is his “above the line” version of his background. Hear the other 90% of the story in the intro episode of Below The Line. “Below the Line with James Beshara" is brought to you by Another Podcast Network.

The Ultimate Health Podcast
442: Dr. Valter Longo on How to Get All the Health Benefits of Fasting Without the Hunger

The Ultimate Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 91:04


Watch the full video interview on YouTube here: https://bit.ly/drvalterlongo442 Dr. Valter Longo (IG: @prof_valterlongo) has thirty years of experience in the field of longevity and healthy eating. He is the author of the bestselling book, The Longevity Diet. In 2018, TIME Magazine named Valter as one of the 50 most influential people in health care for his research on fasting-mimicking diets as a way to improve health and prevent disease. In this episode, we discuss: Born & raised in Italy and moving to the US at age 16 Being in the military taught discipline and leadership Transitioning from studying jazz to getting a Ph.D. in biology Fasting and the effects on human health Studying yeast bacteria and starving organisms The chronological lifespan of yeast The fundamental property of cancer cells Shielding healthy cells through fasting The fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) and chemotherapy Hormone therapy and high-dose vitamin C Defining the fasting-mimicking diet Water fasting versus the 5-day fasting-mimicking diet How often should you use the ProLon fasting-mimicking kit? Incorporating fasting into chemotherapy protocols Timing and fasting: why you need to work with a healthcare team When should a doctor practice compassionate use? The benefits of using the FMD for preventive health Valter's thoughts on intermittent fasting The 5 pillars of longevity Insulin growth factor (IGF) decreases as you age Consume foods your grandparents ate Should you eliminate gluten? Research studies about caffeine and Alzheimer's & Parkinson's Cutting out salt, sugar, and starches Supplement recommendations on the longevity diet Exercising 150 minutes a week No exercise during the 5-day FMD Comparing the longevity diet to the Mediterranean diet What is the potential lifespan of a human being? The genetics of aging Revolutionizing the health span of an individual Show sponsors: AquaOmega

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing
ConstitutionDAO Loses Auction To Citadel CEO

Ethereum Daily - Crypto News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:18


Quick Take ConstitutionDAO loses the auctioned U.S. Constitution to Citadel CEO Ken Griffin. TIME Magazine adds ETH to its balance sheets from a partnered deal with Galaxy Digital. Aave launches its institutional arm Aave Arc to provide a regulated sandbox for DeFi. Connext Network adds support for bridging to Optimism directly from other sidechains and L2s   Read more: https://ether.fm/079

Today in America
ConstitutionDAO Loses Auction To Citadel CEO

Today in America

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:18


Quick Take ConstitutionDAO loses the auctioned U.S. Constitution to Citadel CEO Ken Griffin. TIME Magazine adds ETH to its balance sheets from a partnered deal with Galaxy Digital. Aave launches its institutional arm Aave Arc to provide a regulated sandbox for DeFi. Connext Network adds support for bridging to Optimism directly from other sidechains and L2s   Read more: https://ether.fm/079

UN News
‘Kid of the year' who's not afraid to tackle global challenges through science 

UN News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 3:55


If news headlines get you down sometimes, I've got the antidote: it's youth activist Gitanjali Rao.   At just 15, Miss Rao was Time Magazine's first Kid of the Year in 2021 – in recognition of her success in solving problems through science.  Earlier this week, she was in Geneva for the Youth Activists Summit, which is where UN News's Daniel Johnson caught up with her.

All Of It
Sfoglini Cascatelli: Best New Pasta?

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 14:39


[REBROADCAST FROM MARCH 19, 2021] Dan Pashman, host of the podcast, The Sporkful, discusses a long-running project of his -- to design and develop his own unique pasta shape. He details his journey to making his own pasta shape in a 5-part series called, “Mission: ImPASTAble.” Since Pashman joined us, TIME Magazine has named his pasta one of the 100 best inventions of 2021.

Bulletproof Radio
Temperature Hacking for Better Deep and REM Sleep – Matteo Franceschetti : 879

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 65:30


WE APPRECIATE OUR PARTNERS. CHECK THEM OUT!Support Immune & Digestive Health: https://justthrivehealth.com, use code ASPREY to get 15% offTrack Your Health: https://info.insidetracker.com/dave, sign up to get your promo code for 25% OFF storewideMeasure Brain Function: Learn more and get a special discounted package at https://wavimed.com/, use code DAVESPECIAL OFFER FOR THE HUMAN UPGRADE™ LISTENERSGet Your Sleep Temperature Right: Go to https://www.eightsleep.com/dave to save $250 on the Pod Pro mattress padIN THIS EPISODE OF THE HUMAN UPGRADE™……you're going to learn a bunch of brand new sleep hacks, taken from over a million nights of sleep data. Those hacks will come from my guest Matteo Franceschetti. Matteo defines high performance—having been a professional skier, high-level tennis player, competitive race car driver and practicing lawyer. He didn't get much sleep doing all those things, so he co-founded Eight Sleep and set out to create and advanced sleep improvement device so he, and everyone else, could sleep better and perform better.We can all agree: “Sleep is a pillar, a fundamental pillar for your health,” Matteo says.Eight Sleep tracks biomarkers that measure your sleep quality. Then it uses machine learning to make automatic adjustments to your sleep environment. This helps you optimize your sleep, get the reset and recovery your body needs, and well, wake up feeling better than you have in years. Best of all, you don't actually have to do anything. You just go to sleep, exactly like you did last night, and the technology does all the sleep hacking for you. TIME Magazine named Eight Sleep one of its “Best Inventions” of both 2018 and 2019, and Fast Company listed it as one of the most innovative companies of 2018. They're a sleep hacking company making big inroads into understanding and regulating your body's temperatures while sleeping. This affects your REM sleep the most.“While you are in REM your brain deactivates all the temperature controls in the body,” Matteo explains. “It doesn't let you fall into REM if it's too hot or too cold because you could potentially die. Changing the temperature based on your sleep stages and the different stages of the night is fundamental to maximize your deep and REM stages.”And Eight Sleep has a fix for that.“Based on your sleep stages and based on your biometrics, we adjust your body temperature during the night,” Matteo says. “It's not that we are inventing the wheel. Your body is already changing temperature during the night. It's part of your physiological process. We just enhanced that process to maximize your sleep performance.”And then I wanted to know, “How many hours of sleep per night do you think you can save people, by just changing temperature?” The point isn't necessarily to get less sleep, but it's to live more. Right? If you just got everything you needed and it was as good as what you have today, but you had enough time to do two hours of reading or learning every day or meditating or parenting or whatever else, it's not about working more necessarily. It's just about living more. It's exciting to talk to Matteo because he brings a whole bunch of new biohacking ideas to the table, er bed. He and I get into a bunch of sleep topics during this conversation, including:How you can instantly increase your deep sleep by 40%, starting tonightHow you can reset your energy levels in the morning just by regulating your sleep temperature at nightHow you can compress sleep down to 5-6 hours a night, while actually getting more rest and recoveryWhy sleep consistency matters (and is still the hardest thing for people to do, well, consistently}Why machine learning is the future of personalized healthIf your sleep could use an upgrade, check out this episode for hacks you can implement right away and learn about what's next in sleep technology. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Sonya Looney Show
How to Stay Grounded while Striving for More with Brad Stulberg

The Sonya Looney Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 66:38


Most of us try to balance the act of doing and the feeling of being in our lives. We ask ourselves questions like, "How can I work hard and have success without burning out? What do I need to do to feel fulfilled while striving for improvement?" Brad Stulberg, author of the bestselling author of the new book, The Practice of Groundedness, and also Peak Performance regularly researches, writes, and coaches on the many elements of health, well-being, and sustainable performance. And today, he returns to the podcast for his third conversation all about how to feel more grounded. His research suggests 6 principles of groundedness: acceptance, presence, patience, vulnerability, community, and movement. More specifically, The Practice of Groundedness focuses on: Accept where you are to get to where you want to go Be Present to Own Your Energy and Attention Be Patient to Get There Faster Embrace Vulnerability to Build Genuine Strength and Confidence Build Deep Community Move Your Body to Ground Your Mind Brad's book combines ancient wisdom with modern science to dive into how to build a strong foundation. We talk about separating your work from your sense of self, how heroic individualism can be challenging, the importance of having local community, and how to have a more deliberate relationship with striving. Heroic individualism is a never-ending game of one-upmanship against yourself and other people, so you're constantly trying to beat yourself and other people where measurable achievement is the main arbiter of success and the goal post is always 10 yards down the field, so you never actually arrive.  You think that if you just accomplish this, or just win that race, or just achieve that thing, or just fall in love with that perfect person, then you'll be content. But what you find is that there is no arriving at contentment and having that mindset will make you miserable. Whereas contentment is an ongoing practice of the principles that we talked about with groundedness. Contentment is every day, aligning your being with your doing and practicing those things.  Brad Stulberg  His work has been featured in The New York Times, New Yorker, Atlantic, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Time Magazine, Forbes, and more. In his coaching practice, he works with executives, entrepreneurs, and physicians on their performance and well-being. He lives in Asheville, North Carolina. Make sure you listen to our podcast episodes on Peak Performance and The Passion Paradox! "Keeping it fun is really important for me. Particularly taking the work very seriously, but not taking myself seriously at all. What does that look like in practice? The Practice of Groundedness, this book, I care deeply about. I think it's excellent. I'm going to do everything I can for the book. But the book was such a team effort with so many people. The book is just my brain at one point of time, it's not me. But now the book is its own thing. Separating my sense of self from my work.  Really caring about the work but realizing that it's something I did, it's no longer me. That's been really helpful because I can feel like I want the book to be really relevant without feeling like I need to be really relevant." 17:28 Brad Stulberg   Listen Now   Key Takeaways the metaphor of the three-legged stool combining ancient wisdom with modern science how to practice more patience a healthy relationship with striving separating work from your identity heroic individualism excitement vs. ease the difference between being grounded vs. being balanced importance of local community why movement makes you feel more grounded ___ Links Get The Practice of Groundedness Check out The Growth Equation Check out my Substack about high-performance mindset Sign up for my weekly newsletter! 

Daily Crypto Report
"New legislation to amend crypto-related provisions in infrastructure bill." November 18, 2021

Daily Crypto Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 2:52


Today's blockchain and cryptocurrency news Brought to you by ungrocery.com Bitcoin is down 1% at $59,067 Ethereum is down 1% at $4,172 and Binance Coin down 1% at $563 The Sandbox up 25% Algorand up 16% Decentraland up 16% US Congressmen introduce legislation to amend the crypto-related provisions in infrastructure bill. Crypto.com spends $700M for naming rights of LA's Staples Center. Time magazine partners with with Mike Novogratz's Galaxy Digital to deliver Metaverse Content

Optimal Business Daily
413: How to Plow Through Work and Still Produce Quality by Tynan on Breaking Down Big Projects

Optimal Business Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 8:42


Tynan tells you how to plow through work and still produce quality Episode 413: How to Plow Through Work and Still Produce Quality by Tynan on Breaking Down Big Projects Tynan was named as one of the top 25 best bloggers in 2013 by Time Magazine. He believes in making deliberate decisions and breaking away from the herd mentality. He likes learning new things, building habits, exposing the world, connecting with awesome people, and creating good work. The New York Times Bestseller “The Game” featured him as one of the main characters, as he was one of the most famous pickup artists in the world. In 2008, he sold everything he owned and went on an extended world trip, becoming a fervent minimalist. Fun facts: he's a college dropout, was a professional poker player, Courtney Love was his roommate for 9 months, and he once built a swimming pool in his living room. The original post is located here: https://tynan.com/work/  For startups, Notion can provide a full-on operating system for running every aspect of your company, keeping everyone aligned as you grow fast and take on more. Get up to $1,000 off Notion's team plan by going to Notion.com/startups  Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalStartUpDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Great Women Artists
Bisa Butler

The Great Women Artists

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:57


In episode 77 of The Great Women Artists Podcast, Katy Hessel interviews the fantastic artist, BISA BUTLER!!! [This episode is brought to you by Alighieri jewellery: www.alighieri.co.uk | use the code TGWA at checkout for 10% off!] One of the leading artists working today, Butler uses the medium of textile for her vivid and vibrant portraits of subjects that weave personal and historical narratives of Black life. From integrating members of her own family derived from old photographs to immortalising celebrated figures from Chadwick Boseman to Frederick Douglass, or those unknown from depression-era photographs, Butler's oeuvre aims to, in her words, “tell the story – the African American side – of American life”. Born and raised in New Jersey, where she still resides today, Butler studied for her BA at the prestigious Howard University – where she was taught under the AfriCobra group – and for an MA at Montclair State University, it was here when she first began using the medium of textiles after assembling together a portrait quilt for her grandmother. Working as a high art teacher for more than a decade, Butler worked on her fibre creations in school holidays and at the weekend, exhibiting at churches and community centres. And it is this medium which she has come to pioneer – not only by integrating portraits in such meticulous ways, but by fusing a range of fabrics in her work – from her father's homeland of Ghana, batiks from Nigeria, and prints from South Africa. Butler's rise has been astronomical. Having had her first solo exhibition in 2017, within just a few years she has had solo exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Katonah Museum of Art; made two covers for TIME Magazine, as well as a cover for New York Magazine featuring Questlove, and for those in Los Angeles, her work is currently and prominently on view at LACMA's hotly anticipated exhibition, Black American Portraits. LISTEN NOW + ENJOY!!! Follow us: Katy Hessel: @thegreatwomenartists / @katy.hessel Sound editing by Nada Smiljanic Research assistant: Viva Ruggi Artwork by @thisisaliceskinner Music by Ben Wetherfield https://www.thegreatwomenartists.com/

Wretched Radio

Seg 1 Thank you Time Magazine.. What Jesus Really Said about Heaven and Hell by Bart Ehrman. Seg 2 Can you prove the doctrine of hell without quoting Jesus? Seg 3  If you’re one of the people who believe chanting “Let’s Go Brandon” is okay – imagine this. A megachurch broke out into a “Let’s […] The post Hell appeared first on Wretched.

Below the Line with James Beshara
#121 — The Next Era for Logistics — Kevin Gibbon

Below the Line with James Beshara

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 107:49


Today's episode is with the brilliant, Kevin Gibbon. Kevin is the Founder and CEO of Airhouse. He was previously the Founder and CEO of Shyp. Kevin opens up candidly about his experience in Silicon Valley and explains what it was like moving to the USA to pursue his dream of owning his own company. James and Kevin, speak about the Silicon Valley Network and why it is the hub for startups. They also dive deep into why investors are more likely to invest in a second time failed founder rather than a brand new founder just starting their company. Kevin also explains the lows, mentally, he endured during the end of his first company and how it impacts him still to this day. To conclude the episode, James and Kevin talk about the legitimacy behind CryptoCurrency and if it is here to stay! https://bit.ly/Go_BelowtheLine Find out more about Kevin Gibbon: https://twitter.com/kevingibbon https://www.airhouse.io/ Hit the show hotline and leave a question or comment for the show at 424-272-6640, email James questions directly at askbelowtheline@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter @ twitter.com/gobelowtheline Support Our Sponsors Magic Mind https://magicmind.co (Use Code BTL at Checkout for 20% off) AppSumo http://appsumo.com/bff About your host, James: James Beshara is a founder, investor, advisor, author, podcaster, and encourager based in Los Angeles, California. James has created startups for the last 12 years, selling one (Tilt, acquired by Airbnb), and invested in a few multi-billion dollar startups to date. He has spoken at places such as Y-Combinator, Harvard Business School, Stanford University, TechCrunch Disrupt, and has been featured in outlets like the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, and Time Magazine. He's been featured in Forbes, Time, and Inc Magazine's “30 Under 30” lists and advises startups all around the world. All of this is his “above the line” version of his background. Hear the other 90% of the story in the intro episode of Below The Line. “Below the Line with James Beshara" is brought to you by Another Podcast Network.

The Leading Voices in Food
Weight Loss Study Drives New Insight in Role of Carbohydrates in Overeating

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 21:26


For nearly 70 years now, Americans have been bombarded with advice on how to lose weight. Countless diet books have become bestsellers. Some diets like Atkins keep coming back in sort of a recycled way. And there really hasn't been agreement, even among nutrition scientists, about which approach is best. Lots of attention has focused in recent years on carbohydrates, but over the years, protein and fat have had plenty of attention. In this podcast, our guest, Dr. David Ludwig of Harvard University, discusses this history and the reason for re-envisioning how best to lose weight – and for people to maintain the weight loss, perhaps the most important issue of all. Ludwig recently published a landmark, exquisitely designed and controlled study that tests whether limiting carbohydrates actually makes sense. This study, published in the "American Journal "of Clinical Nutrition 2021," has been generating lots of attention.   Interview Summary   Access the study: https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab287     I'll begin by asking a question fundamental to this work. Why care so much about carbohydrates?   Great question, Kelly. Carbohydrates amount to at least half the calories in a typical diet today, which is interesting from a historical and evolutionary perspective. Because of the three major nutrients we eat, protein, fat, and carbohydrate, carbohydrate is the only one for which humans have virtually no requirement. Think of Northern populations, especially in the Ice Ages but also up to recently, such as the Inuit, that had access to only animal products and could eat plant products like berries maybe one or two or three months a year at most. So for nine months a year, they were eating only fat and protein. And yet, those populations were healthy. The women were fertile; they could breastfeed. And children grew normally. So recognizing that there's no absolute requirement for carbohydrates, the question then becomes: How much carbohydrate and what kind would be optimal for health and allow for the greatest flexibility, diversity and enjoyment in our diets?   So David, if the body doesn't have an innate need for these, presumably there's no biological driver to go out and seek these, why in the heck are people eating so much of this?   Well, carbohydrates are delicious. And the food industry certainly knows that and has taken advantage of that. In fact, when you step back and ask: What are the foods that we tend to binge on? They may have a combination of key flavors and nutrients. Oftentimes, we hear sugar, salt and fat. But I'll argue that there are virtually no binge foods that are just fat. Do people actually binge on butter? I mean, butter is very tasty. You might enjoy an initial bite. But very few people, perhaps with the exception of a major eating disorder, would sit down and eat a quarter pound, a stick of butter. But there are all sorts of high-carbohydrate binge foods. Sugary beverages are 100% sugar. Bread, baked potato chips, popcorn, especially the low-fat versions, these are easy to binge. And from one perspective, the key difference is the hormone insulin. Fat does not raise insulin. And so fat is digested slowly, and doesn't get directly stored in large amounts into body tissue. It has to be metabolized more slowly. Whereas carbohydrates, especially the processed ones, when eaten in large amounts, raise insulin to high levels. That insulin directs those incoming calories into storage. And a few hours later, blood sugar crashes and we get hungry again and are ready to have another blood sugar surge by indulging the next time in those foods.   So what question specifically was your study designed to address?   We conducted a large feeding study that had two parts. The parent study had 164 young and middle-aged adults, who were at least a little bit overweight, ranging from overweight to having obesity. And the first thing we did was bring their weight down by providing them all of their foods, delivered foods to their home, in a calorie-restricted way. You know, you cut back calories, and of course you're going to lose weight for a while. It doesn't address why people get hungry, and why they regain weight. But in the short term, we cut their calories, and they lost 10% to 12% of their weight. Then we stabilized them at their new, lower body weight, and then randomly assigned them to one of three groups: low, moderate or high-carbohydrate diets. And we kept them on these three different diets for another five months. And during this time, we were again delivering all of the meals to the participants. This was over 100,000 prepared meals throughout this time, so it was a really major effort. And during this low, moderate, and high-carbohydrate diet period, we adjusted calories to keep their weight the same. We wanted to keep them at that weight-loss anchor, 10% to 12% below where they started. The first study looked at what happened to their metabolism and their energy expenditure. And we found that when people were on the low-carb diet at the same weight as the other groups, they were burning about 200 calories a day more. So the study raised an interesting possibility, that the kind of calories you eat can affect the number of calories you burn. That from a biological perspective, all calories are not alike to the body.   David, this is fascinating work. I'd like to ask a strategy question. So this was an extremely intensive study of 164 people. And you mentioned the people were provided all their meals, very careful measurement and things like that. So the same amount of money, you could have studied many more people but just done a less intensive study with less supervision and fewer measurements of outcome. So why do the study in such an intensive way?   Right, there's always going to be a trade-off in design considerations. And you've identified a classic trade-off. You can study fewer people more intensively, or more people less intensively. Most weight loss trials have chosen the second route. They take a lot of people, and they try to study them for a long period of time, or at least some of them do: a year or ideally two years or longer. The problem is that without an intensive intervention, so what are we talking about? These studies would oftentimes have participants meet with a nutritionist once a month. They would get written educational materials, and maybe other kinds of behavioral support. But that's about it. And without greater levels of support and intervention, people characteristically can't stick to these diets over the long term. Maybe they make changes for two, three or four months. But by six months or a year, they're largely back to eating what they were originally. And the different diet groups don't look much different. So if the groups didn't eat in much of a different way throughout most of the study, why would we expect to see any differences in outcomes, such as weight or energy expenditure, or cardiovascular disease risk factors? So these studies don't test a dietary hypothesis very well. It leads to the mistaken conclusion that all diets are alike. Really, what the conclusion of these studies has to mean is that we need more intensive intervention in our modern toxic environment, if you will, to promote long-term change. And it's only when we get that long-term change can we actually figure out which diet is better and for whom.   So you've explained how the study was done and why you did it. What did you find?   So the first leg of the study, which was published in "BMJ" late in 2018, so just before the pandemic, showed that the kinds of calories you're eating can affect the number of calories you burn. And, that by cutting back on the total and processed carbohydrates, you can increase your metabolic rate. And that could be a big help in the long-term management of a weight problem. You know, you want your body on your side rather than fighting you when you're trying to maintain weight loss. And a faster metabolism would be a tremendous help if this is a reproducible finding and applies to the general population. We recently published in the September "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," a second part of the study. And that asks: How do these different diets, low, moderate and high carbohydrate, affect cardiovascular disease risk factors? It's one thing to lose weight. Maybe a low carbohydrate diet helps you lose weight. But if your cardiovascular disease risk factors go up, that might not be such a good trade-off. So that's the aim of the second study. Because low-carbohydrate diets are often very high in saturated fat. So we wanted to find out what were the effects of this low-carbohydrate, high-saturated-fat on a range of risk factors.   So tell us specifically some of the cardiovascular risk factors that changed. And if you would, place the changes that you found in your participants in a context. Like are these big-deal changes? Are they small changes? Or put it in context, if you would?   The big problem with saturated fat is that it clearly raises LDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, which is a classic cardiovascular disease risk factor. It's the main one that's targeted by many of the drugs, such as statins. Yeah, I think there's no question that on a conventional high-carbohydrate diet, a lot of saturated fat is harmful. So the combination of bread and butter is not a good one. But the question we wanted to ask was: What happens when you get rid of a lot of that bread? Does the saturated fat still comprise a major risk factor? And so our low-carbohydrate diet was exceptionally high in saturated fat, as is characteristic of how these low-carb diets are usually consumed. It had 21% saturated fat, which compares to the 7% saturated fat on the high-carb, low-fat diet that's oftentimes recommended to people at risk for heart disease.   So what did we find? Well, the first thing we found was that LDL cholesterol was not adversely affected at all. There was no difference in LDL cholesterol between those getting 21% versus 7% saturated fat. Suggesting that when you substitute saturated fat for processed carbohydrates, from the standpoint of this key risk factor, it's pretty much a wash. However, the low-carbohydrate, high-saturated-fat diet benefited a range of other risk factors that go along with what we call the metabolic syndrome, the insulin resistance syndrome. Specifically, we saw strongly significant, from a statistical perspective, improvements in triglycerides, that's the total amount of fat in the bloodstream; HDL cholesterol, that's the good cholesterol that you want to be higher; and other lipids that indicate overall levels of insulin resistance. Suggesting that insulin resistance was improving. And we know that low-carbohydrate diets show promise for diabetes in other studies, in part because they do tend to improve insulin resistance and lower blood sugar. And so our study suggests that if you are pursuing a low-carbohydrate diet, and we can talk about the different degrees of restriction of carbohydrate, and at the same time you're reducing the processed carbohydrates, then the saturated fat might not really be such a problem.   So then if you take all this information in this, as I said, exquisitely designed intensive study and distill it into what dietary recommendations would be, what do you think is a reasonable proportion of fat, carbohydrate and protein in the diet? And what sort of things should people think about as they want to lose weight and keep the weight off?   One key qualification I need to mention is even though this was an intensive study with a relatively large number of people for a feeding study of this magnitude, we still don't know how generalizable these findings are to people at different ages, different body weights, different levels of susceptibility. So no one study can inform a change of clinical practice like this, especially in the world of nutrition where there's so many complicated and interacting factors. I will also venture to say that there's no one diet that's going to be right for everybody. We know that some people can do perfectly well on a high-carbohydrate, low-fat diet. I mean, think of the classic Asian agrarian societies where rates of obesity and diabetes are very low. But those societies tend to be highly physically active and the people insulin-sensitive. America is characterized by high levels of overweight and obesity, sedentary lifestyle. And these create insulin resistance as a highly prevalent problem. For societies such as ours, we think that high-carbohydrate diets that are raising insulin levels on the background of insulin resistance is a recipe for metabolic problems. And so for Americans, especially those struggling with weight, pre-diabetes, and even more so diabetes, a reasonable first step is to cut back on the processed carbohydrates. And I think that's an intervention that increasingly few experts would argue with. We're talking about concentrated sugars and refined grains. Where we start to get into the controversy is whether carbohydrates should be further reduced down to say 20% as in our study, which still leaves room for some unprocessed grains, beans, and a couple of servings of whole fruit a day, or even lower to what's called the ketogenic diet that's less than 10%. And that's where you really have to give up most carbohydrates and focus just on the proteins and fats. I think for people with diabetes, such a strict approach looks appealing in preliminary research studies. But again, this is going to need more research. And I would caution anybody with diabetes or anybody who's thinking about a ketogenic diet to discuss these kinds of dietary changes with their healthcare provider.   I realize your study wasn't meant to address this issue that I'm about to raise, but I'd appreciate hearing your instincts. One key, of course, to any recommended nutrition plan or diet, if you'd like to call it that, is whether people will stick to it. What do your instincts tell you, or data if you have it, on how readily people can adhere to this sort of an approach over the long term compared to other kinds of approaches?   Great question. And I'll approach that by saying: We all understand that if diet is a problem that's contributing to obesity, diabetes, heart disease, other chronic health problems, then we have to change our diet in one way or another regardless of what the mechanisms are. So I'll return the question to you by saying: Which do you think is going to be easier for most people over the long term: cutting back calories, getting hungry and trying to ignore that very intense drive to eat, or getting rid of certain kinds of foods that may be triggering hunger and making it so much harder to stick to a lower calorie intake?   As a doctor, as a pediatrician, and as a researcher, and also myself, I try to do N of 1 experiments on myself with any kind of a nutrition approach I might use with patients or with research participants. I've found that it's so much easier to just give up the processed carbohydrates and enjoy a range of other very satisfying, delicious, higher fat foods. And oftentimes, in my experience personally and I hear as reported by patients that the cravings for these highly processed carbohydrates go down. And lastly, I'll just say, it's not that these processed carbohydrates are inherently so irresistibly delicious. I mean, white bread, these common binge foods, white bread, unbuttered popcorn, baked potato chips, even though these are almost 100% carbohydrate yet they're commonly binged on not because they're so incredibly tasty. But I would argue because they're producing changes in our body that are driving overeating. So it's not that they're so tasty and we're getting so much enjoyment. We're eating these foods because we're driven to metabolically. And once you come off that blood sugar rollercoaster, it becomes much easier to say no.   When you mentioned before that with one approach, you're kind of fighting your body; and another approach, your body is becoming your ally in this process, I thought of going to the beach and, you know, you can go out and try to swim against the waves coming in, or you can ride the waves toward the beach. And one, of course, is a lot easier than the other. And it sounds that's kind of what you're talking about, isn't it?   When you line up biology and behavior, and clearly behavior, psychology, and our food environment are all factors that are going to have to be addressed. We don't want to make it much harder for people. So we do need to think in systems dynamics: the food supply, the environment. But on a strictly individual level, when you line up biology with your behavior, the effort required to accomplish your goals becomes less. You know, this is characteristic of so many areas of medicine and research. This is why we aim to identify the cause of a problem when you treat a cause. So let's use the example of fever. Fever you could say is a problem of heat balance: too much heat in the body, not enough heat out. And so from that perspective, you could treat any fever by getting into an ice bath. Couldn't you, right? The ice would pull the excess heat out of your body. But is that an effective treatment for fever? No, of course not. Because your body's going to fight back violently with severe shivering, blood vessel constriction. And you're going to feel miserable and you're going to get out of that ice bath quickly. In the case of obesity, the timeframe is much longer, but similar kinds of responses occur. The body fights back against calorie restriction because calorie restriction, according to this way of thinking, is an effect. It's not the cause. If the cause is the body's been triggered to store too much fat, then we have to address that problem by lowering insulin levels and producing a more stable blood sugar pattern after eating. If that happens, then the effort that you put into cutting back calories goes a lot further.   Bio:   David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is the founding director of the Optimal Wellness for Life (OWL) program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of diet on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. He has made major contributions to development of the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model, a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations totaling over $50 million and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He appears frequently in national media, including New York Times, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN. Dr. Ludwig has written 3 books for the public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.  

Creative Elements
#80: Lauren Hom [Play] – How turning your work into play turns into my clients and more opportunities

Creative Elements

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:11


Lauren Hom is a designer and hand lettering artist based in Detroit (formerly New York & Los Angeles). Lauren is known for her bright color palettes and playful letterforms. She has created work for clients like Starbucks, Google, AT&T, YouTube and TIME Magazine. Her work has been recognized by Communication Arts, the Type Directors Club, and the Webby Awards.  Lauren is also the author of the popular blog and book Daily Dishonesty. She finds that she's happiest when creating; so, when she's not working, you can find her baking yummy things, selling your ex-boyfriend's tears, or putting bread on her head. In this episode, we talk about Lauren's experience getting (and leaving) her dream job, what she took away from her time at an ad agency, how she grew her Instagram account to 250,000 followers, and why her instinct to bring play into her work has helped her find new clients and new opportunity. Visit Lauren Hom's website Follow Lauren Hom on Instagram Full transcript and show notes *** IF YOU LOVE CREATIVE ELEMENTS Follow Creative Elements on Instagram Leave me a voicemail Subscribe to weekly episode emails Leave a review on Apple Podcasts Buy Me A Coffee *** ABOUT JAY CLOUSE Learn more about me Subscribe to my newsletter, Creative Companion Connect with me on Twitter Connect with me on Instagram Join #Tweet100 *** SPONSORS Sign up for ButcherBox Get a free 45-day extended trial of Canva Pro Get a free month of Blinkist Premium *** FOR PODCASTERS Enroll in my podcasting workshop Enroll in my course on podcasting, Podcast Like The Pros Learn more about Podpage *** PODGLOMERATE NETWORK This show is a part of the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. We encourage you to visit the website and sign up for our newsletter for more information about our shows, launches, and events. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy.  Since you're listening to Creative Elements, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows surrounding entrepreneurship, business, and careers like Rocketship.fm and Freelance to Founder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing
Israeli tech gets into TIME, and skewered by comedians

The Times of Israel Daily Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 19:43


Welcome to The Times of Israel's Daily Briefing, your 15-minute audio update on what's happening in Israel, the Middle East, and the Jewish world, from Sunday through Thursday. Health and science writer Nathan Jeffay and Startup Israel editor Ricky Ben-David join today's podcast, hosted by Jessica Steinberg. Jeffay opens the podcast with a look at the struggle to convince Israeli parents to vaccinate their children against the coronavirus, particularly in the Arab and ultra-Orthodox communities. Ben-David then examines the government's new housing plan, with the aim to offer an increase in supply but the many issues that will hinder the plan, despite the best intentions. Jeffay discusses the testing of an artificial intelligence tool to help hone the use of antibiotics, recently used in the Maccabi health organization with excellent results. Finally, Ben-David talks about the four Israeli technologies that made it into Time Magazine's 100 Best Inventions for the year, as well as the recent skit on satire show "Eretz Nehederet," poking fun at the tech industry. Discussed articles include: Israel approves COVID shots for kids; experts predict uphill acceptance struggle Government housing plan seen as just a ‘drop in the bucket' 35% fewer UTI patients given wrong medicine, thanks to Israeli AI tool 4 Israeli inventions feature in TIME magazine's 100 Best Inventions for 2021 WeLaugh: Israeli satire show skewers excesses and fantasy in tech sector ‘Subscribe to The Times of Israel Daily Briefing on iTunes, Spotify, PlayerFM, Google Play, or wherever you get your podcasts. IMAGE: Nadir Hackerman and Didi from fictitious company Webos speak speak to a potential new tech hire in a November 2021 segment on Eretz Nehederet. (Screenshot) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Be Real Show
#372 - Jason Falls gets REAL about Reframing Infuencer Marketing

Be Real Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 25:50


I've been called a thought leader and an expert, but I've also been called bad names by trolls, so it balances out. My job is leading digital strategy for a kick-ass agency called Cornett in Lexington, Ky. (2021 Ad Age Small Agency Gold Winner in the Southeast Region). My experiences have given me the opportunity to speak at conferences, write three books and be called all sorts of superlatives by Forbes, Business Week, Entrepreneur and others. To serve the small business community, I offer a few select marketing coaching calls each month. Let's connect! https://jasonfalls.com/get-winfluence/ I host a pair of podcast on C-Suite Radio. Digging Deeper - Make Creativity Your Business Advantage is a weekly interview series focused on creativity and marketing. Winfluence - The Influence Marketing Podcast dives deep into experts on influencer marketing and is a supplement to my latest book. I'm also on the Global Influencer Marketing Advisory Board, an industry directional organization founded by Audience2Media, a UK firm. Some people know me from founding SocialMediaExplorer.com, which at one point was one of the top marketing blogs in the world according to AdAge. I've been involved in some really cool projects over the years that have won awards and recognition. I'm particularly proud of helping form the strategy for Wonderopolis, an education effort by the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL) which was called one of the top 50 websites in the world by Time Magazine in 2013. Projects I've been a part of have also won SAMMY Awards, Shorty Awards and dozens of regional ADDY Awards. Some people call me insightful. Some call me funny and engaging. My kids just roll their eyes and call me Dad. I dig bourbon and sports.

Below the Line with James Beshara
What is Vedanta? — Below the (Hot)Line #14

Below the Line with James Beshara

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 31:00


In today's episode, James gets a voicemail from a caller asking "What is Vedanta?" James, has talked a lot about Vedanta in pervious episodes and today explains what it means to him in his own words. He has credited some of his success and peace in life to this philosophy. Vedanta is a philosophy taught by the Vedas, the most ancient scriptures of India. Its basic teaching is that our real nature is divine. https://bit.ly/Go_BelowtheLine Hit the show hotline and leave a question or comment for the show at 424-272-6640, email James questions directly at askbelowtheline@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter @ twitter.com/gobelowtheline Support Our Sponsors Magic Mind https://magicmind.co About your host, James: James Beshara is a founder, investor, advisor, author, podcaster, and encourager based in Los Angeles, California. James has created startups for the last 12 years, selling one (Tilt, acquired by Airbnb), and invested in a few multi-billion dollar startups to date. He has spoken at places such as Y-Combinator, Harvard Business School, Stanford University, TechCrunch Disrupt, and has been featured in outlets like the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, and Time Magazine. He's been featured in Forbes, Time, and Inc Magazine's “30 Under 30” lists and advises startups all around the world. All of this is his “above the line” version of his background. Hear the other 90% of the story in the intro episode of Below The Line. “Below the Line with James Beshara" is brought to you by Another Podcast Network.

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp
S2E82 The Two Kens: What Trumpist Evangelicals Really Want

The Beached White Male Podcast with Ken Kemp

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 45:31


Ken Fong and Ken Kemp review Fong's powerful conversation with Dr. Russell Jeung, named one of the Top 100 Global Influencers by TIME Magazine. Dr. Jeung is co-founder of Stop AAPI-HATE (Asian American hate). Conservative author, Jennifer Rubin's Washington Post article suggests that Evangelicals can never get what they really want. The recent Virginia election (Republican Youngkin defeats Democrat McAuliffe) brings the great divide into sharp focus. The two call up "dispensationalism" as a long-time filter for Biblical interpretation and "Biblical World-View."  The "Lost Cause" narrative drives much to this agenda. If this is all a failure of "discipleship" or "catechism" then what sort of discipleship would have made a difference? Replacement theory drives much of the fear of the loss of power.Listen to Ken Fong - http://asianamericapodcast.com/Become a Patron: http://patreon.com/beachedwhitemaleSupport the show (http://thebeachedwhitemale.com)

Life Coach Zach
S3E21: "Indistractable". Learn how to stay focused with Author Nir Eyal

Life Coach Zach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 24:11


I recently sat down and had a conversation with Author Nir Eyal about his best-selling book "Indistractable". Ever get the feeling the world is full of too many distractions? This is a book on how to control your attention and choose your life. Nir Eyal writes, consults, and teaches about the intersection of psychology, technology, and business. Nir previously taught as a Lecturer in Marketing at the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford. Nir co-founded and sold two tech companies since 2003 and was dubbed by The M.I.T. Technology Review as, “The Prophet of Habit-Forming Technology.” Bloomberg Businessweek wrote, “Nir Eyal is the habits guy. Want to understand how to get app users to come back again and again? Then Eyal is your man.” He is the author of two bestselling books, Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products and Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life. Indistractable received critical acclaim, winning the Outstanding Works of Literature Award as well as being named one of the Best Business and Leadership Books of the Year by Amazon and one of the Best Personal Development Books of the Year by Audible. The Globe and Mail called Indistractable, “the best business book of 2019.” In addition to blogging at NirAndFar.com, Nir's writing has been featured in The New York Times, The Harvard Business Review, Time Magazine, and Psychology Today. Nir invests in habit-forming products that improve users' lives. Some of his past investments include Eventbrite (NYSE:EB), Anchor.fm (acquired by Spotify), Kahoot! (KAHOOT-ME.OL), Canva, Homelight, Product Hunt, Marco Polo, Byte Foods, FocusMate, Dynamicare, Wise App, and Cutback Coach. Nir attended The Stanford Graduate School of Business and Emory University. For more on Nir and to download his free 80 page Indistractable workbook visit NirandFar.com Zach Rance, Certified Life Coach | Certified Nutritionist Questions, Comments, or Business Inquiries Visit: Lifecoachzach.com ​or Instagram: @ZachRancey --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/zachrance/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/zachrance/support

The Common Good Podcast
David French explains what the Virginia election taught us about abortion, Pastor Mark Moore shares about his radio ministry, “Overcoming Through Grace,” and Brian and Aubrey discuss the importance of healthy boundaries - November 9, 2021

The Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 54:26


(00:00-7:44): Brian and Aubrey shared their thoughts on a tweet from Daniel Darling, “Nuance: You can be pro-vax and anti-federal mandate. You can be pro-racial reconciliation and racial justice and also be very concerned about some of the toxic elements of what passes for anti-racism (Kendi/DiAngelo, etc). A lot of partisans want to conflate things.” (7:44-27:27): David French, Senior Editor at The Dispatch, Columnist for Time Magazine, and Author of, “Divided We Fall,” joined Brian and Aubrey to talk about his new newsletter for The Atlantic, “The Third Rail,” and some of his blog posts at The French Press. “Evangelical Elites, Fighting Each Other” “What the Virginia Election Taught America About ‘the New Politics of Abortion'” “J.D. Vance and the Great Challenge of Christian Malice” Learn more about David at thedispatch.com and at his blog, The French Press and connect with him on Twitter at @DavidAFrench (27:27-36:02): What does it say about the state of evangelicalism when best selling books and popular podcasts are scathing looks at evangelicalism, from evangelicals? Brian and Aubrey talked about this and discussed Dr. Scot McKnight's newsletter, “Evangelicals Tiring with Critique.” (36:02-45:19): Mark Moore, Senior Pastor of Belmont Bible Church in Downers Grove and Host of “Overcoming Through Grace,” joined Brian and Aubrey to talk about the impact of his radio ministry and the plans for a new church facility for Belmont Bible Church.  Learn more about the ministry of Belmont Bible Church at belmontbiblechurch.com, connect with them on Facebook at @belmont4christ, and tune in to “Overcoming Through Grace” weekdays at 5:30am on AM 1160 Hope for Your Life.   (45:19-54:25): Brian and Aubrey talked about boundaries and commented on a quote from the book, “Boundaries: When to Say Yes, How to Say No to Take Control of Your Life,” shared in a tweet by Ike Miller, “This blew my mind: 4 types of relational boundary problems: 1. Can't set boundaries 2. Can't respect boundaries 3. Sets boundaries against responsibility to love others 4. Sets boundaries against receiving love -Cloud & Townsend, “Boundaries.”” See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

In The Thick
A Climate of Racial Equity

In The Thick

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 35:42


Julio and guest co-host Jenni Monet, independent investigative journalist and founder of the newsletter Indigenously, are joined by S. Mitra Kalita, co-founder of URL Media and CEO and publisher of Epicenter-NYC, and Justin Worland, senior correspondent for Time Magazine covering climate change and policy. They reflect on the 2021 election results and unpack the latest with infrastructure spending and Biden's Build Back Better plan. They also talk about the COP26 climate summit, and the latest on vaccine outreach.Staff Picks:On the language around climate change, Mary Annaïse Heglar writes “as we look for new words and slogans, it should be for the purpose of galvanizing those who want to be on the right side of history,” for The Nation. Leaders in developing countries have faced hurdles in attending the COP26 climate conference, yet they are the most vulnerable to climate change, reports Justin Worland for Time Magazine. The 19th's Washington correspondent Amanda Becker spoke with Arizona voters about what they are hoping to see from Biden's Build Back Better plan, including a paid leave program. Photo credit: AP Photo/Alastair Grant See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Leading Voices in Food
We've Had it Backwards - New Model Explains Weight Gain and Obesity

The Leading Voices in Food

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:20


A paper just released in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition challenges, and I mean really challenges conventional thinking about nutrition, weight gain, and what has caused the very rapid and profound increase in obesity rates over the last 50 years. This is a landmark paper by any standard, and saying that it will raise eyebrows is an understatement. The paper is authored by a number of distinguished nutrition scientists. The lead author is Dr. David Ludwig from Harvard University. Interview   David Ludwig MD, PhD is Professor of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, and Professor of Pediatrics in the Harvard Medical School. He has published innumerable books and papers on nutrition, contributors to obesity and diabetes, and what might be done with both practice and policy to improve things. He has a real remarkable breadth and scope of his work. David, Time Magazine once named you a warrior in work on obesity. This is exactly how I see you as well. You're really challenging the traditional ways of thinking, and as I said, you've broken new ground. So I'm proud to say that you and I have been friends for a number of years, and I'm also proud to say that we've written a number of things together. So thanks so much for being with us today. It's a real honor to have you.   Thanks, Kelly. Great to be with you. And I'm sitting here in my office looking at a plaque I have on the wall of an op-ed we wrote for the Washington Post almost two decades ago, so it's been a real honor and productive pleasure to know you.   The pleasure has been mine. So let's talk about the paper. So in this paper, you and your co-authors challenged the widely-embraced energy balance model. So can you say what the energy balance model is?   Well, the notion of energy balance is really just a restatement of physics, the first law of physics that says, that speaks to energy conservation, and it's commonly interpreted that in order to gain weight, you have to have a positive energy balance, that is you have to consume more calories than you burn off, and that to lose weight, you have to reverse that. You have to have a negative energy balance. You have to consume fewer calories than you burn off. But we argue first off that this doesn't tell us anything about causality, cause and effect, what's actually driving obesity. We use the example of a fever. Of course, a fever can only happen if the body generates more heat than it dissipates, more heat into the body than heat out of the body. But that's obvious that's, it's, you know, we don't need to be emphasizing that in textbooks. We don't need to be teaching patients that notion. The question is what's cause and what's effect? And the conventional way of thinking is that the positive energy balance is driving weight gain, is causing obesity. So we're surrounded by all these convenient, inexpensive, energy-dense, hyper-palatable, highly tasty foods. We lose control. We overeat them. We don't burn off those excess calories with our modern lifestyle, and so those excess calories get forced into fat cells, and we gain weight. So ultimately this view considers all calories are alike to the body, and that we have to eat fewer calories, and ideally burn more of them off by exercise to address the problem. So that's the conventional way of thinking.   So you have a different, and very science-based explanation for all of this that I'll get to in a minute, but before we do that, why did the field come to adopt this energy balance model?   Well, it does seem to make sense, and certainly over the short term, we know that this way of viewing things applies. If you force feed an animal, or if we just intentionally overeat ourselves, we can gain weight, and conversely, if we put ourselves on a low calorie diet, we can lose weight for a while, but characteristically, we know the body isn't a, you know, an inert energy storage depot. The body fights back in a dynamic way against changes in body weight and in energy balance, and this is something that almost every dieter has experienced, right? If it were just a matter of eating less and moving more, 150 calories less a day, that's a serving of juice, 150 calories out more a day, that's walking moderately for half hour, then virtually every weight problem should be solved within, you know, months to at most, a few years, but that's not the case. Very few people can adhere to, can stay with low calorie diets for very clear reasons. The first thing that happens is we get hungry, and hunger isn't a fleeting feeling. It's a primary biological signal that the body wants more calories. And even if we could, those few of us who are highly-disciplined, and can resist hunger, the body fights back in other ways, most notably by slowing down metabolism, which means that to keep the weight coming off, even as we're getting hungrier. We have to keep eating less and less, because the body's getting more efficient. So the conventional way of thinking about things, all calories are alike, calorie in calorie out, just eat less and move more. Doesn't seem to address the difficulty that people are facing, and recognize that despite a lot of attention to calorie balance, the obesity epidemic is getting worse and worse every year. I mean, the data just from the last year suggests that the weight gain during the pandemic was even faster than it was just prior.   Well, let's talk for a minute about what's at stake here. So vast numbers of people in the United States, both adults and children are overweight. This is increasingly becoming true of essentially every country in the world. The amount of weight that people have been gaining seems to be going up over time, and people find it very difficult, perhaps for the reasons you mentioned, to lose weight and keep it off, so it's a pretty dire situation then, and given the health consequences of excess weight, and the psychosocial implications of things, there's really a lot at stake here, isn't there?   Certainly so. We know that in childhood, obesity can affect virtually every organ system in the body, and set the stage for a lifetime increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, even many cancers. Among adults, the majority, and in fact 70% of adults in the United States have at least overweight, if not obesity, and this is becoming a huge driver of the chronic health burden on the healthcare system, and which so many patients themselves experience, in terms of diabetes, risk for heart disease, fatty liver, orthopedic problems, sleep apnea. So we have a problem that has gotten so much attention, and yet keeps getting worse with every effort that we can bring to bear. My coauthors and I have this new paper in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, arguing it's time for new thinking. And the carbohydrate insulin model that we are proposing is perfectly consistent with the laws of physics around energy balance, but it suggests that we've been coming at the problem in exactly the opposite way than would be most effective.   So let's talk about that. So if you have a different explanation than the traditional energy balance model, what is it exactly?   So the usual way of thinking, as we considered earlier is that overeating causes weight gain, and that certainly happens in the short term, but that model has a hard time explaining why people are gaining weight year after year, and their bodies are wanting to hold onto those calories. So we argue that a metabolic perspective would better explain this continuing creep upward in the so-called body weight set point. So the carbohydrate insulin model suggests that we've had it backwards, that overeating is not the primary cause of weight gain, that the body's process of gaining weight, and storing too much fat is driving overeating. So overeating and a positive calorie balance certainly has to exist. That's a law of physics, but it's a downstream effect. It's not at the source of the problem. And so this may sound a little surprising. How could the body gaining weight cause us to overeat? Well, let's take the example of an adolescent during the growth spurt. We know a teenager might consume hundreds, or a thousand calories more than he or she might have a few years earlier, and that adolescent is growing really quickly, but which comes first? Is the overeating that that child is doing causing the growth, or is the rapid growth and the deposition of many calories into new body tissue causing that adolescent to get hungry and to eat more? Neither explanation violates any law of physics, but they have radically different implications to how we understand growth, and what we might do about growth disorders. In the case of the adolescent, it's clearly the other way. It's the growth that's driving the overeating, and how do we know that? Well, Kelly, neither you or I, no matter how much we're going to eat or overeat are going to grow any taller. So something in the body is regulating hunger, based on the needs of growth, and we argue that the same thing is happening in the case of obesity, that the aspects of our diet, importantly, including the processed carbohydrates that flooded our diet during the low fat years, that these are triggering fat cells in the body to hoard too many calories, to hold onto too many calories, so there are fewer calories available for the muscle, the liver, and the brain, and our body recognizes that. We get hungry, and we eat more as a consequence.   You mentioned the highly processed foods, especially carbohydrates that bombarded the American scene during the low fat craze. Explain more about that.   These processed carbohydrates, that at one point, just 20 to 30 years ago, people thought, and you can find many examples of this written in the literature. In fact, the first food guide pyramid is a clear illustration of the fact that all fats were considered unhealthy, because they have so many calories per bite, more than twice the calories per gram than carbohydrates. Whereas the bottom of the food guide pyramid, you know, we were supposed to eat six to 11 servings of grains, many of which were highly processed. Sugar was considered benign, and a good way to, and this is what they said, dilute out fat calories. The problem is that these processed carbohydrates, white bread, white rice, potato products, virtually all of the prepared breakfast cereals, and of course, concentrated sugars, and sugary beverages. So when you eat these foods in substantial amount, and it's worse if the meal is also low in fat and protein, because they tend to slow down digestion. So if you just eat a lot of these processed carbohydrates, the body digests it into glucose literally in minutes. So blood sugar shoots upwards 10, 20, 30 minutes later, and that causes a lot of the hormone insulin to be produced. I sometimes refer to insulin as the Miracle-Gro for your fat cells, just not the sort of miracle you want happening in your body. We know that when a person with diabetes gets started on insulin, they'll typically gain weight, and if insulin is given in excess dose, they'll gain a lot of weight. So insulin is the hormone that promotes fat storage, and we argue that basically just endocrinology 101, all these processed carbohydrates, by stimulating more insulin than we would normally make on a less processed, lower carbohydrate diet, are driving too many of the incoming calories from a meal into storage and fat cells, instead of into muscle where they can burn. And so when you store, all it takes us to store one gram of fat too much a day to explain basically the whole of obesity, if one looks from childhood to adulthood.   So David, provide some context for this, if you would. So what fraction of the American diet is comprised of these kinds of foods, and what would that number be if people followed the recommended dietary guidelines you suggested?   Well, back in the 1950s, it's not as if Americans were extremely healthy. We had much higher rates of heart disease, although much of that related to smoking, and we of course, had many fewer medications, and surgical procedures to help prevent or treat heart disease. But at that time, obesity rates were much, much lower, you know, about only one third of the rates they are today. And at that time in the 1950s, Americans ate about 40% of their calories as fat, and about 40% as carbohydrate, and maybe 15 to 20% as protein. Because of concerns around saturated fat and heart disease, which then got generalized to all fats being bad, well, we got the low fat diet of the 1980s, nineties, and the beginning of the century. Fat came down as a proportion of our diet. Carbs went up, but also the processing of those carbs. We got foods like the fat-free SnackWells cookies, a whole range of these fat-reduced products that simply took out fat, dumped in sugar and starch. These are after all processed foods, so they're not going to be putting in fruits and vegetables. And these products were considered healthy. We ate them as we were told to eat them, and at that time, obesity rates really exploded. And we're arguing that this is not just an association, that this change to our diet has played an important role in driving obesity, and that by bringing both the total amount of carbohydrates down, not necessarily a very low carb or ketogenic diet, but bringing them back down, maybe to what might oftentimes be characterized as a Mediterranean diet, focusing on getting rid of the processed carbs, eating more of the delicious and nutritious high fat foods, like nuts and nut butters, olive oil, avocado, even real dark chocolate. All of these high fat high, calorie foods look a whole lot healthier than the processed carbohydrates do in the best cohort studies.   You know, it's a somewhat hopeful message, isn't it? Because you're not just telling people you have to eat less of everything, but there are actually some things that are quite delicious where you can eat more, and maybe that hope will lead more people to try this sort of approach.   That is exactly the issue with the conventional approach. If all calories are alike, and overeating is the primary problem, then we really just have to control our appetites. We have to discipline ourselves. Yes, clearly the conventional thinking recognizes that environment has a lot to do with it, and psychology of behavior, but ultimately, one way or another, you have to cut back on calories, because overeating is driving the problem. But if the driver is at the fat cells, if the foods that we're eating are triggering our fat cells to store too many calories, and that's what's causing the hunger and the overeating, then just eating less doesn't solve the problem, and it actually could make it worse by slowing down your metabolism. So this model argues that a focus on what you eat, not how much is more effective. You focus on controlling the quality of the foods, importantly, the processed carbs, but there are other aspects that can help hormonal and metabolic response. That's what the person focuses on, and we let the body, based on our hunger levels, and satiety levels, determine how much we need to satisfy metabolic requirement.   So you've got what we call in the field a testable hypothesis, that people will do better if they follow the approach that you've mentioned, compared to the traditional approach. And you put that to a test in a study that we're going to be talking about in a second podcast. But before we get to that, what sort of pushback, if you had, as your paper has been published, are corporate interests involved in this picture at all?   Yeah, let me just say that we recognize that these ideas are not fully proven. There are animal studies, we've done one of them that provides what we could call a proof of concept, that when you give rodents, and this has been reproduced by many different groups. This is a very rigorous finding. When you give rodents high glycemic index, versus low-glycemic index starch, so that's fast-digesting, versus slow-digesting starch. You keep everything else the same, the ones that get the fast-digesting starch, that's like, all of those processed carbs we're eating that raise insulin a lot, well, they in fact show this whole sequence of events. Their insulin levels initially go up, they start getting fatter, and their energy expenditure goes down. They start moving less, and if you restrict their calories to that of the control animal, they're still fatter, because more calories wound up getting stored than burnt in muscle. So they wind up getting more fat tissue, and less lean tissue, even at the same total body weight when you prevent their weight from going up. So we argued that there's no way to explain that finding based on the conventional, calorie in, calorie out way of thinking. We need to examine whether this applies in humans, and to whom, you know? It may be that one model explains certain situations, or certain people better than the other, but it is a testable hypothesis. Unfortunately, this debate has become polarized, and we, in our article, specifically invite opponents to work with us on generating common ground. There's plenty of basis for common ground already, and in our article, which is freely available online at American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. We put out a diagrammatic model in which each step leads to another step, and each of these steps is testable. So we can figure out what we got right, what needs improvement, you know, and where common ground is. After all, this is what science is supposed to be about, to come up with new ways of thinking for intractable problems.   You know, you reminded me when you talked about the animal studies of work that occurred many decades ago on something that people in the field were referring to as the cafeteria diet. And I remember the slide that I used for years in my own talks that was given to me by Ted Van Itallie, one of the pioneers in the obesity field, that showed a rat sitting on top of basically a junk food diet, where they take animals, and in the cage, they would put Cheetos and Hershey bars, and marshmallows, and things like that. And the animals would eat a lot of those things, and gain an enormous amount of weight. But people were really attributing the weight gain to the fact that these were highly palatable foods. The animals would eat a lot of it just because it tasted really good, and that would bring a lot of calories, and that was the reason for the weight gain. And what you're saying is just, "Wait a minute, what happens to be that food that goes in there is a really important part of the picture," And that's been proven by controlling the calories in the experiment that you set.   Well, I think that's a really great point that you raised that it's easy to think in the cafeteria diet model, that the animals are getting fat because of the tastiness of the food, but these studies can't distinguish tastiness, and whatever that means, and we could come back to that point, because tastiness is elusive. It's a very squishy term to define, for reasons we can consider, but it's impossible in these studies to distinguish tastiness from the nutrient content of the foods, and they tend to be full of sugar and processed carbs. In fact, the few studies that have aimed to disentangle this provide clear support for the carbohydrate insulin model that tastiness by itself, when you control nutrients, does not result in obesity, but the nutrients, even in a bland or untasty diet does result in weight gain in animals.   Fascinating science. So, David, what do you think are some of the main policy implications of all this?   Well, there has been push back. Some of that relates to just the difficulty of paradigm change, amidst scientific uncertainty. You know, we need ultimately to be all working together on all sides of this. But in addition, there's resistance from the food industry that loves the notion that all calories are alike. All calories are alike, and there are no bad foods, and that you can drink a sugary beverage, have any kind of junk food, as long as you eat less of other things, or burn off those calories with physical activity. Whereas if this way of thinking, involving the carbohydrate insulin model, this opposite cause and effect conception is correct, then those foods have adverse effects on our metabolism above and beyond their calorie content. And that from that perspective, you really, can't just outrun a bad diet, that we really need to be thinking about how our food is influencing our hormones and metabolism, otherwise we're going to set ourselves up for failure, and that's not a message that many, although not all in the food industry like to hear, because it requires corporate responsibility for helping to create the nutritional nightmare that confronts so many of us, and especially children throughout so much of their days.   You reminded me about an interesting parallel with tobacco here, where the tobacco companies, you know, long after it was known that cigarettes were killing people, just said that it's not the tobacco that's killing the people, it's the fact that they're just consuming too much of it, and the food companies have made very much that same argument. And then the tobacco researchers said, "No, tobacco is bad in any amount, and even a little of it can be harmful." And that's not totally true of the processed foods you're talking about. I'm assuming people can have them in small amounts, but the parallel really kind of exists there, doesn't it? That these things are risky, and dangerous really, after you go beyond whatever that small amount is, and then you're going to have trouble, no matter what you're doing elsewhere in your diet?   The metaphor with tobacco is useful to a point, although it can also elicit some strong responses, because obviously, tobacco products aren't needed for survival, food clearly is. But I do think that there are some parallels that if these highly processed carbohydrates are undermining our metabolism, and also triggering, in part because of the metabolic changes. Fat cells communicate with the brain in many ways, including by releasing or withholding nutrients. If these foods are also triggering pathways in the brain that make managing calorie balance increasingly difficult, then we do really begin to need to think about food way beyond calorie issues, and that all calories aren't alike, and that the food industry may indeed have to manage the food supply in a way that makes weight control easier rather than harder.   The paper we were discussing today was published in September, 2021 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and is publically available for free.   Bio: David S. Ludwig, MD, PhD is an endocrinologist and researcher at Boston Children's Hospital. He holds the rank of Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Ludwig is the founding director of the Optimal Wellness for Life (OWL) program, one of the country's oldest and largest clinics for the care of overweight children. For 25 years, Dr. Ludwig has studied the effects of diet on metabolism, body weight and risk for chronic disease – with a special focus on low glycemic index, low carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. He has made major contributions to development of the Carbohydrate-Insulin Model, a physiological perspective on the obesity pandemic. Described as an “obesity warrior” by Time Magazine, Dr. Ludwig has fought for fundamental policy changes to improve the food environment. He has been Principal Investigator on numerous grants from the National Institutes of Health and philanthropic organizations totaling over $50 million and has published over 200 scientific articles. Dr. Ludwig was a Contributing Writer at JAMA for 10 years and presently serves as an editor for American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. He appears frequently in national media, including New York Times, NPR, ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN. Dr. Ludwig has written 3 books for the public, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Always, Hungry? Conquer Cravings, Retrain your Fat Cells, and Lose Weight Permanently.  

Broken Record with Malcolm Gladwell, Rick Rubin, and Bruce Headlam

According to Time Magazine, singer Angelique Kidjo is “Africa's premier diva.” Kidjo started out singing traditional music in her native Benin, West Africa when she was a teenager. In 1983, she escaped the conflict-riddled Benin for Paris, where she studied music and eventually signed her first record deal with Island Records. Kidjo has since released 16 albums and won four World Music Grammys. Her latest album, Mother Nature, was released in June and features young African musicians like Sampa the Great and Burna Boy. On today's episode Bruce Headlam talks to Angelique Kidjo about the nature of African rhythm and why it can confuse Western musicians. She also explains how she lets her songs dictate what language her lyrics should be in, and how she managed to escape her home country despite being a recognizable national pop star. Subscribe to Broken Record's YouTube channel to hear all of our interviews:  https://www.youtube.com/brokenrecordpodcast and follow us on Twitter @BrokenRecord You can also check out past episodes here: https://brokenrecordpodcast.com Check out our favorite Angelique Kidjo songs HERE. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Culture Gabfest
Decoder Ring: The Great Helga Hype

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 56:02


In the summer of 1986, both Time Magazine and Newsweek ran blockbuster cover stories on the same subject: a secret cache of provocative, intimate paintings by Andrew Wyeth, one of America's most famous artists. These paintings were completed over fifteen years and all featured the same, often-nude model named Helga, and had been hidden from his wife and the public for 15 years. The implication was obvious: Wyeth had been having an affair with this woman. But just as the story was breaking in Time and Newsweek, it began to unravel, and something even stranger and more complex emerged. On this episode we examine the story of these secret paintings, the backlash to that story, and question if, maybe, that backlash was itself overdrawn. This is the first episode of our winter season. If you love the show and want to support us, consider joining Slate Plus. With Slate Plus you can get ad free podcasts, bonus episodes, and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
Decoder Ring: The Great Helga Hype

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 56:02


In the summer of 1986, both Time Magazine and Newsweek ran blockbuster cover stories on the same subject: a secret cache of provocative, intimate paintings by Andrew Wyeth, one of America's most famous artists. These paintings were completed over fifteen years and all featured the same, often-nude model named Helga, and had been hidden from his wife and the public for 15 years. The implication was obvious: Wyeth had been having an affair with this woman. But just as the story was breaking in Time and Newsweek, it began to unravel, and something even stranger and more complex emerged. On this episode we examine the story of these secret paintings, the backlash to that story, and question if, maybe, that backlash was itself overdrawn. This is the first episode of our winter season. If you love the show and want to support us, consider joining Slate Plus. With Slate Plus you can get ad free podcasts, bonus episodes, and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Decoder Ring
The Great Helga Hype

Decoder Ring

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 56:02


In the summer of 1986, both Time Magazine and Newsweek ran blockbuster cover stories on the same subject: a secret cache of provocative, intimate paintings by Andrew Wyeth, one of America's most famous artists. These paintings were completed over fifteen years and all featured the same, often-nude model named Helga, and had been hidden from his wife and the public for 15 years. The implication was obvious: Wyeth had been having an affair with this woman. But just as the story was breaking in Time and Newsweek, it began to unravel, and something even stranger and more complex emerged. On this episode we examine the story of these secret paintings, the backlash to that story, and question if, maybe, that backlash was itself overdrawn. This is the first episode of our winter season. If you love the show and want to support us, consider joining Slate Plus. With Slate Plus you can get ad free podcasts, bonus episodes, and much more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

AnarchoChristian - Evaluating the relationship between the Christian and the state

Martin Niemoller coined the phrase “God is my Fuhrer” in opposition to the rise of the Third Reich. Let's examine some of his sermons, and other writings, to see what lead him to defy rising Nationalism, and ultimately landed him in a concentration camp. AnarchoChristian Resources: Episode 55, The Barmen Declaration - https://www.anarchochristian.com/the-barmen-declaration-ac055/ Episode 78, Christianity and Atomic Bombs - https://www.anarchochristian.com/christianity-and-atomic-bombs-ac078/ Episode 24, Obey God Rather Than Men - https://www.anarchochristian.com/obey-god-rather-than-men-ac024/ Resources mentioned in the show: Religion: German Martyrs, Time Magazine 1940 - http://content.time.com/time/subscriber/article/0,33009,765103-1,00.html First they came for.. https://encyclopedia.ushmm.org/content/en/article/martin-niemoeller-first-they-came-for-the-socialists Sweet AnarchoChristian gear! Amazon - https://www.amazon.com/s?rh=n%3A7141123011%2Cp_4%3AAnarchoChristian&ref=bl_sl_s_ap_web_7141123011 Proud Libertarian - https://proudlibertarian.com/collections/anarchochristian Get your Tuttle Twins books through our affiliate link! https://tuttletwins.com/?ap_id=AnXP1  Support the show! Support the show on Patreon & PayPal Find us on the web! AnarchoChristian.com Twitter Facebook YouTube Subscribe today, and don't miss an episode! iTunes Google Play Stitcher Android YouTube Credits: Tune by Owen-Glass Beats by Semiotician

Here & Now
Rebecca Hall talks 'Passing'; Climate questions, answered

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 40:54


Writer-director Rebecca Hall adapted the story of the new film "Passing" from the 1929 novel by Nella Larsen. Hall talks about how the film connects to her own family history. And, as the COP26 climate summit heads into its final week, speeches and headlines are full of buzzwords like net-zero and carbon budget. Time Magazine's Justin Worland explains what it all means.

Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders
Dr. Ellen Burts-Cooper - Building (Virtual) Teams

Phronesis: Practical Wisdom for Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 41:14


Dr. Ellen Burts-Cooper is the senior managing partner of Improve Consulting and Training Group, a firm that provides personal and professional development training, coaching, and consultation. Improve has been featured in Time Magazine, Black Voices, Smart Business Magazine, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, Cleveland Jewish News, Cleveland.com, and Crain's Cleveland Business. Ellen works across numerous industries, including manufacturing, healthcare, financial services, education, retail, utilities, governmental agencies, not-for-profit, and small businesses.Dr. Burts-Cooper is on faculty at Case Western Reserve University in the Weatherhead Executive Education Program and The Institute for Management Studies (IMS). She currently serves on the Board of Directors of First Federal of Lakewood and Sea-Land Chemical Company. She is the author of the books aMAZEing Organizational Teams: Navigating 7 Critical Attributes for Cohesion, Productivity and Resilience and Canine Instinct: A Guide to Survival and Advancement in Corporate America.Previously, Ellen served as a Senior Vice President and Senior Director of Operational Excellence, IT Performance Management, and Governance for PNC Financial Services. Prior to the financial services industry, Ellen worked in the electronics industry where she led global teams in several functions at 3M Company in St. Paul, MN.She earned a BS in chemistry from Stillman College in Tuscaloosa, AL, her Ph.D. in organic/polymer chemistry from Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA, her MBA from the University of Minnesota, Carlson School of Business, her Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt certification from 3M Company, and her Multicultural Competency and Wellness Certificate from the National Wellness Institute.Ellen is also an active volunteer and supporter for a host of community-related organizations across the US and provides college scholarships through her fund at The Cleveland Foundation. She is a member of the Private Directors Association and the National Wellness Institute.A Powerful Quote From This Episode"I want teams to be more productive, more cohesive, and more resilient. That is my life's work."Resources Mentioned in This EpisodeEllen's WebsiteAbout The International Leadership Association (ILA)The ILA was created in 1999 to bring together professionals with a keen interest in the study, practice, and teaching of leadership. Connect with Scott AllenWebsite

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism
2156: Managing Time Like Money by Tynan on Self Development & Personal Growth

Optimal Living Daily: Personal Development & Minimalism

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 9:44


Tynan talks about managing time like money Episode 2156: Managing Time Like Money by Tynan on Self Development & Personal Growth Tynan was named as one of the top 25 best bloggers in 2013 by Time Magazine. He believes in making deliberate decisions and breaking away from the herd mentality. He likes learning new things, building habits, exposing the world, connecting with awesome people, and creating good work. The New York Times Bestseller “The Game” featured him as one of the main characters, as he was one of the most famous pickup artists in the world. In 2008, he sold everything he owned and went on an extended world trip, becoming a fervent minimalist. Fun facts: he's a college dropout, was a professional poker player, Courtney Love was his roommate for 9 months, and he once built a swimming pool in his living room. The original post is located here: https://tynan.com/timelikemoney/   Visit Me Online at OLDPodcast.com  Interested in advertising on the show? Visit https://www.advertisecast.com/OptimalLivingDaily Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Issues, Etc.
3081. A Time Magazine Story about Middle East Politics and Biblical Archaeology – Dr. Craig Evans, 11/4/21

Issues, Etc.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 28:38


Dr. Craig Evans of Houston Baptist University Jesus and the Manuscripts Jesus and His World: The Archaeological Evidence

PETPIX ACADEMY with Vasi Siedman
The World of Posh Puppy Boutique

PETPIX ACADEMY with Vasi Siedman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 26:36


We are so excited to welcome the CEO of Posh Puppy Boutique, Jennifer Kirk.Posh Puppy Boutique was started as a family business. The driving force behind the start of this business was the love of a mother. From a mom whose eyes always shone and glittered whenever she used to see her daughters dressing up their dogs. This love for dogs has always been there in Jeniffer's family.Whether it's that extra-special outfit for a dressy occasion, or an every-day collar showcasing your pet's unique personality, the Posh Puppy Boutique offers it. Their gigantic selection for dogs big and small was one key reason why the Posh Puppy Boutique was picked by Disney Studios as an official partner in the movie Beverly Hills Chihuahua 2. They provided the costumes and accessories seen by millions of viewers.Posh Puppy Boutique's business and products have also been featured in publications including People Magazine, Vogue, InStyle, Modern Dog, Every Dog Magazine, TIME Magazine and many others. You may also have seen Posh Puppy Boutique's products on television on the Katie Couric Show, Today Show, Good Morning America, Good Day Sacramento, Sacramento Fox News, and as part of the Oxygen Network, Storibook Weddings with Tori SpellingConnect with Posh Puppy Boutique & Jennifer Kirk:website: https://www.poshpuppyboutique.comhttps://www.instagram.com/poshpuppyhttps://www.facebook.com/poshpuppyboutique 

WorkParty
Christian Siriano on How to Handle Rejection, Advocating for Change, and Championing Inclusivity in the Fashion Industry

WorkParty

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 38:01


Christian Siriano needs no introduction. Since winning Project Runway and launching his namesake collection in 2008, he has firmly established himself as a cultural icon over the course of his impressive career. Let's take a look at some of his milestones, shall we? He's been named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by TIME Magazine. His designs have been worn by the likes of Dr. Jill Biden, Michelle Obama, Ariana Grande, Tiffany Haddish, Billy Porter, and Helen Hunt, to name just a few. But, above all, he's an advocate for change and pushing the fashion industry forward as a dedicated champion to inclusivity, both on the runway and red carpet. Needless to say, I can't wait to dive into the amazing career of this incredible designer—and talk about building his veritable fashion empire, stepping into his new role as a mentor on Project Runway, and launching his newest venture, Siriano Interiors. So without further ado—Welcome, Christian! • Join the party on social @workparty and stay in the know at workparty.com. Go to Oralessentials.com and use code "party" to save 15% off your first order. Produced by Dear Media

Below the Line with James Beshara
Improve Your Fundraising As A 1st Time Founder — Ajay Mehta — Below The (Hot)Line #13

Below the Line with James Beshara

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 46:32


On today's episode, James takes voicemails from listeners. He invites his good friend Ajay Mehta on to discuss the topics from the callers. Ajay previously worked with him at Tilt and has founded two companies since, Birthdate Co. and Therapy Notebooks. The callers asks wide range of questions all centered around the lifestyle of being a founder and an entrepreneur. From Health and Diet for productivity to how to start fundraising as a first time founder. James explains why 90% of the interaction with investors should be based on asking for advice before asking for a check. To conclude the episode, James and Ajay discuss what company or one project they would invest in if somebody theoretically gave them a million dollars. https://bit.ly/Go_BelowtheLine Find out more about Ajay Mehta: https://twitter.com/ajaymehta Hit the show hotline and leave a question or comment for the show at 424-272-6640, email James questions directly at askbelowtheline@gmail.com or follow us on Twitter @ twitter.com/gobelowtheline Support Our Sponsors Magic Mind https://magicmind.co (Use Code BTL at Checkout for 20% off) AppSumo http://appsumo.com/bff About your host, James: James Beshara is a founder, investor, advisor, author, podcaster, and encourager based in Los Angeles, California. James has created startups for the last 12 years, selling one (Tilt, acquired by Airbnb), and invested in a few multi-billion dollar startups to date. He has spoken at places such as Y-Combinator, Harvard Business School, Stanford University, TechCrunch Disrupt, and has been featured in outlets like the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune Magazine, and Time Magazine. He's been featured in Forbes, Time, and Inc Magazine's “30 Under 30” lists and advises startups all around the world. All of this is his “above the line” version of his background. Hear the other 90% of the story in the intro episode of Below The Line. “Below the Line with James Beshara" is brought to you by Another Podcast Network.

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan
The Father Of Emotional Intelligence On How To Manage Your Emotions At Work & Why EQ Is More Valuable Than IQ

The Future of Work With Jacob Morgan

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 57:39


Daniel Goleman is an internationally known psychologist and a science journalist, he is, in fact, known as the father of emotional intelligence. He's also the bestselling author of several books including Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQ and Primal Leadership: Unleashing the Power of Emotional Intelligence. Emotional Intelligence was named one of the 25 Most Influential Business Management Books by Time Magazine and Daniel has been listed among the most influential business thinkers by The Financial Times and the Wall Street Journal. What is emotional intelligence? Daniel says it is a competence, a workplace ability, that makes you stand out from others and there's a set of around a dozen competencies within the domain of emotional intelligence including empathy, adaptability, being able to stay positive, being able to inspire others, and keeping your eye on a goal without getting distracted. Why is EQ critical for leaders and can it be learned As Daniel shares, “everything is a combination of nature and nurture, you get your genetic makeup, but that doesn't limit you. That's what you start with.” And he says that emotional intelligence is definitely learnable. But you need life experience, feedback, and practice to get better at it. Daniel shares why EQ is so important for leaders: “Here's what emotional intelligence tells you. If you're in a negative emotional state, because of the way the brain is wired, you're narrowing the bandwidth of your other capabilities, your cognitive abilities, whatever talents you may have. Because emotions, the way the brain is designed and wired, take up a huge amount of space. In fact, emotional distractions, that thing she said to me that got me so upset, are far stronger than external distractions, it's gonna cap your intelligence, your attention, continually. So emotional intelligence helps you manage disturbing emotions.” Leaders need to be able to lead themselves first, Daniel says, they have to have control of their emotions. The emotional state of the leader is contagious, so if the leader is negative all of the time, that drives the performance of employees, and production and morale go down. Whereas if the leader is emotionally intelligent and has a positive outlook on life and knows how to manage negativity, employees are more productive and happier too. It's not to say leaders won't ever experience anger, frustration, sadness, etc...All humans experience the full range of emotions. Emotionally intelligent people just know how to manage those emotions and they don't let the emotions control them. --------------------------- There are 6 trends that are transforming leadership forever do you know what they are and are you ready for them? Download the PDF to learn what these 6 trends are and what you should be doing about each one of them. These are crucial for your leadership and career development in the future of work! --------------------------- IQ alone is not enough A majority of the time people are promoted to leadership positions because they are good at a certain task they perform in their current role. They are smart, capable people, but that doesn't mean they have what it takes to lead people. We are currently seeing what people are calling the great resignation, people are leaving their jobs right and left and a lot of it has to do with leaders. People don't want to work for horrible bosses who aren't empathetic, positive, caring, self aware, etc… “So you may be good at a job in terms of the objective measures of the job, such as--I'm really good at programming. But it turns out that it's all done with people. And if you're the leader of people, you need emotional intelligence to work well with the people you're leading. It's just a fact.” A certain level of IQ is needed for specific roles like being a lawyer or an accountant, but usually in those types of roles everyone around you has around the same IQ--so the thing that sets you apart is EQ. For people who only have IQ, but no EQ they may be better suited to a job in coding or something with numbers that doesn't require them to work with people too much. They are not good for leadership roles because it is crucial for leaders to be good communicators. For people with high EQ but not high IQ they may be best suited for a role in sales or a position where they are building relationships with customers and clients. Three methods you can use to control your emotions at work We can all use some techniques that can be utilized when we feel angry, frustrated, sad, etc...Daniel has three main methods that he suggests: Sympathetic nervous system arousal. It sounds complicated, but actually it's a breathing technique that helps you recover quickly from being upset. You start out by inhaling as long as you can (at least a count of four), hold it as long as you can (at least a count of four), and then exhale as long as you can. Repeat this six to nine times and it actually shifts your physiology. Name what you are feeling. It can help to say out loud what you are feeling either to yourself or to someone else. Just saying “I'm getting angry now” is shown to shift the energy from the part of the brain that feels it to the part of the brain that manages it.  Practice mindfulness. Bring your focus to your breath and keep it there. Keep your attention on the rise and fall of your belly, and the breath in and out. If your mind starts to wander, notice it, and bring it back to your breathing. And do that for 10-20 minutes a day. The action of catching your mind wandering and bringing it back strengthens your mind to stay focused and avoid distractions.  It's also important, when you have negative emotions, to take a step back and think twice about your negative thoughts. There are many times when we go to the extreme in our head. You make a mistake at work and your mind starts thinking about how you are going to be fired. When those thoughts pour in, realize that you are being extreme and refocus. --------------------------- This episode is sponsored by Workplace from Facebook. Whatever you bring to work to help you be you, Workplace celebrates it. Our familiar features help everyone work together in new ways. To make your place of work a great place to work, visit workplace.com/human Get the latest insights on the Future of Work, Leadership and employee experience through my daily newsletter at futureofworknewsletter.com  Let's connect on social! Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jacobmorgan8 Instagram: https://instagram.com/jacobmorgan8 Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/jacobm Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FuturistJacob

The Climate Pod
What's At Stake At COP26? (w/ Time's Justin Worland)

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 46:37


On this installment of our series, The Road To COP26 Presented By Octopus Energy, we kickoff our two week special coverage of COP26 in Glasgow with Time Magazine's Justin Worland, senior correspondent covering climate change, about what to expect from this year's critical United Nation's conference on climate change. Justin explains the biggest issues on the table at this year's negotiations, why this year's conference is a big test for multilateralism, and what it's like to be in Glasgow during the meetings. He also talks about his recent piece "The Diplomat: John Kerry Brings America Back To The Climate Fight" and what COP26 could mean for the legacy of the US Special Presidential Envoy on Climate. Co-hosts Ty Benefiel and Brock Benefiel also react to COP26 President Alok Sharma's kickoff press conference and discuss the stakes for world leaders as they gather for the opening days as the conference begins with a rocky start.  Subscribe to Time Magazine's Climate Newsletter Thank you to our sponsor Octopus Energy, a 100% renewable electricity supplier. Octopus Energy is currently serving millions of homes around the globe in countries like the United Kingdom, United States, New Zealand, and Germany.  Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group. Check out our updated website! Further Reading: The COP26 Climate Talks Are Opening. Here's What to Expect. Climate finance for poor countries to hit $100bn target by 2023, says report Bad weather causes delays on train routes to Glasgow Cop26 talks  

The Howie Carr Radio Network
Masterpiece Theatre: Time Magazine's Kerry Puff Piece, Journalism in the News and more - 10.28.21 - Hour 3

The Howie Carr Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 38:29


Grace is putting on her thespian hat and acting out a puff piece about John Forbes Kerry in Time Magazine. CNN and MSNBC aren't reporting on the migrant caravan or Florida's low Covid-19 case rate. What gives?

The Handoff
Overcoming a stroke and finding a career in nursing

The Handoff

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 28:43


Our guest for this episode has a truly remarkable story. At 26, Paul Coyne suffered a stroke while working as a derivatives analyst at Goldman Sachs. Rather than slowing him down, the stroke and the nurses who cared for him inspired Paul to pursue a career in healthcare, and over the next four years, he earned five degrees, including a Doctorate from Columbia University School of Nursing, an MBA in Healthcare Management and an MS in Finance from Northeastern University. Paul went on to pursue a career in nursing informatics at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, where he is now a Vice President. He also founded Inspiren, a nurse-led technology company that has been recognized by awards from the ANA, Time Magazine, Fast Company, Becker's Hospital Review, SXSW and the Webby Awards.  In our conversation today, Paul and Dan talk about his journey and how it led him to where he is today, as well as the outside-the-box advice he gives to nurses who come to him for career advice. Links to recommended reading:  Improving Clinical Communications: A Smartphone for Every Nurse Paul Coyne,  A Nursing Graduate Inspired by His Nurses   The full transcript for this episode can be found here: http://www.trustedhealth.com/the-handoff-podcast/paul-coyne  

Adam Carolla Show
Part 2: Teresa Strasser News + Time Magazine for Kids (Carolla Classics)

Adam Carolla Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 62:24


Carolla Classics is back! 1. Time Magazine for Kids (2020) 2. Teresa Strasser News (2010) Hosted by Chris Laxamana and Giovanni Giorgio Support the show: Lifelock.com, promo code ADAM TommyJohn.com/ADAM LiveXLive.com/adamcarolla Geico.com Request clips: Classics@adamcarolla.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/chrislaxamana INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/chrislaxamana1 https://instagram.com/giovannigiorgio Website: https://www.podcastone.com/carolla-classics