Podcasts about deputy chief

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9-1-WHAT? Podcast (91WHAT)
EP 67 - Chief Ross Swope, retired

9-1-WHAT? Podcast (91WHAT)

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2023 50:39


Chief Ross Swope's law enforcement career has spanned four decades.  He started as a walking beat cop and worked his way up to Deputy Chief of the DC Metro PD.  After retiring there, he went on to work as a cop for the U.S. Supreme Court.  This man is happy to spin a tale or two.  We discuss how he dealt with police complaints and incidents of excessive force under his watch.  He shares a story of a car jacking you won't believe.  Chief Swope has recently released a book entitle "Ethics-Based Policing, Solving the Use of Excessive Force." Follow him at: https://www.rossswopeauthor.com/ https://www.instagram.com/rossswopeauthor/ https://www.facebook.com/RossSwopeAuthor https://www.linkedin.com/in/ross-swope-67b0b7229/ https://twitter.com/authorswope   Be sure to support our sponsors: Eric Buchanan & Associates - https://www.buchanandisability.com/ Carlos Bail Bonding - https://www.bailbondsmanchattanooga.com/   If you'd like to be a sponsor, email us at 91what.podcast@gmail.com  

Ray Appleton
No Price Gouging During The Storms.Chief Trindade With Cal Fire Joins Ray. A Bill To Declassify COVID-19's Origins Clears The House

Ray Appleton

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2023 35:50


California Attorney General Rob Bonta today issued a consumer alert following the Governor's declaration of a state of emergency amidst the ongoing series of storms set to continue through mid-March. Chief Trindade is Deputy Chief of Operations Of Cal Fire For Madera, Mariposa, and Merced Unit. He joins Ray to discuss the fire depts. role in this Atmospheric River. The House has unanimously passed a bill to require the Director of National Intelligence to declassify information regarding the origins of the COVID-19 pandemic.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tavis Smiley
Shermichael Singleton on "Tavis Smiley"

Tavis Smiley

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2023 41:35


Shermichael Singleton – CNN/MSNBC political commentator, 2019 Forbes 30 under 30 honoree, former director of communications for Ben Carson, and formerly the youngest ever Deputy Chief of Staff at Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) – joins Tavis to unpack the top trending political stories and headlines.

Hello Sonoma!
Protocol and Possibilities with Sherri Ferris

Hello Sonoma!

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 4, 2023 54:30


Sherri Ferris connects cities, companies, nations, and people . She develops platforms for all kinds of connections that help facilitate friendships, business relationships, and ultimately peace. In her role as protocol professional, she has acted as the City of San Francisco's Deputy Chief of Protocol, welcoming members of the world's royal families, heads of diplomatic missions, and more; she was the lead VIP Hostess at Disneyland, helping magic happen for many famous guests; and in Sonoma she has helped bolster our connections to Sister Cities and nations around the world. In this episode, we discuss what protocol is, what it means, and who it can benefit. We also talk about Sherri's own incredible travel experiences, and the ways in which we can build long lasting relationships if we incentivize and prioritize civility. It is a fascinating dive into a world of relationships few have a chance to see. -------- If you want to: Learn more about Sherri's business and background, visit protocolprofessionals.com Learn more about Hello Sonoma, visit Hellosonoma.org Thank you, as always, for tuning in. And if you enjoyed this episode, tell a friend!

The Get Balanced Podcast, with Dr. Donnie Hutchinson
Episode 152: Life Scan Learning Lab Edition | Deputy Chief Chuck DeSmith

The Get Balanced Podcast, with Dr. Donnie Hutchinson

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2023 24:17


In Episode 152, Chief Todd LeDuc (Ret) and I have a discussion with Chief DeSmith about his career journey including his health and safety officer experience at Renton Regional Fire Authority, his recent experience at FDSOA, and the current health and wellness trends within the fire service.

Danger Close with Jack Carr
Ric Prado: Black Ops [Rebroadcast]

Danger Close with Jack Carr

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 22, 2023 94:14


Note: This episode originally aired in April 2022. Today's guest is legendary CIA paramilitary and operations officer Enrique “Ric” Prado. Ric is a retired CIA operations officer who specialized in paramilitary, counter-terrorism and special/clandestine operations. Escaping Cuba as a child amidst the violence of Castro's Cuban Revolution, he would go on to retire as the CIA equivalent of a two-star general after serving for twenty-four years in the nation's premier intelligence service which included 36 months as the first CIA officer to live in the anti-Sandinista “Contra” camps and later as Deputy Chief of Station of the original Bin Laden Task Force. His new New York Times bestselling memoir Black Ops: The Life of a CIA Shadow Officer takes a deep dive into a truly exceptional career filled with assassins, terrorists, spies and revolutionaries. Prado's memoir highlights not only the complexities of America's shadow wars, but the extreme courage, creativity and perseverance it takes to execute such missions inside the most demanding and hostile environments. You can learn more about Ric Prado at ricprado.com Sponsors: Navy Federal Credit Union: Today's episode is presented by Navy Federal Credit Union. Learn more about them at navyfederal.org Protekt: Visit protekt.com/dangerclose to get 25% off while supplies last. Black Rifle Coffee Company: Today's episode is also brought to you by Black Rifle. Purchase at http://www.blackriflecoffee.com/dangerclose and use code: dangerclose20 at checkout for 20% off your purchase and your first coffee club order! SIG: This episode is sponsored by SIG Sauer. You can learn more about SIG here. FEATURED GEAR Black Ops: The Life of a CIA Shadow Warrior SIG P210 Carry Danger Close is an IRONCLAD Original.

TranscendWithM
Know Her Story With Senator Robyn Kennedy

TranscendWithM

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2023 33:50


Born and raised in Worcester, Massachusetts, Senator Kennedy graduated from Holy Name High School and got her bachelor's degree from Assumption University. Her internship at Congressman Jim McGovern's office provided her with her first exposure to the world of politics. After graduating, she got involved in his re-election campaign as well as the one to elect Ed Augustus to the State Senate. Her affection for the community they were creating grew as a result of door-to-door canvassing, getting to know the locals, and developing relationships. In 2006, after devoting months of hard work to getting Governor Deval Patrick and Lt. Governor Tim Murray elected, she stepped into her first role on Beacon Hill as a Deputy Director of Appointments. From there she went on to the Lt. Governor's Office as a Director of Policy and Interagency Initiatives, then a Deputy Chief of Staff, and a Deputy Assistant Secretary for Children, Youth, and Families. She gained greater knowledge about the effort required to provide services for the citizens of our Commonwealth every day. She is devoted to making sure that no parent in our community has to choose between employment and childcare and that every child in our community has access to high-quality, affordable early education and care. She is working for these objectives as a newly elected senator. She also recognizes the long-standing regulations that have made it challenging to find and maintain housing, as well as the reality of how little new housing has been constructed in previous years and to ensure that everyone has access to affordable homes. Episode Highlights: How did you get into politics? (2:03) Working on several campaigns. (5:23) The importance of having a strong team around you. (8:12) Focusing on the care economy. (13:02) Why do you stick to one child? (14:57) Advocacy is so important. (19:27) It's not just about the pay but the respect. (21:38) It takes the entire village to make a change. (27:40) Ladies run for office. (29:42) Key Takeaway: "Run for office. If you have any interest in this field, We are frequently socialized to believe that we are too average or that we lack the necessary skills, and we've become so accustomed to hearing that we're not good enough and that someone else is better. However, there is a lot that women can contribute and bring to the table." Resources: Twitter Instagram Website

Tax Notes Talk
Updates From IRS Criminal Investigation Deputy Chief

Tax Notes Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2023 46:56 Transcription Available


Tax Notes legal reporter Nathan Richman talks with IRS Criminal Investigation Deputy Chief Guy Ficco about the upcoming Advance Collaboration Data Center and other CI initiatives. For additional coverage, read these articles in Tax Notes:IRS Starts Showing Tax Fraud Fruits of Pandemic InvestigationsFirst Update to IRS's Bank Secrecy Act Data Analysis Coming SoonIRS Criminal Investigators Want to Keep Talking About Bank DataIRS Looking for Real Tax Crime in Virtual RealityIRS Teams Collaborating to Thwart Emerging Cybercrimes and FraudCI Chief Has a Big Plan for How to Find Tax Dirty DeedsIn our “Editors' Corner” segment, Sharon Katz-Pearlman, a shareholder with Greenberg Traurig's global tax practice in New York, chats about her Tax Notes piece, "Definitely Not Boring: The U.N. Tax Committee and OECD Collide.”  Follow us on Twitter:David Stewart: @TaxStewTax Notes: @TaxNotes**This episode is sponsored by the University of California Irvine School of Law Graduate Tax Program. For more information, visit law.uci.edu/gradtax.***CreditsHost: David D. StewartExecutive Producers: Jasper B. Smith, Paige JonesShowrunner and Audio Engineer: Jordan ParrishGuest Relations: Alexis Hart

Kreative Radio
KR #15 The Power of Voice

Kreative Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2023 42:01


In this episode, Khalil Kavon sits down with special guest Ty Hankerson, Deputy Chief of Staff of District Affairs for Speaker Adrienne Adams to discuss "The Power of Voice". Take a listen and also watch on Youtube.com/khalilkavon. Subscribe now for updates on new episodes. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/kreativeradio/support

This is Democracy
This is Democracy – Episode 227: Intelligence

This is Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 7, 2023


In this week's episode, Jeremi and Zachary are joined by John Sipher to discuss intelligence and the ways in which US intelligence agencies collect information on China and Russia. Zachary sets the scene with his poem entitled, "Conceiving the Spies Lament." John Sipher retired in 2014 after a 28-year career in the Central Intelligence Agency's National Clandestine Service. At the time of his retirement, he was a member of the CIA's Senior Intelligence Service, the leadership team that guides CIA activities globally. John served multiple overseas tours as Chief of Station and Deputy Chief of Station in Europe, Asia, and in high-threat environments. John also served as a lead instructor in the CIA's clandestine training school and was a regular lecturer at the CIA's leadership development program.

Gettin' Salty Experience Firefighter Podcast
GETTIN_ SALTY EXPERIENCE PODCAST EP. 125 I FDNY DEPUTY ASSISTANT CHIEF FRANK LEEB

Gettin' Salty Experience Firefighter Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 150:15


GETTIN' SALTY EXPERIENCE PODCAST Ep.125 : Our special guest is Active 30 year FDNY veteran Deputy Assistant Chief Frank Leeb. Volunteer for the East Farmingdale Fire Department - Long Island, NY (April 1983- present). He got on FDNY in 1992 and was assigned to Engine 323. In 1998 he became a charter member of Squad 270. he responded to Airtrain incident and American airlines flight 587 crash. He was promoted to Lt in 2002 and was assigned to Engine 324 and then to Capt in 2007 and was assigned to Engine 76. He was promoted to BC in 2011 and worked in Battalion 46 down the road from Squad 288. Deputy Chief, Division 1 from 10/18 - 04/20 Deputy Assistant Chief, Chief of the Fire Academy 02/20 – 12/21 His highlight of his career was doing the Getting Salty - welcome to the rock!

Urology Care Podcast
Urology Mythbusters: Truth vs. Myth with Dr. Lori Lerner and Dr. Arthur Burnett

Urology Care Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2023 32:18


We have two guests with us to talk urology mythbusters. Dr. Lori Lerner is an Associate Professor of Urology at Boston University and works as the Section Chief of Urology and Deputy Chief of Surgery at the Veteran's Affairs Boston Healthcare System. Dr. Arthur Burnett is a faculty member at John's Hopkins University School of Medicine, and is the Director of the Sexual Medicine and Urologic Reconstructive Fellowship at Johns Hopkins. Want to know the truth behind these urologic mythbusters? Listen along and put your knowledge to the test! Short on time? Use the below timestamps to jump to any section: 0:56 - Introductions 2:09 - Myth 1: You can catch something by sitting on a public toilet 3:53 - Myth 2: Dark yellow urine means a person is dehydrated 5:39 - Myth 3: Infertility is more common in women than in men 9:47 - Myth 4: Erectile dysfunction is super common and highly treatable 17:37 - Myth 5: Getting up at night a lot to pass urine is a sign of a large prostate 24:52 - Myth 6: The only way to enhance men's sexual health is through testosterone therapy 29:20 - Final thoughts Check out Dr. Arthur Burnett's book here: "The Manhood Rx: Every Man's Guide to Improving Sexual Health and Overall Wellness" (https://rowman.com/isbn/9781538166598/%e2%80%a6anhood-rx-every-man's-guide-to-improving-sexual-health-and-overall-wellness) For more information, please visit www.UrologyHealth.org and don't forget to subscribe to our free digital magazine, UrologyHealth extra® at https://www.urologyhealth.org/healthy-living/urologyhealth-extra. **** February 2, 2023

Army Management Staff College (AMSC) Podcast
Episode 50 - Leadership Perspectives, with Ms. Diane M. Randon

Army Management Staff College (AMSC) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 35:00


AMSC's Mr. David Howey meets with Ms. Diane M. Randon, Principal Deputy to the Deputy Chief of Staff for Intelligence (G-2), Department of the Army, to hear her perspectives on leadership, coaching, career progression, and other topics relevant to Army Civilian Professionals. Ms. Randon has served as a member of the Senior Executive Service since 2007. For questions, suggestions, or feedback, write us at usarmy.leavenworth.tradoc.mbx.armyu-amsc-podcast@army.mil To learn more about the Army Management Staff College, visit our website at https://armyuniversity.edu/amsc/podcast No DoD or U.S. ARMY ENDORSEMENT IMPLIED. Any references to commercially available products or works are used for research and educational purposes only. Mention of any specific commercial products, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the US Army, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. The views and opinions of the authors expressed herein do not state or reflect those of the United States Government and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. The mention of companies by name is solely for the purpose of representing educational framework and should not be implied as endorsement.

True Thirty with Joey Dumont
A Case for Reformative Justice with Cristine Soto Deberry

True Thirty with Joey Dumont

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2023 64:00


Cristine Soto Deberry is the Founder and Executive Director of the Prosecutors Alliance, an organization that supports and amplifies the voices of California prosecutors committed to reforming our criminal justice system through smart, sage, modern solutions that advance not just public safety but community well-being.Cristine spent 9 years with the San Francisco DA's Office, a decade as the Chief of Staff to San Francisco District Attorneys George Gascon and Chesa Boudin – as well as serving as San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom's Deputy Chief of Staff.In our attempt to understand the many issues related to our criminal justice system here in San Francisco, we were thrilled to have Cristine join us and share her vision of what proper criminal justice reform looks like.I hope you learn as much as I did from today's episode.Watch Episode: This is a public episode. If you'd like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit truethirty.substack.com/subscribe

Tavis Smiley
KBLA Exclusive: LAPD Chief Michel Moore on “Tavis Smiley”

Tavis Smiley

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 57:43


Insightful conversations with thought leaders, opinion makers, celebrities, authors and artists. Plus, socially conscious commentary that challenges listeners to re-examine the assumptions they hold, and expand their inventory of ideas. One of TIME magaziTopic: Los Angeles Police Department Chief Michel Moore recently requested reappointment for a second term, writing in a letter to the Board of Police Commissioners that there remains "more work to be done" and he has a "strong desire" to continue leading the department. Moore, a 40-year veteran of the department, has served as chief since 2018 when he was appointed by former Mayor Eric Garcetti. His current term ends in June 2023. But does he deserve another five-year term? He joins Tavis live in studio for an exclusive one-on-one conversation. Bio: Chief Michel R. Moore is a 40-year veteran of the Los Angeles Police Department. He was born the second of five children in Porterville, California, and grew up in various parts of the United States, graduating high school in Conway, Arkansas. He returned to Southern California in 1978 and joined the Los Angeles Police Department in 1981. Chief Moore rose through the ranks of police officer, detective, sergeant, and lieutenant working various patrol, investigative, and administrative assignments throughout the City. Chief Moore promoted to the rank of Captain in 1998 and his assignments included assuming command at Rampart Area following the arrest of Rafael Perez and during the 2000 Democratic National Convention. Upon his promotion to Commander in 2002, his assignments were at Operations-Valley Bureau and later the Assistant to the Director, Office of Operations. In 2004, he was promoted to Deputy Chief and assumed the command of Operations-West Bureau, later transferring to Operations-Valley Bureau in 2005. In 2010, he promoted to Assistant Chief and was assigned as Director, Office of Special Operations. In that position, Chief Moore oversaw Detective Bureau and Counter-Terrorism and Special Operations Bureau, as well as Citywide Jail, Property and Security Services Operations. In 2015, Chief Moore was assigned as Director, Office of Administrative Services. In that position, he oversaw the Department's fiscal, personnel, training and various support operations including the Department's command center, communications and records management. He was also the Chair of the Department's Use of Force Review Board which evaluates all Categorical Uses of Force, including deadly force and hospitalizations. In 2016, he was promoted to First Assistant Chief and was assigned as Director, Office of Operations. In that position, he oversaw the Department's geographic bureaus and patrol divisions which provide uniformed and investigative services within the City of Los Angeles. In addition, Chief Moore directed the Department's COMPSTAT process, including weekly command inspections. On June 27, 2018, Michel R. Moore was sworn in by the Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti as the 57th Chief of Police of the City of Los Angeles. During his time as the Chief of police, Chief Moore has implemented effective crime fighting initiatives, institutionalized the Community Safety Partnership model, focused heavily on community engagement, and ensured the on-going modernization of the Department's technology; all while guiding the men and women of this organization through the challenges of a global pandemic. Chief Moore attended the University of Redlands, completing a Bachelor of Science in Business and Management in 1993 and a Masters of Business Administration in 1999. He is also a graduate of the Police Executive Research Forum, the Senior Management Institute for Police, the Supervisory Leadership Institute, and the West Point Leadership program. Chief Moore has completed advanced coursework in emergency management, counter-terrorism, and process improvement. He has received numerous commendations and awards for his police service including the Department's Medal of Valor, the Police Medal, the Police Star, and the Meritorious Service Medal. Chief Moore is a Director for the Los Angeles Police Federal Credit Union, Past President of the Los Angeles County Peace Officers Association, and serves on the Board of Directors for the Los Angeles Police Memorial Association. He is a member of various professional organizations including the Police Executive Research Forum, the Latin American Law Enforcement Association, the Los Angeles Women Peace Officers and Associates Organization, and the International Association of Chiefs of Police. Chief Moore strives to promote a community policing style of leadership that stresses intelligent, partnership-oriented strategies involving community stakeholders, as well as various members of the criminal justice system.

MindFULL conversations
She Said - A Lawyer's Movie Review

MindFULL conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 46:28


How often do you get to hear what a lawyer has to say about a movie involving our legal system and one of the most high profile films of the 2022 Holiday Season? In the beginning of December, I went to see the movie She Said about the Harvey Weinstein case, with Leora Joseph. I met Leora at a wedding and one mindful conversation led to another...Lucky us - Leora was  Deputy Chief of the Family Violence and Sexual Assault Bureau in the Boston (Suffolk County) District Attorney's Office.  Over 25 years of practicing law has brought Leora's empathy and intelligence to difficult conversations with thousands of victims. She has supervised specialized units involving the most vulnerable victims - human trafficking, domestic violence, sexual abuse, elder abuse - and oversaw all the District Attorney's special projects and community involvement in areas of intimate crimes.Since moving to Colorado, she has been the Managing Chief Deputy District Attorney, Colorado Chief Of Staff in the Office of the Attorney General for Colorado, Managing Chief Deputy District Attorney, General Counsel and now is the Director Of Behavioral Health . Phew! That is quite the experience to use to fill our minds with insight about the movie and about the "collateral consequences" facing this generation. 3 Takeaways (actually there are many, but I try and give you at least 3) from our conversation - the gist of which is that we have to be open to difficult conversations and understand that opposite ideas can co-exist:1. Accountabilty and Victims Rights. We must learn not to judge. You can't know what you would do in someone's shoes. They do what is best for them and you have to respect that.2. Speaking of respect - we must learn to respect The Constitution/Rule of Law and The Public Interest.3. Learn to understand the nuance of Free Press and what it means for what we are told, how we are told and when we are told something that matters to our every day ways of living. Please follow my blog, The MindFULL Creative. It's the inspiration for this podcast and has tons of ideas and links to fill your mind with fresh perspectives! https://themindfullcreative.comBe in touch with me! You can DM me on Instagram and let me know what you think, what you like and if you'd like to be a guest and fill our minds! https://www.instagram.com/mindfullconversations/And, if I have mentioned a book in this episode, click to easily buy it! Support Local Bookstores, shop my page and fill your mind. https://bookshop.org/shop/mindfullconversations

Talk+Water Podcast
#54 - Jeremy Mazur, Texas Water Policy

Talk+Water Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 58:46


Texas Water Journal and Texas+Water Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Todd Votteler, talks with Jeremy Mazur, Senior Policy Advisor for Texas 2036, about water policy priorities in Texas. Mazur directs Texas 2036's work in the area of natural resources, which includes water, oil and gas, and energy.  Since joining Texas 2036 in September 2021, Mazur has played a leading role in Texas 2036's energy expansion project, charting an energy future that includes cleaner oil and gas and renewable sources of energy.  Mazur also directs research and policy development in water.  His current projects include a study on water markets, developing a strategic implementation plan for recent federal water legislation, and improving the state's infrastructure and resilience to extreme weather. Drawing on over 20 years of experience working in the Texas legislature and critical state agencies, Mazur works directly with state and legislative leaders on policy changes needed for Texas' energy and water future. Before coming to Texas 2036, his legislative career began in the late 20th century as a policy analyst with the Texas Sunset Advisory Commission. From there, he served as a Chief of Staff for Texas State Representative Bill Callegari and as Deputy Chief of Staff and Legislative Director for Texas State Senator Van Taylor.  He also served as Director of Governmental Relations for two state agencies essential to Texas' future: the Texas Water Development Board and, more recently, the Railroad Commission, Texas' leading oil and gas, pipeline safety, and surface mining regulator.

director texas chief drawing deputy chief senior policy advisor mazur legislative director water policy governmental relations railroad commission texas water development board
Taking the Pulse: a Health Care Podcast
Episode 127: Kelli Ferry, SVP and Deputy Chief Legal Officer, and Angela Yochem, EVP and Chief Transformation and Digital Officer, Novant Health

Taking the Pulse: a Health Care Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 20:59


Matthew and Heather welcome Kelli Ferry and Angela Yochem, leaders from Novant Health, a three-state integrated network of physician clinics, outpatient centers, and hospitals. Angela and Kelli share the unique efforts of Novant to revitalize and transform health care, including the creation of Novant's Innovation Lab and Novant Health Enterprises as well as collaborations with cutting-edge tech and health care companies. Tune in for an exciting discussion on the future of health care!

Kansas City's Northeast Newscast
272: Kansas City Police Chief Stacey Graves

Kansas City's Northeast Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 47:51


On this week's episode of the Northeast Newcast, Publisher Michael Bushnell is joined by recently promoted Kansas City, Mo., Police Chief Stacey Graves. A 25-year veteran of the department, she was previously the acting Deputy Chief of the Patrol Bureau. They discuss community policing, the homicide rate, recruitment and retention of officers, local control and more. 

The One Away Show
Ximena Hartsock: One Vote Away From a Paradigm Shift

The One Away Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 43:58


Ximena Hartsock is the co-founder of BuildWithin, which provides software and services for employers to find, onboard, and accelerate the productivity of “new-collar” workers. BuildWithin was founded on the principle that when given the proper access, resources, and training, anyone can move into a career they are passionate about and be successful in it - a philosophy they sum up in their motto, "Potential over Credential"!   Ximena was born and raised in Santiago, Chile, where her father instilled in her a love of books that led her to pursue a degree in Spanish Literature and Philosophy at the University of La Serena. Upon graduating, Ximena moved to the US and started over from the ground up, working a series of service jobs while pursuing a teaching license. She would go on to work in the DC Public Schools for several years, starting as an aide and working all the way up to Deputy Chief for Teaching and Learning. In 2009, Ximena was promoted to Director of Parks and Recreation by then-DC Mayor Adrian Fenty, where she was tasked with the completion of numerous major construction projects such as the Wilson pool and Washington Nationals Baseball Park.    When the Mayor's term ended, Ximena left local government and became the National Director of Mobilization and Outreach at StudentsFirst, a nonprofit focused on education initiatives. At StudentsFirst, she had the idea for Phone2Action, a technology for civic engagement, and wrote a patent for connecting people to their lawmakers that was granted by the USPTO in 2021.   Read the show notes on Arcbound's Podcast Page: https://arcbound.com/podcasts/    Find Arcbound here: Homepage: Arcbound.com Services/Work with Us: https://arcbound.com/work-with-us/ About: https://arcbound.com/about/ Founders Corner: https://arcbound.com/category/founders-corner/ Connect: https://arcbound.com/connect/

IoT For All Podcast
Leading Use Cases of Space and IoT | Kinéis's Alexandre Tisserant | Internet of Things Podcast

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 16:31


In this podcast, Alexandre Tisserant, President of Kinéis, a new satellite provider and connectivity provider dedicated to the Internet of Things, discusses his background as an IT engineer and his experience leading Kinéis. He explains that Kinéis currently has eight satellites in low orbit and provides commercial service to connect 20,000 objects around the earth. He also mentions that Kinéis raised 100 million euros to launch 25 new nano-satellites in 2023 to improve the performance and lower the cost of their service, with a focus on use cases such as science and wildlife monitoring, shipping vessel tracking, logistics, smart agriculture, and energy infrastructure. He also explains that satellite connectivity is complementary to terrestrial connectivity and will be used more in hybrid connectivity. Alexandre Tisserant is the ex-Deputy Chief of Staff to the Deputy Minister for Digital Affairs and Innovation. He became President of Kinéis three years ago and has a background in telecommunications engineering, graduating from Ecole Polytechnique and TelecomParisTech in France. He worked for several years for the french Government and spent two years as COO of a hardware startup in San Francisco.Kinéis is a satellite operator and global connectivity provider. It inherited from 40 years of expertise with the Argos system, founded at that time by CNES (French space agency) and operated by CLS (Collecte Localisation Satellites). To simplify and revolutionize the uses of IoT by professionals and individuals, Kinéis locates and connects objects anywhere around the world. Kinéis raised 100 million euros from public and private investors in 2020.

Next in Foreign Policy
Development Finance and Naz El-Khatib

Next in Foreign Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 35:28


The Development Finance Corporation is one of America's newest organizations in foreign policy. Zoe and Grant talk with Naz El-Khatib, DFC's Deputy Chief of Staff for Policy, about the organization, its work, and the intersection of foreign policy and finance. For our final segment Naz talks about the Australian Open, Zoe discusses 'Goblin Mode', and Grant comments on the insurrection in Brazil.     If you are under 40 and interested in being featured on the podcast, be sure to fill out this form. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Congressional Dish
CD266: Contriving January 6th

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 134:58 Very Popular


The January 6th Committee investigation is over and four criminal charges against former President Donald Trump have been referred to the Justice Department by the Committee. In this episode, hear a summary of 23 hours of testimony and evidence presented by the Committee which prove that former President Trump went to extraordinary and illegal lengths to remain President, despite losing the 2020 Election. Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! View the shownotes on our website at https://congressionaldish.com/cd266-contriving-january-6th Executive Producer Recommended Sources “PREPARED REMARKS: Sanders Files Amendment on Microchip Legislation to Restrict Blank Check Corporate Welfare.” Jul 19, 2022. U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders. Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD236: January 6: The Capitol Riot CD228: The Second Impeachment Trial of Donald Trump The Final Committee Report “Final Report of the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the Capitol,” [House Report 117-663] 117th Congress Second Session. Dec 22, 2022. U.S. Government Publishing Office. The January 6th Committee “Inside the Jan. 6 Committee.” Robert Draper and Luke Broadwater. Dec 23, 2022. The New York Times Magazine. 2020 Election Litigation “Litigation in the 2020 Election.” Oct 27, 2022. The American Bar Association. “‘Trump Won Two-Thirds of Election Lawsuits Where Merits Considered.'” Daniel Funke. Feb 9, 2021. PolitiFact. January 6th Security Failures “Capitol Attack: The Capitol Police Need Clearer Emergency Procedures and a Comprehensive Security Risk Assessment Process,” [GAO-22-105001] February 2022. U.S. Government Accountability Office. Electors and Vote Certification Process “Who Are Electors And How Do They Get Picked?” Domenico Montanaro. Dec 14, 2020. NPR. “About the Electors.” May 11, 2021. U.S. National Archives. John Eastman “Who is John Eastman, the Trump lawyer at the center of the Jan. 6 investigation?” Deepa Shivaram. Jun 17, 2022. NPR. “About Us.” The Federalist Society. “The Eastman Memo.” Trump and Georgia “The Georgia criminal investigation into Trump and his allies, explained.” Matthew Brown. Nov 22, 2022. The Washington Post. “Here's the full transcript and audio of the call between Trump and Raffensperger.” Amy Gardner and Paulina Firozi. Jan 5, 2021. The Washington Post. AG Bill Barr Interview “In exclusive AP interview, AG Barr says no evidence of widespread election fraud, undermining Trump.” Mike Balsamo. Dec 11, 2020. “Barr tells AP that Justice Dept. hasn't uncovered widespread voting fraud that could have changed 2020 election outcome.” Dec 1, 2020. The Associated Press. Past Electoral Vote Challenges “Post Misleadingly Equates 2016 Democratic Effort to Trump's 2020 ‘Alternate Electors.'” Joseph A. Gambardello. Jun 29, 2022. FactCheck.org. “Democrats challenge Ohio electoral votes.” Ted Barrett. Jan 6, 2005. CNN. Fake Electors “What you need to know about the fake Trump electors.” Amy Sherman. Jan 28, 2022. PolitiFact. “Exclusive: Federal prosecutors looking at 2020 fake elector certifications, deputy attorney general tells CNN.” Evan Perez and Tierney Sneed. Jan 26, 2022. CNN. “American Oversight Obtains Seven Phony Certificates of Pro-Trump Electors.” Mar 2, 2021. American Oversight. Censure of Cheney & Kinzinger “Read the Republican Censure of Cheney and Kinzinger.” Feb 4 2022. The New York Times. Audio Sources 12/19/22 Business Meeting December 19, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol 10/13/22 Business Meeting October 13, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Featured speakers: Kayleigh McEnany, Former White House Press Secretary Molly Michael, Former Executive Assistant to the President Pat Cipollone, Former White House Counsel Clips Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Why would Americans assume that our Constitution, and our institutions, and our Republic are invulnerable to another attack? Why would we assume that those institutions will not falter next time? A key lesson of this investigation is this: Our institutions only hold when men and women of good faith make them hold, regardless of the political cost. We have no guarantee that these men and women will be in place next time. Any future president inclined to attempt what Donald Trump did in 2020 has now learned not to install people who could stand in the way. And also please consider this: The rulings of our courts are respected and obeyed, because we as citizens pledged to accept and honor them. Most importantly, our President, who has a constitutional obligation to faithfully execute the laws, swears to accept them. What happens when the President disregards the court's rulings is illegitimate. When he disregards the rule of law, that my fellow citizens, breaks our Republic. January 6 Committee Lawyer: To your knowledge, was the president in that private dining room the whole time that the attack on the Capitol was going on? Or did he ever go to, again only to your knowledge, to the Oval Office, to the White House Situation Room, anywhere else? Kayleigh McEnany: The the best of my recollection, he was always in the dining room. January 6 Committee Lawyer: What did they say, Mr. Meadows or the President, at all during that brief encounter that you were in the dining room? What do you recall? Gen. Keith Kellogg: I think they were really watching the TV. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Do you know whether he was watching TV in the dining room when you talked to him on January sixth? Molly Michael: It's my understanding he was watching television. January 6 Committee Lawyer: When you were in the dining room in these discussions, was the violence of capital visible on the screen on the television? Pat Cipollone: Yes. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): A federal appeals court in Pennsylvania wrote, quote, "charges require specific allegations and proof. We have neither here." A federal judge in Wisconsin wrote, quote, "the court has allowed the former President the chance to make his case and he has lost on the merits." Another judge in Michigan, called the claims quote, "nothing but speculation and conjecture that votes for President Trump were either destroyed, discarded or switched to votes for Vice President Biden." A federal judge in Michigan sanctioned nine attorneys, including Sidney Powell, for making frivolous allegations in an election fraud case, describing the case as a historic and profound abuse of the judicial process. Recently, a group of distinguished Republican election lawyers, former judges and elected officials issued a report confirming the findings of the courts. In their report entitled "Lost, Not Stolen," these prominent Republicans analyzed each election challenge and concluded this: Donald Trump and his supporters failed to present evidence of fraud or inaccurate results significant enough to invalidate the results of the 2020 Presidential Election. On December 11, Trump's allies lost a lawsuit in the US Supreme Court that he regarded as his last chance of success in the courts. Alyssa Farah: I remember maybe a week after the election was called, I popped into the Oval just to like, give the President the headlines and see how he was doing and he was looking at the TV and he said, "Can you believe I lost to this effing guy?" Cassidy Hutchinson: Mark raised it with me on the 18th and so following that conversation we were in the motorcade ride driving back to the White House, and I said, like, "Does the President really think that he lost?" And he said, "A lot of times he'll tell me that he lost, but he wants to keep fighting it and he thinks that there might be enough to overturn the election, but, you know, he pretty much has acknowledged that he, that he's lost. 07/12/22 Select Committee Hearing July 12, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Jason Van Tatenhove, Former Oath Keepers Spokesperson Stephen Ayres, January 6th Defendant Clips Rep. Stephanie Murphy (D-FL): According to White House visitor logs obtained by the Committee, members of Congress present at the White House on December 21 included Congressmen Brian Babin (TX), Andy Biggs (AZ), Matt Gaetz (FL), Louie Gohmert (TX), Paul Gosar (AZ), Andy Harris (MD), Jody Hice (R-GA), Jim Jordan (OD), and Scott Perry (PA). Then Congresswoman-elect Marjorie Taylor Greene (GA) was also there. Rep. Stephanie Murphy (D-FL): We've asked witnesses what happened during the December 21 meeting and we've learned that part of the discussion centered on the role of the Vice President during the counting of the electoral votes. These members of Congress were discussing what would later be known as the "Eastman Theory," which was being pushed by Attorney John Eastman. 06/28/2022 Select Committee Hearing June 28, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Cassidy Hutchinson, Former Special Assistant to the President and Aide to the Chief of Staff Clips 9:10 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Today's witness, Ms. Cassidy Hutchinson, is another Republican and another former member of President Trump's White House staff. Certain of us in the House of Representatives recall that Ms. Hutchinson once worked for House Republican whip Steve Scalise, but she is also a familiar face on Capitol Hill because she held a prominent role in the White House Legislative Affairs Office, and later was the principal aide to President Trump's Chief of Staff, Mark Meadows. 10:10 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): In her role working for the White House Chief of Staff, Miss Hutchinson handled a vast number of sensitive issues. She worked in the West Wing, several steps down the hall from the Oval Office. Miss Hutchinson spoke daily with members of Congress, with high ranking officials in the administration, with senior White House staff, including Mr. Meadows, with White House Counsel lawyers, and with Mr. Tony Ornato, who served as the White House Deputy Chief of Staff. She also worked on a daily basis with members of the Secret Service who were posted in the White House. In short, Miss Hutchinson was in a position to know a great deal about the happenings in the Trump White House. 24:20 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): On January 3, the Capitol Police issued a special event assessment. In that document, the Capitol Police noted that the Proud Boys and other groups planned to be in Washington DC on January 6, and indicated that quote, "unlike previous post election protests, the targets of the pro-Trump supporters are not necessarily the counter protesters, as they were previously, but rather, Congress itself is the target on the Sixth. 27:45 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Of course the world now knows that the people who attacked the Capitol on January 6 had many different types of weapons. When a President speaks, the Secret Service typically requires those attending to pass through metal detectors known as magnetometers, or mags for short. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): The Select Committee has learned about reports from outside the magnetometers and has obtained police radio transmissions identifying individuals with firearms, including AR-15s near the Ellipse on the morning of January 6. Let's listen. Police Officer #1: Blue jeans and a blue jean jacket and underneath the blue jacket complaintants both saw the top of an AR 15. Police Officer #2: Any white males brown cowboy boots, they had Glock-style pistols in their waistbands. Police Officer #3: 8736 with the message that subject weapon on his right hip. Police Officer #4: Motor one, make sure PPD knows they have an elevated threat in the tree South side of Constitution Avenue. Look for the "Don't tread on me" flag, American flag facemask cowboy boots, weapon on the right side hip. Police Officer #5: I got three men walking down the street in fatigues and carrying AR-15s. Copy at Fourteenth and Independence. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): We're going to show now an exchange of texts between you and Deputy Chief of Staff Ornato, and these text messages were exchanged while you were at the Ellipse. In one text, you write, "but the crowd looks good from this vantage point, as long as we get the shot. He was f---ing furious." But could you tell us, first of all, who it is in the text who was furious? Cassidy Hutchinson: The he in that text that I was referring to was the President. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): And why was he furious, Miss Hutchinson? Cassidy Hutchinson: He was furious because he wanted the arena that we had on the Ellipse to be maxed out at capacity for all attendees. The advanced team had relayed to him that the mags were free flowing. Everybody who wanted to come in had already come in, but he still was angry about the extra space and wanted more people to come in. Cassidy Hutchinson: And that's what Tony [Ornato] had been trying to relate to him [President Trump] that morning. You know, it's not the issue that we encountered on the campaign. We have enough space. They don't want to come in right now, they have weapons they don't want confiscated by the Secret Service. They're fine on the Mall, they can see you on the Mall and they want to march straight to the Capitol from the Mall. But when we were in the off stage announced tent, I was part of a conversation -- I was in the, I was in the vicinity of a conversation -- where I overheard the President say something to the effect of you know, "I don't think that they have weapons. They're not here to hurt me take the effing mags away. Let my people in, they can march to the Capitol from here. Let the people in, take the effing mags away." Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): On December 1, 2020, Attorney General Barr said in an interview that the Department of Justice had now not found evidence of widespread election fraud, sufficient to change the outcome of the election. Ms. Hutchinson, how did the President react to hearing that news? Cassidy Hutchinson: I left the office and went down to the dining room, and I noticed that the door was propped open in the valet was inside the dining room changing the tablecloth off of the dining room table. The valet had articulated that the President was extremely angry at the Attorney General's AP interview and had thrown his lunch against the wall. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Miss Hutchinson, Attorney General Barr described to the Committee the President's angry reaction when he finally met with President Trump. Let's listen. Former Attorney General Bill Barr: And I said, "Look, I I know that you're dissatisfied with me and I'm glad to offer my resignation" and then he pounded the table very hard. Everyone sort of jumped and he said "Accepted." Reporter: Leader McCarthy, Do you condemn this violence? Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA): I completely condemn the violence in the Capitol. What we're currently watching unfold is un-American. I'm disappointed, I'm sad. This is not what our country should look like. This is not who we are. This is not the First Amendment. This has to stop and this has to stop now. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Did White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows ever indicate that he was interested in receiving a Presidential Pardon related to January 6? Cassidy Hutchinson: Mr. Meadows did seek that pardon. Yes, ma'am. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): While our committee has seen many witnesses, including many Republicans, testify fully and forthrightly, this has not been true of every witness. And we have received evidence of one particular practice that raises significant concern. Our committee commonly asks witnesses connected to Mr. Trump's administration or campaign whether they'd been contacted by any of their former colleagues, or anyone else who attempted to influence or impact their testimony, without identifying any of the individuals involved. Let me show you a couple of samples of answers we received to this question. First, here's how one witness described phone calls from people interested in that witness's testimony. "What they said to me is, as long as I continue to be a team player, they know I'm on the right team, I'm doing the right thing, I'm protecting who I need to protect, you know, I'll continue to stay in good graces in Trump World. And they have reminded me a couple of times that Trump does read transcripts and just keep that in mind as I proceed through my interviews with the committee." Here's another sample in a different context. This is a call received by one of our witnesses. "A person let me know you have your deposition tomorrow. He wants me to let you know that he's thinking about you. He knows you're loyal, and you're going to do the right thing when you go in for your deposition." I think most Americans know that attempting to influence witnesses to testify untruthfully presents very serious concerns. 06/23/22 Select Committee Hearing June 23, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Jeffrey A. Rosen, Former Acting Attorney General Richard Donoghue, Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Steven Engel, Former Assistant Attorney General for the Office of Legal Counsel Eric Herschmann, Former White House Senior Advisor Clips Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): From the time you took over from Attorney General Barr until January 3, how often did President Trump contact you or the Department to push allegations of election fraud? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: So between December 23 and January 3, the president either called me or met with me virtually every day, with one or two exceptions like Christmas Day Rep. Andy Biggs (R-AZ): Again, I join my colleagues in calling on Attorney General Barr to immediately let us know what he's doing. Rep. Paul Gosar (R-AZ): We're already working on challenging the certified electors. And what about the court? How pathetic are the courts? Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL): January 6, I'm joining with the fighters in the Congress, and we are going to object to electors from states that didn't run clean elections. Democracy is left undefended if we accept the result of a stolen election without fighting with every bit of vigor we can muster. Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH): The ultimate date of significance is January 6. This is how the process works. The ultimate arbiter here, the ultimate check and balance, is the United States Congress. And when something is done in an unconstitutional fashion, which happened in several of these states, we have a duty to step forward and have this debate and have this vote on the 6th of January. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: So both the Acting Attorney General [Rosen] and I tried to explain to the President on this occasion, and on several other occasions that the Justice Department has a very important, very specific, but very limited role in these elections. States run their elections. We are not quality control for the states. We are obviously interested in and have a mission that relates to criminal conduct in relation to federal elections. We also have related civil rights responsibilities. So we do have an important role, but the bottom line was if a state ran their election in such a way that it was defective, that is to the state or Congress to correct. It is not for the Justice Department to step in. And I certainly understood the President, as a layman, not understanding why the Justice Department didn't have at least a civil role to step in and bring suit on behalf of the American people. We tried to explain that to him. The American people do not constitute the client for the United States Justice Department. The one and only client of the United States Justice Department is the United States government. And the United States government does not have standing, as we were repeatedly told by our internal teams. Office of Legal Counsel, led by Steve Engel, as well as the Office of the Solicitor General researched it and gave us thorough clear opinions that we simply did not have standing and we tried to explain that to the President on numerous occasions. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Let's take a look at another one of your notes. You also noted that Mr. Rosen said to Mr. Trump, quote, "DOJ can't and won't snap its fingers and change the outcome of the election." How did the President respond to that, sir? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: He responded very quickly and said, essentially, that's not what I'm asking you to do. What I'm just asking you to do is just say it was corrupt and leave the rest to me and the Republican Congressmen. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: There were isolated instances of fraud. None of them came close to calling into question the outcome of the election in any individual State. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And was representative Gaetz requesting a pardon? Eric Herschmann: Believe so. The general tone was, we may get prosecuted because we were defensive of, you know, the President's positions on these things. A pardon that he was discussing, requesting, was as broad as you could describe, from the beginning of time up until today, for any and all things. He had mentioned Nixon and I said Nixon's pardon was never nearly that broad. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And are you aware of any members of Congress seeking pardons? Cassidy Hutchinson: I guess Mr. Gaetz and Mr. Brooks, I know, both advocated for, there to be a blanket pardon for members involved in that meeting and a handful of other members that weren't at the December 21 meeting as the preemptive pardons. Mr. Gaetz was personally pushing for a pardon and he was doing so since early December. I'm not sure why. Mr. Gaetz had reached out to me to ask if he could have a meeting with Mr. Meadows about receiving a Presidential pardon. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Did they all contact you? Cassidy Hutchinson: Not all of them, but several of them did. January 6 Committee Lawyer: So you'd be mentioned Mr. Gaetz and Mr. Brooks. Cassidy Hutchinson: Mr. Biggs did. Mr. Jordan talks about congressional pardons but he never asked me for one. It was more for an update on whether the White House is going to pardon members of Congress. Mr. Gohmert asked for one as well. Mr. Perry asked for a pardon too, I'm sorry. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Mr. Perry, did he talk to you directly? Cassidy Hutchinson: Yes, he did. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Mr. Clark was the acting head of the Civil Division and head of Environmental and Natural Resources Division at the Department of Justice. Do either of those divisions have any role whatsoever in investigating election fraud, sir? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: No. And and to my awareness, Jeff Clark had had no prior involvement of any kind with regard to the work that the department was doing. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Is there a policy that governs who can have contact directly with the White House? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: Yes. So across many administrations for a long period of time, there's a policy that particularly with regard to criminal investigations restricts at both the White House and the Justice Department and those more sensitive issues to the highest ranks. So for criminal matters, the policy for a long time has been that only the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General from the DOJ side can have conversations about criminal matters with the White House, or the Attorney General and the Deputy Attorney General can authorize someone for a specific item with their permission. But the idea is to make sure that the top rung of the Justice Department knows about it, and is in the thing to control it and make sure only appropriate things are done. Steven Engel: The purpose of these these policies is to keep these communications as infrequent, and at the highest levels as possible, just to make sure that people who are less careful about it who don't really understand these implications, such as Mr. Clark, don't run afoul of those contact policies. Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: He acknowledged that shortly before Christmas, he had gone to a meeting in the Oval Office with the President. That, of course, surprised me. And I asked him, How did that happen? And he was defensive, he said it had been unplanned, that he had been talking to someone he referred to as "General Perry," but I believe is Congressman Perry, and that, unbeknownst to him, he was asked to go to a meeting and he didn't know it, but it turned out it was at the Oval -- he found himself at the Oval Office. And he was apologetic for that. And I said, Well, you didn't tell me about it. It wasn't authorized. And you didn't even tell me after the fact. You know, this is not not appropriate. But he was contrite and said it had been inadvertent and it would not happen again and that if anyone asked him to go to such a meeting, he would notify [Former Acting Deputy Attorney General] Rich Donohue and me. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): On the same day Acting Attorney General Rosen told Mr. Clark to stop talking to the White House, Representative Perry was urging Chief of Staff Mark Meadows to elevate Clark within the Department of Justice. You can now see on the screen behind me a series of tasks between representative Perry and Mr. Meadows. They show that Representative Perry requested that Mr. Clark be elevated within the department. Representative Perry tells Mr. Meadows on December 26, that quote, "Mark, just checking in as time continues to count down, 11 days to January 6 and 25 days to inauguration. We've got to get going!" Representative Perry followed up and says quote, "Mark, you should call Jeff. I just got off the phone with him and he explained to me why the principal deputy won't work especially with the FBI. They will view it as not having the authority to enforce what needs to be done." Mr. Meadows responds with "I got it. I think I understand. Let me work on the deputy position." Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Mr. Donohue on December 28, Mr. Clark emailed you and Mr. Rosen a draft letter that he wanted you to sign and send to Georgia State officials. This letter claims that the US Department of Justice's investigations have quote, "identified significant concerns that may have impacted the outcome of the election in multiple States, including the state of Georgia." The letter also said this: quote, "in light of these developments, the Department recommends that the Georgia General Assembly should convene in special session," end quote, and consider approving a new slate of electors. Steven Engel: The States had chosen their electors, the electors had been certified, they'd cast their votes, they had been sent to Washington DC. Neither Georgia nor any of the other States on December 28, or whenever this was, was in a position to change those votes. Essentially, the election had happened. The only thing that hadn't happened was the formal counting of the votes. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: I had to read both the email and the attached letter twice to make sure I really understood what he was proposing because it was so extreme to me, I had a hard time getting my head around it initially. But I read it and I did understand it for what he intended and I had to sit down and sort of compose what I thought was an appropriate response. In my response, I explained a number of reasons this is not the Department's role to suggest or dictate to State legislatures how they should select their electors. But more importantly, this was not based on fact, that this was actually contrary to the facts, as developed by Department investigations over the last several weeks and months. So I responded to that. And for the Department to insert itself into the political process's way, I think would have had grave consequences for the country. It may very well have spiraled us into a Constitutional crisis. And I wanted to make sure that he understood the gravity of the situation because he didn't seem to really appreciate it. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): President Trump rushed back early from Mar-a-Lago on December 31, and called an emergency meeting with the Department's leadership. Mr. Donohue, during this meeting, did the President tell you that he would remove you and Mr. Rosen because you weren't declaring there was election fraud? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: Toward the end of the meeting, the President, again was getting very agitated. And he said, "People tell me I should just get rid of both of you. I should just remove you and make a change in the leadership, put Jeff Clark and maybe something will finally get done." Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Mr. Rosen during a January 2 meeting with Mr. Clark, did you confront him again about his contact with the President? And if so, can you describe that? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: We had -- it was a contentious meeting where we were chastising him that he was insubordinate, he was out of line, he had not honored his own representations of what he would do. And he raised again, that he thought that letter should go out. And we were not receptive to that. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): So in that meeting, did Mr. Clark say he would turn down the President's offer if you reversed your position and sign the letter? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: Yes. Subsequently, he told me that on the on Sunday the 3rd. He told me that the timeline had moved up, and that the President had offered him the job and that he was accepting it. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): White House Call Logs obtained by the Committee show that by 4:19pm, on January 3, the White House had already begun referring to Mr. Clark as the Acting Attorney General. Let's ask about that, what was your reaction to that? Former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen: Well, you know, on the one hand, I wasn't going to accept being fired by my subordinate. So I wanted to talk to the President directly. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: So the four of us knew, but no one else, aside from Jeff Clark of course, knew what was going on until late that Sunday afternoon. We chose to keep a close hold, because we didn't want to create concern or panic in the Justice Department leadership. But at this point, I asked the Acting AG [Rosen], what else can I do to help prepare for this meeting in the Oval Office, and he said, You and Pat [Cipollone] should get the Assistant Attorney Generals on the phone, and it's time to let them know what's going on. Let's find out what they may do if there's a change in leadership, because that will help inform the conversation at the Oval Office. We got most, not all, but most of the AAGs on the phone. We very quickly explained to them what the situation was. [They] essentially said they would leave, they would resign en mass if the President made that change in the department leadership. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): DOJ leadership arrived at the White House. Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: The conversation this point was really about whether the President should remove Jeff Rosen and replace him with Jeff Clark. And everyone in the room, I think, understood that that meant that letter would go out. And at some point, the conversation turned to whether Jeff Clark was even qualified, competent to run the Justice Department, which in my mind, he clearly was not. And it was a heated conversation. I thought it was useful to point out to the President that Jeff Clark simply didn't have the skills, the ability and the experience to run the Department. And so I said, "Mr. President, you're talking about putting a man in that seat who has never tried a criminal case, who's never conducted a criminal investigation, he's telling you that he's going to take charge of the department, 115,000 employees, including the entire FBI, and turn the place on a dime and conduct nationwide criminal investigations that will produce results in a matter of days. It's impossible. It's absurd. It's not going to happen, and it's going to fail. He has never been in front of a trial jury, a grand jury. He's never even been to Chris Wray's office." I said at one point, "if you walked into Chris Wray's office, one, would you know how to get there and, two, if you got there, would he even know who you are? And you really think that the FBI is going to suddenly start following you orders? It's not going to happen. He's not competent." And that's the point at which Mr. Clark tried to defend himself by saying, "Well, I've been involved in very significant civil and environmental litigation. I've argued many appeals and appellate courts and things of that nature." And then I pointed out that, yes, he was an environmental lawyer, and I didn't think that was appropriate background to be running in the United States Justice Department. Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Did anybody in there support Mr. Clark? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: No one. Along those lines, he [former President Trump] said, "so suppose I do this, suppose I replace him, Jeff Rosen, with him, Jeff Clark, what would you do?" And I said, "Mr. President, I would resign immediately. I'm not working one minute for this guy [Clark], who I just declared was completely incompetent." And so the President immediately turned to to Mr. Engel. Steven Engel: My recollection is that when the President turned to me and said, "Steve, you wouldn't leave, would you?" I said, "Mr. President, I've been with you through four Attorneys General, including two Acting Attorneys General, but I couldn't be part of this." Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: And I said, and we're not the only ones. No one cares if we resign. If Steve and I go, that's fine, it doesn't matter. But I'm telling you what's going to happen. You're gonna lose your entire Department leadership, every single AAG will walk out on you. Your entire Department of leadership will walk out within hours." And I said, "Mr. President, within 24...48...72 hours, you could have hundreds and hundreds of resignations of the leadership of your entire Justice Department because of your actions. What's that going to say about you?" Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: And then the other thing that I said was that, you know, look, all anyone is going to sort of think about when they see this...no one is going to read this letter....all anyone is going to think is that you went through two Attorneys General in two weeks until you found the environmental guy to sign this thing. And so the story is not going to be that the Department of Justice has found massive corruption that would have changed results of the election. It's going to be the disaster of Jeff Clark. I think at that point Pat Cipollone said, "Yeah, this is a murder suicide pact, this letter." Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-IL): Mr. Cipollone, the White House Counsel, told the Committee that Mr. Engels response had a noticeable impact on the President, that this was a turning point in the conversation. Mr. Donohue, towards the end of this meeting, did the President asked you what was going to happen to Mr. Clark? Former Acting Deputy Attorney General Richard Donoghue: He did. When we finally got to, I'd say, the last 15 minutes of the meeting, the President's decision was apparent, he announced it. Jeff Clark tried to scrape his way back and asked the President to reconsider. The President double down said "No, I've made my decision. That's it. We're not going to do it." And then he turned to me and said, "so what happens to him now?" Meaning Mr. Clark. He understood that Mr. Clark reported to me. And I didn't initially understand the question. I said, "Mr. President?" and he said, "Are you going to fire him?" And I said, "I don't have the authority to fire him. He's the Senate confirmed Assistant Attorney General." And he said, "Well, who has the authority to fire him?" And I said, "Only you do, sir." And he said, "Well, I'm not going to fire him." I said, "Alright, well, then we should all go back to work." 06/21/22 Select Committee Hearing June 21, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Rusty Bowers, Arizona House Speaker Brad Raffensperger, Georgia Secretary of State Gabriel Sterling, Georgia Secretary of State Chief Operating Officer Wandrea ArShaye, “Shaye” Moss, former Georgia election worker Ronna Romney McDaniel, RNC Chair Justin Clark, former Trump Campaign lawyer Robert Sinners, former Trump campaign staffer Andrew Hitt, Former Wisconsin Republican Party Chair Laura Cox, Former Michigan Republican Party Chair Josh Roselman, Investigative Counsel for the J6 Committee John Eastman, Former Trump Lawyer Mike Shirkey, Majority Leader of the Michigan Senate Angela McCallum, Trump Campaign caller Rudy Giuliani Clips Josh Roselman: My name is Josh Roselman, I'm an Investigative Counsel for the House Select Committee to investigate the January 6 attack on the United States Capitol. Beginning in late November 2020. The President and his lawyers started appearing before state legislators, urging them to give their electoral votes to Trump, even though he lost the popular vote. This was a strategy with both practical and legal elements. The Select Committee has obtained an email from just two days after the election, in which a Trump campaign lawyer named Cleata Mitchell asked another Trump lawyer, John Eastman, to write a memo justifying the idea. Eastman prepared a memo attempting to justify this strategy, which was circulated to the Trump White House, Rudy Giuliani's legal team, and state legislators around the country and he appeared before the Georgia State Legislature to advocate for it publicly. John Eastman: You could also do what the Florida Legislature was prepared to do, which is to adopt a slate of electors yourself. And when you add in the mix of the significant statistical anomalies in sworn affidavits and video evidence of outright election fraud, I don't think it's just your authority to do that, but quite frankly, I think you have a duty to do that to protect the integrity of the election here in Georgia. Josh Roselman: But Republican officials in several states released public statements recognizing that President Trump's proposal was unlawful. For instance, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp called the proposal unconstitutional, while Arizona House Speaker Rusty Bowers wrote that the idea would undermine the rule of law. The pressure campaign to get state legislators to go along with this scheme intensified when President Trump invited delegations from Michigan and Pennsylvania to the White House. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Either you or speaker Chatfield, did you make the point to the President, that you were not going to do anything that violated Michigan law? Mike Shirkey: I believe we did. Whether or not it was those exact words or not, I think the words that I would have more likely used is, "we are going to follow the law." Josh Roselman: Nevertheless, the pressure continued. The next day President Trump tweeted quote, "hopefully the Courts and/or Legislatures will have the COURAGE to do what has to be done to maintain the integrity of our Elections, and the United States of America itself. THE WORLD IS WATCHING!!!!" He posted multiple messages on Facebook, listing the contact information for state officials and urging his supporters to contact them to quote "demand a vote on decertification." These efforts also involves targeted outreach to state legislators from President Trump's lawyers and from Trump himself. Angela McCallum: Hi, my name is Angela McCallum, I'm calling from Trump campaign headquarters in Washington DC. You do have the power to reclaim your authority and send us a slate of Electors that will support President Trump and Vice President Pence. Josh Roselman: Another legislator, Pennsylvania House Speaker Brian Cutler, received daily voicemails from Trump's lawyers in the last week of November. Cutler felt that the outreach was inappropriate and asked his lawyers to tell Rudy Giuliani to stop calling, but Giuliani continued to reach out. Rudy Giuliani: I understand that you don't want to talk to me now. I just want to bring some facts to your attention and talk to you as a fellow Republican. Josh Roselman: These ads were another element in the effort. The Trump campaign spent millions of dollars running ads online and on television. Commercial Announcer: The evidence is overwhelming. Call your governor and legislators demand they inspect the machines and hear the evidence. Fake electors scheme Casey Lucier: My name is Casey Lucier. I'm an Investigative Counsel for the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6 Attack on the United States Capitol. On November 18, a lawyer working with the Trump campaign named Kenneth Chesebro wrote a memo arguing that the Trump campaign should organize its own electors in the swing states that President Trump had lost. The Select Committee received testimony that those close to President Trump began planning to organize fake electors for Trump in states that Biden won in the weeks after the election. At the President's direct request, the RNC assisted the campaign in coordinating this effort. January 6 Committee Lawyer: What did the President say when he called you? Ronna Romney McDaniel: Essentially, he turned the call over to Mr. Eastman, who then proceeded to talk about the importance of the RNC helping the campaign gather these contingent electors in case any of the legal challenges that were ongoing change the result of any dates, I think more just helping them reach out and assemble them. But the My understanding is the campaign did take the lead, and we just were helping them in that in that role. Casey Lucier: As President Trump and his supporters continued to lose lawsuits, some campaign lawyers became convinced that convening electors in states that Trump lost was no longer appropriate. Justin Clark: I just remember I either replied or called somebody saying, unless we have litigation pending this, like in the states, like, I don't think this is appropriate, or no, this isn't the right thing to do. I'm out. Matt Morgan: At that point, I had Josh Findlay email Mr. Chesebro, politely, to say, "This is your task. You are responsible for the Electoral College issues moving forward". And this was my way of taking that responsibility to zero. Casey Lucier: The Committee learned the White House Counsel's Office also felt the plan was potentially illegal. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And so to be clear, did you hear the White House Counsel's office saying that this plan to have alternate electors meet and cast votes for Donald Trump in states that he had lost was not legally sound? Cassidy Hutchinson: Yes, sir. Casey Lucier: The Select Committee interviewed several of the individual fake electors, as well as Trump campaign staff who helped organize the effort. Robert Sinners: We were just, you know, kind of useful idiots or rubes at that point. You know, a strong part of me really feels that it's just kind of as the road continued, and as that was failure, failure, failure that that got formulated as what do we have on the table? Let's just do it. January 6 Committee Lawyer: And now after what we've told you today about the Select Committee's investigation about the conclusion of the professional lawyers on the campaign staff, Justin Clark, Matt Morgan and Josh Findlay, about their unwillingness to participate in the convening of these electors, how does that contribute to your understanding of these issues? Robert Sinners: I'm angry, I'm angry. Because I think in a sense, you know, no one really cared if people were potentially putting themselves in jeopardy. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Would you have not wanted to participate in this any further, as well? Robert Sinners: I absolutely would not have had I know that the three main lawyers for the campaign that I've spoken to in the past, and were leading up, we're not on board. Yeah. Andrew Hitt: I was told that these would only count if a court ruled in our favor. So that would have been using our electors. Well, it would have been using our electors in ways that we weren't told about and we wouldn't have supported. Casey Lucier: Documents obtained by the Select Committee indicate that instructions were given to the electors in several states that they needed to cast their ballots in complete secrecy. Because the scheme involved fake electors, those participating in certain states had no way to comply with state election laws, like where the electors were supposed to meet. One group of fake electors even considered hiding overnight to ensure that they could access the State Capitol, as required in Michigan. January 6 Committee Lawyer: Did Mr. Norton say who he was working with at all on this effort to have electors meet? Laura Cox: He said he was working with the President's campaign. He told me that the Michigan Republican electors were planning to meet in the Capitol and hide overnight so that they could fulfill the role of casting their vote per law in the Michigan chambers and I told him in no uncertain terms that that was insane and inappropriate. Casey Lucier: In one state, the fake electors even asked for a promise that the campaign would pay their legal fees if they got sued or charged with a crime. Ultimately, fake electors did meet on December 14, 2020 in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, New Mexico, Nevada and Wisconsin. At the request of the Trump campaign, the electors from these battleground states signed documents falsely asserting that they were the quote, "duly elected" electors from their state and submitted them to the National Archives and to Vice President Pence in his capacity as President of the Senate. In an email produced to the Select Committee, Dr. Eastman told the Trump campaign representative that it did not matter that the electors had not been approved by a state authority. Quote, "the fact that we have multiple slates of electors demonstrates the uncertainty of either. That should be enough." He urged that Pence "act boldly and be challenged." Documents produced to the Select Committee show that the Trump campaign took steps to ensure that the physical copies of the fake electors' electoral votes from two states were delivered to Washington for January 6. Text messages exchanged between Republican Party officials in Wisconsin show that on January 4, the Trump campaign asked for someone to fly their fake electors' documents to Washington. A staffer for Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson texted a staffer for Vice President Pence just minutes before the beginning of the Joint Session. This staffer stated that Senator Johnson wished to hand deliver to the Vice President the fake electors' votes from Michigan and Wisconsin. The Vice President's aide unambiguously instructed them not to deliver the fake votes to the Vice President. Even though the fake elector slates were transmitted to Congress and the Executive Branch, the Vice President held firm and his position that his role was to count lawfully submitted electoral votes. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Brad Raffensperger is the 29th Secretary of State of Georgia, serving in this role since 2019. As an elected official, and a Republican Secretary, Raffensperger is responsible for supervising elections in Georgia and maintaining the state's public records. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Speaker Bowers, thank you for being with us today. You're the speaker of the Arizona House and a self-described conservative Republican. You campaigned for President Trump and with him during the 2020 election. Is it fair to say that you wanted Donald Trump to win a second term in office? Please? Rusty Bowers: Yes, sir. Thank you. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): And is it your understanding that President Biden was the winner of the popular vote in Arizona in 2020? Rusty Bowers: Yes, sir. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Before we begin with the questions that I had prepared for you, I want to ask you about a statement that former President Trump issued, which I received just prior to the hearing. Former President Trump begins by calling you a RINO, Republican in Name Only. He then references a conversation in November 2020, in which he claims that you told him that the election was rigged, and that he had won Arizona. To quote the former President, "during the conversation, he told me the election was rigged and that I won Arizona," unquote. Is that false? Rusty Bowers: Anywhere, anyone, anytime that has said that I said the election was rigged, that would not be true. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): And when the former President, in his statement today, claimed that you told him that he won Arizona, is that also false? Rusty Bowers: That is also false. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Mr. Bowers, I understand that after the election, you received a phone call from President Trump and Rudy Giuliani, in which they discussed the result of the presidential election in Arizona. If you would, tell us about that call. Rusty Bowers: Mr. Giuliani came on first. And niceties...then Mr. Trump, President Trump, then-President Trump came on. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): During the conversation did you ask Mr. Giuliani for proof of these allegations of fraud that he was making? Rusty Bowers: On multiple occasions, yes. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): And when you asked him for evidence of this fraud, what did he say? Rusty Bowers: He said that they did have proof. And I asked him, "Do you have names?" [He said] for example, we have 200,000 illegal immigrants, some large number, five or six thousand, dead people, etc. And I said, "Do you have their names?" Yes. "Will you give them to me?" Yes. The President interrupted and said, "Give the man what he needs Rudy." He said, "I will." And that happened on at least two occasions, that interchange in the conversation. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Did you ever receive from him that evidence either during the call, after the call, or to this day? Rusty Bowers: Never. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): What was the ask during this call? Rusty Bowers: The ones I remember, were first, that we would hold -- that I would allow an official committee at at the Capitol so that they could hear this evidence, and that we could take action thereafter. I said, "to what end? To what end the hearing." He said, well, we have heard by an official high up in the Republican legislature that there is a legal theory or a legal ability in Arizona, that you can remove the the electors of President Biden and replace them. And we would like to have the legitimate opportunity, through the committee, to come to that end and and remove that. And I said that's, that's something that's totally new to me. I've never heard of any such thing. And I would never do anything of such magnitude without deep consultation with qualified attorneys. And I said, I've got some good attorneys, and I'm going to give you their names. But you're asking me to do something against my oath and I will not break my oath. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Did you also receive a call from US Representative Andy Biggs of Arizona on the morning of January 6? Rusty Bowers: I did. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): And what did Mr. Biggs asked you to do? Rusty Bowers: I believe that was the day that the vote was occurring in each state to have certification or to declare the certification of the electors. And he asked if I would sign on both to a letter that had been sent from my State, and/or that I would support the decertification of the electors. And I said I would not. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Speaking Bowers, did the President call you again later in December? Rusty Bowers: He did, sir. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Did you tell the president in that second call that you supported him, that you voted for him, but that you are not going to do anything illegal for him? Rusty Bowers: I did, sir. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Nevertheless, his lawyer John Eastman called you some days later, and what did Dr. Eastman want you to do? Rusty Bowers: That we would, in fact, take a vote to overthrow -- or I shouldn't say overthrow -- that we would decertify the electors, and that we had plenary authority to do so. But I said, "What would you have me do?" And he said, "Just do it and let the court sorted out." And I said, "You're asking me to do something that's never been done in history, the history of the United States. And I'm going to put my state through that without sufficient proof? And that's going to be good enough with me? That I would, I would put us through that, my state that I swore to uphold, both in Constitution and in law? No, sir." Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): I want to look even more deeply at the fake electoral scheme. Every four years, citizens from all over the United States go to the polls to elect the President. Under our Constitution, when we cast our votes for president, we are actually voting to send electors pledged to our preferred candidate to the Electoral College. In December, the electors in each state meet, cast their votes, and send those votes to Washington. There was only one legitimate slate of electors from each state. On the Sixth day of January, Congress meets in a joint session to count those votes, and the winner of the Electoral College vote becomes the president. Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Secretary Raffensburger, thank you for being here today. You've been a public servant in Georgia since 2015, serving first as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, and then since January 2019, as Georgia Secretary of State as a self described conservative Republican. Is it fair to say that you wanted President Trump to win the 2020 election? Brad Raffensperger: Yes, it is. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Secretary Raffensperger, did Joe Biden win the 2020 presidential election in Georgia and by what margin? Brad Raffensperger: President Biden carried the state of Georgia by approximately 12,000 votes. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA): Bear in mind as we discuss this call today that by this point in time, early January, the election in Georgia had already been certified. But perhaps more important, the President of the United States had already been told repeatedly by his own top Justice Department officials that the claims he was about to make to you about massive fraud in Georgia were completely false. 06/16/22 Select Committee Hearing June 16, 2022 House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol Witnesses: Greg Jacob, Former Counsel to Vice President Mike Pence J. Michael Luttig, Retired judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit and informal advisor to Mike Pence Julie Radford, Former Chief of Staff for Ivanka Trump Eric Herschmann, Former White House Senior Advisor Nicholas Luna, Former Assistant to President Trump Gen. Keith Kellogg, Former National Security Advisor to VP Pence Clips 16:45 Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS): Greg Jacob was Counsel to Vice President Pence. He conducted a thorough analysis of the role of the Vice President in the Joint Session of Congress under the Constitution, the Electoral Count Act, and 230 years of historical practice. But he also has firsthand information about the attack on the Capitol because he lived through it. He was with the Vice President and his own life was in danger. 31:05 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Eastman was, at the time, a law professor at Chapman University Law School. He prepared a memo outlining the nonsensical theory that the Vice President could decide the outcome of the election at the Joint Session of Congress on January 6. 32:50 Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY): Dr. Eastman himself admitted in an email that the fake electors had no legal weight. Referring to the fake electors as, quote "dead on arrival in Congress" end quote, because they did not have a certification from their States. 46:40 Greg Jacob: We had a constitutional crisis in 1876 because in that year, multiple slates of electors were certified by multiple slates [sic]. And when it came time to count those votes, the antecedent question of "which ones?" had to be answered. That required the appointment of an independent commission. That commission had to resolve that question. And the purpose of the Electoral Count Act of 1887 had been to resolve those latent ambiguities. Now I'm in complete agreement with Judge Luttig. It is unambiguous that the Vice President does not have the authority to reject electors. There is no suggestion of any kind that it does. There is no mention of rejecting or objecting to electors anywhere in the 12th amendment. And so the notion that the Vice President could do that certainly is not in the text. But the problem that we had and that John Eastman raised in our discussions was, we had all seen that in Congress in 2000, in 2004, in 2016, there had been objections raised to various states. And those had even been debated in 2004. And so, here you have an Amendment that says nothing about objecting or rejecting. And yet we did have some recent practice of that happening within the terms of the Electoral Count Act. So we started with that. 1:20:45 Greg Jacob: He again tried to say, but I don't think the courts will get involved in this. They'll invoke the political question doctrine and so if the courts stay out of it, that will mean that we'll have the 10 days for the States to weigh in and resolve it. And then, you know, they'll send back the Trump slates of electors, and the people will be able to accept that. I expressed my vociferous disagreement with that point, I did not think that this was a political question. Among other things, if the courts did not step in to resolve this, there was nobody else to resolve it. You would be in a situation where you have a standoff between the President of the United States and, counterfactually, the Vice President of the United States saying that we've exercised authorities that, Constitutionally, we think we have by which we have deemed ourselves the winners of the election. You would have an opposed House and Senate disagreeing with that. You would have State legislatures that, to that point, I mean, Republican leaders across those legislatures had put together, had put out statements, and we collected these for the Vice President as well, that the people had spoken in their States and that they had no intention of reversing the outcome of the election. We did receive some signed letters that Mr. Eastman forwarded us by minorities of leaders in those States, but no State had any legislative house that indicated that added any interest in it. So you would have had just a an unprecedented Constitutional jump ball situation with that standoff. And as I expressed to him, that issue might well then have to be decided in the streets. Because if we can't work it out politically, we've already seen how charged up people are about this election. And so it would be a disastrous situation to be in. So I said, I think the courts will intervene. I do not see a commitment in the Constitution of the question, whether the Vice President has that authority to some other actor to resolve there. There's arguments about whether Congress and the Vice President jointly have a Constitutional commitment to generally decide electoral vote issues. I don't think that they have any authority to object or reject them. I don't see it in the 12th Amendment, but nonetheless. And I concluded by saying, "John, in light of everything that we've discussed, can't we just both agree that this is a terrible idea?" And he couldn't quite bring himself to say yes to that. But he very clearly said, "Well, yeah, I see we're not going to be able to persuade you to do this." And that was how the meeting concluded. Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): We understand that the Vice President started his day on January 4 with a rally in Georgia for the Republican candidates in the US Senate runoff. When the Vice President returned to Washington, he was summoned to meet with the President regarding the upcoming Joint Session of Congress. Mr. Jacob, during that meeting between the President and the Vice President, what theories did Dr. Eastman present regarding the role of the Vice President in counting the electoral votes? Greg Jacob: During the meeting on January 4, Mr. Eastman was opining there were two legally viable arguments as to authorities that the Vice President could exercise two days later on January 6. One of them was that he could reject electoral votes outright. The other was that he could use his capacity as Presiding Officer to suspend the proceedings and declare essentially a 10-day recess during which States that he deemed to be disputed, there was a list of five to seven states, the exact number changed from conversation to conversation, but that the Vice President could sort of issue and demand to the State Legislatures in those States to re-examine the election and declare who had won each of those States. So he said that both of those were legally viable options. He said that he did not recommend, upon questioning, he did not recommend what he called the "more aggressive option," which was reject outright, because he thought that that would be less politically palatable. The imprimatur of State Legislature authority would be necessary to ultimately have public acceptance of an outcome in favor of President Trump. And so he advocated that the preferred course of action would be the procedural route of suspending the Joint Session and sending the election back to the States. And again, the Vice President's first instinct here is so decisive on this question, there's just no way that the framers of the Constitution who divided power and authority, who separated it out, who had broken away from George III, and declared him to be a tyrant, there was no way that they would have put in the hands of one person, the authority to determine who was going to be President of the United States. And then we went to history. We examined every single electoral vote count that had happened in Congress since the beginning of the country. And critically, no Vice President, in 230 years of history, had ever claimed to have that kind of authority, hadn't claimed authority to reject electoral votes, had not claimed authority to return electoral votes back to the States. In the entire history of the United States, not once had a Joint Session, ever returned electoral votes back to the States to be counted. So the history was absolutely decisive. And again, part of my discussion with Mr. Eastman was, if you were right, don't you think Al Gore might have liked to have known in 2000, that he had authority to just declare himself President of the United States? Did you think that the Democrat lawyers just didn't think of this very obvious quirk that he could use to do that? And of course, he acknowledged Al Gore did not and should not have had that authority at that point in time. So at the conclusion of the meeting on the 4th, the President had asked that our office meet with Mr. Eastman the next day to hear more about the positions he had expressed at that meeting, and the Vice President indicated that....offered me up as his counsel, to fulfill that duty. We had an extended discussion an hour and a half to two hours on January 5. What most surprised me about that meeting was that when Mr. Eastman came in, he said, "I'm here to request that you reject the electors." So on the 4th, that had been the path that he had said, "I'm not recommending that you do that." But on the 5th, he came in and expressly requested that. Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): Mr. Jacob did you, Mr. Short, and the Vice President have a call later that day, again, with the President and Dr. Eastman? Greg Jacob: So, yes, we did. Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): And what did Dr. Eastman requested on that call? Greg Jacob: On that phone call, Mr. Eastman stated that he had heard us loud and clear that morning, we were not going to be rejecting electors. But would we be open to considering the other course that we had discussed on the 4th, which would be to suspend the Joint Session and request that State Legislatures reexamine certification of the electoral votes? Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-CA): Trump issued a statement claiming the Vice President had agreed that he could determine the outcome of the election, despite the fact that the Vice President had consistently rejected that position. Mr. Jacob, how did the Vice President's team reacts to the stat

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Diplomatic Immunity
Understanding the African Union with Ambassador Jessica Lapenn

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 24:34


Season 5, Episode 2: This season we are talking about multilateralism. What it is, what it's good for, and also what it's not. After looking at the big picture through the lens of the United Nations in episode one, this episode takes us to the regional level. U.S. Ambassador to the African Union Jessica Lapenn joined Dr. Kelly McFarland to explain how the African Union (AU) functions, why the U.S. was the first non-African nation to establish a permanent mission to the AU, how the AU tackles issues of peace and security differently than the UN, and where regional institutions and the United Nations can best work together.    Ambassador Lapenn was sworn-in as the U.S. Ambassador to the African Union and the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa on August 27, 2019. She most recently served as the Chargé d'Affaires at the U.S. Mission in South Africa. Prior to this, she served as the Chief of Staff to the Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights at the Department of State in Washington, D.C. She was Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Kigali from 2012-2014. Ambassador Lapenn entered the U.S. Foreign Service in October 1994. Her overseas tours have included Jeddah, Riyadh, Paris, Tbilisi, Baghdad, and Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, she was the Chief of the Political Section at the U.S. Consulate General, and at the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi, she was responsible for regional refugee assistance and policy in the South Caucuses and Central Asia.   Episode recorded: November 16, 2022 Produced by Daniel Henderson and Kelly McFarland.  Episode Image: African Union Headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Solen Feyissa on Unsplash Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  Funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.  For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.    

Global Recon
GRP 167-Black Ops: The Story Of A Cuban Refugees Journey Into The Upper Ranks of the Central Intelligence Agency

Global Recon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 107:54


GRP 167-Black Ops: The Story Of A Cuban Refugees Journey Into The Upper Ranks of the Central Intelligence Agency. Joining me for this week's podcast is Ric Prado. Ric witnessed a firefight at seven in Cuba during Fidel Castro's revolution. After his family fled, they relocated to Miami. Prado would go on to serve as an elite Pararescuemen in the Airforce and spent 24 years at the CIA, retiring at the rank of Senior Intel Service-2, the Major General equivalent at the Agency. He was the Deputy Chief of Station of the original Bin Laden Task Force and later served as the head of Korean Operations for the CIA. We discussed Castro and Che Guevara, his time in Nicaragua, countering terrorism in the Philipines, and tracking Bin Laden. Tune in. Main Takeaways Witnessing a firefight between government forces and Castros rebels as a young kid in Cuba Fleeing Cuba under the Castro regime Joining the Airforce as a Pararescuemen Working as a paramilitary officer in Nicaragua with the Contra's Working on the Bin Laden task force in the mid-'90s Follow Ric Prado: www.ricprado.com Connect With John Hendricks www.globalrecon.net www.instagram.com/igrecon Music provided by Caspian: www.caspian.band --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/globalrecon/support

You Evolving Now
You Evolving Now with Special Guest, Matt Caruso; Leadership & Creating an Exceptional Environment!

You Evolving Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 31:42


Take a listen to this month's episode as Matt Caruso and I discuss Leadership, Work/Life Harmony... and School/Life Harmony! If you're in a leadership position at work, a parent of a child in college, or a student... this episode is for you!Matt Caruso proudly serves as the Vice-President of Student Affairs at Kean University in Union, NJ. In his current role, he leads a number of departments, including the Kean Wellness Center, Office of Residence Life, and the Student Center. Since graduating from Kean in 1999, Matt has held many positions at his alma mater, including Assistant to the President, Deputy Chief of Staff, and Director of University Relations.Visit Kean University Website: https://www.kean.edu/Enhance Leadership & Work/Life Harmony for your Leaders, Employees, Teams, and Organization with Andre Young's Leadership Trainings & Speaking Engagements! Click to find out more, chat, and customize: https://youevolvingnow.com/

The Lid is On
PODCAST: Seeking Peace episode 5

The Lid is On

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 0:24


This is the fifth and final episode of Seeking Peace, a podcast from the Department of Peace Operations.In this episode, Melanne Verveer from Georgetown University's Institute for Women Peace and Security, examines the challenges and complex realities that women uniformed peacekeepers face.We will hear from General Maureen O'Brien, who serves as the Deputy Chief of Military affairs at the UN, about her pioneering career.

NATO Innovation Podcast
Multi-Domain Operations: The NATO Perspective

NATO Innovation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 19:47


Today, NATO's focus is not only towards threats emanating from the Maritime, Land and Air domains, but also on defending the Alliance across the Space and Cyberspace domains. Transforming to a Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) approach, in which the Alliance synchronizes capabilities across all 5 operational domains to achieve military objectives, will enhance deterrence and ensure NATO maintains a warfighting advantage over its adversaries. Join us for a discussion on MDO with Lt. General Dave Julazadeh, Deputy Chief of Staff for Capability Development at Allied Command Transformation.

AAAIM High ELI
Scott Chan, Deputy Chief Investment Officer, California State Teachers' Retirement System (CalSTRS)

AAAIM High ELI

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 65:38


Our guest for today's podcast is Scott Chan, Deputy Chief Investment Officer of the California State Teachers' Retirement System (better known as CalSTRS).  CalSTRS is the largest teachers' retirement system and second largest public pension fund in the United States.  A world-class financial services institution and state agency, CalSTRS is known for its unique organizational culture which emphasizes customer service, leadership and respect for its members and colleagues.   What a pleasure it was for me and fellow AAAIM Board member, Susan Soh, to hear Scott's background and his path to becoming one of the most powerful people in finance.  As Deputy CIO, Scott oversees CalSTRS' investment division and is responsible for leading a diverse and growing team of over 200 investment professionals. He manages eight critical investment functions including investment strategy and risk, global equities, fixed income, real estate, private equity, risk mitigating strategies, inflation sensitive and sustainable investment and stewardship strategies. What a mouthful…  And, he reports directly into the great Chris Ailman who is highly regarded to be one of the best CIOs in the business.   Direct investing; getting to net zero; embracing diversity, equity and inclusion – you want it, Scott delivers it…  Without further ado, here is our conversation with Scott Chan.

Chaz & AJ in the Morning
Pod Pick: Holiday Fire Safety With Tom G.

Chaz & AJ in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 31:45


Tom G, Deputy Chief with the Stamford Fire Department was in studio with Chaz and AJ this morning to talk about holiday fire safety. His biggest concern is the lithium ion batteries in newer gadgets like electric scooters, and how to store and charge those properly. Plus, stories from the Tribe on how they accidentally lit something on fire. 

Science of Reading: The Podcast
S6 E8: Love at the center of literacy with Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson

Science of Reading: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 39:11 Very Popular


Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson, Deputy Chief of Curriculum and Instruction in the School District of Philadelphia, has played an integral role leading and sustaining a transition to the Science of Reading in the Philadelphia public school district. But making such a change across a large district is difficult. In this episode, Dr. Francis-Thompson (who goes by Dr. Ny) talks with Susan about Philadelphia's experience. She also talks about her own experience learning about the Science of Reading, and offers tips to other district-level leaders and wisdom about providing all students with the liberation that comes through reading and leading—all with love at the center.Additional Resources:Dr. Ny's LinkedIn profileFocused implementation: Doing less to do more with Dr. Doug Reeves—Podcast episode2021 The Philadelphia Citizen story: “A Better Way to Teach Reading” 2021 Chalkbeat Philadelphia story: “Just 32% of Philadelphia third graders read on grade level. Freedom Schools Literacy Academy could be a model to change that.”A 2017 Accountability Review Council report on Philadelphia: “Promoting the Science of Reading Instruction in Philadelphia Public Elementary Schools: Early Implementation Lessons”Video of Dr. Ny speaking: “Equity in Curriculum”Dr. Ny's 2017 dissertation: “Beyond the Pink Sand: Case Studies of Experiences of Multi-Tier System of Supports Implementation in the Bermuda Public School System”Quotes:“I have never met a student that did not want to learn how to read or a family that did not understand the importance of their children knowing how to read.” —Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson“We have to listen to our young people in order to be able to move with that sense of urgency.” —Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson“Liberation is connected to our students being literate… In order for our students to truly be free, we [need to] understand the power that reading has in their future.”—Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson“We have to remember who we are serving and why we are serving them.” —Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson“A lot of times when you're in a large system and you're leading a large system, it can become very robotic-like a machine. You do this, you get this, you do this, you get this. But there's a human aspect that if you have not considered that human aspect, you could very well end up in the same place that you're trying to move away from.”—Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson“And while it's a five-year strategic plan, we do have a sense of urgency and I'm sure within that there are gonna be benchmarks and hundred-day plans and smaller plans to make sure that we are actually doubling down again on the things that truly matter, that are gonna lead, outcomes for our students here in the school district.”—Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson“If we're only in the business of educating some students, then what are we really doing? It's important to look at the students that are not benefitting and really identifying the things that work for that population of students rather than continuing with practices that aren't meeting the needs of the students we're serving.” —Dr. Nyshawana Francis-Thompson

Mic’d In New Haven
Episode 243: The Best of The Bravest: Deputy Chief Vincent Dunn (Volume 35)

Mic’d In New Haven

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 113:33


For an instant classic and one of the greatest episodes in Mic'd In New Haven history, retired FDNY Deputy Chief Vincent Dunn, a 42 year veteran of the fire service having served from 1957 until 1999 and continues to write and instruct in retirement, joins the program for a highly anticipated Volume 35 of The Best of The Bravest: Interviews With The FDNY's Elit and the final show of 2022.Connect With Mike Colón:Twitter: https://twitter.com/mikeinnewhavenInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/original_mc1/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100080791700186LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mikecol%C3%B3n/Business Line: 917-781-6189Business Email: thecolonreport@gmail.comConnect With Vincent Dunn:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/VincentDunnFireBattlespace/?mibextid=LQQJ4dWebsite: https://vincentdunn.com/?mibextid=Zxz2cZListen To The Podcast:iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/micd-in-new-haven/id1347647537iHeart: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/966-micd-in-new-haven-74906026/Spreaker: https://www.spreaker.com/show/mike-colons-showSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/7yth6tWkA7kPAse43eJnNn?si=5y8boJBlRXOqRkIylL-KXw&nd=1PlayerFM: http://front.player.fm/series/micd-in-new-haven-2095021Google Podcasts: https://podcasts.google.com/search/mic%27d%20in%20new%20havenYouTube (Video Version): https://youtu.be/uLlvgsjfdqwOutro Song: U2 - Desire (1988)SONG DISCLAIMER: I DO NOT OWN THIS SONG. All Rights Reserved To Respective Owners.

The Cognitive Crucible
#126 Edgar Hollandsworth on Talent Development and Intelligence Support for OIE

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 49:43


The Cognitive Crucible is a forum that presents different perspectives and emerging thought leadership related to the information environment. The opinions expressed by guests are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of or endorsement by the Information Professionals Association. During this episode, Ed Hollandsworth of the Joint Forces Staff College shares his observations related to career-level US military officer education and the recently released joint doctrine: JP 3-04 Information in Joint Operations.  Research Question: Ed suggests that researchers consider a cluster of inter-related questions that could be considered as a research agenda. This means each question by itself could be the focus of a separate research effort.  Building on the podcasts of Major Cassandra Brooker (#81) and John DeRosa and Alex DelCastillo (#82), Ed challenges scholars to ask “How can the US Government validly, accurately, and rapidly measure the effectiveness of its operations in the information environment in time to influence leader decisions about future plans and operations?  What social science methods and performance measurement models are well-suited to this complex task?  How should the Intelligence Community posture itself to support OIE performance measurement?  Downstream, what are the implications of integrated OIE strategies, and the measurement of their effectiveness, for future changes in intelligence collection, predictive analysis, and training and education curriculum development?” Resources: Cognitive Crucible Podcast Episodes Mentioned #38 Lori Reynolds on Operations in the Information Environment #20 Chris Paul on the Firehose of Falsehood #125 JP 3-04 Information in Joint Operations Joint Forces Staff College Book Recommendations: Joshua A. Sipper.  (2021).  It's not just about cyber anymore:  Multidisciplinary Cyber Education and Training Under the New Information Warfare Paradigm, Joint Forces Quarterly, Spring 2021, pp. 49-56. Mark M. Lowenthal, Intelligence: From Secrets to Policy, 9th edition, 2023. Amy B. Zegart, Spies, Lies and Algorithms:  The History and Future of American Intelligence, 2022. Martin C. Libicki, Cyberspace in Peace and War, 2d edition, 2021. Link to full show notes and resources https://information-professionals.org/episode/cognitive-crucible-episode-126 Guest Bio:  Dr. Edgar “Ed” Hollandsworth reported to the Joint Forces Staff College in September of 2021 as the DIA Academic Chair, a 3-year rotational assignment.  In September 2022, National Defense University appointed him as an Assistant Professor.  He teaches lessons on intelligence studies, information warfare, space and cyberspace operations, and national defense organization in all three JFSC colleges. Ed joined DIA in 2007.  His positions included Director of National Intelligence Pat Roberts Intelligence Scholar, 2020-2021; Deputy Career Field Manager and Lead Career Development Officer, Mission Management (MM) Career Field, Joint Staff J2M (MM Workforce Development Division), 2015-2020; Deputy Chief, Mission Integration Division, National Measurement and Signature Intelligence Office (NMO), Directorate for Science and Technology (ST), 2014-2015; Chief, Enterprise Integration Division, DoD Special Communications Enterprise Office, ST, 2012-2014; Space Policy Analyst, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space Policy, 2011-2012; Chief, Functional Management Division, Office for Collection Management Enterprise, Defense Intelligence Operations Coordination Center (DIOCC), 2009-2010; Senior Intelligence Officer (Policy and Strategy) and Acting Chief, Policy and Strategy Division, DIOCC, 2007-2009. Prior to his DIA career, Ed served for 20 years as an Air Force intelligence officer, retiring in 2006 as a Lieutenant Colonel.  His Air Force assignments included Assistant Director of Operations, Air Force Technical Applications Center, 2004-2006; Assistant Air Attaché to Germany, DIA, 2001-2004; Intelligence Requirements Certification Officer, Joint Staff J2P, 1999-2001; Joint Warfighting Capabilities Assessment Studies Lead, Joint Staff J2P, 1997-1999; Chief, Multi-Force Assessment Division, Chief, Joint Analysis and Reporting Division, and Section Chief, Misawa Cryptologic Operations Center, Air Intelligence Agency, 1994-1997; Chief, National Systems Collection Management, OPERATION PROVIDE COMFORT C2, 1996; Assistant Professor of Aerospace Studies, Air Force ROTC Det. 520, Cornell University, 1991-1994; Arms Control Analyst, Soviet Politico-Military Affairs Officer and Watch Officer, Headquarters Air Force Intelligence Agency, 1988-1991; Student, Naval Postgraduate School National Security Affairs program, Air Force Institute of Technology, 1986-1987.  He also served as a desk editor for the Foreign Broadcast Information Service and as a security escort at the Central Intelligence Agency, 1984-1986. Ed is a graduate of the Defense Senior Leader Development Program, 2012; Army War College, 2011; Armed Forces Staff College, 2000; Air Command and Staff College, 1998; and Air Force Academic Instructor School, 1991. He holds a B.S. in Foreign Service majoring in International Politics from Georgetown University, a masters in East European Area Studies from the Naval Postgraduate School, an MBA from the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, a masters in strategic studies from the Army War College, and a Ph.D. in Public Administration/Public Affairs from Virginia Tech.  Ed co-taught Cornell University and Ithaca College undergraduates as an Air Force ROTC instructor; adult undergraduates in business administration at Columbia College, Patrick Air Force Base, as an adjunct faculty member; and graduate students in the Joint Forces Staff College as a full-time faculty member.  His research interests include government reform, public management theory and practice, intelligence studies, and challenges of governing the global commons. About: The Information Professionals Association (IPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell, on LinkedIn. Disclosure: As an Amazon Associate, 1) IPA earns from qualifying purchases, 2) IPA gets commissions for purchases made through links in this post.

Takeaways – A podcast about learning from the wisdom of others
NAIOP Takeaways 30 – October 2022 - There's a New Sheriff In Town

Takeaways – A podcast about learning from the wisdom of others

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 52:16


There's a new sheriff in town! Reduced crime rates, increased safety, and community well-being are on the radar for the new Las Vegas sheriff. TAKEAWAYS explores learning from the wisdom of others. The NAIOP SOUTHERN NEVADA Program in October is titled There's a New Sheriff In Town. Keep reading for a summary, and listen to the audio below. After a brief intro to the NAIOP program, you will hear the speaker, the panelist, and the program in its entirety. TAKEAWAYS – Life. Lessons. Learned. There's a New Sheriff In Town Why did God create policemen? “So firemen could have heroes, too.” – Kevin McMahill There's a new Sheriff in town! Kevin McMahill, the new Clark County Sheriff-elect of the Las Vegas area, won outright in the primaries with 58% of the votes. During this NAIOP breakfast meeting, we discussed issues that are relevant to the commercial real estate development community. Topics included tourism, financial crime, visitor safety, and the homeless problem. Kevin was a parole officer for the first twelve years of his career after he joined the force back in 1990. Following this, he entered the police academy where he was promoted to Sergeant. He was promoted from Sergeant to Lieutenant, from Lieutenant to Captain, and from Captain to Deputy Chief. Finally, he was promoted to Assistant Sheriff and then Undersheriff. Kevin has worked in every part of the Metro Police Department. He's been on the ground for many local events, including 1 October and the 2020 summer of protests that led to the shooting of police officer Shay Mikalonis. It's clear that he brings tremendous experience to the Las Vegas area. As the new Sheriff-elect, his main focus is to find a better way to help the homeless problem humanely, to increase safety, and to take better care of our first responders. He is creating a wellness bureau to help take care of our first responders in a markedly different way, and better than we've ever seen before. Financial crime is also a common concern in the Las Vegas area. It was refreshing to hear how Sheriff McMahill explained these types of crimes and how he plans to address this issue. The Metro Police Department is quickly becoming one of the most technologically advanced police departments in the country. To be prepared, we need to fill positions with skilled and technology-savvy police officers. The Panelist that morning: Kevin McMahill, Clark County Sheriff-elect in Nevada Moderator: Hayim Mizrachi, President of MDL Group The sponsor that morning was Dermody Properties! Takeaways Here are some of the key Takeaways from the October NAIOP panel: Las Vegas Metro Police Department implemented the ‘shot spotter deploy' to monitor the most crime-heavy areas. There are 11 chronic ‘hot spots' where most crime takes place in the Las Vegas valley. With many new events coming to the Las Vegas Strip, visitor safety is a top priority I hope you enjoy this episode, and stay tuned for more! Thank you for listening! Please subscribe to “TAKEAWAYS” on iTunes, and make sure to rate and review wherever you get your podcasts.

Tesseract Podcast
Leading the Future of the A4 with Lieutenant General Tom Miller

Tesseract Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 49:03


If you're an Airman in maintenance, logistics readiness, civil engineering, or force protection, you can't miss this episode! We sat down with Lt. Gen. Tom D. Miller, the Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection. We talked about mentorship between officers and enlisted, the Basing and Logistics Enterprise Strategy, and how we must prepare for the future. Lt. Gen. Miller is responsible to the Chief of Staff for leadership, management and integration of Air Force logistics readiness, aircraft, munitions and missile maintenance, civil engineering and security forces. He is also responsible for setting policy and preparing budget estimates that reflect enhancements to productivity, combat readiness and quality of life for Airmen. He has served in a variety of leadership positions and has commanded maintenance squadrons in the United States and Iraq, a maintenance group in Afghanistan, a nuclear wing, an air logistics complex, and has served on the Air Staff and the Joint Staff. Before his current position, he was the Commander of the Air Force Sustainment Center, Air Force Materiel Command, Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma.

Brooklyn, USA
65 | Slow Down A Little Bit

Brooklyn, USA

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 34:17


Historian Benjamin Hunnicutt has called the push for more free time the “forgotten American dream"; but somewhere along the way the pursuit of that happiness was replaced by the idea that work and wealth are ends in themselves. This week, we're imagining the utopian and dystopian futures of work. • Brooklyn, USA is produced by Emily Boghossian, Shirin Barghi, Charlie Hoxie, Khyriel Palmer, and Mayumi Sato. If you have something to say and want us to share it on the show, here's how you can send us a message: https://bit.ly/2Z3pfaW• Thank you to Alisha Bhagat, Muhammad Floyd, Rob Cameron, Brad Parks, James Earl King, Carlos Luis Delgado, Christopher Lazariuk, and the Kaleidocast podcast.• LINKSAssemblymember Kenny Burgos was born and lives in the Bronx, New York. Assemblymember Burgos graduated from the Bronx High School of Science and received his Bachelor's Degree in Economics from the University at Albany. He has worked as a Deputy Chief of Staff and Budget Director on the New York City Council.Alex Soojung-Kim Pang is the global programs and research manager for 4 Day Week Global, a nonprofit devoted to advancing the 4-day week. He also offers keynotes about deliberate rest through his own company, Strategy and Rest. Alex's work has been written about in the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Financial Times, the Guardian, and other venues. Alex is the author of four books, including SHORTER: WORK BETTER, SMARTER, AND LESS– HERE'S HOW (US | UK); REST: WHY YOU GET MORE DONE WHEN YOU WORK LESS (US | UK); and THE DISTRACTION ADDICTION (US).Together, these books have been translated into more than a dozen languages. His op-eds and articles have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, The Guardian, the South China Morning Post, and many other venues.Ashley Nelson is the Communications Director at the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience, a global network of over 300 historic sites, museums, and memory initiatives in more than 65 countries dedicated to remembering past struggles and addressing their contemporary legacies. In addition, Ashley has written on culture, politics and women for a variety of publications, including The New York Times, The Guardian, The Washington Post, and The Nation.Alisha Bhagat is a futurist focusing on the creative use of futures tools to impact long term positive change, particularly around social justice and equality. She utilizes systems thinking, mapping,and speculative futures to engage with stakeholders on strategic visions and the actions needed to achieve them. She has worked with public sector partners on topics such as the future of feminism, neo-nationalism, and the impact of COVID-19.Carlos Luis Delgado lives with his roommates and a large cat in Brooklyn, New York. He writes speculative fiction early in the morning before the cat wakes up to yowl for breakfast and edits other people's fiction at night after it's eaten dinner. In 2016 he won the People's Telly Award for Outstanding Comedic TV Writing. He holds a BA in English Literature from Rutgers University and wonders when he can let it go. Follow @Delgadowrites.Christopher Lazariuk is a writer, producer, creator, and sound designer seeking representation for his debut cli-fi thriller novel: THE PYRITE VICTORY. Christopher is a member of the Brooklyn speculative Fiction Writers group, and a contributor to the Kaleidocast Podcast.Rob Cameron is a teacher, linguist, and writer. He has poetry in Star*Line Poetry Magazine and The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. His essays and short fiction have appeared in Foreign Policy Magazine, Tor.com, the New Modality, Solarpunk Magazine, and Clockwork Phoenix Five. His debut middle grade novel Daydreamer is forthcoming from Labyrinth Road, Summer '24. Rob is also lead organizer for the Brooklyn Speculative Fiction Writers, a guest host and curator for the New York Review of Science Fiction Reading Series, and executive producer of Kaleidocast. Follow @cprwords.The Kaleidocast podcast is an audio literary magazine with a mission to showcase new voices in speculative fiction alongside stories from today's top writers. The show was created to improve the writing of active Brooklyn Speculative Fiction Writers members by motivating them towards a tangible goal: Write at a professional level. The show is in its 4th season, and has recently partnered with the Octavia Project to mentor girls and non-binary youth: https://www.kaleidocast.nyc/post/octaviaprojectmentorship. Please support the Kaleidocast's Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/kaleidocastnyc.Muhammad Floyd is an accomplished self-starter with a wide skillset focused on start-to-finish photo/video production from setup to post. Muhammad is adept at photography, camerawork, lighting, and sound, with deep technical knowledge of Canon, Sony, Panasonic, and Blackmagic hardware. He is an end-to-end specialist well-versed in motion graphics, color grading, and other post-production techniques dedicated to delivering under budget and ahead of schedule, while always adhering to the client's vision.• MUSIC and CLIPSThis episode featured clips from the BBC series “Tomorrow's World”, ABC News, Business Insider, and “From the Archives (1966): Issues and Answers with Richard Nixon”. This episode featured music from freesound, setuniman, danjfilms, and podcastac. It also featured Harry Partch's “Delusion of Fury”, used by permission of Innova Recordings and the Harry Partch Foundation.• TRANSCRIPT: ~coming soon~• Follow us on Twitter and Instagram @BRICTV Visit us online at bricartsmedia.org/Brooklyn-USA

The Ready State Podcast
Lt. Gen. Michael Ferriter: Empowering and Supporting Veterans with the National Veterans Memorial and Museum

The Ready State Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 56:55


Lieutenant General Ferriter, U.S. Army (Retired), is the founding President and CEO of the National Veterans Memorial and Museum (NVMM). Not simply a museum, NVMM seeks to honor and positively impact the lives of Veterans by sharing the Veteran experience as well as through outreach programs directly supporting Veterans and their families.Before heading to Columbus, Ohio, Lt. Gen. Ferriter successfully supported Veterans and their families, underserved groups, students, and business leaders with his consulting firm, the Ferriter Group LLC. He has dedicated his civilian career to helping organizations and associations, and remains committed and passionate about serving Veterans, military families, and families of the Fallen.Lt. Gen. Ferriter served 35 years in the US Army commanding Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and International Forces at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels all around the world and has received numerous honors and distinctions for his service.As an added bonus, we are also joined by Jennifer Ballou, Master Sgt., U.S. Army (Retired), who is the Deputy Chief of Staff of the NVMM supporting the entire staff and all programs, and is currently building up the museum's Resilience and Wellness program.