Podcasts about Oregon State University

Public university in Corvallis, Oregon, United States

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Latest podcast episodes about Oregon State University

New Books in Medicine
Anita Guerrini, "Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 63:08


Experimentation on animals—particularly humans—is often assumed to be a uniquely modern phenomenon. But the ideas and attitudes that encourage biological and medical scientists to experiment on living creatures date from the earliest expressions of Western thought. In Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022) (Johns Hopkins UP), Anita Guerrini looks at the history of these practices and examines the philosophical and ethical arguments that justified them. Guerrini discusses key historical episodes in the use of living beings in science and medicine, including the discovery of blood circulation, the development of smallpox and polio vaccines, and recent research in genetics, ecology, and animal behavior. She also explores the rise of the antivivisection movement in Victorian England, the modern animal rights movement, and current debates over gene therapy and genetically engineered animals. We learn how perceptions and understandings of human and animal pain have changed; how ideas of class, race, and gender have defined the human research subject; and that the ethical values of science seldom stray far from the society in which scientists live and work. Thoroughly rewritten and updated, with new material in every chapter, the book emphasizes a broader understanding of experimentation and adds material on gene therapy, self-experimentation, and prisoners and slaves as experimental subjects. A new chapter brings the story up to the present while reflecting on the current regulatory scene, new developments in science, and emerging genomics. Experimenting with Humans and Animals offers readers a context within which to understand more fully the responsibility we all bear for the suffering inflicted on other living beings in the name of scientific knowledge. Anita Guerrini is a historian of science and medicine, recently retired as Horning Professor in the Humanities at Oregon State University, where she's been since 2008. Before that she was a professor of History and Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She was educated at Connecticut College and Oxford University and received a Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science from Indiana University. Callie Smith is a poet and a PhD candidate in English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/medicine

New Books in History
Anita Guerrini, "Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 63:08


Experimentation on animals—particularly humans—is often assumed to be a uniquely modern phenomenon. But the ideas and attitudes that encourage biological and medical scientists to experiment on living creatures date from the earliest expressions of Western thought. In Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022) (Johns Hopkins UP), Anita Guerrini looks at the history of these practices and examines the philosophical and ethical arguments that justified them. Guerrini discusses key historical episodes in the use of living beings in science and medicine, including the discovery of blood circulation, the development of smallpox and polio vaccines, and recent research in genetics, ecology, and animal behavior. She also explores the rise of the antivivisection movement in Victorian England, the modern animal rights movement, and current debates over gene therapy and genetically engineered animals. We learn how perceptions and understandings of human and animal pain have changed; how ideas of class, race, and gender have defined the human research subject; and that the ethical values of science seldom stray far from the society in which scientists live and work. Thoroughly rewritten and updated, with new material in every chapter, the book emphasizes a broader understanding of experimentation and adds material on gene therapy, self-experimentation, and prisoners and slaves as experimental subjects. A new chapter brings the story up to the present while reflecting on the current regulatory scene, new developments in science, and emerging genomics. Experimenting with Humans and Animals offers readers a context within which to understand more fully the responsibility we all bear for the suffering inflicted on other living beings in the name of scientific knowledge. Anita Guerrini is a historian of science and medicine, recently retired as Horning Professor in the Humanities at Oregon State University, where she's been since 2008. Before that she was a professor of History and Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She was educated at Connecticut College and Oxford University and received a Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science from Indiana University. Callie Smith is a poet and a PhD candidate in English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Anita Guerrini, "Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR" (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 63:08


Experimentation on animals—particularly humans—is often assumed to be a uniquely modern phenomenon. But the ideas and attitudes that encourage biological and medical scientists to experiment on living creatures date from the earliest expressions of Western thought. In Experimenting with Humans and Animals: From Aristotle to CRISPR (Johns Hopkins UP, 2022) (Johns Hopkins UP), Anita Guerrini looks at the history of these practices and examines the philosophical and ethical arguments that justified them. Guerrini discusses key historical episodes in the use of living beings in science and medicine, including the discovery of blood circulation, the development of smallpox and polio vaccines, and recent research in genetics, ecology, and animal behavior. She also explores the rise of the antivivisection movement in Victorian England, the modern animal rights movement, and current debates over gene therapy and genetically engineered animals. We learn how perceptions and understandings of human and animal pain have changed; how ideas of class, race, and gender have defined the human research subject; and that the ethical values of science seldom stray far from the society in which scientists live and work. Thoroughly rewritten and updated, with new material in every chapter, the book emphasizes a broader understanding of experimentation and adds material on gene therapy, self-experimentation, and prisoners and slaves as experimental subjects. A new chapter brings the story up to the present while reflecting on the current regulatory scene, new developments in science, and emerging genomics. Experimenting with Humans and Animals offers readers a context within which to understand more fully the responsibility we all bear for the suffering inflicted on other living beings in the name of scientific knowledge. Anita Guerrini is a historian of science and medicine, recently retired as Horning Professor in the Humanities at Oregon State University, where she's been since 2008. Before that she was a professor of History and Environmental Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She was educated at Connecticut College and Oxford University and received a Ph.D. in History and Philosophy of Science from Indiana University. Callie Smith is a poet and a PhD candidate in English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

An Educated Guest
S2 E5 | Innovating Through Failure – with Dr. Bridget Burns

An Educated Guest

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 49:41


Higher ed was never designed around students. But Dr. Bridget Burns is determined to disrupt that. In this episode of An Educated Guest, Todd Zipper, EVP and GM of Wiley University Services and Talent Development, welcomes Dr. Bridget Burns, Founder and CEO of the University Innovation Alliance (UIA). Together, they explore how empathy, design thinking, accessible data, trusting each other to fail, and the UIA's six policy areas have innovated scalable solutions for student success. Key Takeaways: • Why tools like predictive analytics and proactive advising are fundamental to diagnosing students' problems and providing immediate support • How chatbots can resolve students' issues and help staff be more effective • Why career services need to become part of every classroom experience • How $1000 grants have ensured students graduate on time • How creating the social safety to fail is key to innovation Guest Bio Dr. Bridget Burns is the founder and CEO of University Innovation Alliance, a multi-campus laboratory for student success innovation that helps university leaders implement scalable solutions to increase the number and diversity of college graduates. In 2020, Bridget was recognized by Diverse Issues as one of "35 Leading Women in Higher Education" and named one of the “16 Most Innovative People in Higher Education” by Washington Monthly magazine. In addition, her work has been highlighted in national outlets like The New York Times, Fast Company, and 60 Minutes. She was also featured in the documentary “Unlikely." Bridget received her bachelor's degree in Political Science and master's degree in Public Policy from Oregon State University and her Doctorate in Higher Education, Leadership & Policy from Vanderbilt University.

Jaxon Talks Everybody
#122 - Katey Blaire - Fashion Is The Best Form of Personal Expression

Jaxon Talks Everybody

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 71:35


Katey Blaire joins Jaxon Talks Everybody this week. Katey is a stylish creative apparel and print designer, travel enthusiast & socialite who believes fashion is the best form of personal expression. Her designs are modern, bold, unique and one-of-a-kind; pieces to excite any fashion enthusiast. She specializes in party attire, festival wear, swimwear, and upcycling thrifted pieces. Along with design, Katey's passion for styling, writing and content creation come to life through her blog posts, which vary in topics from Fashion, DIY Projects and Travel Guides.   Katey studied Apparel Design & Merchandising at Oregon State University and just moved from Portland, OR to Dallas, TX in early 2022.  - Our Sponsor AMARE - get $10 off your next order - https://www.amare.com/155249/en-us/ (use code: JAXONTALKS) Try MentaBiotics The most comprehensive combination of unique strains of probiotics, prebiotics, and phytobiotics that have been scientifically shown to improve mental wellness.  https://www.amare.com/155249/en-us/MentaBiotics (use code: JAXONTALKS) - Extra Stuff: Follow Katey on iG: https://www.instagram.com/kateyblaire/ Check out Katey's website: https://www.kateyblaire.com/ Get my free Reading List → https://jaxontalkseverybody.com/jaxonstonereadinglist/  - To support me on Patreon (thank you): https://www.patreon.com/JaxonStone  (Recorded on October 11th, 2022) Edited by Ben Rogerson (@BenRogerson_) Intro music by Residual Audio (Residualaudio.com) - Get in touch:  iG: https://www.instagram.com/jaxonstone Twitter: https://twitter.com/JaxonStone_ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JaxonStoneEverybody Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/JaxonStoneEverybody Email: https://jaxonstone.net/contact  

Earth Wise
Agrivoltaics | Earth Wise

Earth Wise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2022 2:00


According to a study last year at Oregon State University, co-developing land for both solar photovoltaic power and agriculture could provide 20% of total electricity generation in the United States with an investment of less than 1% of the annual U.S. budget.  Widespread installation of agrivoltaic systems could reduce carbon emissions by 330,000 tons annually […]

The Football Odyssey with Aron Harris
Michael Oriard - The End of Autumn, King Football & Brand NFL

The Football Odyssey with Aron Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 67:07


Michael Oriard is a former professional football player, a retired professor at Oregon State University and the author of numerous books that analyzes the cultural relevance of football in America, including The End of Autumn: Reflections On My Life In Football, King Football and Brand NFL: Making and Selling America's Favorite Sport. Today, Michael joins Aron to discuss a wide variety of subjects that Michael has explored in his books, including his odyssey within the game at every level, how football is portrayed in various forms of media, the economic and cultural impact that will be brought about from changes within the NFL and NCAA, the future of football, and much more.  TFO Blog  https://www.thefootballodyssey.com/  TFO Social Media Accounts  https://twitter.com/FootballOdyc  https://www.instagram.com/thefootballodyssey/  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3Kv_NInjlOAlE4lrpWu4zw/playlists

Air Health Our Health
Fighting Fire with Fire- Prescribed Burns & Protecting your Home with Bodie Shaw

Air Health Our Health

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 28:47


Can we fight fire with fire? The American Lung Association has released a report suggesting that this is a healthy way forward, and our Native communities have used ceremonial burns on our lands for generations. I wanted to talk to someone who lives at the intersection of all of this. For this episode, I was honored to be joined by Bodie Shaw. He is a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, and previously served as the national wildland fire director for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and has worked as the acting Chief of the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, ID. He is a veteran of the US Air Force, and previously taught at Oregon State University. He has lectured widely on tribal interests as they pertain to natural resource management. In 2008, Shaw was the first to participate in an international exchange program between the U.S. and Australian governments and lived Down Under with his family from August 2008 to March 2009 while developing a new trilateral wildland fire/bushfire agreement between the U.S., Australia and New Zealand. He currently serves as the Bureau of Indian Affairs deputy regional director of Trust Services for the Northwest Region. Today, we talk about balancing the perils and the promise of prescribed burns in wildfire-prone areas. To Do Got to Firewise.org to learn how to protect your home and family. Learn more about health impacts from prescribed burns from the ALA report “Can Prescribed Fires Mitigate Health Harm.” Tell your representatives how important it is to ensure a professional and well-funded, year round proactive approach to decreasing the risk of catastrophic wildfire. Learn more about the health of our wildland firefighters and outdoor workers by listening to “The Health of Our Heroes” episode from Season One. Learn more about the impact of wildfire smoke and how to keep you and your family safe during smoke events by listening to the “Our Health in Wildfire Season” episode from Season Two. Donate to the American Lung Association who works hard to help navigate challenging health concerns such as their evaluation of health effects of prescribed burns. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Visit blog post for more information, or go to airhealthourhealth.org. Follow and comment on Facebook page and Instagram. Record a question or comment on the Anchor podcast site or send an e-mail via the website. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/airhealthourhealth/message

Working Class Fishing
Interview with Logan Ellis ( Chicken Littles Guide Service)

Working Class Fishing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 65:47


Jon and Brian had the pleasure and opportunity to sit down with Logan Ellis, owner of Chicken Littles Guide Service, a full service fishing guide service based out of Salem, Or. Logan, a recent graduate of Oregon State University, is now pursuing his passion as a fishing guide not only in Oregon, but during the summer in Alaska. Logan is always booking trips year round and has very good, affordable rates for his clients. You can find Logan on IG: @chicken_littles_guide_service Facebook: Chicken Littles Guide Service or get directly in touch with Logan on his website www.chickenlittlesguideservice.com . And as always please check out our fantastic show sponsors and let them know you heard about them from us!Angry Rooster Fly Company Apply 10% off to Tying Tools with the promo code "WCFTOOLS10". Apply 15% off to Necks and Capes with the promo code "WCFHACKLE15". Apply 15% off to All Hooks with the promo code "WCFHOOKS15". Lid Rig “WCF15” Maxxon Outfitters “working15” Troutlander Nets “WorkingClass10” in order notes

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
Michael Mehta Webster on The Rescue Effect

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 54:05


(11/4/2022) In The Rescue Effect, by Michael Mehta Webster reveals the science behind nature's inherent resilience, through compelling stories of species that are adapting to the changing world—including tigers in the jungles of India, cichlid fish in the great lakes of Africa, and corals in the Caribbean. Michael Mehta Webster is a Professor of Practice in the Department of Environmental Studies. He earned a Ph.D. in Zoology at Oregon State University, and a B.S. in Zoology from the University of Wisconsin. Webster argues that there are good reasons to expect a bright future, because everywhere we look, we can see evidence that nature can rescue many species from extinction; and when nature alone is not up to the task, we can help. Join us when Webster shares rigorous research with gripping storytelling, The Rescue Effect provides the cautious optimism we need to help save life on Earth on this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large.

Think Out Loud
Disease outbreak leaves sea lions stranded on Oregon's coast

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 14:35


More than 150 sea lions have been found sick or dead along Oregon's coast due to a bacterial outbreak of Leptospirosis this summer. The disease is spread through the mammals' urine and can be spread to other species such as dogs. Jim Rice is the stranding program manager for Oregon State University's Marine Mammal Institute. He joins us to share what the outbreak has looked like so far and how it compares to previous years.

Lancaster Farming Industrial Hemp Podcast
Cornell Hemp: Pushing the Industry Forward

Lancaster Farming Industrial Hemp Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 75:36


Our guest on the podcast this week is Dr. Heather Grab, senior lecturer at Cornell University's School of Integrative Plant Science, where she focuses on hemp cultivation and processing. On Nov. 15, Grab will be participating in a free online event, The National Hemp Industry Needs Workshop, co-hosted by The Global Hemp Innovation Center at Oregon State University and USDA. The workshop will cover all aspects of hemp from genetics, sustainable ag practices, harvesting and processing to manufacturing, supply chains, economics, regulations, compliance testing and more with interactive sessions led by experts in the hemp space (many of whom will be familiar to regular listeners of this podcast). The workshop is free but you must register at hempindustryresearchneeds.org by Nov. 11. The goal of the workshop is to bring together many voices “to contribute to the synthesis of knowledge and to understand what the needs are and how we can work together as public institutions with private partners in order to build our knowledge and put that to use,” Grab said. Cornell's College of Agriculture and Life Science's hemp program has been a leading source of research in hemp genetics, pest and diseases, supply chain development and processing. Contact Dr. Heather Grab Cornell University profile page: https://cals.cornell.edu/heather-grab email: heathergrab@cornell.edu insta: @heather.grab LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/heather-grab/ Cornell's Hemp Program https://hemp.cals.cornell.edu/ Hemp Industry Research Needs Workshop https://hempindustryresearchneeds.org/ Dr. Grab's article about Retting for Lancaster Farming newspaper, April 25, 2025 https://www.lancasterfarming.com/farming-news/retting-hemp-fiber-from-the-stalk/article_d40a884d-83f4-53c8-a196-81b8ef346611.html News Nuggets Company commits $17.5 million to make Virginia hemp manufacturing center https://www.wavy.com/news/virginia/company-commits-17-5-million-to-make-virginia-hemp-manufacturing-center/ Hemp grain and fiber processing facility opening in Augusta, KS https://www.kwch.com/2022/11/02/hemp-grain-fiber-processing-facility-opens-augusta/ Pennsylvania Hemp Summit, November 14-15 https://pahempsummit.com/ Thanks to our Sponsors IND HEMP https://indhemp.com/ King's AgriSeeds https://kingsagriseeds.com/

Meaningful Marketplace Podcast
#132 Happy Trails to You - Aiyesha Christian, Nomad Mix

Meaningful Marketplace Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 44:42


A Pacific Northwest camper, hiker, fisher, and ocean swimmer. That's the growing-up bio of Aiyesha Christian. And being the super outdoors person, Aiyesha also was obviously a big consumer of trail mix to keep her nutrition gauge from going empty. But the trail mix she found was just too dull; either too much salt or too much sugar, always the same ingredients and definitely not enough flavor. Aiyesha loved her outdoor life and wanted all the diversity, flavors, freshness and spirit to be reflected in the food she put into her body, especially when she was on the outdoor trails – being a nomad of course. She had the food background to begin her venture, having worked in restaurants and having tended bars. She began the grand experiments in her kitchen and her friends and family ooed and ahhed over her creations. Some of them also steered her to the Oregon State University's Food Innovation Center in Portland, Oregon and straight to the Director, our show host Sarah Masoni. Sarah was duly impressed with the great taste of the trail snacks and immediately encouraged Aiyesha to continue with the recipes and learn how to commercialize her products so that more people could share in her discovery and the Nomad company began to take shape. One of her first big wins was being part of the Food Innovation Center's holiday markets, where she became introduced to Market of Choice, one of our show sponsors, and got signed on to be displayed on their shelves. Each flavor of Nomad mix has its own special story, Tide Pool to represent the coast, Forest for the woods and so forth. But Aiyesha has a guideline for each product and flavor. Each bag contains at least one type of seed, nut, fruit, and vegetable. It is gluten free, paleo, and almost vegan except for locally sourced honey as the only added sweetener. All the snacks are great to share with your pet, but Aiyesha is contemplating a pet line of snacks as well. So why this foyer into the saturated market of trail snacks, a market that is old, dominated by big food companies that bought up all the small ones years ago and have all the shelf space already taken? In one of her Masters of Business classes, Aiyesha was introduced to the book, Blue Ocean Strategies, that talked about finding new opportunities in old, stodgy markets. This gave her the insight to find her new opportunity and she is making the most of it. Her packaging is exquisite and truly reflects the mission of her company, and the website is impressive. Grocery store shopping is localized in the Pacific Northwest currently, but all products are available online. And in alignment with Aiyesha's love of the outdoors, Nomad gives a percentage of profits to partnered organizations that focus on the protection, rejuvenation, and integrity of our precious communities and environments. Website: www.nomadmix.com, questions: Info@nomadmix.com, IG: @nomadsnackmix. Our hosts: Twitter - @sarahmasoni and @spicymarshall Instagram - @masoniandmarshall.

Wine for Normal People
Ep 448: Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Terroir with Dr. Kevin Pogue, PhD, Geologist and Terroir Educator

Wine for Normal People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 59:34


Dr. Kevin Pogue, PhD, professor, geologist, and terroir expert educates us on terroir. This podcast is like taking a terroir class: it debunks so many things that people spout in reference books, at wineries, and in mainstream press about the topic! He explains things brilliantly and he is one of the first people I've ever met who actually has answers to my really dorky questions about terroir.  Photo: Kevin Pogue. From Vinterra.net As more detail, Kevin is one of the most famous people in the field of terroir. He's considered the foremost terroir expert on Washington State wine and he's known around the world -  his work has been featured in both national and international journals. He's a licensed geologist and professor of geology at Whitman College in Walla Walla. Kevin has a doctorate in geology from Oregon State University, and decades of college teaching and research experience. He has authored books, articles, and done extensive research on the terroir of the Pacific northwest, with a good portion of this time spent on investigating the deposits of the Missoula floods, which were the pivotal event that formed the geological base of the region.    Kevin's research today focuses on terroir. He owns a consulting company, Vinterra, through which he assists wineries in choosing the best vineyard sites, matching grape to site, and educating winery owners and winemakers and their customers on why their specific terroir leads to the style in their wine.  Photo: Whitman.edu I need to thank Eric McKibben from Amavi and Pepper Bridge for the introduction.    Here are the items we discuss: Kevin tells us about his past, studying the Himalyan thrust belt, and how he got into wine in Walla Walla To set our baseline, Kevin defines terroir, referring to the definition of terroir from the OIV (International Organization of Vine and Wine)   The majority of the show is spent with Kevin clearing up many, many things we hear about terroir, much of which is not exactly correct. We cover... Why grapes that grow on slopes are often of higher quality than those on the valley floor. Why slopes can be warmer even though altitude makes them cooler (VERY confusing -- temperature drops 1˚C for every 100 meters of altitude yet during the coldest times, the slopes are warmer due to air density!) The benefits of south, southeast, and southwest facing slopes in the northern hemisphere and what actually happens with temperatures of the soil to have this make an appreciable difference.   Solar radiation and how it plays a part in ripening and quality of the grapes. We get into whether slope angle actually matters.   DIRT! Kevin is a geologist and he rocks my world talking about the two or three REALLY key factors of soil and what you may be tasting in the wine that is reflective of the terroir. We also discuss the role of irrigation and whether that makes wine or a more manipulated beverage. Kevin helps me understand the “terroir deniers” and the argument he makes to try to convince them. Washington State, discussing the AVA petition for the Rocks of Milton Freewater, which makes some of the most distinctive Syrah in the world. Kevin discusses this unique plot and why some of the wines taste so much of place (“funk”) and some are just ok.  Photo: https://rocksdistrict.com/terroir How AVAs are made, what goes into it and whether or not they are meaningful or meaningless. We compare the AVA system in the US to the PDO system in Europe.   To me, this is the most comprehensive look at terroir I have ever received. I hope you learn as much as I did in the show. This is Kevin's first show with me, but it won't be his last! I hope you love the super dork out that is this show!!  _________________________________________    

Coaching Mind's Podcast: Mental training plans for athletes
#89 - Dee Mahoney talks mental toughness from an athletic trainer's perspective

Coaching Mind's Podcast: Mental training plans for athletes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 23:41


Dee Mahoney played NCAA Division I softball at Oregon State University. She graduated in 1985 and completed graduate work at the University of Miami (Fla.). She then began her career with USA Track & Field. Spent 25 years raising two lovely children and being an athletic trainer at Westfield High School on the north side of Indianapolis before retiring, moving to Colorado and traveling the world with Team USA. An experienced athlete herself, Dee has a unique insight into the minds of athletes, often seeing them at their lowest points and helping them develop a plan to recover from injury.  Dee is masterful at instilling confidence in her athletes as they come back from injury and get back to playing the sport that they love.  Interested in having a conversation with Ben about how he can help you with the mental side of your game? Here is a link to schedule a free consultationhttps://www.mentaltrainingplan.com/free-consultation

Rik's Mind Podcast
HumanWild's Loren Fjord, Ancestral Lifestyle Coach Wants Us to Get Cold | Rik's Mind Podcast Ep 106

Rik's Mind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022


Friend of the show Loren Fjord is back to share his wisdom once again. Loren is starting a new challenge. We cover lots of ground, between cold exposure therapy, exercise, nutrition and so much more! Loren owns and operates HumanWild. HumanWild is an education platform designed to help you achieve movement freedom. The cross discipline program is woven together to help anyone bring their body into balance for optimal strength, range and skill development. Loren works with hundreds of amazing humans from children as young as 6 to adults in their 70s, from all backgrounds and walks of life, testing varied approaches to reverse movement dysfunction and gain strength, flexibility and new skills to improve overall physical literacy. Fjord also holds a B.S. in Kinesiology and Nutrition from Oregon State University.Like and subscribe to us on Youtube for more fun and exclusive content!https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuM080VqVCe0gAns9V9WK9wSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/00gCjGhq8qrAEkraZnMwGR?go=1&sp_cid=ce203d55369588581151ec13011b84ac&utm_source=embed_player_pGoogle Podcast: https://podcasts.google.com/u/1/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cucmlrc21pbmQuY29tL2xpc3Rlbj9mb3JtYXQ9cnNz?Apple Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/riks-mind-podcast/id1460215365Show Notes:HumanWild | Official WebsiteCold Water Plunges Are Trendy. Can They Really Reduce Anxiety and Depression? | The New York TimesMicroplastics are everywhere — but are they harmful? | NatureHeartache, anger in Central Washington over drinking-water wells tainted by 'forever chemicals' | Seattle TimesPFAS Explained | United State Environmental Protection AgencyWhat's Really in Your Bottled Water? | Consumer Reports

TurfNet RADIO
Understanding Carbon in Golf Turf with Claire Phillips and Alec Kowaleski

TurfNet RADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 42:00


Signals of a changing climate are everywhere, from more intense storms to more frequent droughts. The basis of this change lies in carbon emissions and the solution potentially lies in sequestering the carbon into our soils. Grasses are perfect vehicles for this process. In this episode of Frankly Speaking, Frank Rossi speaks with Drs. Claire Phillips of the USDA-ARS and Alec Kowaleski of Oregon State University about their review paper on Carbon Sequestration in Turf and the role turfgrass management plays in emitting carbon.

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast
Ben Howe: Oral History Interview

The Oregon Wine History Archive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 93:17


This interview is with Ben Howe of Stoller Wine Group. In this interview, Ben speaks about his history in the winemaking world. He talks about moving to Oregon from the Midwest and attending Oregon State University where he graduated with a Bachelors in Fermentation Science. He also describes his experience working in the California and Southern India Wine Industries. Later, Ben discusses he role as Vice President of Operations at Stoller and talks about some of his more recent projects. This interview was conducted by Rich Schmidt at Stoller Family Estate in Dayton on July 6, 2022.

Healthy Tips After 50 Podcast
Committed 100 Weight Loss Program

Healthy Tips After 50 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 37:33


Chad Tackett is a personal health coach with a degree in Exercise Science, Health, & Nutrition from Oregon State University and has been a certified personal trainer & weight loss expert for almost 30 years. He started the world's very first online weight loss program, Committed 100, in 1995 and he's been featured in more than 100 books, radio, and TV shows. Chad has helped more than 10,000 people online, showing them exactly how to activate their body's natural ability to burn fat 24 hours a day. What was fun to find out was that the vast majority of his clients are over 50 and are women. We need to find him some more men to help - especially as there are definitely just as many overweight men as there are women (my editorializing). I am sure that you will all enjoy the podcast and after you listen you can go to his website  https://www.committed100.com/ to learn more and sign up for his program if it makes sense for you and your life.     

RoadWorthy Drive Podcast
Odometer Fraud is Still a Thing; Agrivoltaic Farming; Improving Safety for Women in a Crash

RoadWorthy Drive Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 40:46


In the 1980 comedy Used Cars, Kurt Russell plays a "jack of all trades" salesman of dubious reputation.  The opening scene of the movie shows him under the dashboard of a mid-1970's Buick convertible.  The scene tightens around the odometer of the car at the exact moment he illegally "rolls back" the odometer from over 95,000 miles to just over 30,000.  While that was done mechanically, today it can be done with software.  We also take a look at agrivoltaic farming, the combination of farming around acres of solar panel arrays - and why it could hold big promise.  Finally, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety is studying why women suffer greater injuries than men in similar crashes and what can be done to change that dynamic. 

RoadWorthy Drive Moments
Agrivoltaic Farming

RoadWorthy Drive Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 11:00


Solar panels and row crops.  Seems that when it comes to land use, it used to have to be one or the other.  Not so fast!  Since the 1980's researchers have been studying ways for both to co-exist on the same land, with benefits for both! 

Think Out Loud
Smoke and poor air quality helped by recent rain, but expected to remain an ongoing problem

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 21:52


Wildfire smoke drove down the air quality significantly in many parts of Oregon this summer and fall. Many students were not allowed to play or take breaks outside because of the high levels of air pollution from smoke. The Oregon Health Authority provides guidance for people — and school districts — trying to figure out what level of exposure is safe. And even though rain has finally brought some relief, questions about how to respond to bad air quality are only going to get more urgent in the coming years.Our guests are Molly Kile, professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University; Gabriele Goldfarb, manager of the Environmental Public Health Section at the Oregon Health Authority; and Carl Mead, Deputy Superintendent of Operations and Support Services for the Beaverton School District. We discuss the effects of smoky air on young lungs, and what goes into the decisions that schools and health authorities have to make.

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea
Can Humpback whales be altruistic?

Futureproof with Jonathan McCrea

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 41:10


It can be easy to think poorly of humans. When we're not destroying the planet or starting wars, we're likely off somewhere making fools of ourselves on social media. We're not all bad though, as some people dedicate their spare time, and even their lives, to helping others. But can we say the same about other animals? (We're looking at you, cats.) Bob Pitman is a Marine Ecologist at the Marine Mammal Institute at Oregon State University. He joins Jonathan to discuss.

The Nonlinear Library
EA - The heritability of human values: A behavior genetic critique of Shard Theory by Geoffrey Miller

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 37:30


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: The heritability of human values: A behavior genetic critique of Shard Theory, published by Geoffrey Miller on October 20, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. Overview (TL;DR): Shard Theory is a new approach to understanding the formation of human values, which aims to help solve the problem of how to align advanced AI systems with human values (the ‘AI alignment problem'). Shard Theory has provoked a lot of interest and discussion on LessWrong, AI Alignment Forum, and EA Forum in recent months. However, Shard Theory incorporates a relatively Blank Slate view about the origins of human values that is empirically inconsistent with many studies in behavior genetics indicating that many human values show heritable genetic variation across individuals. I'll focus in this essay on the empirical claims of Shard Theory, the behavior genetic evidence that challenges those claims, and the implications for developing more accurate models of human values for AI alignment. Introduction: Shard Theory as an falsifiable theory of human values The goal of the ‘AI alignment' field is to help future Artificial Intelligence systems become better aligned with human values. Thus, to achieve AI alignment, we might need a good theory of human values. A new approach called “Shard Theory” aims to develop such a theory of how humans develop values. My goal in this essay is to assess whether Shard Theory offers an empirically accurate model of human value formation, given what we know from behavior genetics about the heritability of human values. The stakes here are high. If Shard Theory becomes influential in guiding further alignment research, but if its model of human values is not accurate, then Shard Theory may not help improve AI safety. These kinds of empirical problems are not limited to Shard Theory. Many proposals that I've seen for AI ‘alignment with human values' seem to ignore most of the research on human values in the behavioral and social sciences. I've tried to challenge this empirical neglect of value research in four previous essays for EA Forum, on the heterogeneity of value types in humans individuals, the diversity of values across individuals, the importance of body/corporeal values, and the importance of religious values. Note that this essay is a rough draft of some preliminary thoughts, and I welcome any feedback, comments, criticisms, and elaborations. In future essays I plan to critique Shard Theory from the perspectives of several other fields, such as evolutionary biology, animal behavior research, behaviorist learning theory, and evolutionary psychology. Background on Shard Theory Shard Theory has been developed mostly by Quintin Pope (a computer science Ph.D. student at Oregon State University) and Alex Turner (a post-doctoral researcher at the Center for Human-Compatible AI at UC Berkeley). Over the last few months, they posted a series of essays about Shard Theory on LessWrong.com, including this main essay here , ‘The shard theory of human values' (dated Sept 3, 2022), plus auxiliary essays such as: ‘Human values & biases are not accessible to the genome' (July 7, 2022), ‘Humans provide an untapped wealth of evidence about alignment' (July 13, 2022), ‘Reward is not the optimizer' (July 24, 2022), and ‘Evolution is a bad analogy for AGI: Inner alignment' (Aug 13, 2022). [This is not a complete list of their Shard Theory writings; it's just the set that seems most relevant to the critiques I'll make in this essay.] Also, David Udell published this useful summary: ‘Shard Theory: An overview' (Aug 10, 2022). There's a lot to like about Shard Theory. It takes seriously the potentially catastrophic risks from AI. It understands that ‘AI alignment with human values' requires some fairly well-developed notions about where human values come from, what they're for, a...

When it Mattered

Ep. 71 —  A failed apprentice farmer turns into a renowned futurist / Thomas Frey, Founder and Executive Director, DaVinci Institute & Co-host, Futurati Podcast  Born on a grain farm in South Dakota, Thomas Frey was an unlikely candidate to become a world-renowned futurist and public speaker. But then one day, when he was four years old, Frey's parents received a big mysterious box that would change his life forever. His mom put him on a tractor at age 11 to distract him from the television but Frey would prove to be, in his own words, a “terrible farmer”—because his mind was always elsewhere. In fact, it was in the future. And that's where it has stayed ever since. I was delighted to have a deep conversation with Thomas Frey on the future of the world. He's currently the founder and Executive Director of the DaVinci Institute & Co-host of the Futurati Podcast, with Trent Fowler.  Over the past decade, Frey has built an enormous following around the world based on his ability to develop accurate visions of the future and describe the opportunities ahead. Before launching the DaVinci Institute, Frey spent 15 years at IBM as an engineer and designer where he received over 270 awards, more than any other IBM engineer. And if that isn't proof that he's no slacker, Frey also is a past member of the Triple Nine Society (the High I.Q. society for those over the 99.9th percentile). If you liked this episode, check out these other episodes:

Bloomsbury Academic Podcast
The Godfather, part two

Bloomsbury Academic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 33:39


If you would like to buy your own copy of The Godfather, go to the Bloomsbury website and use code pod35 followed your respective country code, US, UK, CA, AU, depending on where you are located. Jon Lewis is the University Distinguished Professor of Film Studies and University Honors College Eminent Professor at Oregon State University. He has published thirteen books, including The Godfather and The Godfather, Part II for our British Film Institute's Film Classics series. In part two of this episode, we will be exploring what the relationship between Hollywood and crime was like before and after this movie as well as how the film got its reputation as “high art” in the Western canon. Then, we talk about New Hollywood, the power of the director, the idea of the auteur, and what the future for medium-sized indie films could look like. Take a listen.

Inside The War Room
Graham Spanier

Inside The War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 56:24


The dust from the Jerry Sandusky scandal has settled, but has the true story been told? Today we hear from Dr. Graham Spanier about his book In the Lions' Den: The Penn State Scandal and a Rush to Judgment. Links from the show:* In the Lions' Den: The Penn State Scandal and a Rush to Judgment* Connect with Graham* Subscribe to the newsletterAbout my guest:GRAHAM SPANIER served as president of The Pennsylvania State University from September 1995 to November 2011. His prior positions include chancellor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs at Oregon State University, and Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He previously served Penn State from 1973 to 1982 as a member of the faculty and in three administrative positions in the College of Health and Human Development.A family sociologist, demographer, and marriage and family therapist, he earned his Ph.D. in sociology from Northwestern University, where he was a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, and his bachelor's and master's degrees from Iowa State University. He is the recipient of three honorary doctorates. Spanier is President Emeritus and University Professor Emeritus at Penn State. He held academic appointments as professor of human development and family studies, sociology, demography, and family and community medicine.As president of Penn State, Dr. Spanier was often described as an unconventional university president. He is a magician who served as faculty advisor to the Penn State Performing Magicians, performed with Penn State's Musical Theatre students, the marching band, the glee club, and the chamber orchestra. He has run with the bulls in Pamplona, has a commercial pilot's license, and plays percussion with the Deacons of Dixieland. He and his racquetball partner were the eleven-time Penn State co-ed intramural racquetball champions.He oversaw one of the nation's largest and most comprehensive universities, with nearly 100,000 students and 47,000 employees on 24 campuses and a physical plant of 1,700 buildings. During his tenure, applications soared to more than 120,000 per year and the academic standing of dozens of programs rose in national rankings.As a national leader in higher education, Spanier chaired the Association of American Universities, the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, and led the Kellogg Commission on the Future of State and Land-Grant Universities. He was a founding member of the Internet2 board, U.S. Chair and international Vice Chair of the Worldwide Universities Network, and co-chair, with the President of the Recording Industry Association of America, of the Committee on Higher Education and the Entertainment Industry. Dr. Spanier was the first university president to receive the Theodore M. Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence awarded by the American Council on Education. He was given the American Institute of Architects Award for Contribution to the Profession by a Non-Architect.In the world of collegiate athletics, he chaired the NCAA Division I Board of Directors, was a member of the NCAA Executive Committee, was chair of the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) Presidential Oversight Board, oversaw the reorganization of the Fiesta Bowl, was chairman of the Big Ten Conference Council of Presidents/Chancellors, and chaired commissions for the NCAA.A distinguished researcher and scholar, he has more than 100 scholarly publications, including ten books, and was the founding editor of the Journal of Family Issues. Spanier served as President of the National Council of Family Relations, chairman of the Board of Directors of Child Fund International (formerly Christian Children's Fund), a member of the Board of Governors of Junior Achievement Worldwide, and a member of the Board of Trustees of the National 4-H Council.Spanier served as chair of the National Security Higher Education Advisory Board, a member of the National Counterintelligence Working Group, and as a member of the Board of Advisors of the Naval Postgraduate School and the Naval War College. He has received numerous recognitions for his contributions to national security, including being honored as one of the “Most Influential People in Security,” the “Wings of Law” Award from the Respect for Law Alliance, the Director's Award for “Exceptional Public Service” presented by the FBI, and the Warren Medal for “Outstanding Contributions to the National Security of the United States of America.” He has been a frequent speaker at FBI and other governmental and educational conferences and seminars on topics related to national security.Spanier spent decades working in television and radio, even while serving higher education. He hosted To the Best of My Knowledge, a live call-in program on public television and radio, and Expert Opinion, a sports topic program on the Big Ten Network.Spanier currently serves as a consultant in national and international security, intelligence, and risk management. Get full access to Dispatches from the War Room at dispatchesfromthewarroom.substack.com/subscribe

Bloomsbury Academic Podcast
The Godfather, part one

Bloomsbury Academic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 28:34


If you would like to buy your own copy of The Godfather, go to the Bloomsbury website and use code pod35 followed your respective country code, US, UK, CA, AU, depending on where you are located. Jon Lewis is the University Distinguished Professor of Film Studies and University Honors College Eminent Professor at Oregon State University. He has published thirteen books, including The Godfather and The Godfather, Part II for our British Film Institute's Film Classics series. In this episode, we will be discussing film's revolutionary visual style, the political context for the film, and its unusual production history—was the film partly funded by the mob? We'll find out. We'll also be talking about the theme of assimilation into (white) America and the depiction of women in the films. Take a listen.

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 265: How did U of Portland get a 13.4 million dollar shortfall

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 93:57 Very Popular


In this episode you will hear:   (25:24) Mark and Vince discuss an article by Sami Edge that appeared on August 31, 2022 in Oregonian entitled: “Record number of 1st year students withdraw from the University of Portland, contributing to 13.4 million shortfall.   Vince and Mark discuss how could this happen and what are the implications of this budget shortfall; what implications does this have for other colleges.   (41:35) Mark discusses with Lisa several of the reasons why a college will admit a student with a lower GPA and a lower test score over a kid with a higher GPA and a higher test score.   (01:04:50) Our interview is with Jon Boeckenstedt, the Vice Provost of Oregon State University . John discusses a range of topics in this final part 4 of 4: Jon gives his opinion on whether it is ethical for a college admission officer to tell a student that they are admissible if they will withhold their test score Jon talks about what he would like to see changed in admissions Jon talks about what he thinks about using Student Search as the starting point for colleges Jon talks about the access vs selectivity Jon goes on the hotseat   (01:18:18) The first recommended resource is the quick reference guide for Counselors for admissions to the nine University of California universities. Here is the link:   The second recommended resource is the book Jon Bockenstedt says is the best admissions book on college admissions of how college admissions should work: Alden B Thresher's classic “College Admissions and the common good”. The book was written in 1966 and it looked at MIT's admission perspective but Chris Peterson of MIT ( an MIT admissions officer we have had on our podcast) reissued this classic book with the 2018 version. MIT is making it available for free. Here is the link: https://mitadmissions.org/blogs/entry/college-admissions-in-the-public-interest/     .   Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 28 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews you can still send in questions for our guests: Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner University of Wisconsin-Andre Phillips University of Illinois-Andy Borst Purdue University-Mitch Warren University of Minnesota-Keri Risic Cornell University-Jonathon Burdick Akil Bello of Akilbello.com Bard College Baylor University Butler University California Institute of Technology Colorado School of Mines Cornell College Creighton University     To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email , just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons” We are revamping YCBK PLUS and we will have shorter more frequent blog articles that will launch later this fall.   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

Vicious Whispers with Mark Tullius
Episode 183: Rico Petrini, CTE, and Transcranial Photobiomodulation (PBM)

Vicious Whispers with Mark Tullius

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 51:48


My guest, Rico Petrini, was a top defensive player in the country as a linebacker at Oregon State University in the 90's. I connected with Rico in the Facebook support group CTE & Brain Injury Global Support - https://www.facebook.com/groups/164998687455984 In this interview, Rico discusses his numerous concussions, unsafe training practices, and the desire to play through any pain or medical problem. It was over two decades later that his TBI/CTE symptoms reared their head, a cascade of awful symptoms that were kicked off by a very stressful moment in his life. Fortunately, Rico was proactive and began doing anything he could that might help. He volunteered for a study at the University of Utah TBI and Concussion Center, with 49 other football players where they used photobiomodulation, a type of light therapy. This treatment turned Rico's life around and although he will never be the person he once was, he is in such a better place and making a difference helping others with their struggles. We talk about the importance of not fighting CTE or any struggle on your own and how important it is to be part of a supportive group. He also has put together the non-proft 4CTE by CTE which is in its early stages. Includes the short story "Going Dark" taken from Somber Stroll and narrated by Tee Quillin. Here is an article on the Light study - https://www.concussionalliance.org/blog/2022/1/25/light-therapy-study-at-the-university-of-utah  

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 10.10.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 60:08 Very Popular


VIDEOS: Paul Marik speaks about the silencing of doctors who want to speak out about the COVID vaccines (18:00) Jeffrey Sachs: US biotech cartel behind Covid origins and cover-up ( start at 0:36) Neil Oliver – ‘…digital enslavement is coming…' (19:06) New Rule: A Unified Theory of Wokeness | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)   Quinoa-Based Diet Stabilizes Blood Sugar In Older Adults University of Barcelona (Spain), October 2, 2022 According to a recent study published in the journal Nutrients, a quinoa-based diet was able to normalize glucose metabolism, and this effect was more pronounced among elderly people with impaired glucose tolerance, suggesting that quinoa is a healthy pseudocereal that is far more beneficial and nutritious than other cereal products. This study examined the effects of a quinoa-rich diet on mediating hyperglycemia and other metabolic risk factors. Glycemic data was collected by glucose sensors operating over extended periods of time with regular prespecified recording points that could be analyzed using the functional data analysis approach to yield glucose concentrations over time. All of the participants in this pilot study were aged 65+, without a history of diabetes, and fasting glucose levels were between 100-125 mg/dL. The participants ate grains, legumes, and tuber daily while also consuming quinoa, quinoa flakes, and quinoa flour as well as biscuits, brioche, sponge cake, baguettes, sliced bread, and pasta which all had a quinoa content of 70% or greater. During the initial four weeks, the participants consumed their regular diets, then they were switched to the quinoa-based diet for the following four weeks, during this time all grains, grain-based products, legumes, and tubers were substituted with quinoa-based products without changing the overall composition of nutrients with exception to the cereal. During the study, all food products were provided to the participants who commonly consumed them. Additionally, eight recipes were introduced to the participants using quinoa substitutions. At the beginning of the study most of the participants had an overweight profile, and hypertension, 45% had high blood lipids, and 33% had one or more close family members with disease. At the end of the study glucose levels were reduced before and after the quinoa-based diet, and glycated hemoglobin levels were reduced by the end of the study, as was weight and waist circumference by slight decreases. Additional analysis revealed that multiple nutrients were associated with enhanced or reduced glucose concentrations: Gamma-tocopherol, soluble fiber insoluble dietary fiber, and ORAC were associated with enhanced glucose concentrations, while fatty acids, fructose, citric acid, cellulose, phytic acid, omega-6 PUFA, theobromine, and the proportion of total energy from proteins had a link with reduced glucose concentrations. The nutritional profile of quinoa accounts for the difference in nutritional intake between the two diet phases. Consuming more carbs increases insulin levels, and fat storage and reduces the metabolic rate causing a cycle of fat accumulation. A high-fat diet with the same amount of calories reduces insulin secretion by triggering fat turnover in the cells making free fatty acids available for use in energy production. Dietary proteins also enhance the building of lean muscle during weight loss which also helps to expend more energy and improve the overall body composition. Mediterranean diet improves immunotherapy response rates and progression-free survival in advanced melanoma, new study suggests Eating a Mediterranean diet, rich in fibre, mono-unsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols, has been associated with improved immunotherapy response rates and progression-free survival in advanced melanoma patients. University Medical Center Groningen (Netherlands), October 9, 2022 Eating a Mediterranean diet, rich in fibre, mono-unsaturated fatty acids and polyphenols, has been associated with improved immunotherapy response rates and progression-free survival in advanced melanoma patients, a new study has found.1 Experts anticipate that the diet will play an important role in the success of immunotherapy and trials are being expanded to investigate outcomes for different tumour types, including digestive cancers. A Mediterranean diet, containing mono-and polyunsaturated fats from olive oil, nuts and fish, polyphenols and fibre from vegetables, fruit, and wholegrains, was significantly associated with an improved response to immunotherapy drugs called Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors (ICIs). ICIs, which have been highly successful in treating melanoma, work by blocking immune system checkpoints, which then force the body's own T-cells to attack cancers.2 The new multi-centre study by researchers from the UK and the Netherlands, recorded the dietary intake of 91 patients with advanced melanoma, who were treated with ICI drugs and monitored their progress with regular radiographic response check-ups. As well as having a significant association with overall response rate, a Mediterranean diet was significantly associated with progression-free survival at 12 months. The study also found that eating whole grains and legumes reduced the likelihood of developing drug induced immune-related side effects, such as colitis. In contrast, red and processed meat was associated with a higher probability of immune-related side effects. Music practice can sharpen the brain University of St Andrews (Scotland) October 1, 2022 A new study by researchers at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland concludes that people who practice playing musical instruments have sharper brains because they pick up mistakes in their performance and fix them more quickly than other people. Writing about their work in a recent issue of the journal Neuropsychologia, psychologist Doctor Ines Jentzsch and colleagues suggest playing music may help guard against mental decline, either through age or disease. “Our study shows that even moderate levels of musical activity can benefit brain functioning.” For their study, the researchers compared the mental performance of musicians versus non-musicians as they challenged them to complete simple conflict tasks. There were 36 young adult participants in total, divided into four groups of 8 to 10, according to the number of accumulated hours of practicing a musical instrument over their lifetime (from “high,” over 5,000 hours, through “intermediate,” 2,000 to 5,000 hours and “low,” between 200 and 2,000 hours, to “no,” under 200 hours). The researchers tested each participant's mental ability in a single session that lasted about 2 hours. During the session, they measured the participant's reaction times to the simple mental tasks and also took various physiological measurements. Their results show that the amount of musical practice was positively linked to response speed – the more-practiced musicians responded faster than those with little or no musical training, with no loss in accuracy. “This result suggests that higher levels of musical training might result in more efficient information processing in general […] and confirms earlier reports indicating a positive link between mental speed and musical ability,” write the authors. However, what this study particularly highlights is that more hours of musical practice were also linked with “better engagement of cognitive control processes,” which came through in more efficient error and conflict detection, and reduced levels of post-error interference and post-conflict adjustments. In other words, the more practice hours musicians had accumulated, the faster their reaction times in completing mental challenges, the better they were able to recognize and correct mistakes, and the less likely they were to go back and adjust their responses when they made mistakes. “The research suggests that musical activity could be used as an effective intervention to slow, stop or even reverse age- or illness-related decline in mental functioning.” 3 Weeks Of Vitamin C Supplements Reduces Inflammation In Cystic Fibrosis Patients Oregon State University, October 6, 2022 Cystic fibrosis, being the aggressive disease that it is, often presents new clinical obstacles tied to treatment. Now, a new study by Oregon State University researchers may help improve patient outcomes, revealing that CF patients who take vitamin C supplements can help increase their uptake of vitamin E, which reduces inflammation. “Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease that is associated with increased inflammation, and like many inflammatory diseases, it comes with a large amount of oxidative stress,” says Maret Traber of OSU's Linus Pauling Institute in a university release. Traber also notes that CF patients have difficulty absorbing fat, limiting their body's ability to use fat-soluble vitamins like vitamin E. This generally means that this patient population has to take in more fat than an average person to break even. Studies have connected vitamin C to reducing inflammation and making use of oxidized vitamin E that the body wouldn't otherwise absorb. The team found that after 3.5 weeks of daily vitamin C supplementation at a dose of 1,000 milligrams, the patients had lower concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), which is a marker of oxidative stress. Additionally, they noticed that vitamin E wasn't leaving the bloodstream as quickly. These findings aren't just promising for CF patients, but also for smokers and people with metabolic syndrome since they normally also struggle with oxidative stress in their bodies, which may also suggest that vitamin C and E supplements could help them find relief. Traber also explains that while this study reinforces that getting ample vitamin C and E through a varied and nutritious diet is important, the effects have more to do with adding high amounts of vitamin C to a healthy diet. “This study used vitamin C far in excess of what someone can easily obtain from the diet,” Traber concludes. “One thousand milligrams is the equivalent of 15 oranges or four or five medium bell peppers. But the research does suggest a high dosage may be beneficial in inflammatory conditions.” Link Found Between High-Fat, High-Calorie Diet and Pancreas Cancer University of California Los Angeles, Oct. 1, 2022 Researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center (JCCC) have found that mice made obese by being given high-calorie, high-fat diets (HFCD) developed abnormally high numbers of lesions known as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs), which are known to be precursors to pancreas cancer. This is the first study to show a direct causative link in an animal model between obesity and risk of this deadly cancer. Cancer of the pancreas (scientifically known as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or PaCa) is one of the most deadly forms of the disease in humans. Overall five-year survival rates are approximately three to five percent and the average survival period after diagnosis is just four to six months. It is a particularly aggressive disease and often beyond the point of effective treatment by the time symptoms appear. Dr. Eibl and colleagues set out to develop diet-induced obesity and development of pancreas cancer in a set of mice and then compare them to another set of mice that are genetically identical but not given a high-fat, high-calorie diet. Obesity in these mice resembles several important clinical features of human obesity such as weight gain and disturbance of metabolism, and this mouse model was ideal for unraveling any underlying biological mechanisms of pancreas cancer that are put in motion by obesity. Mice that ate the normal diet gained an average of approximately 7.2 grams, plus or minus approximately 2.8 grams over 14 months. Mice that ate the high-fat, high-calorie diet gained an average of 15.9 grams, plus or minus 3.2grams. Mice fed the normal diet had mostly normal pancreases with very few scattered PanIN lesions. Mice fed the high-fat, high-calorie diet had significantly more PanIN lesions and fewer overall healthy pancreases. The study showed that the mice fed a diet high in fats and calories gained significantly more weight, had abnormalities of their metabolism and increased insulin levels, and had marked pancreatic tissue inflammation and development of PanIN lesions. These observations strongly suggest that such a diet leads to weight gain, metabolism disturbances, can cause pancreas inflammation and promotes pancreas lesions that are precursors to cancer. “The development of these lesions in mice is very similar to what happens in humans,” Dr. Eibl said. “These lesions take a long time to develop into cancer, so there is enough time for cancer preventive strategies, such as changing to a lower fat, lower calorie diet, to have a positive effect.” The vegetable that treated gunshot wounds National Geographic, October 9, 2022 One of the most expensive meals ever eaten—barring Cleopatra's show-stopping vinegar cocktail with dissolved pearl—was an onion. At least, the eater thought it was an onion. He was a (nameless) sailor in the 1630s, on board a ship transporting a cargo of tulip bulbs at the height of the European tulip craze. Now nicknamed tulipomania, this was the dot-com bubble of the day, in which speculators drove the price of tulip bulbs, recently introduced from the seraglios of the Middle East, to unsustainably astronomical heights. (Predictably, the market crashed, leaving many tulip investors ruined.) The clueless sailor, who said only that he thought his meal remarkably blah-tasting for an onion, had chowed down on a bulb of Semper Augustus, then worth 5,500 florins—a fortune on the open market. It's an interesting story because, frankly, it's hard to miss an onion. Onions—members of the odoriferous Allium genus that includes some 700 species, among them garlic, leeks, shallots, chives, rakkyo, and kurrats—are crammed with smelly, eye-stinging, volatile chemicals that are distinctly absent from tulip bulbs. Collectively, these pack such a powerful sensory punch that onions and relatives have an historical reputation for effectively fending off everything from devils, demons, and vampires to witches, serpents, tigers, the black plague, and the common cold. Onions, traditionally, have also been known as fighting food. Onions were fed to Greek athletes in training for the brutally competitive Olympics, and gladiators were massaged with onion juice before entering the arena. The Roman legions, who had a passion for all things onion, distributed alliums across Europe. (One authority claims that it's possible to follow the advance of the Roman Empire by plotting range maps for garlic.) For the legionnaires, alliums were not only tasty, but militarily helpful, believed to promote strength and courage in face of the enemy. In ancient times, gamecocks and warhorses were fed garlic to boost their fighting spirit; and in Aristophanes's 5th-century BCE play The Knights, warriors stuff themselves with garlic in preparation for battle. Garlic, in Rome, was dedicated to Mars, the god of war. Onions themselves are fine-tuned biological fighting machines. The compounds generated when an onion is bitten, nibbled, sliced, chopped, diced, or otherwise disrupted are the onion's anti-pest defense mechanism, a phenomenal battery of repellants nasty enough to discourage most onion attackers from ever coming back again. When onion cells are damaged, the onion goes into red alert, releasing enzymes that act upon ordinarily benign sulfur-containing organic compounds to produce a barrage of malodorous, painful, and highly reactive molecules. It doesn't pay to mess with an onion. The Onion Equivalent of Tear Gas Some allium-generated chemicals simply smell awful: onions and garlic, for example, contain some of the same sulfurous ingredients found in skunk spray. (American cowboys once called onions skunk eggs.) Others make us cry. An abused onion undergoes chemical reactions that lead to the production of syn-propanethial-S-oxide—known as a lachrymator, from the Latin lacrima meaning “tear.” Fast-acting and potent, syn-propanethial-S-oxide, is the onion equivalent of tear gas. When syn-propanethial-S-oxide hits the cornea of the eye—which happens within seconds of chopping knife meeting onion—it activates nerve endings that, detecting an irritant, send a signal to the lachrymal glands to pump out tears to wash the invader away. And well it should; onion irritant is really irritating. Chemist and onion expert Eric Block compares its effect to a punch in the eye-socket. Combined with the water in tears, syn-propanethial-S-oxide breaks down to make sulfuric acid, which is something nobody wants in the eye. Solutions to the onion-slicing lachrymator problem—none of them totally foolproof—include goggles, fans, or dicing up your onion under cold running water. Mean as onions are, they've got a lot going for them. Onion and garlic juices are both mild antibiotics. In the Civil War, onion juice was routinely used to treat gunshot wounds. General Grant, deprived of it, sent a testy memo to the War Department in Washington: “I will not move my troops without onions.” (They promptly sent him three cartloads.) Garlic was used as an antiseptic in both World Wars I and II. Modern research shows that these weren't bad picks in a medical pinch: garlic juice, for example, inhibits Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and the causative agents of typhus and dysentery. Alliums, if not optimal, were certainly better than nothing. Healing Properties of Onions Today onions are considered more than food. They're now touted as nutraceuticals—a portmanteau word cobbled together from “nutrient” and “pharmaceutical”—indicating that as well as adding flavor to spaghetti sauce and stew, they also have substantial medicinal and health-promoting qualities. Onions not only inhibit bacterial and fungal growth, but are laden with antioxidants, effective at protecting us from cancers and cardiovascular disease. Various chemicals in the versatile onion have been found to ameliorate everything from allergies and asthma to diabetes; and onions are lush sources of vitamins and minerals. Foodwise, it's hard to imagine living without onions. Onions are essential components of any number of global cuisines. Perhaps the best plug for the culinary versatility of the onion is the story of the 18th-century French caterer who-faced with hungry customers and nothing in the larder-served up a pair of leather gloves, shredded, and sautéed with onions, mustard, and vinegar. The recipients thought it delicious. Nowadays we may soon even be able to have all the pleasures and perks of onions without the pain. Colin Leady and colleagues, of New Zealand's Crop and Food Research, along with collaborators in Japan, have come up with a tear-free onion. It was created using a gene-silencing technology in which the gene for the enzyme that generates the onion lachrymator is shut down. The result is an onion with all the flavorful and nutritional bennies of a conventional onion, but without the tear-inducing syn-propanethial-S-oxide.

Nutrition with Judy
197. The Real Environmental Impact of Eating Meat - Dr. Peter Ballerstedt

Nutrition with Judy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 82:57 Very Popular


Paleovalley's mission is to help people get back to optimal health, so they only carry products that pass their strict standards.  Our family uses several of their products and we've come to love their Organic Pasture Raised Meat Sticks, their Essential C Complex and their unflavored bone broth powder. Our kids love their Superfood Bars and often have one before jiujitsu.Paleo valley always prioritizes health over profit and they never skimp on ingredients. They also have a 60-day, 100% money back guarantee.Make sure to support this podcast and head over to Paleovalley.com/NwJ and use code NWJ to get 15% off your first order._____I'm excited to sit down with Dr. Peter Ballerstedt. We talk about the true impact of US cattle on the environment, the beef industry and much more. Make sure to listen to the full interview to learn more.Dr. Peter Ballerstedt received his Bachelor of Science in Agriculture in 1981 and Master of Science in 1983, both from the University of Georgia. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky in 1986, specializing in forage management and utilization, minoring in ruminant nutrition. He was the forage extension specialist at Oregon State University from 1986 to 1992.Dr. Peter Ballerstedt has an extensive background in forage production, utilization, and forage-based livestock production systems. His personal experience has led him to re-examine human diet and health.We discuss the following:All about Dr. Peter BallerstedtThe true impact of US cattle on the environmentThoughts on reducing meat consumptionThoughts on the beef industryGreenhouse gas emissionsHow to change people's view on animal productsMisinformation on plant-based foodsThoughts on conventional meat Thoughts on hormones, nitrites, and antibioticsWays to fight rising meat prices Prices of meatDifferences in proteinWhere to find Dr. Peter Ballerstedt_____RESOURCESWebsite: http://grassbasedhealth.blogspot.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GrassBasedHealth/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/GrassBased/Twitter: https://twitter.com/grassbasedGrocery deals: https://www.mygrocerydeals.com/Shop for local meat from farms near you: https://meatsuite.comWhen Protein is Not Protein Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VY8YNhEpXw____CHECK OUT MY BOOK, Carnivore CureSIGN UP FOR MY WEEKLY NEWSLETTER_____ ADDITIONAL RESOURCESNutrition with Judy ArticlesNutrition with Judy ResourcesCutting Against the Grain Podcast_____ **DISCLAIMER: I am only here to provide support as a nutritional therapy practitioner and I am not providing medical advice. I always recommend working with a team of holistic practitioners, including your PCP and a certified nutritional therapy practitioner. Do not self-diagnose. Always seek medical guidance when you have a medical condition.Head over to paleovalley.com/nwj and get 15% off your first order. Promo code NWJ

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 263: Are colleges that don't produce big earners worth it?

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 96:37 Very Popular


In this episode you will hear:   (16:02) Mark and Susan discuss an article by Ron Lieber, that appeared on August 24, 2022 in The New York Times entitled: “Some Colleges Don't Produce Big Earners. Are They Worth It?” Susan and Mark discuss the complexities involved in this question.   Some Colleges Don't Produce Big Earners. Are They Worth It?     (45:40) Two listeners, Ari and Ivan wrote in to ask us, why do some colleges not share their data in the Common Data Set. Lisa and Mark answer this question.   (01:08:05 )Our interview is with Jon Boeckenstedt, the Vice Provost of Oregon State University . John describes what Higher Ed Data Stories is. Why did he start this and how should listeners use it?   Jon explains what Higher Ed Data Stories are and how they work Jon explains what his favorite article ever for Higher Ed Data stories was Jon covers the difference between data and Insights Jon talks about test scores, where does he see them going? Jon talks about the importance of California   (01:19:38) The recommended resource is Ron Lieber's 2016 book: The Opposite of Spoiled: Raising Kids Who Are Grounded, Generous, and Smart About Money     .   Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 28 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews you can still send in questions for our guests: Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner University of Wisconsin-Andre Phillips University of Illinois-Andy Borst Purdue University-Mitch Warren University of Minnesota-Keri Risic Cornell University-Jonathon Burdick Akil Bello of Akilbello.com Bard College Baylor University Butler University California Institute of Technology Colorado School of Mines Cornell College Creighton University     To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email , just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons” We are revamping YCBK PLUS and we will have shorter more frequent blog articles that will launch later this fall.   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

Financial Advisor's Workshop with Brian Kasal
#29 Helping Any Client To Retirement In 20 Years w/ Laura Holcombe - Financial Advisor at Resource Financial, Inc.

Financial Advisor's Workshop with Brian Kasal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 37:17


Download our FREE Guide on “How To Find Ultra High Net Worth Clients"” from https://financialadvisorsworkshop.com/ Laura Holcombe (https://www.resourcefinancial.com/) is a third generation graduate of Oregon State University and has worked in financial services since 1985. Laura has Series 7 and Series 66 registrations. She is life and health Insurance licensed as well as being a Stock Broker and Investment Advisor Representative. Laura honed her speaking skills at the local Toastmasters International, and along with the other advisors in the firm, she teaches classes throughout the year at Portland Community College and local businesses. She shares her secrets on building lasting relationships with new clients, anchored around trust, personality, and customer service. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/laura-holcombe-cfp%C2%AE-07ba9999/ Website: https://www.finra.org/ Website: https://www.sipc.org/ Website: https://www.resourcefinancial.com/ To see short videos of all our best FA Business Growing tips follow us on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/FinancialAdvisorsWorkshop TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@faworkshop YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFRh9BxjF0cT7PdkEhsg6lw Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FinancialAdvisorsWorkshop Twitter: https://twitter.com/FAsWorkshop iTunes:https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/financial-advisors-workshop-with-brian-kasal/id1614768408 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4OB78889GRx2FHjvWtsyeE Website: https://www.financialadvisorsworkshop.com/ Interested in working at FourStar: https://fourstarwealth.com/Advisors DISCLAIMER: This content is provided by FourStar Wealth Advisors for the general public and general information purposes only. This content is not considered to be an offer to buy or sell any securities or investments. Investing involves the risk of loss and an investor should be prepared to bear potential losses. Investment should only be made after thorough review with your investment advisor considering all factors including personal goals, needs and risk tolerance. FourStar is an SEC registered investment advisor that maintains a principal business in the state of Illinois. The firm may only transact business in states in which it has filed or qualifies for a corresponding exemption from such requirements. For information about FourStar's registration status and business operations please consult the firm's form ADV disclosure documents, the most recent versions of which are available on the SEC investment advisory public disclosure website at www.adviserinfo.sec.gov

Think Out Loud
How the Oregon Kelp Alliance is working to restore Oregon's kelp forests

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 12:38


Oregon is known for its terrestrial forests, but there's an equally important forest ecosystem in its oceans: kelp. Kelp forests provide a crucial food source and habitat for marine species, helping to support coastal biodiversity as well as the state's fishing and tourism industries. But along some parts of the coast, these forests are in decline. Sarah Gravem is a research associate at Oregon State University and a leader with the Oregon Kelp Alliance. She joins us to talk about how the organization is working to bring kelp back from the brink.

Think Out Loud
OSU's Guinness Record-setting robot makes strides for machine learning

Think Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 17:18


Cassie, a robot developed by Oregon State University researchers, is essentially just a pair of sophisticated mechanical legs. But those legs just set a Guinness World Record for the fastest 100-meter dash run by a bipedal robot. Running – even quickly – might seem an easy task for a human, but it takes considerably more effort to teach a machine to do so without tripping or veering off course. Alan Fern is a professor of computer science and artificial intelligence at Oregon State University and the College of Engineering's executive director of artificial intelligence programs. He explains what Cassie's accomplishments mean for machine learning and the future of robotics.

Adventures in Advising
Looking Beyond Your Office - Adventures in Advising

Adventures in Advising

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 54:20


In Episode 68 of the Adventures in Advising podcast, you'll hear interviews with:Clay Schwenn -  University of Washington-BothellKerry Kincanon from Oregon State University guest hosts!We have merch! Check out our Merch store for shirts, hoodies, stickers, coffee mugs and more!Register for the NACADA Annual Conference and book your hotel!The Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and TikTok handle for the podcast is @AdvisingPodcastCheck out and bookmark the Adventures in Advising website!Also, subscribe to our Adventures in Advising YouTube Channel!You can find Matt on Linkedin.Buzzsprout — Easiest Way to Start a PodcastStart podcasting today. It's the easiest way to start, grow, and monetize your podcast.Brand EquipThe Green Acres Women Equip Podcast seeks to equip women with tools for everyday life!Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

California Ag Today
Using Artificial Intelligence to Protect Bees

California Ag Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022


Researchers on the west coast put the power of artificial intelligence to good use to protect bees from pesticides.

Gills Talk
Dr. Alex McInturf - Perseverance Pays Off

Gills Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 40:55


Dr. Alex McInturf is currently a CICOES postdoctoral fellow at Oregon State University's Big Fish Lab. Her research generally focuses on how marine organisms respond to environmental variables. She studies salmon and sevengill sharks in California and basking sharks in Ireland. She is currently looking at the foraging ecology of salmon sharks in Oregon and Alaska and its impact on local salmon populations. Enjoy! Follow Alex: On Instagram On Twitter Follow Big Fish Lab On Instagram On Twitter Follow Irish Basking Shark Research Follow Gills Club: On Instagram On Twitter On Facebook --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gillstalk/support

GW Integrative Medicine
Let's Talk Vitamin D Studies

GW Integrative Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 31:24


Today, we discuss some Vitamin D studies that have received a lot of attention from the media. We have with us Adrian “Fritz” Gombart, PhD, principal investigator from the Linus Pauling Institute and a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at Oregon State University. Dr. Gombart's research focuses on understanding how vitamin D status influences how well the immune system works, including the body's ability to fight off infection. The Linus Pauling Institute is a world leader in the study of micronutrients, phytochemicals, and other dietary factors, and the role these compounds can play in promoting optimum health or preventing and treating disease. ◘ Related Links https://bit.ly/3dWFDUk ◘ Transcript https://bit.ly/3fAXvVa ◘ This podcast features the song “Follow Your Dreams” (freemusicarchive.org/music/Scott_Ho…ur_Dreams_1918) by Scott Holmes, available under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial (01https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) license. ◘ Disclaimer: The content and information shared in GW Integrative Medicine is for educational purposes only and should not be taken as medical advice. The views and opinions expressed in GW Integrative Medicine represent the opinions of the host(s) and their guest(s). For medical advice, diagnosis, and/or treatment, please consult a medical professional.

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies
YCBK 261: College Financial Aid is a Sham

Your College Bound Kid | Scholarships, Admission, & Financial Aid Strategies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 111:03 Very Popular


In this episode you will hear:   (09:55) Mark and Dave discuss an article by Kevin Carey, that appeared on July 25, 2022 in Slate.org entitled: “The Single biggest thing to know about financial aid: It's a Sham. Mark and Dave talk about why financial aid is controversial and then they have one of their knock down drag out debates.     https://slate.com/business/2022/07/college-financial-aid-sham.html     (52:50) For our question from a listener, Lisa and Mark answer a question about what should a student do if they ask for a recommendation and they are told, “you write it and I will sign it”. Do they proceed and write the letter?   (01:03:40) Our interview is with Jon Boeckenstedt, the Vice Provost of Oregon State University . In this two-part interview Jon will answer questions about whether certain practices are ethical or unethical in college admissions. Part 2 of 2   Preview of Part 2   Jon rates taking a large number of student through Early Decision. Jon shares when ED feels appropriate and when it isn't Jon talks about using Early Action as a tool to flip students to commit Early Decision Jon talks about learning from how a college treats you in the application process Jon comments on his perspective on the propriety or impropriety of saying that a college meets 100% of need Jon also comments on whether any college is really need blind. Jon talks why he likes the term “FAFSA-blind” better than “need-blind” Jon talks about what he means by saying, graduation rates are more input than output data Jon tells us a responsible way to use graduation rate as a statistical metric Jon tells us why IPEDS is such a great source of data   (01:16:00) The recommended resource looks at Bethesda Magazine's annual look at which colleges students from six local high schools applied, were admitted  and where they enrolled:   (01:28:56) There is no college Spotlight this week but Dave and Mark give you a bonus, “in the News” as they discuss Columbia's fall from 2 to 18 the rankings. The article is called, “Columbia whistleblower on exposing college rankings: “They are Worthless” This article appeared in the Guardian and it is an interview with Michael Thaddeus, the Columbian professor who blew the whistle on Columbia. This is a fascinating article:   https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2022/sep/16/columbia-whistleblower-us-news-rankings-michael-thaddeus .   Please send in your questions either on Twitter at @YCBKpodcast using the Messages tab (this is our preference) or via email at for the 28 admissions interviews we are doing in the summer and fall. Our interviews are with the following people at the following schools: Confirmed interviews you can still send in questions for our guests: Bard-Mackie Siebens Mercer-Kelly Holloway Rice University-Tamara Siler American University-Andrea Felder Pitzer College-Yvonne Berumen Chapman University-Marcela Meija-Martinez Connecticut College-Andy Strickler* Trinity College-Anthony Berry* College of the Atlantic-Heather Albert* Spelman College-Chelsea Holley* Scripps College-Victoria Romero* Saint Louis University-Daniel Wood-(Interview is about transfer admissions, Daniel is a transfer counselor) Colby College-Randi Arsenault* University of Georgia-David Graves* Washington University St Louis-Ronne Turner     To sign up to receive Your College-Bound Kid PLUS, our free quarterly admissions deep-dive, delivered directly to your email , just go to yourcollegeboundkid.com, and you will see the sign up on the right side of the page under “the Listen to our podcast icons” We are revamping YCBK PLUS and we will have shorter more frequent blog articles that will launch later this fall.   Follow Mark Stucker on Twitter to get breaking college admission news,  and updates about the podcast before they go live. You can ask questions on Twitter that he will answer them on the podcast. Mark will also share additional hot topics in the news and breaking news on this Twitter feed. Twitter message is also the preferred way to ask questions for our podcast:   https://twitter.com/YCBKpodcast   To access our transcripts, click: https://yourcollegeboundkid.com/category/transcripts/ Find the specific episode transcripts for the one you want to search and click the link Find the magnifying glass icon in blue (search feature) and click it Enter whatever word you want to search. I.e. Loans Every word in that episode when the words loans are used, will be highlighted in yellow with a timestamps Click the word highlighted in yellow and the player will play the episode from that starting point You can also download the entire podcast as a transcript   We would be honored if you will pass this podcast episode on to others who you feel will benefit from the content in YCBK.   Please subscribe to our podcast. It really helps us move up in Apple's search feature so others can find our podcast.   Don't forget to send your questions related to any and every facet of the college process to: questions@yourcollegeboundkid.com.   If you enjoy our podcast, would you please do us a favor and share our podcast both verbally and on social media? We would be most grateful!   If you want to help more people find Your College-Bound Kid, please make sure you follow our podcast. You will also get instant notifications as soon as each episode goes live.   Check out the college admissions books Mark recommends:   Check out the college websites Mark recommends:   If you want to have some input about what you like and what you recommend we change about our podcast, please complete our Podcast survey; here is the link:     If you want a college consultation with Mark or Lisa, just text Mark at 404-664-4340 or email Lisa at lisa@schoolmatch4u.com. All they ask is that you review their services on their website before the complimentary session. Their counseling website is: https://schoolmatch4u.com/

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 09.27.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 61:16


Videos: Gary Null – Speaks to U.N. on Earth Day (Part 1 & 2) Iain McGilchrist, ‘We Need to Act' Iain McGilchrist is a former Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford, an associate Fellow of Green Templeton College, Oxford, a Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a Consultant Emeritus of the Bethlem and Maudsley Hospital, London, a former research Fellow in Neuroimaging at Johns Hopkins University Medical School, Baltimore, and a former Fellow of the Institute of Advanced Studies in Stellenbosch. He now lives on the Isle of Skye, off the coast of North West Scotland, where he continues to write, and lectures worldwide.   California's “holy herb” Yerba Santa found to be an effective natural treatment for Alzheimer's   Salk Institute for Biological Studies, September 19, 2022 Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, and aging is its primary risk factor. Therefore, researchers continue to look for ways to counter the effects of aging on the brain. In a recent study, researchers from The Salk Institute for Biological Studies discovered a potential natural treatment for Alzheimer's in the form of a medicinal herb found in California. In their study published in the journal Redox Biology, they found that yerba santa (Eriodictyon californicum), a plant native to California, contains an active compound called sterubin that could be used to treat people with Alzheimer's. Yerba santa, which is the Spanish for “holy herb,” is highly regarded as a medicine for respiratory diseases, bruising, fever, headaches, infections, and pain. For the current study, the researchers first examined 400 plant extracts with known medicinal properties for their ability to prevent oxytosis – a type of cell death that occurs in Alzheimer's disease – in mouse hippocampal nerve cells. The researchers found that sterubin exhibited the greatest protective effect against inflammation and other triggers of brain cell death. In particular, sterubin strongly reduced inflammation in microglia, which are brain cells that provide support to nerve cells. In addition, the researchers found that sterubin can remove iron from cells, helping to prevent iron accumulation. Iron accumulation can result in a type of nerve cell damage that accompanies aging and occurs in neurodegenerative problems. “Not only did sterubin turn out to be much more active than the other flavonoids in Yerba santa in our assays, it appears as good as, if not better than, other flavonoids we have studied,” said Pamela Maher, the corresponding author of the study. Vitamin B may reduce risk of stroke Zhengzhou University (China)  September 23, 2022   Researchers have uncovered evidence that suggests vitamin B supplements could help to reduce the risk of stroke, according to a study published in the journal Neurology. Vitamin B supplements are said to be beneficial for many health issues, including stress, anxiety, depression, dementia, Alzheimer's disease and heart disease. However, according to Xu Yuming of Zhengzhou University in Zhengzhou, China, previous studies have conflicting findings regarding the use of vitamin B supplements and stroke or heart attack. In order to determine the role of vitamin B supplements in the risk of stroke, Prof. Yuming and colleagues analyzed 14 randomized clinical trials involving a total of 54,913 participants  All studies compared use of vitamin B supplements with a placebo, or a very low dosage of the vitamin. All participants were then followed for a period of 6 months. Results of the analysis revealed that the participants taking the vitamin B supplements had a 7% reduced risk of stroke, compared with those taking the placebo supplements or a low dosage of vitamin B. The researchers found that a supplemental form of folate (vitamin B9) – a vitamin frequently found in fortified cereals – actually reduced the effect of vitamin B on the risk of stroke Additionally, the study showed that vitamin B12 did not have any effect on the risk of stroke.   Ginger may protect the brain from MSG toxicity, says fascinating research University of Jeddah (Saudi Arabia), September 23, 2013  For thousands of years, ginger has been hailed as a superfood for its healing properties that aid every system of the body. The oils that ginger contains are antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal, and ginger has even been found to inhibit cancer growth. Now a study has actually proven that ginger can reverse the damage done by monosodium glutamate, or MSG, a known harmful excitotoxin. After injecting pure MSG into rats for 30 days, researchers found subsequent withdrawal caused adverse effects including significant epinephrine, norepinephine, dopamine and serotonin depletion. Low levels of these important neurotransmitters can be detrimental to health. Subsequent to injecting lab rats with MSG, researchers injected ginger root extract for 30 more days and were able to completely reverse the neurotransmitter depletion and brain damage that MSG caused. Not only that, but the positive effects of ginger were maintained even after scientists stopped administering it! A wealth of independent studies show that MSG should be avoided at all costs. Also popularly printed on food labels as hydrolyzed protein, torula or autolyzed yeast, soy or yeast extract and soy protein isolate among some 40 other names, scientists have found that consuming MSG even in low doses can cause blood glutamate levels to fluctuate abnormally high and then stay there. Anyone suffering from a disease or immunity issue that would contribute to a weakened blood-brain barrier is then much more susceptible to the chemical seeping into his or her brain and doing damage. Studies have effectively linked MSG consumption to several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Men with anxiety are more likely to die of cancer, study says Cambridge University's Institute of Public Health, September 20, 2022 Men over 40 who are plagued with generalized anxiety disorder are more than twice as likely to die of cancer than are men who do not have the mental affliction, new research finds. But for women who suffer from severe anxiety, the research found no increased risk of cancer death. That finding, presented at the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology's Congress in Vienna, emerges from the largest study ever to explore a link between anxiety and cancer. It tracked 15,938 Britons over 40 for 15 years. Even after researchers took account of factors that boost the risk of cancer, including age, alcohol consumption, smoking and chronic diseases, men with a diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder were 2.15 times as likely to die of cancer than were those with no such diagnosis. Generalized anxiety disorder – a condition marked by excessive, uncontrollable worry about many areas of life – affected women more commonly than it did men. Among women in the large cohort studied, 2.4 percent suffered from the disorder. Among men in the cohort, 1.8 percent did. Whatever the relationship, says the study's lead author, the new findings identify extremely anxious men as a population whose mental and physical health should be closely tracked. “Society may need to consider anxiety as a warning signal for poor health,” said study lead author Olivia Remes of Cambridge University's Institute of Public Health. “With this study, we show that anxiety is more than just a personality trait,” but rather, a disorder linked to real and serious health risks. Out of Over 400 Compounds Analyzed, Red Grapes and Blueberries Are Tops In Boosting Immunity – So Effective They Work As Well As Drugs Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, September 18, 2022Pterostilbene, an antioxidant produced by plants has been shown to exhibit exceptional properties in fighting infections, cancer, hypertriglycerides, as well as the ability to reverse cognitive decline. It is believed that the compound also has anti-diabetic properties. In an analysis of 446 compounds for their the ability to boost the innate immune system in humans, researchers in the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University discovered just two that stood out from the crowd. Red grapes and blueberies both have an exceptional ability to significantly impact immune function. In fact, pterostilbene works as well as some commercial drugs.

Both of these compounds, which are called stilbenoids, worked in synergy with vitamin D and had a significant impact in raising the expression of the human cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide, or CAMP gene, that is involved in immune function.The research was published in Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, in studies supported by the National Institutes of Health.

Almost a decade ago, researchers discovered that pterostilbene helps regulate blood sugar and might help fight type-2 diabetes. The finding adds to a growing list of reasons to eat colorful fruit, especially blueberries, which are rich in compounds known as antioxidants. These molecules battle cell and DNA damage involved in cancer, heart disease, diabetes and perhaps also brain degeneration. 

Pterostilbene works as well as the commercial drug ciprofibrate to lower the levels of fats (lipids) and triglycerides — but they worked even more accurately. They are so specific that side-effects are non-existent.”Out of a study of hundreds of compounds, just these two popped right out,” said Adrian Gombart, an LPI principal investigator and associate professor in the OSU College of Science. “Their synergy with vitamin D to increase CAMP gene expression was significant and intriguing. It's a pretty interesting interaction.”This research is the first to show a clear synergy with vitamin D that increased CAMP expression by several times, scientists said.The CAMP gene itself is also the subject of much study, as it has been shown to play a key role in the “innate” immune system, or the body's first line of defense and ability to combat bacterial infection. The innate immune response is especially important as many antibiotics increasingly lose their effectiveness.

Grapes don't have to be fermented to contain this antioxidant. It's actually found in the skin of red grapes along with other nutrients, such as minerals manganese and potassium and vitamins K, C and B1.Stilbenoids are compounds produced by plants to fight infections, and in human biology appear to affect some of the signaling pathways that allow vitamin D to do its job, researchers said. It appears that combining these compounds with vitamin D has considerably more biological impact than any of them would separately. Fungus in humans identified for first time as key factor in Crohn's disease Case Western Reserve University, September 22, 2022 A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine-led team of international researchers has for the first time identified a fungus as a key factor in the development of Crohn's disease. The researchers also linked a new bacterium to the previous bacteria associated with Crohn's. The groundbreaking findings, published in mBio, could lead to potential new treatments and ultimately, cures for the debilitating inflammatory bowel disease, which causes severe abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and fatigue. Mycology at Case Western Reserve and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center “Essentially, patients with Crohn's have abnormal immune responses to these bacteria, which inhabit the intestines of all people. While most researchers focus their investigations on these bacteria, few have examined the role of fungi, which are also present in everyone's intestines. Our study adds significant new information to understanding why some people develop Crohn's disease. Equally important, it can result in a new generation of treatments, including medications and probiotics, which hold the potential for making qualitative and quantitative differences in the lives of people suffering from Crohn's.” The researchers assessed the mycobiome and bacteriome of patients with Crohn's disease and their Crohn's-free first degree relatives in nine families in northern France and Belgium, and in Crohn's-free individuals from four families living in the same geographic area. Specifically, they analyzed fecal samples of 20 Crohn's and 28 Crohn's-free patients from nine families and of 21 Crohn's-free patients of four families. The researchers found strong fungal-bacterial interactions in those with Crohn's disease: two bacteria (Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens) and one fungus (Candida tropicalis) moved in lock step. The presence of all three in the sick family members was significantly higher compared to their healthy relatives, suggesting that the bacteria and fungus interact in the intestines. Additionally, test-tube research by the Ghannoum-led team found that the three work together (with the E. coli cells fusing to the fungal cells and S. marcescens forming a bridge connecting the microbes) to produce a biofilm — a thin, slimy layer of microorganisms found in the body that adheres to, among other sites, a portion of the intestines — which can prompt inflammation that results in the symptoms of Crohn's disease. This is first time any fungus has been linked to Crohn's in humans; previously it was only found in mice with the disease. The study is also the first to include S. marcescens in the Crohn's-linked bacteriome. Additionally, the researchers found that the presence of beneficial bacteria was significantly lower in the Crohn's patients, corroborating previous research findings.