Podcasts about Veterans Day

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Federal holiday in the United States

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  • 4,174EPISODES
  • 40mAVG DURATION
  • 1WEEKLY EPISODE
  • Aug 6, 2022LATEST
Veterans Day

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Best podcasts about Veterans Day

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Latest podcast episodes about Veterans Day

Kingdom Cross  Roads Podcast
Mission to Help the Vets - Jane Babcock pt 3

Kingdom Cross Roads Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 25:17


A Mission to Help the Vets Jane Babcock pt 3 https://kcrpodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Jane-Babcock.jpeg ()These last few years, there has been an increase awareness about the terrible care our military veterans have received. Thank God for the efforts President Trump put into this area that did show some promising improvements and results. Amen! But there is still a long way, a very long way, to go. Our vets, their spouses and their families are hurting. They are suffering. And when they try to navigate the myriad mazes that consist in our government, they get lost and give up. Or they fall through the cracks and start over again. And again. And again. But, all hope is not lost. There is a team of volunteers out there that take this very, very seriously. Our guest today has formed a grass roots mission, “National Promises Made But Not Kept by the VA.” Jane Babcock has been a volunteer for over 12 years, serving the veterans in her state of Wisconsin, but also helping others nationwide! Praise God. Through her volunteer training and guidance, with one-on-one virtual calls, live and podcast interviews, in person group and virtual classes, Jane has been on the forefront of helping veterans navigate the mazes of bureaucracy, especially inside the VA. Amen! Her mission is to educate every veteran, their families, and their widow(or)s on the benefits which the VA seems happy to keep secret. This is part three of a great three part interview! What about funeral benefits? Do VA Counselors also help with those? I've heard that a veteran should “prearrange” funeral plans in a VA cemetery, well before their death or that of a spouse. How is that accomplished if they are not in a terminal state of health? You are trying to put together a media push to get this information out there before Veterans Day. Can you share what it is you are trying to put together? Before we close, you mentioned something about “war time pensions.” What is it you would like to share? What about a vet that has a good income, health insurance, etc., but would like to have their prescriptions filled by the VA and still have that annual physical. Is that something that the vet can do? Jane, this has really been informative. I know I've learned a lot and our listeners have as well. How can they reach out to a local benefits educator in their area? How can they find someone like you that can help them locally? If someone had a question or wanted to get in touch with you, maybe to do an interview like this, how can they do that? Folks, as a veteran and just as an American, I'm shocked to see how bureaucracy has treated and continues to treat our heroes. It is a tragedy. It really is. But folks like Jane Babcock are there to help. If you want to get in touch with your local VA benefits educator, look them up. Find a contact number. Email Jane and tell here where you are located and she can probably refer you to someone or maybe email you the info you need to get started. Amen! This is something YOU need to take control of. Amen! I urge you, if you are a veteran or a family member of a veteran or are just aware of a situation involving a veteran, please get in touch with Jane or a local representative and get the help that is due to the veterans. Amen! CONTACT INFORMATION: Jane Babcock on LinkedIn:  https://www.linkedin.com/in/janebabcock/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/janebabcock/) Find your Accredited VSO Reps:  https://www.va.gov/ogc/apps/accreditation/index.asp (https://www.va.gov/ogc/apps/accreditation/index.asp) https://www.linkedin.com/dms/D5606AQEmSJMIH_DQXQ/messaging-attachmentFile/0/1656173810390?m=AQJ7uyclGxKPjgAAAYHP79bHVfa-JHCzBq9XiWkPTWc_MDUPHhP1IHjS&ne=1&v=beta&t=qJPj-ssKue0bjSCXk_mxY2vys0ZlUqnpTR1YgnxoBQ0&lipi=urn%3Ali%3Apage%3Ad_flagship3_people_invite_accepted_contextual%3Bi9b0boBHQ%2BKH3Ksd8zn%2Baw%3D%3D (Presumptive Disabilities Document)...

Learn Hebrew | HebrewPod101.com
Hebrew Vocab Builder S1 #17 - Veterans Day in the United States

Learn Hebrew | HebrewPod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 3:39


Inside Appalachia
Righting A Wrong, Greyhounds, And Talking To A Hero, Inside Appalachia

Inside Appalachia

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 53:39


This week, on Inside Appalachia, we visit a cemetery in Bluefield, Virginia, and learn how racial segregation followed some people to the grave. Also, we continue our series on greyhound racing. Most states have closed down their race tracks. So, what's the future of the sport in West Virginia? And we'll revisit a conversation with America's last World War II Medal of Honor recipient — Hershel “Woody” Williams, who died recently at the age of 98. A Conversation With An American Hero Last year, for Veterans Day, Us & Them host Trey Kay talked with Williams about his time in the military. Memorial services were held for Williams over the July 4th weekend, with public visitation held at Capitol Rotunda in Charleston. You can hear the entire Us & Them podcast episode. It's called “Last Man Honored.” Find it at wv public dog org, or through your favorite podcast app.  Reactions In Appalachia About Roe v. Wade The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade sent shockwaves across the country — including here in Appalachia. WEKU reporter Stan Ingold brought us reactions from Kentucky.  Trouble With Plastic Shell is expected to begin operations this summer at its ethane cracker plant on the Ohio River. The plant will use natural gas to make tiny plastic pellets — which can wind up in waterways. For StateImpact Pennsylvania, the Allegheny Front's Julie Grant took a boat ride with people surveying the river for plastic.  Water Woes Everywhere According to the U.S. Census, more than a million and a half people in the U.S. live without running water or flush toilets. But a recent study found the number was a lot higher. Jessica Lilly recently spoke with George McGraw, CEO of Dig Deep — a water advocacy organization that took a closer look at the numbers.  Covering More Ground About Greyhound Racing By the end of the year, West Virginia will be the only state that still has a greyhound racetrack. One of the biggest questions driving the national push to end greyhound racing — is can the sport be run in a humane way? Or is it inhumane by its very definition? Reporter Chris Shulz took us to a veterinarian's office and a breeder's farm. Healing Through The Hills Herbal remedies have been experiencing a nationwide renaissance for several years now. But here in Appalachia, those remedies have been a path to wellness and independence for centuries. From Tennessee, Folkways reporter Heather Duncan has more. That story originally aired last summer, as part of our Folkways Reporting Project. The project documents arts and culture across the region. You can hear all of our Folkways stories at wvpublic dot org.  Righting A Wrong America has a history of segregating Black and white people — in restaurants, schools, buses … even in death. For decades, graves of the Black residents who helped build the community were neglected in the town's segregated cemetery. And it might have stayed that way if it hadn't been for the efforts of one persistent woman, whose family was buried there. Folkways reporter Connie Bailey Kitts brought us this story.

The Paul W. Smith Show
Steve Courtney ~ The Paul W. Smith Show

The Paul W. Smith Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 5:54


July 14, 2022 ~ WJR Sports Analyst Steve Courtney talks with MSU Basketball Coach Tom Izzo about the upcoming Veterans Day game on the USS Abraham Lincoln.

Stories We Can Tell

Unstuck There he was, out on the porch When I pulled up. CR didn't seem to notice me. He rocked away the summer morning With his German Shepherd pup, Slowly sipping on his tea With the spoon still in his cup. “You'll put your eye out,” I warned him But he didn't seem to care. He just patted the dog and sang a song To someone who wasn't there: Jeannie won't you lay with me And scratch my back a while, Whisper in my ear Sweet things that make me smile Ever since he quit the booze He sits out here and reads the news And worries about his country. CR flies a little flag on a stick taped to the lamppost, A Christmas wreath still graced the door. Finding nothing to fall back on, He drops the paper on the floor. “Sean,” he said, “They're taking books right off the shelf And I don't feel so good myself.” Staring out into the sunburned lawn, He kept on rocking, rocking on, still talking— “A bobcat killed the rooster down at Honest John's.” I wasn't sure of what to say or just how I should respond But I promised I would buy him a flag of decent size. He told me not to bother And wiped the water from his eyes. “I figure anybody who can fly a great big flag Can fly a great small one,” he said, Gazing out towards my pickup truck. “A little girl gave me that one At the Veterans Day parade. She sat down right beside me on the curb And drank her lemonade. We spoke of kindness, love, and beauty In the universe displayed.” Then he sang another song: Billy Pilgrim they will burn you, Just you wait and see. It seems you've made the list Of Moms for Liberty. Guilty of the heinous crime Of coming all unstuck in time, Billy, you've been a friend to me. “Is that you, CR? Coming all unstuck?” I asked. I recognized the line from a book He made me read in high school. “I guess,” he answered. “But Vonnegut was with your Pop in World War Two. A nightmare. No big deal, they said—just what they had to do. Billy, he won't work on Maggie's farm, And he sure won't study war no more. That's what got him banned.” I leaned on the post and nodded But I couldn't really comprehend. And CR sang his verse again. Then, for the first time, at least with me, He spoke of Vietnam. “They drafted you right out of school,” I said, “According to my Mom.” “Yeah, I won the lottery.” “Number 93, Spec 4, 25th Infantry.” He talked about Long Binh and Cu Chi, LZ's and IED's And losing two friends from Indiana. Sleeping in the rice fields To hear Charlie coming out, ‘Didi Mow!' The GI's shout— Dinki Dow and getting out of there somehow Before he turned 21. “I made six fifty a month. Sent all but forty of it home Except for the time I went to Australia.” “You went to Australia?” “Hell, that was 50 years ago. Everybody was talking Thailand, Said Australia was way too far For just a week on R&R. I had my heart all set on Sydney, though, Spent a week there with an older woman, don't you know.” He shook his head and laughed. I told CR that I once had a science teacher who served. A Helicopter pilot. He wore an eyepatch like a pirate. Scar down the side of his face. Talked politics at the drop of a hat— Called himself a Southern Democrat I forgot I remembered him. He was always walking around Swinging his old baseball bat. Offered no war stories—said he was just glad to be alive. One of the last to leave Saigon in 1975 Before it fell. It was quiet for a time while— Neither of us said a thing, Both of us sweat the sweat that summer brings. Afraid he couldn't hear the songbirds sing, CR refused to use the fan I gave him. He stared out again across the lawn. He kept on rocking, rocking on— It seemed to comfort him, But then he stopped. “She wore a yellow sundress.” “Who?” “The little girl with the flag. Dawn. She said her name was Dawn. I liked that name. Last week a shooter walked into her school And now she's gone.” “What?” “Along with 19 others, she is gone.” “What am I supposed to do with that?” I asked after a moment. “I don't know.” CR ra

Ancestral Findings (Genealogy Gold Podcast)
AF-628: Do You Know the History of Veterans Day?

Ancestral Findings (Genealogy Gold Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 7:37


Do you know the history of Veterans Day? Since our nation celebrates it on November 11, we should all know how the holiday originated. Here are the details. Podcast Show Notes: https://ancestralfindings.com/a-history-of-veterans-day/  Genealogy Clips Podcast https://ancestralfindings.com/podcast Historical Postcard Giveaway https://ancestralfindings.com/postcard-giveaway/ Free Genealogy eBooks https://ancestralfindings.com/ebooks Hard To Find Surnames https://ancestralfindings.com/surnames Follow on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/AncestralFindings Support Ancestral Findings https://ancestralfindings.com/donation #Genealogy #AncestralFindings #GenealogyClips

Warm Thoughts
Episode 140: Healing Liberty

Warm Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 2:45


It is that time of year when many patriotic thoughts arise as we see the flag flying high in the sky. I am very impressed in my travels to note where homes fly the flag on a daily basis. There are special days of the year beginning with January 1st, when we fly the flag resolving to keep our nation free. On January 20th, it is Inauguration Day, February 12th - Lincoln's birthday, and February 22nd, Washington's day and also on Presidents Day in February. In April we have Army Day on April 6th. On Easter Sunday we proclaim our freedom source anew. In May we have Mother's Day and Memorial Day. June brings us Flag Day and Father's Day. July 4th is Independence Day, the birthday of our freedom. A day when those stars and stripes wave over the land of the free and the home of the brave. Labor Day is when our flag speaks for the workmen in our country. September 17th is Constitution Day. October 12th is Columbus Day - the day America was discovered. October 27th is Navy Day, when the flag floats on ship or shore. November we have Veterans Day, a day of thanks for our freedom. December 25th Is Christmas day, when we honor Him who came to give everyone healing liberty. The American flag has the colors of red, white, and blue. Most national flags use one or combinations of seven basic colors. Red, white, blue, green, yellow, black, and orange. It was on June 14th, 1977 that Continental Congress adopted the Stars and Stripes Flag. Whoever the mother or father of this flag may be, we know it represents America the Beautiful and God Bless America. Patriotic thought: On guard then, O America, let nothing ever dead, the flame of true democracy nor still the fervent hymn of liberty and justice and noble destiny. Again, we raise our thanks to God, America for thee. God bless America. Warm Thoughts from the Little Home on the Prairie Over a Cup of Tea by Luetta G. Werner Published in the Marion Record June 27th, 1996.Download the Found Photo Freebie and cherish your memories of the past.Enjoy flipping through the Vintage Photo Book on your coffee table.I hope you enjoyed this podcast episode! Please follow along on this journey by going to visualbenedictions.com or following me on Instagram, Facebook, and Pinterest. You can listen to the podcast on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Stitcher, and Overcast. And don't forget to rate and review so more people can tune in! I'd greatly appreciate it.Till next time,Trina

Land Line Now
Getting the message across on speed limiters

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 51:18


LLN (6/10/22) – Marty Ellis is talking about some creative ways to get the message across to the feds on speed limiters, and fielding complaints about a truck driving school that doesn't want to follow the new driver training rules. Also, OOIDA is already talking about Truckers for Troops, a fundraising effort to send care packages to troops overseas and help veterans here at home. A series of videos is being done leading up to Veterans Day. And thinking about your health may not be at the top of your mind, but the St Christopher Truckers Relief Fund is hoping to change that. The group is soon starting another Driving Down Diabetes program. 0:00 – Newscast. 09:55 – Honoring troops and veterans. 24:48 – Driving down diabetes. 39:21 – speed limiters, driver training.

Hot Topics The Podcast
Hot Topics Live #Podcast A US Veteran And A UK Veteran #Storytime

Hot Topics The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 94:09


What is it like being a veteran? Today for Veterans Day in the U.S. we get the perspectives of a male veteran from the UK and a female veteran from the US as we share our stories, comparing and contrasting experiences. I am joined by Gloria again! We will be talking to Simon our friend, and host of Taxi Chronicles UK and cohost of Podcasters Unleashed. Stay tuned until the end to find out what else Gloria and I have to celebrate today! Follow Hot Topics Live #Podcast on Instagram @hottopicsthepodcast and subscribe to the YouTube Channel, Hot Topics Live #Podcast. We appreciate your 5 star reviews on Apple Podcasts! You can watch the live podcast on Thursdays! Set your notifications to know when we are live. We live stream to Facebook and YouTube, and you can ask questions, comment and join the conversation. Catch up on all the episode videos on YouTube or on our Facebook page. ***Not all episodes are published in audio podcast format so be sure to check out YouTube or The Facebook page to see more episodes.

The Voice of Texas Veterans
Texas Women Veterans Day 2022

The Voice of Texas Veterans

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 12:48


Happy Women Veterans Day! TVC Chairwoman and Navy veteran, Laura Koerner has a few words to share, plus meet the veterans behind the Women Veterans Program here at Texas Veterans Commission. Visit the website to find out what TVC can do for you and make sure your veteran friends know all about us. Remember all our services are free! https://www.tvc.texas.gov/women-veterans/

Ohio Christian Alliance Podcast                           News in Focus
Statehouse Update with OCA President Chris Long and OCA Board Member Pastor Al Davis

Ohio Christian Alliance Podcast News in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 51:57


Statehouse Update with OCA President Chris Long and OCA Board Member Pastor Al Davis On this broadcast, we give you a Statehouse legislative update. We discuss Sacred Spaces, legislation that protects worship services in the State of Ohio. We discuss the Ohio Safe Act, H.B. 454, legislation that would ban hormone-blocking agents and would ban sex-change surgeries for underage children. The Primary Election date for Statehouse races has been set for August 4th, as the federal court has upheld the third version of the Redistricting Commission's maps for Ohio House and Ohio Senate.  Part 2 Special Memorial Day Program With an Update on the D-Day Prayer Project "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends." John 15:13 Armed Forces Day is for those who are actively serving and for reservists. May 21st Veterans Day is when we remember and honor those who served in the armed forces. November 11th Memorial Day is for those who gave their lives for the cause of Freedom. Last Monday of May (this year May 30th) In this special program, we honor those who paid the ultimate price for the cause of freedom. We also receive an update from Senator Rob Portman and Congressman Bill Johnson on the D-Day Prayer Project. Construction is to begin in July, with a dedication sometime in November, possibly Veterans Day. 

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act
I was high…on adrenaline

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 43:44


On Cadillac Jack – My Second Act, we figure out who exactly gets to keep those graduation banners at the front of everyone's neighborhoods. Can you go cut your kid's name off of it or is it more of a first come, first served situation. Donna needs to know. Pictures must be had and Nana is waiting. Caddy and Donna talk about the difference between Memorial and Veterans Day, and why people just don't get the difference. It seems to have gotten better in recent years, with people recognizing the solemn nature of Memorial Day, but its still not a time for fireworks and barbeques. Executive Producer Carl Appen joins the show to talk a little bit about Appen Media's public safety news coverage, and more specifically, to tell Donna how he can and cannot help her figure out what a bunch of kids were doing with a rope in the woods. Have you ever tried to donate something to Goodwill and they turned you down? Donna has. Multiple times. Find out what she tried to donate and what sneaky work around she tried to get the unwanted items out of the trunk of her car. How do you honor those who have lost their lives in defense of our country? We'd love to hear it. Text or call 770-464-6024.

Connect FM Podcasts
Kids in the Community - Levi Strong

Connect FM Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 2:01


A local boy and his mother spend each Veterans Day traveling around the area to give veterans a token of their appreciation for their service. Melissa Strong and her son, Levi, of DuBois, still had many stops left when they attended the Veterans Day ceremony in Reynoldsville Wednesday morning. She and Levi had a bag of United States pins that they had individually bagged with a photo that Strong had taken at an air show.

Made2nspire
Episode 84: Sacrifice and Success

Made2nspire

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 27:03


Sadly, a few years ago a Gallup poll was taken and only 28% of Americans knew the true meaning of Memorial Day. Most people got it confused with Veterans Day and a few just thought it marked the first weekend of summer. Memorial Day is an American holiday, observed on the last Monday of May, honoring the men and women who died while serving our country. Although the impact of this day is lost on most it is defiantly not confused by those who have suffered through the loss of a loved one who has died for our freedoms. So today we honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice and we honor their families and loved ones who were left behind to face life without them. We believe you do not have to directly experience something to inhale the full meaning and gravity of it. Furthermore, meaning can be changed just by the way we perceive something. As entrepreneurs, we hear all the time about the “sacrifices” it takes to run your own business. However, perhaps more important is not the sacrifice but the outcome of what we are choosing to sacrifice. For instance, giving up Netflix is less important than missing dinner every night with those that mean the most to you in this world. In this episode, you will discover: • The 3 things you need to consider when prioritizing and scheduling your time. • Why it's important not to continuously sacrifice the things that mean the most. • Success is in the steps not at the finish line. American author Brandon Sanderson wrote “Sometimes the prize is not worth the costs. The means by which we achieve victory are as important as the victory itself.” Thus, the word itself, “sacrifice” is not where the significance lies, that lies in the intention and the outcome. So take the time and really reflect on all the things you are sacrificing to run your business and ensure you are not missing out on the very things you started your business for in the first place. Finally, for those that have and those that continue to serve this county and fight for our freedoms, thank you, and today we honor those who did and did not get to return home to their families or those very freedoms they laid down their own life for. Join us this week as we really dive into sacrifice, success, and prioritization, so you can start taking action towards your dreams and future today. RESOURCES AND LINKS ON SHOW Canva Rocketbook Millions of Possibilities: Taking your Ideas from Inspiration to Monetization Made2BFit The Mentors Studio FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL! Instagram Facebook Twitter MADE2SNPIRE LINKS Dream-Slayer T-shirt link: https://made2nspire.omcheckout.com/dream-slayer-shirts Book link: https://www.millionsofpossibilitiesbook.com/ GET IN THE KNOW! ==> Subscribe to our Email List Rate, Review, & Subscribe on Apple Podcasts If you haven't done so already, subscribe to the podcast now. We will be adding a bunch of bonus episodes that you don't want to miss!! Subscribe now! and share this episode with your friends and family.

Mission: Employable
Episode 116 – Bridging the Gap

Mission: Employable

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 25:37


When Veterans prepare to transition out of the military, one of the first questions they ask themselves is usually, “What do I do now”? The Department of Defense Skill Bridge is here to help answer that question and Iowa businesses are already using the program to bring top-talent to Iowa.  We're joined by two military Veterans, as well as David Ottavianelli, Director of Strategic Projects and Labor Relations at John Deere, to tell us about a program that allows Veterans to get a head start on civilian employment before they leave the military.  

EOD podcast with Sin Supreme & Tania
EOD Podcast Episode 160 - Return to the Mainland

EOD podcast with Sin Supreme & Tania

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 103:40


The squad is back after an extending vacation. Kristen and Terrence recap their trip to Hawaii and share some of the experiences they had. Next, we talk new music and discuss their thoughts on the new Kendrick Lamar album. Later we talk about the new Balenciaga campaign and the Yeezy Gap release. We end out paying our respects to the Veterans and the families who lost their loved ones in the Robb Elementary shooting.

Change It Up Radio
171: A Reunion... 75 Years in the Making! with Jack Gutman and Jerry Ackerman on Change It Up Radio with Paula Shaw

Change It Up Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 42:04


In this episode of Change It Up Radio, we're talking about the reunion of two Navy Veterans who were best friends in World War II and had lost connection with one another for 75 years.   Today, we live in a world with social media, cell phones, and the internet, where it's very easy to reconnect with an old friend or check in with someone we may have lost contact with over the years. But, it wasn't always so easy, especially 75 years ago, for two Navy buddies that got separated and were left wondering what happened to their dear friend over the years.   My dad, Jack Gutman, and his best friend, Jerry Ackerman, met at Camp Pendleton in Oceanside, California during World War II, and were instant buddies who were both from New York and had a lot of things in common. They formed a club called "the 3 jays" with another friend, Joe Gagliardi, who had also become a part of their group. Unfortunately, they were all eventually reassigned. Jack and Jerry were assigned to the USS Cullman, a troop transport, and they lost contact with Joe. Jack ended up being transferred to another ship, and that was the end of a very beautiful friendship.   For 75 years, they wondered where the other was, how the other was, and if the other was even still alive. They both went about life, going to school, falling in love, and raising their families. Fast forward to 2022, Jack and Jerry, who are now both 96 years old, have finally been reunited, all thanks to Jerry's son, Peter, and a search on Google!   In this episode, they reminisce about fond old memories and their fast-growing friendship during World War II, share their individual stories about meeting their wives and building their families, and talk about their plans to meet again in person for the first time in over 7 decades!   Jack also shares how his friends Jerry and Joe were both incredibly helpful in his healing journey, even though he never said this to them back then, and he shares that being reunited with Jerry again has served as a form of closure to his post-traumatic stress that he had gone through for 66 years. This is a truly beautiful conversation that you do not want to miss!   To Learn More About the Show, Visit: www.ChangeItUpRadio.com

The Jedburgh Podcast
Jumping In with United War Veterans Council (The Jedburgh Podcast Short-Form Series)

The Jedburgh Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 33:58


The United War Veterans Council is the keeper of the New York City Veterans Day parade. Their lineage dates back to the Spanish American War of 1898. Today they are led by Veterans of modern conflicts, Executive Director Mark Otto and Chairman Nick Angione. Host Fran Racioppi had the privilege to serve as the UWVC Treasure and emcee of the parade in 2018 and 2019. Mark, Nick and Fran Jump In for a conversation on the parade, the history of UWVC, their careers as devil-dogs and what it means to continue to serve our veteran community through health and wellness programs. Learn more on The Jedburgh Podcast Website and check out our video YouTube versions of all episodes here.Highlights:-UWVC organizes and manages the Veteran's Day Parade in New York City; a tradition that dates back to the armistice of World War I. (3:00)-Mark and Nick share the history of the parade, how Vince McGowan saved it from failure and the size it has grown to today. (4:00)-Nick shares his career in the Marines. (5:58)-In addition to the parade, UWVC runs a Health and Wellness program designed to aid any Veteran in need through integrating them into a community of other Veterans. (7:58)-Mark shares his the incredible story of his birth to an American soldier father and Vietnamese mother during the Vietnam War Tet Offensive. (10:10) -Mark recounts his service during the Powell Doctrine days in some of history's most prominent conflicts: Panama, Grenada, Desert Storm and the Border Wars. (14:21)-Mark carried the American Flag for 1000 miles to raise money and bring awareness to Veteran mental health. (17:02) -Fran, Mark and Nick discuss why meaningful relationships are the core of community building. (19:10)-UWVC provides the much needed connection to others that many Veterans lost when they left service; including partnership with Jon Bon Jovi. (23:20)Quotes:-”It's the largest parade in the country that honors Veteran service.” (4:51-Mark)-”Though we didn't do things at the same time, we did a lot of the same things.” (6:29-Nick)-”Our commitment to service is not just about celebrating Veterans on Veterans Day. It being able to outreach to the most needing of Veterans.” (8:07-Nick)-”I am a war child. I was actually conceived in Vietnam.” (10:19-Mark)-”You also have a nickname though…you are Green Beret Burrito Guy.” (18:55-Mark)-”Everyone who's here…to help the team…is here because I asked them.” (20:54-Fran)-”They're just not used to someone saying ‘hey, thank you.'” (27:16-Nick)This episode is brought to you by Jersey Mike's, 18A Fitness, and Analytix Solutions.

Karen Hunter Show
Kenneth C. Davis - Historian

Karen Hunter Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 41:05


Memorial Day is a teaching opportunity. Kenneth C. Davis answers the questions below about what to know but perhaps never learned about Memorial Day: *What do the Civil War and slavery have to do with Memorial Day? *Who do we honor on Memorial Day and why is it different from Veterans Day? *Who owned the land that became Arlington Cemetery? *What did World War I have to do with establishing the national holiday? *When was the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier built? *What is the significance of the poppy as a Memorial Day symbol? *Why have some states marked different Memorial Days?

#GoRight with Peter Boykin

Memorial DayOn Memorial Day weekend I would like to share a quote from President Ronald Reagan that drives home the true sacrifice made by our soldiers killed in war..."It is, in a way, an odd thing to honor those who died in defense of our country, in defense of us, in wars far away. The imagination plays a trick. We see these soldiers in our mind as old and wise. We see them as something like the Founding Fathers, grave and gray-haired. But most of them were boys when they died, and they gave up two lives -- the one they were living and the one they would have lived. When they died, they gave up their chance to be husbands and fathers and grandfathers. They gave up their chance to be revered old men. They gave up everything for our country, for us... And all we can do is remember them."It never fails... I get chills every time I read it. Funny enough, this quote was from a 1985 Veterans Day speech. But this portion feels appropriate today.https://rumble.com/embed/v13vb1k/?pub=5rh65https://rumble.com/v16hgzc-memorial-day.htmlhttps://gorightnews.com/memorial-day/#GoRight with Peter BoykinGoRightNews.com#GoRightNews #Boykin4NC

Paying Attention
Will Changing the Gun Laws Stop the Killing?

Paying Attention

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 41:10


Today Tom is joined once again by one of his favorite guests, Lisa Williams from AFC Urgent Care. Talking about memorial day weekend, the shooting in Uvalde TX and Willie Lantigua running for state rep.   Can Estela Reyes win against Willie Lantigua? Why does the Republican party need to do a better job of marketing themselves? What's the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day? Are stricter gun laws really the answer to minimize mass shootings?   Follow Tom and The Valley Patriot on: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnmOQIeRxnrkI0iiH-ZEfYw Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ValleyPatriot Public Celebrity Page: https://www.facebook.com/tomdugganJr/?ref=page_internal Podbean: https://payingattention.podbean.com/     #LocalPolitics #TheValleyPatriot #MerrimackValley #UnitedPodcastNetwork #Studio21PodcastCafe   Follow Tom and The Valley Patriot on: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnmOQIeRxnrkI0iiH-ZEfYw Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ValleyPatriot Public Celebrity Page: https://www.facebook.com/tomdugganJr/?ref=page_internal Podbean: https://payingattention.podbean.com/   #LocalPolitics #TheValleyPatriot #MerrimackValley #UnitedPodcastNetwork #Studio21PodcastCafe

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
College Football Week 5 Preview Part 1 | The College Football Experience (Ep. 941)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 84:01


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network continues its 2022 college football season preview with their Week 5 edition. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD), Patty C (@PattyC831) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) break down all of the big 2022 college football games occurring during week 5. Plus the guys key in on Nick Saban's recent comments regarding college football parity, the new Pac 12 scheduling news and more. Will the Iowa Hawkeyes and Kirk Ferentz get revenge against the Michigan Wolverines when they visit Iowa City? Will Mike Leach make it two in a row against Jimbo Fisher and Texas A&M? Should Air Force and Navy play on Thanksgiving or Veterans Day every year? Will Rhett Lashlee and SMU grab a big AAC win in the Bounce House against UCF? Can Bryce Young and Alabama pick up a key road win against Sam Pittman and the Arkansas Razorbacks? Will Herm Edwards and Arizona State pull off the upset against Lincoln Riley and USC in Los Angeles? Will San Diego State and Brady Hoke grab a win on the smurf turf against Hank Bachmeier and Boise State? Will Spencer Sanders and Oklahoma State get revenge on Dave Aranda and the Baylor Bears in Waco? We talk it all and more on this 2022 preview edition of The College Football Experience. Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Sports Gambling Podcast Network
College Football Week 5 Preview Part 2 | The College Football Experience (Ep. 941)

Sports Gambling Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 65:13


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network continues its 2022 college football season preview with their Week 5 edition. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD), Patty C (@PattyC831) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) break down all of the big 2022 college football games occurring during week 5. Plus the guys key in on Nick Saban's recent comments regarding college football parity, the new Pac 12 scheduling news and more. Will the Iowa Hawkeyes and Kirk Ferentz get revenge against the Michigan Wolverines when they visit Iowa City? Will Mike Leach make it two in a row against Jimbo Fisher and Texas A&M? Should Air Force and Navy play on Thanksgiving or Veterans Day every year? Will Rhett Lashlee and SMU grab a big AAC win in the Bounce House against UCF? Can Bryce Young and Alabama pick up a key road win against Sam Pittman and the Arkansas Razorbacks? Will Herm Edwards and Arizona State pull off the upset against Lincoln Riley and USC in Los Angeles? Will San Diego State and Brady Hoke grab a win on the smurf turf against Hank Bachmeier and Boise State? Will Spencer Sanders and Oklahoma State get revenge on Dave Aranda and the Baylor Bears in Waco? We talk it all and more on this 2022 preview edition of The College Football Experience. Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The College Football Experience
College Football Week 5 Preview Part 2 (Ep. 941)

The College Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 65:13


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network continues its 2022 college football season preview with their Week 5 edition. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD), Patty C (@PattyC831) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) break down all of the big 2022 college football games occurring during week 5. Plus the guys key in on Nick Saban's recent comments regarding college football parity, the new Pac 12 scheduling news and more. Will the Iowa Hawkeyes and Kirk Ferentz get revenge against the Michigan Wolverines when they visit Iowa City? Will Mike Leach make it two in a row against Jimbo Fisher and Texas A&M? Should Air Force and Navy play on Thanksgiving or Veterans Day every year? Will Rhett Lashlee and SMU grab a big AAC win in the Bounce House against UCF? Can Bryce Young and Alabama pick up a key road win against Sam Pittman and the Arkansas Razorbacks? Will Herm Edwards and Arizona State pull off the upset against Lincoln Riley and USC in Los Angeles? Will San Diego State and Brady Hoke grab a win on the smurf turf against Hank Bachmeier and Boise State? Will Spencer Sanders and Oklahoma State get revenge on Dave Aranda and the Baylor Bears in Waco? We talk it all and more on this 2022 preview edition of The College Football Experience. Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The College Football Experience
College Football Week 5 Preview Part 1 (Ep. 941)

The College Football Experience

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 84:01


The College Football Experience (@TCEonSGPN) on the Sports Gambling Podcast Network continues its 2022 college football season preview with their Week 5 edition. Pick Dundee aka (@TheColbyD), Patty C (@PattyC831) & NC Nick (@NC_Nick) break down all of the big 2022 college football games occurring during week 5. Plus the guys key in on Nick Saban's recent comments regarding college football parity, the new Pac 12 scheduling news and more. Will the Iowa Hawkeyes and Kirk Ferentz get revenge against the Michigan Wolverines when they visit Iowa City? Will Mike Leach make it two in a row against Jimbo Fisher and Texas A&M? Should Air Force and Navy play on Thanksgiving or Veterans Day every year? Will Rhett Lashlee and SMU grab a big AAC win in the Bounce House against UCF? Can Bryce Young and Alabama pick up a key road win against Sam Pittman and the Arkansas Razorbacks? Will Herm Edwards and Arizona State pull off the upset against Lincoln Riley and USC in Los Angeles? Will San Diego State and Brady Hoke grab a win on the smurf turf against Hank Bachmeier and Boise State? Will Spencer Sanders and Oklahoma State get revenge on Dave Aranda and the Baylor Bears in Waco? We talk it all and more on this 2022 preview edition of The College Football Experience. Download The Free SGPN App - https://sgpn.app WynnBET - Bet $50 Get $200 In Free Bets - https://sg.pn/WynnBET Join Sleeper and get a 100% deposit bonus up to $100 - http://sleeper.com/sgp Support for this episode - AthleticGreens.com/SGP | IPVanish.com/sgp Follow The College Experience & SGPN On Social Media Twitter - https://twitter.com/TCEonSGPN Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/gamblingpodcast Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/sportsgamblingpodcast TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@gamblingpodcast Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/sportsgamblingpodcast   Follow The Hosts On Social Media Colby Dant - http://www.twitter.com/thecolbyd Patty C - https://twitter.com/PattyC831 NC Nick - https://twitter.com/NC__NicK   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Change It Up Radio
169: A Woman Warrior Saves Lives with Rayna Gangi on Change It Up Radio with Paula Shaw

Change It Up Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 41:03


In this episode of Change It Up Radio, Dr. Rayna Gangi joins me to talk about women in the military, navigating Veteran Affairs, veteran suicide prevention, and how we can all do more to honor veterans for their service.   My guest today, Dr. Rayna Gangi, trained as a radio communication engineer and was ready to be one of only a handful of Women Marines deployed to Vietnam. Two days before her embarkment, multiple vaccines paralyzed her from the waist down, and she spent the next several months in the hospital. Rayna fought her way back to mobility and was honorably discharged in 1971.   Through her personal experience, Rayna became more aware of other veterans with disabilities when she approached the VA after her disability had returned and she was no longer able to work. Her experience with the VA was not unlike many who have reached out for help, but the most impactful awareness was for the number of veteran suicides, and the numbers were staggering.   Rayna has since began counseling veterans suffering with PTSD pro bono. She has been focused on prevention and education so that others can help veterans and so veterans can be honored as they should be for their service.   Today, Rayna joins me to talk about the difficulties she faced as a woman navigating the military after enlisting in the U.S. Marines in 1968 during the height of the Vietnam War, sharing the way that she and other women were treated in comparison to their male counterparts. Rayna also shares her struggles with dealing with the VA for disability compensation, and her mission to help prevent and put an end to veteran suicide.   To Learn More About the Show, Visit: www.ChangeItUpRadio.com

Mission: Employable
Episode 110 – Making the Journey From Military Service to Business Owner

Mission: Employable

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 25:47


How do you go from serving your country to running your own business?  Our guests from Home Base Iowa, ISU Pappajohn Center for Entrepreneurship and the North Central Iowa Small Business Development Center (SBDC) share how Veterans and their family members can navigate the new mission of running a business. Find out how Iowa supports Veterans looking to start their own business as well as one avenue to business ownership that you might not have considered. 

The Voice of Texas Veterans
Join Us for the 2022 Women Veterans Day 5K

The Voice of Texas Veterans

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 9:59


Women Veterans Day is almost here! June 12 is the day. Women Veterans around the state have celebrations planned in their various communities. Everyone is invited to join Texas Veterans Commission at Camp Mabry in Austin on Saturday, June 4th for a Women's Veterans Day 5K. Walk, Run, Jog, Skip or Stroll. Bring the kids, the spouse, the friends and neighbors. Everyone is welcome! June 4th from 8:30-11:30 Register Here.

Learn Portuguese | PortuguesePod101.com
Portuguese Vocab Builder S1 #69 - Veterans Day in the United States

Learn Portuguese | PortuguesePod101.com

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 3:43


Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
News Minute: Juneteenth Approved in Marietta

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 1:02


After much controversy, Juneteenth and Veterans Day will now be paid holidays for Marietta city employees.  #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.             Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline            Register Here for your essential digital news.              Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.             This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group   For more information be sure to visit https://www.bgpodcastnetwork.com/ See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Minnesota Military Radio
Veterans Day on the Hill and Minnesota Department of Military Affairs

Minnesota Military Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022


This week we meet with the Minnesota Department of Military Affairs, check in with the executive director of the Disabled American Veterans, Department of Minnesota to learn about Veterans Day on the Hill and get an update from the Minneapolis … Continue reading → The post Veterans Day on the Hill and Minnesota Department of Military Affairs appeared first on Minnesota Military Radio.

WorkHARDAholicsTM Show
Ep 64: Tips to help the Veterans to become an Entrepreneur

WorkHARDAholicsTM Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 66:18


Happy Veteran's Day! Thank you for the bravery of our veterans.

Down the Wormhole
Time Part 4: When is Hanukkah?

Down the Wormhole

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 63:09


Episode 102 How do we mark the passage of time, and how do we encounter the divine within it? From Shabbat to the Eucharist, our religious rituals play with time in unexpected ways. Take some time with us and explore the many ways that you can create sacred time wherever and whenever you are.    Support this podcast on Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/DowntheWormholepodcast   More information at https://www.downthewormhole.com/   produced by Zack Jackson music by Zack Jackson and Barton Willis    Transcript  This transcript was automatically generated by www.otter.ai, and as such contains errors (especially when multiple people are talking). As the AI learns our voices, the transcripts will improve. We hope it is helpful even with the errors.   Zack Jackson 00:05 You are listening to the down the wormhole podcast exploring the strange and fascinating relationship between science and religion. This week our hosts are   Kendra Holt-Moore 00:15 Kendra Holt, more assistant professor of religion at Bethany college and my favorite TV show all time is Avatar The Last Airbender   Zack Jackson 00:25 Zack Jackson, UCC pastor and Reading Pennsylvania and my favorite TV show of all time is Dr. Joe   Ian Binns 00:31 Ian Binns Associate Professor of elementary science education at UNC Charlotte. And I got a lot of TV shows that kept popping up, but the one that just keeps coming to mind right now, I would say is probably Ted LA. So   Rachael Jackson 00:45 Rachel Jackson, Rabbi Agoudas, Israel, congregation Hendersonville, North Carolina and favorite TV show of all time is the Big Bang Theory. Yeah, that's a good one is a good one. And this question is sort of a, you know, a little bit of an in and an intro to what we're talking about today, because it's our favorite TV show of all time. And that's what we're going to be talking about today. Thanks, like,   Zack Jackson 01:15 I segue. I like that even smoother.   Rachael Jackson 01:23 So we are talking about time. And unlike the the last two episodes, where we actually I think at this point, we'll have three episodes where we've talked about time, I wanted to talk about more of a corporeal human time and the experience and really just add the Jewish lens to this. We are saying before we really started recording that. Wow, I love being Jewish, and I have no problems talking about it and sharing it. I don't use that and present that as the lens. But that's really where my focus is going to be today. Because that's how I really understand time and its meaning. And so I'm going to give several examples of what that's going to look like. But I want to start with sort of a poetic read. This comes from reformed judaism.org. They have a blog series, and this comes from almost 10 years ago, but time doesn't matter. And words like this, get held thanks to social media and the internet. We can listen to them 10 years from now or 10 years from when it was written till now. So, but just giving it a little bit of a frame, this was written by Stacy's does Robinson, Zoho Nam live Aha. So she died. Not too not too long ago, and she died of COVID, unfortunately. But she's an incredible author and incredible poet. And so this is what she tells us. When my son was born, I cradled him against my heart, arms wrapped to gently get surely around his small and fragile body, I would stand holding him. Our breaths mingles our hearts beating in an elegant call and response, one beat to the next. And I would sway a slow and gentle side to side rock that lasted for the eternity, that exists between heartbeats, I could feel his body relax into the motion, like oceans, like drifting, like peace, above the simplicity of that rhythm, the warmth of him the smell of his newness and his infinite possibilities. As he drifted as he gem told my own body would react in kind, and I followed him, these moments became our own Fibonacci sequence, the delicate curve of our bodies in motion at rest, in motion again, twined in an eternal spiral, more intimate than a lover's kiss repeated again and again. And again. There's so much time that passes. Now, this is me, that is the end of what I'm going to share of hers for now at least verbatim. But I'll reference a little bit that too. There's so much time that passes in a heartbeat. If you ask someone, how long does this take? There cannot possibly be a single answer. It depends. But what were you how are you getting there? How old were you? How long has COVID lasted Technically speaking, technically, I can remember March of 2020. March 9, we did Perot, I, this is how I'm wound in Jewish time right now. So we did Param. And we had these Inklings. And there was something happening to the west to the east of us and something in a different country. And we weren't quite sure what was happening. And we did Param. And then we didn't come back to the sanctuary for 15 months, but in open the building for 15 months. And that's still been, that was still nine months ago. And here we are. My son, seven years old, finally got vaccinated in December. And there's still people here on this podcast and here who are listening, whose children have not yet been able to be vaccinated. So how long is this pandemic is still going on param for us is in three weeks. We'll be back in our sanctuary together. And we'll be wearing our masks, because that's what perm is about wearing masks. The problem is we'll be wearing two masks, the ones over our nose in our mouth and the one over our eyes, the ones that is a custom and the one that is for protection. So how long is COVID My son was in kindergarten when he got sent home. And he was at home in first grade. And he did virtual in second grade. And when I went and saw him this morning for STEM week show Intel he was in his classroom, five feet away from all the other students still wearing his mask, just like they all did. Not having any playdates. Because it's COVID. So how long is COVID for him? His whole life. He doesn't know times before COVID existed. That wasn't part of his memory. How long is COVID for me? A very, very long time. But something that I can see a life before and a life after. Because time, while quantifiable is meaningless. If we only use a clock, we have to use a relative understanding of time and how we relate to it. And in Judaism, it's I find it so beautiful. That we create time. So let me ask you, the three of you. When is Hanukkah   Ian Binns 07:49 right before Christmas.   Rachael Jackson 07:51 Right before Christmas.   Ian Binns 07:55 The winter season?   Rachael Jackson 07:57 Winter season.   Ian Binns 07:59 Typically when What's the date?   Kendra Holt-Moore 08:02 Is this a trick question?   Zack Jackson 08:03 No. It's never the same day all the time. What if we lived every day like it was   Rachael Jackson 08:15 a miracle. Clean up your stuff, rededicate yourself to your people and your God   Zack Jackson 08:22 and slaughter some solutions and   Rachael Jackson 08:25 don't forget to pick up the pig guts. Like that's just messy. Could we not? That's right. Yeah. So what is Hanukkah?   Ian Binns 08:33 December actual real   Rachael Jackson 08:35 true. When   Zack Jackson 08:36 I mean, it's different every year, right? It's the lunar calendar.   Rachael Jackson 08:40 The 25th of Kislev. You're giving me What's this? 25th of Kislev? Ah, that's the same every year the 25th of Kislev. It doesn't change. I know exactly when it is. But   Zack Jackson 08:54 does it change according it only changes from my perspective,   Rachael Jackson 08:57 right? It only changes from our calendar because the majority of our calendar is the Gregorian calendar, not the Jewish calendar. So when is Hanukkah in December, ish this last year, it was in November this coming year, it's going to overlap with Christmas and if we thought it was bad last year where there was nothing Hanukkah, nothing's gonna happen this year because Christmas will win out. There will be not even inkling of Hanukkah wrapping paper. That is what it is. Yeah. So when is it? Well, it depends whose perspective you're asking. And it depends how excited you are. I don't really care that much about Hanukkah. It's kind of a tiny little nothing holiday I only get excited because I have a child. We have the same question of when is Passover? When is Purim when is Rosh Hashanah, I have an exact date for when those things are. But that's not how I live my life. When is Shabbat? The Israeli calendar is marvelous. I love it. So Jews are terrible at naming things like absolutely terrible. Imagine if all of our holidays in America were named similar to July 4. Like if you didn't know, and you came into America and everyone's like, Whoa, it's July 4. And you have no idea what that means. It is just a date on the calendar. Right? It doesn't tell you Oh, it's independence day. It's Memorial Day. It's Veterans Day. It's Presidents Day. You know what the day is? Almost all of the Jewish holidays are to Shabbat of the ninth of have to have the 15th of have to be Shabbat, the 15th of the month of Shabbat like this is not helpful. Except for some biblical holidays. Where, you know, Rosh Hashanah isn't actually called Rosh Hashanah. Yom true on the day of the sounding it's the day you get to go make noise with the kazoo marvelous. So when we name the days of the week, we don't use Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, right? Those are Greek and Roman gods. Those are not the days of the week. It's yom, Yom Sheni, Yom slushy, Yom obra, day one, day two, day three, day four, day five, day six and Shabbat. We don't say Yom seven, we don't say the seventh day we say Shabbat. It is different in and of itself. Because our frame of reference is not that it's Saturday, our frame of reference is that this day is completely set apart from all other days. When we look on our calendars as Americans, we look on the calendar and go okay, Monday through Friday, those days are particular and then oh, Saturday, Sunday. That's what we're gearing for. we frame our mind differently because of our response to time. One other sort of piece that I want to add for how we then mix time, so I've only been talking about my time, right? I, in this day and age, I'm looking forward to you know, this next upcoming poram Or this upcoming PESA or this upcoming Shabbat, right like we're recording this on a Friday, and I'm going home, oh boy. I have to lead services and five hours and I haven't written my sermon. Oh, boy. Right. That's so exciting. So how do I? How do I understand that time, like not just freaking out that it's five hours from now, and I haven't finished my sermon or started it. Tell people. But when I think about Passover, which is the story of the Jews leaving Exodus, or leaving Egypt in the Exodus, and we can talk in chat, we can check on chat on our Facebook groups about how literal we might take that. Right, we can that's not the conversation that we're gonna have at this moment, though, did did the Exodus actually happen? So that's not going to be part of my conversation. But there is the question of not the question. I shouldn't frame it that way. When we celebrate Passover and commemorate the Exodus, there are four children. The wise child's this simple child's, the child's who is so simple, they do not even know how to ask, and then the wicked child. Okay. So if the why the y's child says, Tell me all about this and what is the purpose of these greens? And what is the purpose of this and ask all these questions? What do you think the wicked child is? Non rhetorical? There's no wrong answers.   Zack Jackson 14:32 I feel like there's a few wrong it's   Rachael Jackson 14:35 a right answer, but there's no wrong answers.   Zack Jackson 14:37 Okay, cuz I'm thinking an Egyptian child would be pretty bad. But that's probably not the answer here.   Kendra Holt-Moore 14:45 Kendra, ah, I'm trying to remember because I've been to   Rachael Jackson 14:50 a few. Save right because you've been to a few supreme   Kendra Holt-Moore 14:53 Yeah. And the wicked child when we go around the table. There's always like handful of people that are like, I think I'm the wicked child. So, I'm trying to remember because I think there's a couple that I get confused, but isn't the way your child, the one who, like asks too many questions or just is like a little bit. Like, out of the status quo of how they, like, think and problem solve. And so they're more disruptive, which is not, you know, I mean, it's like the wicked child, but in different contexts. It's not necessarily about like being good or bad. It's just different.   Rachael Jackson 15:31 Okay? It's kind of you're kind of mixing several of them in together. I, there's   Kendra Holt-Moore 15:35 two that I'm always like. So the   Rachael Jackson 15:37 wise one is the one who's always asking the questions. This is what we want, right? Yay. Asking questions. The wicked one asks, but a single question. And he says, What does this have to do with me?   Zack Jackson 15:54 Huh? Okay.   Rachael Jackson 15:57 Yeah. Whoa. And when we read the text, when we go through the Haggadah, and we we read, we asked, we say my father was a wandering Aramean. Okay, spoiler alert. My dad wasn't my dad was born in Australia. Like, he was not a wandering Aramean. But we say it in the present tense. God took me out of Egypt with an outstretched hand, bah, bah, bah, bah, bah, right? I was there. I wasn't, I was there. I am there. I am going through this. And when we sing the same song, who is like you, Oh, mighty when Myka mocha by alien. I don't know who is like you're among the gods who? Who was this? Who took me out of this place? Who is taking me through redemption? Not going through the theology piece here today, just looking at time. Well, that exists in the Bible that exists in the Torah. That was theoretically, you know, 3300 years ago, I wasn't there. I'm only 41. But I was there. This is my story. This is my understanding of how time works, that it's now so even though it happened at one point, I was there and I am now and it is now. So that there's a meshing of while I might be looking at particular days in particular ways as how am I going to write my sermon? And when am I going to have for dinner? And who am I going to dress up as for Purim? Right. Am I going to be varsity this year? Or am I going to be I'm always a good character, by the way, always. I'm never the evil one.   Ian Binns 17:48 I think that's fitting.   Rachael Jackson 17:49 Thank you. I think so. Yeah.   Ian Binns 17:52 No, I thought him were here. He was he Yeah,   Rachael Jackson 17:54 he'd be Haman. Okay. Yeah, without a doubt he'd be or he'd be the guys. That's moto. Hi, spies. eavesdrops, on, where he's kind of there. But he's not really there. But he's totally a bystander. Now, I love Adam. He's much more of an upstander than any of those characters. He's just, he's easy to pick on. So time is not just what am I doing? It's about how do I go back and forth. And so my final thing, as I'm just like rambling at all, is, I understand time, Jewish type specifically, and my my life living a Jewish life as a slinky. So imagine your slinky, and I hope you've had the chance to play with a slinky recently because they're awesome. And it's closed. So imagine a closed slinky. And you're at the very start, and just go down one rung, it doesn't feel like anything has changed. It's the same time as last year, you're the same person that you were last year, not a whole lot. It's been different. But now imagine you're a slinky on a stair, and how far the distance is between one rung and the next rung. When it's opened like that. It's so much different, but it's the same time. So it allows us to come back together and allows us to check in with ourselves and say, Okay, I've been here before, but I'm completely different, or I'm not so different. It just asked us questions. So that's my sort of brief, very long sort of Drush on what time looks like and how we understand it quarterly.   Kendra Holt-Moore 19:56 The, the thing that I I keep thinking of As you're talking about, I mean, it wasn't really like the central piece of what you're saying, but totally like thinking about time in Judaism. I'm blanking on the name of the, the, the book or like the essay that Abraham Joshua Heschel wrote about, like time was like the, the tabernacle of time, where like in Judaism, what is you can think of architecture as marking something off that is holy, in like, if you go to like a cathedral, like a Catholic Cathedral or something, there's way of using materiality to mark off space as designated, like holy locations. But I Abraham Joshua Heschel published a collection of like essays talking about how in Judaism, we have these really beautiful examples of, you know, not not so much like architecture, marking off holy space, but Shabbat as like a marker of holy time. And it's like, you know, he's like, using the metaphor of, like, the tabernacle of time, I think, is what he calls it. And so that's what I kept thinking about, because it's such a, like, the, the rhythm of Shabbat, being, you know, it's not just this, you know, it's more than just like something you take for granted, every week as a celebration, or like a time of rest. But Hashem just talks about it in this really beautiful way as being, like a marker to orient you to time itself as this special, special thing that is, it's, it's part of our rhythm of, you know, our bodies and our communities and our calendars. And I just love that metaphor of like, a tabernacle of time, in addition to or as a different thing from, like, a tabernacle in space.   Rachael Jackson 22:11 I so glad that you brought that up. So I think the essays that you're referring to are contained in a book called The Sabbath.   Kendra Holt-Moore 22:20 Yeah, yeah.   Rachael Jackson 22:22 It's straightforward, straightforward. Again, we don't really, you know, mince our title is very much. You want to talk about time, the Sabbath. So one of the things that Heschel talks about and is actually in pretty much all Jewish books that talk about the tabernacle, or let's just use English, the sanctuary, a church, a synagogue, the place that you go, it doesn't matter. And that's, I know, we talked a little bit about this a year ago, maybe two years ago, when we're really talking about COVID. And not being in our spaces, and how that really isn't as challenging for Jews, as it is for other cultures and other religions. Because while we like our space, we don't define holiness, by the space our holiness is divided is defined solely by time, which means it can happen anywhere, it can be in the wilderness, it can be with ice cream, it can be with your child's it can be in a sanctuary, it can literally be anywhere. And that sacredness of time as opposed to sacredness of place is something you know that I love about Judaism, I'm not gonna say it doesn't exist in other religions a because I don't know all other religions be because I think that's a little too narcissistic, as, as a culture to say that we're the only ones to do it. But it does feel that it really doesn't matter where we are. It's about when we are so much so. I'm gonna poke fun of us for just a second. There are these rules that you there are things you can't do on Shabbat, right? Like you can't turn on light switches and you can't create a fire and you can't drive and you can't cook and you can't ride an elevator and I could keep going on and on about the sorry juice. Some of the extremely ridiculous things that we do in the name of Jewish law haha. But one of them that's been around for a long time is fire because we've had fire for a very long time. And so we're not supposed to light the Shabbat lights like fire is not fire is prohibited. You can't do that on Shabbat. But you have to light Shabbat candles. So how do you do that? Like how do you light Shabbat candles on Shabbat? We fool ourselves. We fool ourselves. It's beautiful. So what we do is we strike the match. We light the lights, we then cover our eyes, say the blessing. Open our eyes and go, Oh, look at that. candles are lit and now it's Shabbat. It's amazing.   Zack Jackson 25:26 Whatever. Right? Okay, so   Rachael Jackson 25:30 if you ever see somebody, right, I'm sure when you've seen Fiddler on the Roof, there's two sections when they're doing the Sabbath prayer, right? May the Lord protect and defend you that whole thing? Seriously, nothing. I'm looking at the three of you, and there's no recognition there. It's amazing. Well, but   Zack Jackson 25:49 it's been a long time ago. Sorry.   Rachael Jackson 25:52 Oh, Kendra, that's your homework. That is your homework. So anyway, so she's their blessing their family, and they like, do this whole, like waving the candle flames, and then they cover their eyes, and they say this beautiful blessing. It's because we're fooling ourselves of when that happened. Which leads me to sort of another question for you all, if we're looking at what time is, who decides? Who decides? So let's use a Shabbat as an example. In modern America, secular America, most Jews are not politically religious, in the sense of okay, Shabbat is when the sun goes down, and I have to be home and I'm not doing like etc, etc. Most Jews in America are not that way. And so, when is Shabbat at our particular synagogue, right now, we're having services at 530 on Friday night. And in three weeks, when we go through a time change, it's still going to be bright outside when we leave, and we're done with our service. Right? So we then have to say, well, when is Shabbat? So when is something actually happening? When we say it's happening? When we engage in activity? When the culture says it's happening, like when is or if we take also the majority of Jews. Question seven already, many Jews? Never. They don't observe Shabbat. So is Shabbat Shabbat because we observe it is or is it just a Saturday? So I'd ask the same question Quantum. Yeah. So I'm asking that question, again, using Shabbat as the example or the Sabbath as the example. But for anything, is it your birthday? Right? Again, we're all adults here. My birthday is technically March 2, because that's the day that I was born. I have four meetings on March 2, and it's a Wednesday. I'm celebrating my birthday on March 1. So when is my birthday? When should somebody say to me happy birthday, when do I open my cards   Ian Binns 28:17 all of March. That's what I do. Like my, my birthday is on April 3, and this year, it's a it's a Sunday, so I'm good. But even like when my birthday is on the day that I have class. Oh, I tell my students, I let them know what y'all know. It's my birthday. Just Just saying. The class goes.   Zack Jackson 28:46 So at the time of recording, and this obviously is going to go out in a couple of weeks. There's something similar going around in Christian circles. You may have seen in your Facebook feeds, that this one priest had been baptizing children incorrectly. One word wrong. He had, instead of saying, I now baptize you in the name of the Father, the Son of the Holy Spirit, he had been saying, we now baptize you, in the name of the Father, the Son of the Holy Spirit. We instead of I, we instead of I. And through a number of higher ups, having councils and discussing whether or not this actually changed the intent of the baptism itself, they decided that enough had been changed in the intent behind that word change that invalidated every baptism he had done for 20 years. Because the congregation present does not do the baptism. So their affirmation of it is irrelevant. Of course, according to the Catholic theology, God is the one that does the act, the actual, like sanctifying grace disposing act on dispensing not just those. No disposing of children, please. We go into that theology and the priest is the conduit by which that happens. And so the I in that sentence is the priest speaking through God. And so by saying, We, then you're just, it muddies the waters a little bit, and the priest has resigned and he has offered to re baptize anyone who's feels that their baptism is no longer valid, because technically, it's not valid anymore. And in all of the circles that I run in, between all Protestant circles, we were all people who were like, hey, nothing magical happens here. Our act of baptism is that it is not something that is happening in that moment. Nothing changes about that person in that moment. What is happening is it is a an A outward affirmation of an inward and invisible reality that a child is born. Beloved, already, a child is born already a part of the family of God, a child is born already having been awash in God's grace, and mercy and goodness. And the act of baptism is an act in which the community gathers together to affirm that truth that already existed time immemorial. And so whether that child is baptized on the day they're born, or when they're 99 years old, whether it is done using the right magic words, or some other totally different vernacular a bad thing? This is a good thing for me. I made something of the way goes, giant. I can't wait to see you're trying to Okay. Could you hear it? I want to   Ian Binns 31:59 see his giant castle.   Kendra Holt-Moore 32:00 Did he say the banjo is not a bad thing. It's a good thing.   Zack Jackson 32:04 He says this is not a bad emergency. This is a good emergency. I made a giant Castle that's important. And I'll be up in a few minutes to come see it. Okay,   Kendra Holt-Moore 32:14 got to work on your definition of emergency.   Zack Jackson 32:19 Timing. I say one thing and that's when he descends into the basement and comes and plays the banjo in the back of this little studio.   Rachael Jackson 32:28 And you were done such a   Zack Jackson 32:29 train of thought was? Well. So you know, it's almost ironic, though, that my child were to come in here when talking about during the time in which I'm talking about in which God has granted God's blessing on to children before they were born. And before they had a chance to identify it, or have it be given to them from an exterior source because, man oh man, we need to be reminded of that sometimes when you are in the middle of something like recording a podcast and your four year old decides to play a banjo in the room you're recording it in, because that child has already been a Washington grace and goodness and forgiveness. And I too, have been a Washington that very same spirit and me to learn how to honor and forgive and appreciate the toddler's giant Lego Castle he wants me to see. But the point being in their theology, there was a particular moment in which Grace was dispensed in a special way from God on to that child, it can happen one time, you cannot be baptized again. In fact, they they murdered quite a bit of Anabaptists in the Reformation because of that, there's one time only that it can be done. And when you believe that there's one time only that this can be done then there's a whole lot of now stricter rules that have   Ian Binns 33:59 to come with it. And the ramifications for this like I saw the headline and read a little bit about the situation with this you know the Catholic priests making an error with the use of the word we instead of I and you know I didn't spend too much time Reading an article about it but it just seemed like that there was there's some speculation I guess that this could have bigger impacts depending on how the whoever the powers that be decided on the rules, right? Like um, like, if you're not baptized, considered baptized, can you get married in the church? The Catholic Church are there certain rules that you cannot like you have to be baptized Catholic will do certain things in Catholic churches I thought or something along   Zack Jackson 34:48 not to be married. No, at least one of you has to be Catholic but you can be baptized Protestant and still be married in a Catholic church as long as one of the other ones Catholic you can take promise to raise your children me Catholic You can't take communion? No. Okay. But if you promised to raise your child as a Catholic, then they will let you be married in a church.   Ian Binns 35:08 Yeah. But anyway, I just remember seeing that and just being amazed by it.   Rachael Jackson 35:13 Right. And I appreciate that you brought that that piece in Zach, because it's really talking about when does something happen? Right, when? Yeah, when does it happen? And there are a few, there are a few moments in life that give us those very definite, this is when it happened. When are you born? Well, let's, let's just go with the medical piece there. When you exit the womb, right, that's, that's when you're born   Zack Jackson 35:48 when. But when the head exits? Well, because some children   Rachael Jackson 35:51 are not born head first. Right? So, you know, but when someone puts on their birth certificate, What time were you born? Right? It's when you scream. Right? That's what time you're born when you scream. So your heads got to be out whether or not that was first or not. But you have to scream. And that's when you're born. Now modern medicine that feels modern medicine   Zack Jackson 36:16 when you are first alive.   Rachael Jackson 36:19 Yeah, that all happens within a minute, right? Even with even with babies or especially with babies that are not born headfirst. Right? They're just out.   Zack Jackson 36:28 Rachel, I have a question for you about religious time. So as we're as we're talking, I'm remembering a concept. From I think I'd first read it in something written by Mircea Eliade, I'm sure I'm butchering the pronunciation of his name, about the importance of an axis mundi in religion, the center of the world, as it were, and that in the same older Israelite religions, that was the temple on mountain Zion, that was the, the place that connected the underworld with the heavens, that, that sort of central location to the world and every religion has that, right. That's, that's Mount Olympus, that's, you know, all the holy mountains, usually in the ancient world. And then the temples gone in 70 ad, and people are scattered, both Christian and Jewish people scattered to the winds. And the Christians later do find other centers at that point right in Rome especially becomes our center forever, and what becomes the Vatican and all of that the Jews don't get a center for arguably, even now don't really have a center, at least religiously. Christians seem to have then gone back to their being physical spaces, physical centers, as opposed to the temporal centers. As but what from what I hear you talking about? The Sabbath kind of becomes the temple. It does that does that track with kind of the the history of the development of the two religions?   Rachael Jackson 38:26 I think so. And you're, I think from a point of interest you very much like second temple times, right? That's that's where that's where you thrive? First, yes, yes. Like you, like that's just sort of you, you really gravitate toward that time period. That is my least favorite time period in Judaism.   Ian Binns 38:49 Why? And remind myself and those of us who are not familiar with the time frame, your calendar time frame, yearly time frame, what   Rachael Jackson 39:01 Thank you. First Temple first Temple was destroyed 586 BCE. The Jews were then allowed to come back 60 years later reconstruction it reconstructed the tempo plus or minus 520 BCE. It was then destroyed 70 C. And so second temple is considered, you know, 520 BCE to 70. C, by the way, I'm using C as common era or Before Common Era, Zack used ad, which translates to a year of our Lord, which is pretty common, or BC, you know, typically understood as before Christ. And so, for those that do not use Christ as a center point in time, but we still need to communicate that this is the year 2022. We just have communicated as BCE and see.   Zack Jackson 39:57 It also is a little problematic that Jesus was likely born between three or four BC, so Jesus was born before   Ian Binns 40:04 I use, but   Rachael Jackson 40:05 that makes a lot of sense. You know, I was born before I became something too, so.   Zack Jackson 40:10 So why don't you like that period of time.   Rachael Jackson 40:13 Um, so just generally speaking, I find that there's just, it's uncomfortable for me, because it feels very inviting. And that's to reminiscent of today. As far as Jews are concerned, I think that there's a lot of us and them within the Jewish world nowadays, just like, and I see that as an us and them when we look at Second Temple times. It's great Hanukkah started as a Jewish civil war. And I just don't, I don't like that. It just, it just makes me too sad. Frankly. That's why I don't like it. It makes me too sad. The   Ian Binns 40:48 split with the northern kingdom,   Rachael Jackson 40:50 the what split? Oh, that was. So the United Kingdom. Again, if we look at this, from a literal standpoint, the United Kingdom was 1000 BCE. And it was only united for three kings. So really not very long. And then the 10 tribes were theoretically lost, also known as probably the leaders got taken away and they got split up because, you know, bigger, better competitors came along, and that was 722 BC. Yeah, very, very different time period   Zack Jackson 41:27 of sort of civil wars, totally different. There's the influence of the Greeks after Alexander comes through which there's a whole Hellenized wing aspect of, of that region, and then you've got the Jews and Alexandria and the Jews and Babylon and the Jews in Judea, not to mention the Samaritans and the rise of Pharisees, Sadducees, Essenes zealots, a whole Christians, the whole gamut of splintering, and it's very traumatic, which might be why I like it.   Rachael Jackson 41:58 And that's why I don't Yeah, it's too much. It's like, are you reform or conservative? Well, I'm Reconstructionist. And I'm humanistic. And I'm Orthodox, but modern Orthodox, but open Orthodox, but just regular Orthodox, just ultra orthodox, and you're not even Jewish to me. And it's just, it's just to   Ian Binns 42:15 all connected to this god.   Rachael Jackson 42:20 Right. So it's just talking to somebody theoretically, I was just talking to somebody about you know, the prayer, the Shema, which comes from Deuteronomy, here, O Israel, the Lord is God, the Lord is One, etc. I like it better in the Hebrew, right Shema Yisrael, Adonai Eloheinu, Adonai. God. I said, Well, kind of person who's not Jewish say that. So Well, sure. Right. It's, it's in the Bible. Lots of people say it. It's just sort of what your intent is. So what does it mean for God? I said, well, it it's a statement of if you believe in up to one god up to one god yeah, so yes, and Ian. But to go back to Zacks to go back to Zags, a whole point of where and when, and does that track? Yes, I think that totally tracks for it's not a when, and frankly, let's look at Judaism from the scriptures itself. Were like where, where was Judaism in the Torah? Nowhere, which means everywhere. So the Torah was given in the wilderness, the Torah wasn't given in Jerusalem, the Torah was given in Israel, the Torah was given in the wilderness, they were just wandering. They didn't know who or where they were. And that's when we get the tour. That's quite literally what's happening in this week's post shocky Tisa, like this week, we're Reading about when Moses goes up onto the mountain and God's like, Here have some stones that I carved and Moses is like, sweet, and then God's like, he should go back down there because they made an idol out of gold, and it turned into a calf and perhaps you should control that better. And Moses comes down and she's like, Are you kidding me? And pearls, the tablets and all that stuff? Like that's literally what we're Reading this week. So now y'all at home can check when we recorded this. So there is no place in Judaism. It's all about time. And in this exact same portion, it talks about the Sabbath. Like this is what you should do. And let me just also clarify one other piece when I'm talking about Sabbath and we talk about rest. We're not resting because oh my god, the other six days are so hard. That's Saturday. I that's what a Saturday is. It's a whole boy, I had so many meetings and so many emails and these kids are driving me nuts. Like, I just need a day like that Saturday, that's a day of rest. Mazel Tov, we all 100% need that Shabbat is, I am not resting to recover or prepare for I am resting simply to acknowledge that I exist now in this time, not for what I was or what I will be for right now. That's why Jews also still need a two day week right? We still are Americans. We still need a Sunday. We need a day that does not do. Right. That's our Sunday but that's not Shabbat. Shabbat rest is not weekend rest. It's a it's a complete wholeness of right now. And being connected to the text that was 3000 years ago and 3000 years from now. But really, it's just this moment. And we don't, we don't need a place for that. So our centrality? Yeah, wherever you want to be. Which is why a shout out to Rabbi Jaime Korngold who was the rabbi who had my did my bat mitzvah with her. She's the adventurer, Rabbi, I've talked about her a couple of times, right? She has Shabbat on the ski slopes, right? Shabbat on the slopes, they keep talking about mountains, Zach, great, go skiing and then have a Shabbat together. Right 15 minutes and the Shema say a few other prayers and go back skin. That's amazing. It was good enough for Israelite ancestors is good enough for us.   Ian Binns 47:10 One, so some of the readings you sent. Yeah, it makes me like I want to get the whole book. First of all, you know, like, the rejoice in your festivals, the Jewish year, sacred time in the Jewish calendar, just Reading some of that, but you know, the whole it is the when and not aware of prayer that counts the most in Judaism. Judaism is a religion. Indeed, the first religion and by and large the only religion that sanctifies time over space. And I just, I just find that really interesting. So it's not it's not the where you do it. It's the the time that you stopped to pray, is that right?   Rachael Jackson 47:59 It's not even stopping to pray, necessarily. It's a time of connection, whether that's connection. And so this is why I say up to one God, because when you pray, there's this idea that you're praying to God. Right? That's a very Christian.   Ian Binns 48:17 Yeah, please. So I guess what, I just keep thinking back to the, what we continue to find ourselves in with this pandemic. Right, and how, you know, we, you know, the whole world obviously went, has gone through time periods, some still going through it, and around the world have not been able to do like, go into places of worship, they want to people, you know, places around the world where people don't worship at all, they have no faith at all, in any kind of deity that we consider. Right? But that they're still limited on where they can go. How about that. So places, you know, that's still occurring around the world, and in some spaces in the US as well. And so, you know, but I remember when this first started, you know, and, and everything happened and people initially came together when everything was shut down. But then finally, it was, especially in our state, Rachel, in North Carolina, the you cannot shut down our churches, you cannot shut down our churches, like if we cannot be in our church, then we are not able to worship and I did not instill do not hold to that view. You know, I? Yes, when I go into the sanctuary of our church, it is a very, it has a very profound and powerful impact on me. It becomes very inspirational. I mean, there are many times where I start I'll take my phone out, start writing notes, and just things because it just inspires me every time I'm there, because I feel that connection, right. But I was I still felt to me it was like, I think especially with me, as one of the The lay leaders of the church of trying to help, you know, offer up worships at worship service every week on faith on Facebook for almost a year. I took it as like, almost like a, not a test of my faith, but as they making sure I understand, at least to me, the true meaning of all this and the faith is that it's not necessarily in that building. That's, that's not where it should occur for me. Right? It needs to be within me my time I, wherever I am. Right? It does not matter, I guess. And so that's why Reading that just really has such a profound impact on me, because it's just like, to me that's beautiful, of recognizing that it's more than the bricks and mortar that we find ourselves in. That should be bigger than that. Right? And that's, again, goes back to the whole limiting thing, I think back to our first episode in this miniseries on time, and we talked about how do we think of God? And how if we think of God as within the human concept of time, how that limits the power of God. And, you know, what God can or cannot do, is greatly limited by our our understanding of how time flows, right? Or at least the way we think about it, I think   Rachael Jackson 51:16 our connection? Yeah, and I think our connection, not again, I'm trying to keep this, I love that you keep bringing it back to God, I'm like, Nah, leave God out of the conversation. Bringing it back to community, and culture and connection, that it's not, right. I think the building can be beautiful. And I think that there can be holiness in the building. But were for those of us that may not have an interventionalist God concept. What was missing is that we weren't next to pitfalls, that the issue wasn't, Oh, I missed seeing the BMR. And then there to me, the eternal light, and I missed being physically in the presence of the Taurus. It was that I didn't hear the other people singing. I didn't, I didn't watch their faces as they prayed and cried, and that was hugged.   Ian Binns 52:11 And, yeah, that was a struggle for me with the way we did the Facebook worship, and the way Facebook Live works. Because I cannot see the people, right, you don't see the other people, but then also to one of the struggles that I dealt with. And again, it wasn't the space, it was that, as you said, a community of being together and worshiping as one, right. And so I started really struggling when people would, when it was just me and one other person live, knowing that, you know, people would then tell me, but even you so many people watch the video later, you know, and they take time later, which is something to be appreciative of, but at the same time to it, it was like, right, but I don't feel that community. Like, and there was a it wasn't just about offering it to other people it was also offering it's myself. Right, and so I needed that community, and I at times didn't feel it. And that's nothing against anyone of any of the my fellow church members go, you know, listen, that's nothing against anybody. It was just a recognition of, you know,   Zack Jackson 53:17 you know, Rachel, you say that nobody in your context said that they miss seeing the tour miss seeing that. But in my context, in which we are much more concerned with sacred space than sacred time, we, I was recording the services in my dining room for the first six months. And then after Nicole and I kind of parted ways as it were. I started recording services in the sanctuary. And I had dozens and dozens of people tell me how comforting it was, for them to see the stained glass to see the cross to hear the Oregon to, like, see the things in the sanctuary they weren't allowed to be in. And I think about the people who were really excited to be able to just go to the sanctuary, like open sanctuary hours, you can come in and just sit there in the space at any time. And like that was really important for them to connect spiritually, more so than it being on a Sunday morning. Like the time was just like that was just almost accidental. It was like a habit that it was going to be at that time. But the space is what mattered. People found it very hard to worship from their hallway. And   Ian Binns 54:31 so I want to make, you know, I want to clarify, sorry to interrupt, I want to clarify something that, you know, I still highly value that space. Right? And so I feel exactly what you're talking about Zach but the very first time that Father Greg, led a service from our church and our sanctuary. Shout out to one of our huge supporters that when the very first time he got one from there during the pandemic, it was a very powerful moment. I remember being very emotional because I could see it again, right? So yes, I have that deep connection to that space. But for me, what I found fascinating, were those who would advocate that the only way they felt they could worship was in that space. Like that was it. And it wasn't about the words, the connection outside of that space at a different time. That was they had to be in that space where they were not actually worshiping. And I struggled with that. Because to me, that seems limiting.   Zack Jackson 55:30 The only bit of our worship that is connected to time, specifically to time and not to space is the act of communion, or the Eucharist. It is, by its, by its elements in the way it's constructed in the words that you say, of institution around it. It is a a recreation of an event that happened 2000 Some years ago, that you're bringing into the present, and that you are looking into the future of a final reconciliation, we say the words and communion, all together as one people Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again. And in that way, the act of communion acts as a sort of temporal Axis Mundi to us, you know, big old fancy words. But just like it stakes us in eternity, in that moment, reaching to the past, being in the present, pulling the future towards us. But aside from the act of communion, we are all about space. And we all care about time. So I am, I have learned so much from you, Rachel, today, and I've gleaned so much wisdom from you in this time. As you all didn't struggle the same way we did during the beginning of the pandemic, you struggle in the different ways, but not in the way that we struggled.   Rachael Jackson 56:49 Yes, so true. I love I love talking about this stuff. I love our ability to share and find appreciation in our differences and find commonalities. And that we all are seeking to find something sacred, whether that's time or space, whether that's now or eternity. So I appreciate my dialogue.   Zack Jackson 57:19 So welcome to a bonus edition of the dead Christian story hour. I think we're going out of order a little bit, but I have one prepared today. And we're not going to ask Rachel to talk more about about something and Ian has something but it's going to save it until the next time because and you'll see why then it's going to be great. So I'm going to go out of order because I have a fun story to share with you today about a dead Christian that I think is great. So our story today takes place in the little community that St. Francis had put together sometime in the early 1200s, late 1100s. Somewhere in there in Assisi in Italy. They were a wild and crazy group of people who left society because they thought it was getting too. Too rich, too wealthy, too disconnected. They were they ran away from their their family's prosperity from all of the wars and all of that stuff that was happening and they went out and they made their own communes out in the middle of the of the woods in the fields. And they lived this peaceful, happy sort of a life and they had some wild stories that are contained in a book called the little flowers of St. Francis. And now like all good hagiography, this takes this you take this with a grain of salt. Because all of our stories about our heroes of faith, a little bit of a comic book, sort of a bend to them. So this story, there was a there was a good fellow named Brother Rufino i Brother affino was in the woods and he was praying fervently. And suddenly, Jesus Christ appears in front of him. He's got the holes in his hands and all that stuff. He's like, look, it's me. It's JC. I'm here to talk to you. And brother finos. Like, wow, what is the great, this is great is the guy this is the guy rose talking about and he's right here. And he's got something to say to me. And so Jesus opens his mouth and says to him, Oh, brother Rufino. Why do you afflict yourself with penance and prayer? Since you are not among those predestined to eternal life, believe me, because I know who might have chosen and predestined and don't believe in that son of Pietro that St. Francis, if he should say the opposite. You know what, don't even ask him about this matter? Because neither he nor others know it, but only I know, because I'm the son of God. Therefore, believe me, you are certainly among the number of the Damned. And the son of Pietro This again is St. Francis As your father, and also his father, they're all damned as well. And whoever follows him as being deceived. Brother Ruffino at this point, he just met Jesus. And Jesus just told him, he's damned to hell. And sorry, dude, that's just the way it goes. And don't tell anyone about this, by the way. So kids, if you're listening out there and a grown up tells you don't tell anyone about this. That's a red flag. So he, he goes off and he's so sad and he's so despondent, and he says, I knew it. I knew it all along. I am an imposter. I really, I don't belong here. Everyone else is so much more righteous than me. And I am damned from the start. But God's like, I saw that. I saw that sneaky thing there. And tell St. Francis, hey, the devil just showed up. It was wearing my clothing, and is pretending to be me. I need you to go talk to brother Rufino. So St. Francis goes to Brother Rufino and he says hey, look, I know what you just saw. That's not Jesus. You can always tell it's Jesus because of the sorts of things he says that's the kind of words that the devil would say, Brother finos, like, wow, really? All right, if you say so. I'm just Dude, you're you're St. Francis. So San Francis says to him, go back out to the woods. And when this imposter Jesus shows up to you again, I want you to say these words to him verbatim. You say, Hey, open your mouth again. And I'm gonna take a minute. And I'm gonna bleep that out. But that is your King James II and translations may say, I shall expel dung upon thee or something like that. But there's a four letter word. So, brother afina, goes out into the woods again. And then, you know, Jesus, the fake Jesus shows up to him again. And because I thought I told you to go home. You are a damned soul. You have no place being here. What on earth are you even doing trying to pray? Stop wasting your time. And brother fino goes, Look, I'm gonna let you finish. But first, open your mouth again. And I'm gonna take a kid in it. And the devil at that point, you just bust out of his Jesus costume. And he's like, wow, you found me. How dare you speak to me like that. And he basically explodes and flies off into the distance and knocks the top of a mountain off. And there's this massive earthquake in like all of the region that everyone reported hearing, and seeing and a huge landslide that came down off of that mountain that other people saw and can attest to and totally definitely happened and was because the devil was so offended by brother Ruffino because he caught him in his in his traps. And that is the story of how brother Ruffino caused an earthquake in a landslide and destroyed the top of a mountain because he talked back to the devil. That's amazing. Okay, very good.   1:03:06 That's it.

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne
Episode 2266 – Excellent National Vietnam War Veterans Day Op-Ed

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 10:56


Episode 2266 of the Vietnam Veteran News Podcast will feature a story about the excellent op-ed about the reasons we celebrate National Vietnam War Veterans Day. The op-ed appeared in the Alpena News and is titled: Thank veterans on National … Continue reading → The post Episode 2266 – Excellent National Vietnam War Veterans Day Op-Ed appeared first on .

Mississippi Edition
3/29/2022 - Vietnam Veterans Day | Postpartum Medicaid | Shipwreck

Mississippi Edition

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 22:32


A deep dive into postpartum Medicaid. And, the story behind a shipwreck newly discovered off the Mississippi coast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Ready For Takeoff - Turn Your Aviation Passion Into A Career

On Tuesday, March 29, 2022, communities around the U.S. will pay tribute to Vietnam veterans and their families on National Vietnam War Veterans Day. U.S. involvement in Vietnam started slowly with an initial deployment of advisers in the early 1950s, grew incrementally through the early 1960s and expanded with the deployment of full combat units in July 1965. The last U.S. personnel were evacuated from Vietnam in April 1975. Approximately 9 million Americans served during the Vietnam era (Nov. 1, 1955, to May 15, 1975). More than 6 million are still alive. The Vietnam War Veterans Recognition Act of 2017 established March 29 as the day to pause and commemorate, remember, recognize and honor Vietnam Veterans, former Prisoners of War, those listed as Missing in Action and their families. March 29 was chosen for several reasons. It was on this date 49 years ago that the last combat troops departed Vietnam. It was also on this day, nearly half a century ago, that Hanoi freed the remaining prisoners of war the Republic of Vietnam was willing to acknowledge.https://39238b20c00c2e3c88c8778205f8a4e8.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-38/html/container.html As part of the national observance, the Vietnam War Commemoration is interviewing Vietnam Veterans and their families and archiving these oral history interviews on the commemoration website and via the Library of Congress Veterans History Project. To learn more about this program visit www.vietnamwar50th.com or visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/VietnamWar50th. Our previous Vietnam veteran guests: Steve Ritchie Lee Ellis Doc Weaver Bill Driscoll Steven Bennett Larry Freeland Ralph Wetterhahn Manny Montes Vic Vizcarra John Borling Charlie Plumb Robert Shumaker Smitty Harris Randy Larsen John Morrissey Ric Hunter Charles Doryland Jim Badger George Hardy Robin Olds Russ Goodenough Don Mrosla Ed Cobleigh Dave Scheiding Don Shepperd Patrick Brady John Fairfield Lynn Damron Lawrence Chambers Bob Gilliland Brian Settles Mark Berent Dick Jonas Merrill McPeak John Swanson Dale Stovall Walt Fricke Bill Straw Son Tay Raiders Lance Sijan

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts
THE ALL MARINE RADIO HOUR: Khe Sanh Marine Ken Rodgers joins us on Vietnam Veterans Day

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 74:19


On National Vietnam Veterans Day one of our favorite Veterans joins the program — Ken Rodgers. Ken served with Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 26th Marine Regiment during the epic battle of Khe Sanh in Vietnam during 1968.  He and his wife Betty have made two documentaries in the last ten years: “Bravo! Common Men, Uncommon […]

Veteran Made
Veterans in Digital Advertising w/ 212 NYC

Veteran Made

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 65:46


On this 2021 Veterans Day special from the Chicago Brewseum, Carey speaks with Kelly Hinderer, Program Manager @ Verizon Business, Edgar Gallardo, Creative Director @ FanDuel, Nyles Thorne, Senior Associate of Addressable Strategy @ Matterkind, and Veronica Villegas, Manager of Military Recruitment and Programs @ Verizon. They discuss avenues veterans can take to enter the field of digital advertising as well as practical advice for building military resumes. Follow @veteranmadepod on Instagram for daily updates, and follow @twoonetwonyc.

The Voice of Texas Veterans
Vietnam War Veterans Day is March 29, 2022

The Voice of Texas Veterans

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 12:31


Spend time with the Vietnam veterans in your life on Vietnam War Veterans Day, March 29. As Veterans get older, they may develop illnesses connected with military service from decades ago. Ailing Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange may qualify for disability compensation. Listen to learn more about that, from Houston VA Executive Director Robert Worley, then Claims Benefits Advisor Robert Macias has tips on filing a disability claim. We also talk with TVC commissioner and Vietnam veteran Mike Hernandez. Make a Claims Appointment Here.

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots
415: Promenade with JT Liddell

Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 38:34


JT Lidell is the Founder of Promenade, which seamlessly matches and connects military veterans to the resources, people, and organizations that matter to them. Chad talks with JT about being a mission-driven, bootstrapped organization, the problems that he's encountered and hopes that Promenade solves, and aggregating people, tools, resources, and funding to make it happen. Promenade (https://www.promenade.ai/) Follow JT on Twitter (https://twitter.com/promenadeactual) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/sam-zimmerman-35152a22/). Follow thoughtbot on Twitter (https://twitter.com/thoughtbot) or LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/company/150727/). Become a Sponsor (https://thoughtbot.com/sponsorship) of Giant Robots! Transcript: CHAD: This is the Giant Robots Smashing Into Other Giant Robots Podcast, where we explore the design, development, and business of great products. I'm your host, Chad Pytel and with me today is JT Liddell, the Founder of Promenade, which seamlessly matches and connects military veterans to the resources, people, and organizations that matter to them. JT, thank you so much for joining me. JT: No, thank you for having me. Excited to talk to you about what we're building over here and having this conversation. So thank you so much for having me on today. CHAD: I love mission-driven organizations, and Promenade falls right into that. How did it come about for you? JT: Yeah, this has been...the inception of it really truly began many, many years ago when I first joined the military straight out of high school. So I went to The Naval Academy, actually, started there then went to the army. Fast forward 7, 8, 9, 10 years, and as I was getting out of the military and trying to join the civilian workforce, the civilian world, that's where a lot of the problems and challenges that I'm trying to solve through Promenade started. And then, working in the technology space in corporate America really allowed me to identify some of the solutions and tools that I'm working with now. But to answer your original question, the beginning of Promenade or the inception of Promenade really began with my entry into the military. CHAD: What were some of the problems that you encountered and that you hope that Promenade solves? JT: Back in 2000...I left the military officially in 2010 but went straight into defense contracting work from there and worked there for a few years. And it was, as I was leaving, I went literally from Afghanistan, and 30 days later, I was sitting in an MBA classroom. And leaving Afghanistan, I thought there was literally no problem, no challenge...after going through three deployments to Afghanistan and being deployed to other parts of the world, I was like, there's nothing that I'm going to come against that I won't be able to tackle. That was the furthest from the truth. So there are a number of issues when it came to relationships, when it came to navigating the workforce, when it came to just understanding how drastically different the civilian world was from being in the military and the defense industry. So those problems are umbrellas, and there are many, many things underneath those that I came up against. CHAD: What are some of the ways that, you know, I speak as someone not having served in the military. What are some of the big ways in which civilian employment is different? JT: It wasn't even necessarily...well, obviously, there are huge differences obviously from the military and civilian employment. But it was really even like, how do you get entry into the civilian workforce just from the very beginning? So, how do you craft a resume? It seems like a minor thing at this point in my life, but it's a huge one. When you leave the military, you have these 9, 10, 11-page resumes. And that's what you're supposed to do. You're supposed to put literally every single piece of experience that you have on this resume. But when you come to the civilian world, you have to somehow condense all of that down to one page, and there's a science to doing that, and that was one of the first huge hurdles. Because a resume is just your ticket into the door, it's a ticket to that interview. That's just literally the first step. And that was something that I didn't realize was something I was going to have to hone my skill at. CHAD: Do you think that a lot of companies overlook the value of military service? JT: Yeah, that's a tough one to answer. So it's hard to say overlook when as a military veteran just taking myself, for instance, you know, in a lot of ways, I was not communicating effectively what my experience was in relation to the value I could provide to that organization. So as a recruiter or a headhunter, whoever is doing that initial review, they're simply looking...for a large part, they don't have experience in the military. So they don't understand the jargon and what some of these different jobs really mean with the impact they had on their organization. So there's still a lot of meat in the middle here. So that individual needs to do a better job of communicating the exact value through a corporate sense how that value could contribute to corporate America or whatever type of organization they're trying to join. And organizations need to do a much better job of understanding that there's this untapped value in the military community and teaching and training their organizations or whoever is doing the intake process to look for the value that the military community can bring. So I don't think it's a one-sided thing. I think both sides need to come together and do a better job. CHAD: So I said in the intro that Promenade matches and connects veterans to the resources, people, and organizations that matter to them. What exactly does that look like in terms of the product today and what you're doing? JT: Yeah, absolutely. So this really began as a grassroots operation through my own ecosystem. Many, many years ago, when I was first getting in the military, and I was starting to get traction and understanding how to navigate the civilian world, I started to reach back. People would reach out to me, and I would reach back. And they would ask me, "How did you get here? How did you do that?" And I would just help people, review their resumes for them, get them connected to different jobs and career pathways. And then I started to do that a little bit more officially, if you will. And then, I realized this is not just a problem within my own ecosystem; this is a problem across the military community. So as I was working in technology, as I mentioned before, I started to identify tools, one of them being artificial intelligence, that could help me scale the work that I was doing. So the pathway that I started to set out on was how do I take this grassroots work that I'm doing, and then how do I scale that work to millions of people rather than just dozens of people? So that's the journey that I'm on right now. I don't know if that answered your question or not. CHAD: So if someone is listening and they're a veteran, what is the product going to offer them now? JT: So they'll come on, and they'll onboard to the platform. So essentially, we're just taking the process that we've been doing offline, and we're bringing it online. So they'll come on. They'll fill out some demographic information. They'll answer a few questions about where they are in their current post-military journey. They could even be thinking about getting out. The product will still help them as they're on their way out, thinking about getting out. They could have been out for a month, a year, an entire decade doesn't really matter. We'll help assess where they are in their post-military journey. After they go through that intake process, we'll give them the option to talk to one of our coaches, which can make this experience a little bit more personalized. And that's one of the huge things that I learned as I've been building Promenade is when I first started tackling this, thinking about tackling this issue through technology, I was like, okay, this technology these tools that I've identified and I've researched these are going to be the things that solve this problem. That's what's going to do this. No, that's what's going to fix this. [chuckles] And what I quickly realized is you can't remove that human component from this process. There are just things that technology doesn't understand about the military experience. So having a coach, having an individual or human to talk to at the very beginning of this process, or whatever that individual needs is extremely crucial and hugely beneficial to this process. So we put that coach in front of them. That's completely optional because we do want to allow this to be self-service and self-guided. So if they choose to get in front of that coach, they'll be able to talk one on one and augment this process. If they don't, they'll go straight to our dashboard. And what the dashboard will do is it's going to help that individual identify different areas within their post-military journey where they can improve and get better. And, Chad, we haven't talked about this, but we've got this social impact-driven product that we're building. But the lens that we're really thinking about this is through a healthcare lens. So what that means is there's this term called social determinants of health. And what that means is...the very simple version is a super simple concept. Every part of your life impacts your overall health. The health care system, like when you go to the hospital, only impacts 20%-30% of your overall health. The things that truly impact your health are things like, do you have a job? Have you talked to a therapist in the last six months? Do you have food, you know, the right type of food? Do you have access to the right type of food? Not just food. Are you ordering Burger King every day, McDonald's every day? But are you eating healthy food? And do you have consistent access? Those are the things that affect your overall health. So we look at all of these different factors about the veteran and how they're going through their post-military journey. And we give them a score on all these different verticals. So essentially, through that score, we're helping them identify what those gaps are, and then we're pushing them resources to help fill those gaps. So they'll get a couple of things through our platform. They'll get that dashboard and that score and personally recommended or personalized recommended resources to them, and that's where the artificial intelligence component comes into it. And then they'll have sort of a search field where they can just go and keyword for things just like they would go into Google and search for something. And then the third component to this is the community that we're building, and that won't be rolled out initially. But once we've got critical mass, we've got a community that we're building where they'll get connected to people within our community, maybe people with the same skills and interest, people that they were deployed with, people that they were stationed with, or people that they just came across. And we've got a method to do that. But that's really what it's about is bringing this community together, helping them assess where they are in their post-military journey, and then putting the right resources in front of them at the right time based on who they are. So that's the experience they'll get, to answer your question. CHAD: Awesome. Who pays for Promenade? JT: So it's going to be twofold. So there'll be a freemium model for the military veteran, so all those things that I just mentioned, minus one or two. They'll get free access to the platform. So they'll be able to log on. They'll be able to see where they're at in their journey. And they'll be able to navigate the platform and get those personalized recommendations. On the organizational side, they will also pay to access the platform. And then there's some other work...back when I mentioned a couple of minutes ago that organizations need to do a better job of understanding the military community, we help organizations better understand the military community, attract and retain military veteran talent if that's something that they're in the business of doing. So there are multiple ways to do it. CHAD: And organizations would pay for that. JT: That's right. Absolutely. Yeah. CHAD: Is that a significant or a fundamental part of the business model? JT: Which part? CHAD: The organizations paying. JT: Yeah, it is. So it depends on which part of interacting with the organization that we're talking about. So there are two ways we can do that. There's A, giving them access to the platform so just, for example, on the jobs portion, careers portion, recruiters. We'd give them access to the platform to get access to the talent. But on the let's help this organization think about how they're even reaching out to the veteran community, how they're recruiting them, the process that veterans are going through in order to apply to these organizations, once veterans are in these organizations, how are they supporting the veteran community? And maybe even after they've left, depending on which organization you're talking about, how are you supporting that veteran community once they've left so they can be...you want them to be ambassadors for your organization. How are you supporting the veteran community even after they've left? So that's two completely different ways that we can interact with the organization. The fundamental one would be those organizations getting access to our platform and interacting with the veteran community. That for sure would be fundamental to what we're building. CHAD: So who's funding Promenade right now? JT: [laughs] Yeah, that's a great question. So this is definitely up until maybe a year or so ago; it's definitely been bootstrap built for sure completely out of my pocket. But thanks to some of the visibility we were able to get, in the work we were able to do, organizations were able to get in touch. We've gotten a couple of grants, one huge one from Google for Startups last year. That was $100,000 from Google for Startups. That's been obviously huge for the work and the momentum. And what I always tell people is, you know, Chad, you've been doing this a while. [laughs] You know that $100,000 can get run through pretty quickly in the tech startup space. That was huge, and I don't want to downplay that by any means. But that wasn't even the biggest impact to what we're doing. It's just the visibility that it created for our organization. We've had just the veterans that we work with; we've had so many reach out just because they heard about us but organizations as well that have reached out to us. They want to work with us. They want to support us. That was huge. But to answer your question, it's a combination of grant money, cash awards from different organizations, and bootstrapping it from me JT here. CHAD: Well, thanks for doing that [laughs] and bringing this really important service to life. What are some of the barriers to achieving the success that you want to achieve with Promenade? JT: What we're doing is essentially we're aggregating information. We're aggregating people. We're aggregating tools and resources. We're bringing all this together. I didn't think it would be easy by any means. But it's definitely much harder than I imagined it would be when I set out in this journey a couple of years ago. One of the hardest things about this is you've got all of these different areas that you're trying to assess veterans and getting these tools and resources and organizations in front of them. How do you consistently and with quality put those organizations and tools and resources in front of the veteran? I want all of them to have the same experience. I want them to have an amazing experience. I want them to get connected quickly and with quality to the people and organizations and tools that they need to get connected to. So how do you make that experience consistent and standard across the board? And how do you control as much as possible the quality of that interaction? Building these partnerships has been challenging. It's been difficult. But every time, I get frustrated...just like, every startup goes through those barriers. You get frustrated. I just think back to those moments where I was down on my post-military journey. And I'm like, I never want another veteran to have to go through that. That's what keeps me pushing when those barriers do hit. And I'm like, this is going to be hard. How do I keep that organization, or how do I ensure that organization is doing A, B, and C? How do I ensure I'm keeping this veteran pushing forward and motivated when they get frustrated? Those are some of the barriers. But as I said before, I just look back on when I was going through my journey. And I don't want any veteran to have to go through that experience. So that's what keeps me going. Mid-Roll Ad I wanted to tell you all about something I've been working on quietly for the past year or so, and that's AgencyU. AgencyU is a membership-based program where I work one-on-one with a small group of agency founders and leaders toward their business goals. We do one-on-one coaching sessions and also monthly group meetings. We start with goal setting, advice, and problem-solving based on my experiences over the last 18 years of running thoughtbot. As we progress as a group, we all get to know each other more. And many of the AgencyU members are now working on client projects together and even referring work to each other. Whether you're struggling to grow an agency, taking it to the next level and having growing pains, or a solo founder who just needs someone to talk to, in my 18 years of leading and growing thoughtbot, I've seen and learned from a lot of different situations, and I'd be happy to work with you. Learn more and sign up today at thoughtbot.com/agencyu. That's A-G-E-N-C-Y, the letter U. CHAD: So you officially started Promenade in May of 2020. Is that right? JT: I came up with the idea actually in 2017 sort of the framework for what I'm doing now. And I'm in Atlanta, Georgia, and I don't know how much you know about the tech startup space in Atlanta, Georgia, but it's booming right now for sure. That'd be an understatement. And I have a few different people around me, a number of people around me in my ecosystem that are in the tech startup space. And I watched them going through their own personal journeys and finding success. And I was like, number one, I have all these people around me that are doing it, non-technical founders, technical founders, first-time founders. There's no reason I can't also do this. And then number two, I was like, if I looked on my phone seven years from now and I saw a Promenade built by somebody else, I'd be super pissed. [laughter] I'm going to be so pissed. I remember this quite clearly December 2019; I was like, you have to do something; if you don't, you're going to regret it. So December 2019, I went, and I signed up for this organization here in Atlanta called ATDC. I signed up for my first intro to customer discovery class. And from there, I've been pushing ever since. I think I incorporated the organization around May or March or something like that officially. But the idea, inception in its current form probably 2017 and then really began building in January 2020. CHAD: So, how do you think the pandemic has impacted the ability to start Promenade? JT: Yeah, a number of different ways. But I would say net-net actually in a positive way in not like the actual of what the pandemic means but the environment. It showed me clear as day that there's a huge net need for digital services when it comes to the military veteran community. Because a large resource for the veteran community is Department of Veteran Affairs, you know, doing amazing work doing great work. But just like many other government organizations, many aspects of it were shut down during the pandemic. So let's just talk about mental wellness because that's something that is highly visible in the veteran community as being an issue. The suicide rate increased exponentially during the pandemic within the veteran community. That's because people are isolated. They're already going through issues; maybe people are getting out of the military during the pandemic. It just showed me that there's a huge increased need for digitally online for this veteran community, resources for the veteran community, and just giving them an ecosystem to interact in. And it just pushed me even harder to build what I was building. So the pandemic was obviously a very terrible thing, but in terms of Promenade and the work that I was doing, it just made me go even harder for sure. CHAD: So right now, is it just you? JT: Yeah, so it's me. I've got one personal assistant, and I've got several designers and developers that I work with. CHAD: On a contract basis? JT: Yes, all contractors. But in terms of people who are hands-on building this thing, I probably couldn't even count the number, as I'm sure you know when it comes to developers and designers trying to build these solutions. But in terms of being officially a part of Promenade, it's still just me going at this thing right now. CHAD: And while you're doing this, you have another full-time job, right? JT: I do. I do. CHAD: I think that's a scenario that a lot of people find themselves in is wanting to do something new but not necessarily being able to, you know, you're bootstrapping something on the side. How do you make it work? And what would need to happen for you to take the leap to be able to just work on Promenade? JT: How do I make it work? A lot of Red Bull, a lot of energy drinks, [chuckles] and a lot of late nights. But again, as I mentioned before, that's something I would put in as time as a barrier when it comes to building this thing. I just take it back to the many conversations I have with veterans as they've been going through their own personal journeys. That just keeps me going. As far as what would it take for me to move away to work on Promenade full time, the only true thing I think it would take would really be line of sight and visibility on being able to drive this thing forward in a sustainable manner, just having a line of sight on that, on this thing. Okay, I've got the traction. I can see it. It's tangible. I just need to do A, B, and C to keep pushing this thing forward. I know that's sort of vague, but that's really what it would take. CHAD: Do you think you're going to have to take funding from somewhere, or do you think you can continue to bootstrap and operate on the grants and awards? JT: It depends. That's a good question. That's something I've gone back and forth with. Working in the tech startup space, that's something that's discussed a lot is angel investors and VCs, and you need to do this to attract funders and things like that. That's something that's discussed a lot in this space. But it's something that I've gone back and forth with. It really comes down to what I want this thing to be at the end of the day. This thing could be huge. There's a huge gap in the military veteran space in a multitude of ways. This thing could be a unicorn if that's the direction I really wanted to take it. And I think if I go down that pathway, it's for sure going to take funding from outside sources. But if I want to keep this thing more small scale or maybe even local to that Atlanta, Georgia region where I live and only focus on that one region, that's something I could probably bootstrap until I've got the revenue necessary to work on it full time and just keep it at more of a local level. But I think based on the impact that I'm trying to have throughout the entire veteran community and not just on veterans themselves but the organizations which could help...we've got this concept called train the trainer in the military, which is the experience I had as well. But essentially, it's I can do all the work and have all the impact. But it would be 10X more impactful if I'm working with Fortune 500 companies that are doing the same thing that I'm doing, impact in the veteran community in the same way that I am. So I think that's the direction I'll probably end up going, and that's why I'll have to go look for funding from other sources to build this thing the way I want to build it. So we'll see. We'll see. CHAD: The problem with funding, obviously, is that if it comes from traditional investment sources, then they expect a return, and you have to be able to show that. It might be made up, but you have to have a story that demonstrates that there's a return. And you alluded to one angle at the beginning when you talked about healthcare. Do you see that as a potential angle in terms of what the business model might be and what industry you might actually be part of? JT: That's a great question. So I know that if I go full-fledged down the healthcare route, social determinants of health, tracking health outcomes for the veteran community, then most definitely, this would be something where I would need outside funding, traditional funding to build this thing. And I think that's where when it comes to like, okay, I set out on this journey to impact the veteran community, and I want to have the most impact possible. That's going to be the route I'm going to have to go down. But quite candidly, I do not have at this point enough expertise around the healthcare space to say, okay, let's go down that pathway. Right now, part of the journey that I'm on outside of just trying to build this thing and get this thing launched over the next month, or two is how do I get myself more integrated into the healthcare world to better understand how what I'm building overlaps or integrates into what's going on around social determinants of health in the healthcare space? And how do I insert myself into that? That's something I'm currently assessing. CHAD: Well, and the interesting thing, too, for me is the thought that I wonder if that actually is something that is top of mind for the users, the veterans, or whether they're just thinking I need a job, [chuckles] and they're not necessarily thinking about their health top of mind. I mean, what do you think? JT: They're not today. Absolutely not. Today when they reach out to me, they're like...and it's funny because that just opens another can of worms. But it just opens up this whole nother aspect of what I'm doing. So when they come to me, they're like, "I need a job." They're like, "I'm about to lose my car. I need help with my car payment," or "I'm going to be homeless soon." That's how people reach out to me. But, Chad, that's not truly the issue. As you can imagine, if you're at the point to where you're about to be homeless, there's all this other stuff going on within your life. That's truly the work that we do. It's like people come to me...I have people reach out to me literally every single day. "I need help with this. I need help with that." And I'm like, okay, I have a conversation with them. And then we realize there's like 9, 10, 11 other things going on. So to answer your question, they're not thinking about this healthcare issue. And from a user standpoint, that's not even how I want to approach this, like telling them, "Oh, I'm going to be here to improve your health outcomes." I wouldn't have that conversation with them. My conversation with them would still be around these different pillars. But on the organizational side, that's where I would communicate to them and say, "I've got these group of individuals who are coming to me and saying, 'I need this assistance.'" And what we're doing at the end of the day is improving their health outcomes. And what that means is, healthcare payer, they're not touching your healthcare system, which means you're saving tons of money. And that's the part that I'm currently unpacking to say, okay, not to the user that we're doing this work and healthcare but to these organizations. And there are examples of this already out there. So, how do I do that but stay true to the work that I'm doing with the military veteran? Because one of the things that I know that's not going to change for what I'm building is the focus on the user. There are 40,000 veteran service organizations alone. There's $250 billion that gets poured into the veteran community through the Department of Veteran Affairs. So there's no shortage of organizations working on the veteran community, with the veteran community, and there's no shortage of money out there when it comes to helping bolster the veteran community or improve outcomes within the veteran community. The true challenge that I see or the true issue that I see is there's a lack of focus on the actual veteran themselves and what they're going through. There are no tools out there for them to tap into and go on this journey. That's what I'm laser-focused on is how do I create an amazing experience for the military veteran themselves, not the organizations that are out there doing some of this work, if that makes sense. CHAD: It totally does. And I think it really makes sense for you. I think it's a problem that a lot of startups face is that there's this draw, maybe because of your business model or because of the environment that you have this other piece, but what you really need to do is focus on creating value for your users. And in an ideal world, those two things become aligned over time. You mentioned...a little while ago, you said something over the next few months, we got to get this launched. So there's a sign-up on the website now to become part of the community. But are you not fully launched yet? JT: No. So what we've got right now is a landing page which essentially is building a list for individuals. Once I launch, I reach out and say, "Hey, we're live." What's not publicly facing right now is that user experience that I described. That's what's being built. But let me take a step back because we're still doing that grassroots work to where we're working with veterans one on one. So that's still something that we're heavily doing. But again, the idea here is to how do I replicate this work that we're doing to millions of people? That's what we're going to roll out here. CHAD: I know timelines can be tricky. [laughs] What is your working timeline for doing that? JT: As far as launching it? CHAD: Mm-hmm. JT: [laughs] When people ask me, you know, one or two months. It's funny; when I first started this back when I was doing the customer discovery, I was getting all this great information and learning more intimately about what the veterans community is going through. I've got my own experience. I've got the experience of people within my ecosystem. But I was just astounded by all the myriad of issues that were going on. And I was like, oh man, I'm going to have something built and ready to go in like three months. And this is like January 2020, February 2020. I was like, I'm going to have something by Veterans Day this year. It's going to be like everyone's going to know about it. Obviously, that didn't happen because the realities [laughs] of building a tech startup set in really quickly. But we're fairly close. I'm aiming for no later than two or three months, but I hate to put the actual time on it just yet. CHAD: And I think as a founder, you need to give yourself...pressure is good. But you also need to give yourself permission to not ship until you're ready and proud of what you've done. Now the trick is most people wait too long. [laughs] So the trick is actually forcing yourself to launch something that you're probably not unhappy with but actually is sufficient. JT: Yeah, that's right. That's right. I don't want to wait until it's, quote, unquote, "perfect." But I do want to ensure that the individuals that do come to the front door in the very beginning they're going to get a great experience. And if they don't, then there's that feedback loop that helps us get better because that's what it's about. Whether you're a young tech startup or you're Facebook or whoever, there needs to be that feedback loop built-in in the right way. So that's what we're doing. We're trying to ensure that, okay, we've got the foundation of this thing built correctly. And then we've got these feedback loops at all the right points to make this thing even better going forward. And then separately, as every founder is going through, how do you continue to build this thing or fund this thing, rather, to keep it going forward? And that's through bootstrapping. That's through the revenue model that we've got going. And that's through some of these partnerships that we're trying to put wet ink on right now as well. So a lot of things going on. CHAD: So if someone's listening to this and they're in a position where they say, "I care a lot about this. I want to help. I'm a founder or a leader at a company. And I want to work with Promenade." How do they get in touch with you? Where are the best places for them to do that? JT: Yeah, they can reach out to me at jt@promenade.ai. That's the quickest and easiest way. We've got our Instagram page up and our LinkedIn page up. You can reach out on there. But the quickest way if you're like, I want to contribute, our organization we've been thinking about how do we work with the veteran community more closely? How do we recruit them? I've got veterans in my family that are going through some of the same challenges. I want to get them in touch with you. The quickest way is just email jt@promenade.ai. CHAD: Awesome. And good luck in this final stretch towards launch. And I wish you all the best. JT: I appreciate it. CHAD: And maybe you can come back on the show a few months post-launch and debrief. [laughs] JT: Yeah. I would love to. I would love to. I'm sure I'll have plenty of lessons learned. [laughs] CHAD: Yeah, exactly. Again, that was promenade.ai for the website. And you can subscribe to this show and find notes for this episode along with a complete transcript at giantrobots.fm. If you have questions or comments, email us at hosts@giantrobots.fm. You can find me on Twitter @cpytel. Thank you, JT, for stopping by. If other folks want to follow along with you, where can they do that? JT: Instagram, we're at promenade.ai, and LinkedIn, you can find us the same way. CHAD: Awesome. This podcast is brought to you by thoughtbot and produced and edited by Mandy Moore. Thanks for listening and see you next time. ANNOUNCER: This podcast was brought to you by thoughtbot. thoughtbot is your expert design and development partner. Let's make your product and team a success. Special Guest: JT Liddell.

Hacks & Wonks
Robyn Denson, Pierce County Council Candidate

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 36:10


Robyn Denson, candidate for Pierce County Council Position 7, joins Crystal to discuss what's at stake in her run for a critical seat in regional government, including the thin Democratic majority on the Pierce County Council. As a deeply-engaged community member and current Gig Harbor City Councilmember, Robyn is passionate about listening to the diverse voices of her district and fighting for their needs, whether the issue is housing affordability, ending homelessness, COVID assistance and recovery, or mitigating climate impacts. As always, a full text transcript of the show is available below and at officialhacksandwonks.com. Find the host, Crystal, on Twitter at @finchfrii, and Robyn on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/robyndensonpiercecountycouncil.   Resources Elect Robyn Denson: https://www.electrobyndenson.com/   “Gig Harbor councilmember will run for Pierce County Council to replace Derek Young” by Kerry Webster from The News Tribune: https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/community/gateway/g-news/article256502086.html   Pierce County Council District 7 Map: https://www.piercecountywa.gov/DocumentCenter/View/110768/District-7-2022_web   City of Gig Harbor - Councilmember Robyn Denson: https://www.cityofgigharbor.net/directory.aspx?eid=170   Communities in Schools - Peninsula: https://peninsula.ciswa.org/   Harbor WildWatch: https://harborwildwatch.org/   Gig Harbor Land Conservation Fund: https://www.gigharborlandconservation.com/   Pierce County - South Sound Housing Affordability Partners: https://www.piercecountywa.gov/7052/South-Sound-Housing-Affordability-Partne   United Way of Pierce County - South Sound 211: https://www.uwpc.org/get-help-now-dial-211   Pierce County - Applying for Rent & Utility Assistance: https://www.piercecountywa.gov/7488/Applying-for-Rent-Utility-Assistance   Transcript [00:00:00] Crystal Fincher: Welcome to Hacks & Wonks. I'm Crystal Fincher, and I'm a political consultant and your host. On this show, we talk with policy wonks and political hacks to gather insight into local politics and policy in Washington State through the lens of those doing the work with behind-the-scenes perspectives on what's happening, why it's happening, and what you can do about it. Full transcripts and resources referenced in the show are always available at officialhacksandwonks.com and in our episode notes. So today we are thrilled to have with us, candidate for Pierce County Council, Robyn Denson. Welcome. [00:00:45] Robyn Denson: Well, thank you, Crystal. It is an honor to be invited to be on your podcast. [00:00:50] Crystal Fincher: Well, I am certainly excited to have you - there are so many exciting races happening throughout the state. Lots of people have been focused on legislative races or prosecutor races, but we also have county council races and this in Pierce County is very important and interesting. So I guess I just want to start off getting a better idea of who you are and what your background is. [00:01:14] Robyn Denson: Well, first, let me thank you for recognizing that we have county council races as well - because a lot of times, I guess we aren't as maybe as high profile as some of the legislative races, or as local as some of the city council races - so even as I'm door-belling already, people are like, "We have a County Council representative?" if I'm in the city of Tacoma. So, I get to explain the difference and get to draw them in to why this position is so important, why the County Council is so important, and I'm really, really excited to run for County Council District 7. I will say, like probably a lot of public officials and public elected officials, this was not in my plan. I am a current Gig Harbor City Councilperson, and I've been really enjoying working with the community here and getting lots of things done. And that honestly came about because I've been involved in volunteer service in the community for so long - whether it was nonprofits, then I was on our volunteer City Parks Commission for a long, long time and got to know the city - and then at some point, I can't even remember how it happened, somebody asked me to run for city council and I did. And I've really been enjoying it, but about a year and a half ago, our current District 7 County Councilperson, Chair Derek Young - who's fantastic - came to me along with his assistant John Jolibois, and of course I've worked with him a lot on city issues and nonprofit issues as well, and they asked me if I would consider running to replace Derek for County Council District 7. And at first I was like, "What?" but as you know, Crystal, Derek Young is terming out on the Pierce County Council - there's term limits. He has had an incredible eight years, he's accomplished so much. He is the Chair now and for the last two years, the Democrats have had the majority on Pierce County Council, so they are just going gangbusters, accomplishing amazing things for our county and really putting us on a positive path - for the future, for the people, for the lands, and the waters - and this race is so important because it's really important that we retain that momentum and keep things going in a really positive direction. So I will admit it took me - gosh, at least six months before I gave Derek a Yes - and I knew I would love the position, but as a single parent, single-income household, I had to take all of those things into consideration, as probably some of your listeners can appreciate. I knew I'd love the job - public policy, serving the public is definitely my passion. I do it for free right now - way more - I spend way more time on that than my income producing segment of my life. So I was excited about the job, but I just had to make sure that it was fitting in with where I wanted my life to go, because a position like this is so all-encompassing - campaigning is all-encompassing and then when you're in the position - I mean, this is your life. It's not just a 9 to 5 job. You're involved with the community, and going to events, and getting to know all the players, and making sure that you understand their needs, and talking to them about all the policies that are coming down the pipe or things that you're thinking about to make sure you're getting all of that input. So, that's the way I treat my volunteer city council job right now and that's the way I'll treat the county council job. And once I made the decision to go for it, I'm a 100% engaged and a 100% working hard on this campaign. I have the support of just a lot of wonderful community leaders - and I don't know how other elected officials feel or other candidates - but to me, when somebody has given me their support and has maybe gone out on a limb to endorse me or give me hard-earned money, then I want to make sure that I am working as hard as I can to get into the position so that I can make sure that I'm serving the public just like I told everybody I would. [00:05:32] Crystal Fincher: Well, and that's exciting. I completely appreciate you having to weigh what taking on this position would mean. And even as you so appropriately put it, a volunteer city council position - I think people sometimes don't realize how lowly compensated city council members are. If you look at major metropolitan areas, like the biggest cities in the country, the biggest city in our state, Seattle - those positions come with a salary and full-time staff and they have offices. Most cities around the state do not have that, most city councils receive a stipend - [00:06:14] Robyn Denson: Right - a little stipend - no staff, no offices. [00:06:16] Crystal Fincher: Yes. Like less than $5,000/year. Yeah, it's with no staff, no nothing - and it is - to say it's a part-time position is really misleading. It is a humongous responsibility and it really is just kind of mind-boggling that we expect our elected representatives on the local level, who are responsible for so much of what our daily life is on a daily basis, to just work for a stipend. And it certainly impacts the type of people who are able to serve. If you are a one income household, if you have a regular job and you aren't owning a company, or not independently wealthy or coming from wealth, it is certainly a different kind of consideration to be able to do that, not withstanding the cost of childcare and how it impacts your day job and all of that. So I sincerely appreciate just you having to take time to figure out how to make everything possible. I also appreciate you talking about how, for the past two years, Democrats had a majority on the Pierce County Council - was not always that. I mean - [00:07:24] Robyn Denson: I think it's the first time in 17 years. [00:07:27] Crystal Fincher: Yeah, and this is not a given that, "Oh, hey, just Democrats win now," - you are in a purple area that can elect Republicans and it's not a given that, "Hey, this is just sailing and coasting to victory here." So what is your approach in a community that is diverse in many ways, including in ideologies that people hold - how are you communicating with voters and what are you focusing on as you're running for this seat? [00:08:02] Robyn Denson: Well, I guess Crystal, I'll say that I feel very grateful that I have been involved - truly involved - in the community for a long time, and in roles that were not partisan. Even my city council position isn't partisan, which I just love because a lot of these issues that we face every day should not be partisan issues. They should just be basic human rights, human needs, making the community a better place, taking care of our environment. So I'm fortunate that I have a lot of support from around the Gig Harbor and Key Peninsula communities in particular, because I've been involved in so many organizations - from Communities in Schools, which serves our community, our school district here in the Peninsula School District. From Harbor WildWatch, I just started a Land Conservation Fund and Veterans Day event, I'm involved with the Chamber - just all sorts of different types of people with different interests - all really good-hearted people that want to do the right thing for the community. So I love having that diverse base of support - people that, even if they're not in the same political party as me, we have a common respect and they know they can come and talk to me and I'm going to listen. I'm going to listen to their point of view and we can work together on finding solutions to any issue that comes up in the community that makes sense for everybody, whether it's business or tenants or homeowners or folks in the environmental community that are noticing something in our Sound or in this greater Salish Sea. I love having that relationship and I'm building those kind of relationships in Tacoma as well. I'm fortunate to be able to get introduced to a lot of amazing community leaders in Tacoma, and because that area is admittedly newer for me, that's where I'm starting to doorbell. So for the last 3 weeks, 3-4 weeks, I've been out already starting to doorbell in Tacoma and getting to know the issues in that community. Because like you've said, my district is very diverse - I have got urban north Tacoma, I have kind of small city Gig Harbor, and then I've got the Key Peninsula that is very rural. And there are some commonalities, but there's a lot of specific issues that are top of mind in each of these communities that I'm excited to work on. And I think having somebody that takes the time to get to know the people and the issues - and doesn't just assume they're the same as issues in other part of the state - that's what folks need from their representative, because out here in District 7 - I mean, the folks in Tacoma are fortunate because they have their city council person, as well as their county council person. Gig Harbor is a very small footprint, so those folks also have a city council - well, they have all of the city council working for them as well. But most of our district is unincorporated, and the folks in unincorporated Pierce County in District 7 - their County Councilperson is their one representative at the local level, so it's so important. And I'm trying to communicate to folks how important it is that they elect somebody who understands their needs and is going to fight for them. [00:11:19] Crystal Fincher: Well, one big need that is manifesting in a variety of different communities is the need for affordable housing. And this is a conversation statewide, certainly has been in Pierce County - what are your plans to keep the area affordable? [00:11:37] Robyn Denson: Well, thank you - that is a key issue, no matter where you are in my district. And like you said, anywhere in the county, and anywhere in the state, and I would say the country as well. Affordable housing is a huge issue and it's a really, really challenging issue. It's something that I've been involved with professionally for a long time - so I've worked with organizations that had homeless shelters and did Section 8 vouchers and did group homes. I worked for Habitat for Humanity - great organization. I worked for the State House of Representatives for five sessions back in - 2005 through 2010, I believe - where we drafted the Homeless Act, for example, and the Multifamily Tax Exemption Program. So we were really addressing it then as well - so it's something that is near and dear to my heart. It's a challenging issue to address - I can't say that I have the silver bullet answer to it, but I think we're seeing a lot of initiatives that are going to be helpful. We're seeing encouragement of density, especially in transit-oriented areas and areas that are close to housing and other services, or to jobs and other services. That's so important, not only to promote affordable housing, but to prevent urban sprawl into our more rural and natural areas. So, that is certainly one solution. I'm a big fan of making sure that we're working on developing income-based housing as well though, because our area is such a popular place for people to move to. We've got folks coming down from Seattle, we have folks coming up from California, the East Coast, other areas of the country. So even if we're increasing density, a lot of those - if we're not keeping some housing that's really income-based and permanently affordable, I'm afraid that it's going to take us a long time to see density correlating with lowering house prices. It's part of the solution and it will help, but I think in addition to that, we need to make sure that we're creating some housing that is permanently available to folks at different income levels, and particularly the lower income levels. [00:13:52] Crystal Fincher: So how do you do that from the County Council? [00:13:55] Robyn Denson: Well, I think that we can partner with nonprofit housing builders and there's a number of them - Habitat is one of them, but we certainly need to collaborate with others that produce - maybe that their model is to create greater numbers of housing units, apartment complexes, or townhouse developments, cottage style developments - things like that - where we're really getting some numbers in. And those nonprofits are really well positioned to make sure that these properties are managed and sustained as affordable over time. There may be opportunities to work with for-profit developers as well. I was just having a conversation earlier with an advocate about this as well, because sometimes for-profit developers have figured out a way to build efficiently and in a really cost-efficient way, which is great, because we want to make sure that our money is well invested to produce the greatest number of housing options possible. [00:14:53] Crystal Fincher: And so on the Gig Harbor City Council, you've had to contend with this issue also - how has the city approached this - because Gig Harbor's actually done a decent job in providing and growing the amount of housing that you have in the city. [00:15:11] Robyn Denson: We have, although I would argue that not a lot of it is really affordable. So we have done a fantastic job of reaching our Growth Management Act targets. We're on track to not only reach those, but exceed those, and we do have a mix of housing. So I mean, there are definitely some things that we've done really well - and a lot of those decisions were made before me, so I won't take credit for it - but we've got some of our newer developments where the housing is a bit more dense, where we've got a larger apartment complex, for example, where there's some really cute cottage housing that when I door knocked there are a couple years ago, I thought - this is what I need - so cute and no yard to take care of. So there's some good options, but we can do more - and actually just this year, we're embarking upon an affordable housing survey and plan here in Gig Harbor to really look at what housing - what types of housing we're missing and not just design, but in terms of what's available to folks at the lower and middle incomes. And I know we've got a long way to go - we did just join last year with an organization, or a collaborative group, called SSHAP - I'm sure you've heard of that - with a number of other Pierce County jurisdictions to share a staff person and try and identify some real best practices to move things forward. But we're excited to look at some innovative uses of city-owned property, collaborations, and making sure that we're providing some additional resources. We have our businesses reaching out to us. We have our retirement - one of the retirement communities advocating for this saying, "There's no place for our workers to live and we love these people. We care about these people. We want these folks to be able to live in our community and their kids to be able to go to our schools." So we want to be able to provide that as well. [00:17:08] Crystal Fincher: Which makes sense, and related to the conversation about affordable housing is that of homelessness. And an issue that every area is contending with - that is not limited to urban areas, but certainly there's a conversation there. How do you plan to get people housed who are currently on the street? [00:17:30] Robyn Denson: Well, I'm very excited to have the opportunity hopefully to come onto the County Council at this time - as you know, just this week, they passed their comprehensive plan to end homelessness. So they have taken a major step forward with advocates to at least put something on paper and get everyone unified about an approach. Now, I will say from my work in this area, and even just from recently walking around to five or six of the encampments in Tacoma and talking to people and asking them - what kind of housing would work for you, what do you want - that was extremely educational, and what I've learned and what I'm hearing from other advocates is that everyone who is unhoused and is experiencing homelessness - they have their own individual story of their path. No one is five years old thinking, I'm going to grow up and live in a tent encampment. And the other thing I heard from these folks in the encampments is they're like, "We don't want to be on somebody's sidewalk. We don't want to be in the neighborhoods. We don't want to be bothering these people. We don't want them to be bothering us," which is becoming more and more of a concern. They're uncomfortable, the community's uncomfortable, the businesses are uncomfortable - it's not a good situation. And from what I heard from them, because they all came to be unhoused through different paths and all of their situations are completely different - some are working, some are not, some aren't able to, some may never be able to, they need - there's so many different needs that are specific. We need that many different paths to housing. I'm 100% supportive of the housing first model, but that's going to look different for different people. I talked to this one woman at the first encampment I visited and said, "Would you like to be in one of those hotels that the county just purchased or would you like a tiny home?" and she said, "No." She said, "I have experienced such trauma in shelters that I can't be indoors for more than three hours. I have anxiety attacks," and so it really ran the spectrum of what people wanted, but a lot of these folks were interested in sanctioned encampments - a place where, again, they could get out of the neighborhoods or get off of the sidewalks and have a place where they felt safe. They could be with their networks and communities, and there was sanitation, there were showers, there's laundry facilities, and there's supportive services so when folks are ready and they're feeling safer and more comfortable, they can avail themselves with those services. And then hopefully move up to what I think most of us would consider more sustainable, safer, better housing - whether that's tiny homes or the single room occupancy units in a motel or transitional housing, some may be supportive housing. But I think some of us have these expectations that we can just pluck somebody off the sidewalk and stick them in an apartment - and for some folks, yes - some folks just need that first month and last month, and a security deposit, and maybe some subsidy to get them through a few months, and they're going to be on their way. But for a lot of folks, they've dealt with so much trauma and there's so many fears and trust issues that they kind of need that time to be stable in a secure, safe housing situation before they can make those next steps - whether it's mental health treatment, behavioral health, substance abuse, or just relaxing in their space enough to be open to be receiving the services that so many of our wonderful nonprofits are ready - they're ready to provide. [00:21:13] Crystal Fincher: Yeah and I appreciate your perspective there - that safety for everyone, including those who are experiencing homelessness is so important. And the recognition that some of the things that sometimes were well intentioned, that people thought they were doing and providing a helpful space - like a congregate shelter - have been traumatic and harmful for a lot of people. And if you sit and think about it for a while - would you love to have no ability to have any privacy, to have no ability to lock up your possessions, and to not have any space and time on your own by yourself, and to constantly be around other people who may be experiencing their own crises - and that kind of a challenge. And that is traumatic for some people - has resulted in harm and trauma - and people are working through that, and so it's not always, "Oh, hey, we offered a service, there's a shelter available. Why wouldn't someone want to come in here? Well, they're refusing help and they clearly want to be where they're at on the street," and it's not that simple. I appreciate you having conversations with people who are being impacted - that is the group who is usually most able to tell you how they got where they're at, and what types of things would be helpful to be able to get out. So, as we look at that and providing supported services and sanctioned areas for encampments - is that something you plan to pursue if you're elected to the council? [00:22:48] Robyn Denson: Absolutely. Absolutely - and again, there's a variety of housing type needs that I will be supportive of, but I have to tell you, Crystal - until I actually had the conversation with the unhoused folks in the encampments, I did not think sanctioned encampments was a great idea. I thought, surely we can do better than that for these people, right - but what I heard, I learned so much. Again, it's so important to actually get their perspective and what I learned was they felt safer in their tent communities because where they are - if you'll notice - most of the encampments around Tacoma at least are small groups of maybe not even a dozen tents. And they all know each other and they watch out for each other - they take care of each other when somebody is injured or sick. I asked one, "Are you afraid to leave your tent? Are you afraid to leave your stuff and go to this service agency and get a shower?" because they're located typically where they can do that. And they're like, "Nope, we all watch out for each other," and so it's so important to - and even when and if we get some sanctioned encampments together - that we are cognizant of these relationships and of these little communities, because they're helping each other move forward as well. But yeah, the situation now is absolutely a crisis. It's one of the reasons that I'm really passionate about having good people on the County Council right now - who are willing to listen to the unhoused population, to the advocates who've been working with these folks for a long, long time and certainly know way more than I do, and make sure that we are creating the kind of housing that actually works and is going to move people towards self-sufficiency to the extent that is possible for different individuals. [00:24:37] Crystal Fincher: That makes sense. And I also want to talk about this moment that we're in - in terms of the pandemic - which is not over actually - [00:24:46] Robyn Denson: What? [00:24:46] Crystal Fincher: A lot of people are talking about - hey, as we move beyond the pandemic and we're in a post-COVID world - we aren't quite in that post-COVID world. We have certainly moved down from our recent peak of cases, but man, that was a really high peak. And so the overall case rate is still not as low as it has been during other parts of the pandemic - and we're easing up on masking requirements, and easing up - and some of the assistance programs have now terminated or have at least run out of resources, and so some of the supports that have been there to help people get through this time are evaporating. And that's causing some anxiety among a lot of people in the public, and there's still a significant segment of our society that cannot get vaccinated and that isn't feeling protected, whether it's young children or immunocompromised people. So as you look at that, and especially when you're looking at the County Council, which plays such a huge role in the public health response, what is your approach as we move forward with COVID? [00:25:57] Robyn Denson: Well, as I've said all along on City Council, I'm going to continue to follow the science and trust our professionals and our medical professionals as we move forward. I'm as excited as anybody else to be hopefully moving in a positive direction. Most of us, I think, are excited to be able to not wear masks anymore - I wouldn't do it if the CDC hadn't said it was okay, and our public health officials are saying it's okay. I do feel very encouraged that I know - the first day of school on Monday, I asked my daughter, she's a high schooler, "Were there kids that were masked?" and she said, "Yeah, there was four or five kids in each class that were masked," and I felt really good about that - the kids felt comfortable. And I see adults in the grocery store - that they feel comfortable wearing those masks, and I think that's where we need to be - that people need to feel safe and do what they need to feel safe. I know I have friends that are nurses, for example, and they still stay masked because they're working with neonatal babies, for example, or immunocompromised people, or folks who have family members that are immunocompromised, Crystal - and like you said, can't get vaccinated or are just super, super concerned about contracting COVID. So I think we, first of all, need to be respectful of the folks that do still have concerns, because yes, COVID is still out there - and we've heard in the news, high-profile people that are getting COVID after all this time. But I'm also honored for the opportunity to be part of the solution because we do have such a fantastic Public Health Department here in the Tacoma-Pierce County area, and we've got amazing professionals that I will seek the counsel of. I'm not going to pretend to be a doctor or a public health professional - I'm going to listen to them and follow their guidance on things. You mentioned assistance programs and that's a huge concern, because just 'cause we're able to take our masks off - doesn't mean snap your finger, everything's back to normal. There's going to be a transition period where - we're all kind of trying to get used to what our lives are going to look like. They're not going to go back immediately to what they were two years ago, and if folks have gotten behind on rent or behind on their mortgage payments or behind on their utility payments, we need to continue to beat the drum and let folks know that they need to reach out as soon as possible by calling, for example, 211 in Pierce County, or by contacting any of the social service agencies. They're going to point them in the right direction to start filling out that paperwork to get that assistance, because right now is not the time to be losing your housing. The housing market's going crazy, rents are just going up so high - that once you've lost your housing, it just makes - it makes the situation a hundred times worse. So we want to keep people in their housing. [00:28:55] Crystal Fincher: So what programs are available, or what would you continue to advocate for too - as you talk about prevent people from losing housing, because that is another big part of the solution to homelessness - is not to create more homelessness. How do we do a good job of keeping people in their homes who are behind right now? [00:29:16] Robyn Denson: Well, I think Pierce County has been doing a really great job at getting their rental assistance and mortgage assistance - sometimes people don't realize that's available as well - Pierce County's done a great job at getting that out the door. I'm not sure how much is left in the pot, or how long we're going to continue to do that, but I will certainly advocate that we need to keep an eye on what the need is and maintain our vigilance around that issue. So I'll continue and encourage everyone to continue to get the message out that these programs are still available. I know there's quite a bit of utility assistance still available - and something I learned - gosh, a few months ago by talking to somebody - is that even if you are - from what I heard, correct me if I'm wrong - but even if you are up on your rent, if you're behind on your utility payment, a landlord can evict you for that. And so we don't want any - we don't want to leave anything to chance in helping folks make sure that they can retain their housing. The resources are out there right now and even if, for example, the county had to pause its program or ran out of money until they get another influx of dollars, there's a lot of other social service agencies that do have pots of money for things like this - for emergency health, for rent in particular, and utilities. So I'd encourage people to continue to reach out and look for those resources because prevention is so much less expensive and so much less traumatic to an individual or family than an eviction would be. [00:30:52] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely. And then wanted to talk about, before we do close, we just saw in the legislature - a missed opportunity to add climate mitigation as a goal - [00:31:06] Robyn Denson: I know. [00:31:06] Crystal Fincher: - in the Growth Management Act. And so now you're running in a situation where you're headed to the council - that planning is starting now, as we move forward. What are your plans, even though that is not an absolute mandate from the state now, to make sure that as decisions are made - there has been talk and I agree - just every decision that is made does have a climate impact and at this point we need to be aware of that and tracking that. What is your approach going to be, and what do you think you can do throughout this planning process and with the lens that you take to explore decisions that are being made to make sure that we are mitigating climate harms and protecting people from what we're currently experiencing? [00:31:56] Robyn Denson: Right. Well, thank you for bringing that up and honestly, Crystal, I was shocked that that bill did not pass. It's something that I had advocated for, in collaboration with Washington Conservation Voters. And honestly, I thought that was going to be a slam dunk with this legislature and it's just to me, a no brainer. I can tell you that I'm very proud that the city of Gig Harbor is - we're not quite there yet, but we're a meeting or two away from - passing a resolution to include climate change in our comprehensive plan. So I think everything starts local, or sometimes it starts local - it certainly can start local and Gig Harbor is definitely doing that. And hopefully we will be a role model for other jurisdictions that are thinking of doing that as well, because as you mentioned, the planning starts now. So if communities are going to do that, don't wait for the state. At this point, don't wait for the state to mandate it - go ahead and I encourage all the jurisdictions to take that upon themselves. I am fortunate that if I'm able to join the County Council right now, that they have passed their large comprehensive environmental sustainability plan with some fantastic goals to reduce greenhouse emissions. So I am joining a team that appreciates and is in line with my thinking in regards to the environment and climate. So I'm excited for the county to lead the way to be a good role model for the jurisdictions that we serve, and hopefully to be a good role model and hopefully create some best practices that other jurisdictions can follow. And I always say sometimes things do have to start at the local level. I know Gig Harbor, along with some other jurisdictions, for example, passed the plastic bag ban years before the state did. And so if Pierce County does it, if Gig Harbor - I know other jurisdictions are doing it as well - then maybe that will help give some leverage to our state legislators as they work to do it next year. And we don't have to wait for the state - all of you local jurisdictions - we can do it on our own too. [00:34:01] Crystal Fincher: Absolutely makes sense. And as we part, are there any final words that you want to give to voters considering whether or not to vote for you, people even outside of the jurisdiction considering whether to support your campaign? What is at stake here and why is this so important? [00:34:16] Robyn Denson: Thank you, Crystal. Well, I will say - I speak to all sorts of people in and out of District 7 and even in and out of Pierce County - retaining a good County Council that's thinking and putting the people first, putting our communities first, putting our lands and waters first - is so important. And if you're interested in learning more about me, I have a pretty robust website - some people are like, "You put too much on it," at electrobyndenson.com. I'm willing to meet and talk to anybody, I'm out doorbelling. This is a really critical seat - we've got some amazing County Councilpeople now, and I'm so excited to pick up the baton of the amazing Derek Young - he's done such a fantastic job. And really implement a lot of the things that the County Council has worked so hard to get started and put in place. [00:35:11] Crystal Fincher: Well, thank you so much for taking the time to meet with us today. We'll link to the website, anything else that is relevant to this conversation in our episode notes and thank you so much for spending the time to talk with us today. [00:35:23] Robyn Denson: Thank you, Crystal. It was a pleasure. [00:35:25] Crystal Fincher: I thank you all for listening to Hacks & Wonks on KVRU 105.7 FM. The producer of Hacks & Wonks is Lisl Stadler with assistance from Shannon Cheng. You can find me on Twitter @finchfrii, spelled F-I-N-C-H-F-R-I-I. Now you can follow Hacks & Wonks on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever else you get your podcast - just type "Hacks & Wonks" into the search bar. Be sure to subscribe to get our Friday almost-live shows and our midweek show delivered to your podcast feed. If you like us, leave a review wherever you listen to Hacks & Wonks. You can also get a full transcript of this episode and links to the resources referenced in the show at officialhacksandwonks.com and in the episode notes. Thanks for tuning in. We'll talk to you next time.

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne
Episode 2262 – Remember March 29 – National Vietnam War Veterans Day

Vietnam Veteran News with Mack Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 9:30


Episode 2262 of the Vietnam Veteran News Podcast will feature a story about the planned celebration of National Vietnam War Veterans Day in Williamsburg, Virginia on March 29. The featured story is a letter to the editor at the Virginia … Continue reading → The post Episode 2262 – Remember March 29 – National Vietnam War Veterans Day appeared first on .

Bannon's War Room
Episode 1,405 – Veterans Day: Tomb Of The Unknown @ 100 (w/ Patrick K. O‘Donnell, Cpt. Maureen Bannon, Joe Kent, Wendy Rogers, BG Don Bolduc, Tej Gill)

Bannon's War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 53:14


We discuss the history of Veterans Day and commemorate those who served.  Our guests are: Patrick K. O'Donnell, Cpt. Maureen Bannon, Joe Kent, Wendy Rogers, BG Don Bolduc, Tej Gill Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join Aired On: 11/11/2021 Watch: On the Web: http://www.warroom.org On Podcast: http://warroom.ctcin.bio On TV: PlutoTV Channel 240, Dish Channel 219, Roku, Apple TV, FireTV or on https://AmericasVoice.news. #news #politics #realnews

Bannon's War Room
Episode 1,406 – Veterans Day: Tomb Of The Unknown @ 100 (w/ Patrick K. O‘Donnell, Matt Guedes, Eric Greitens, Ethan Segovia, Sonny Borrellil)

Bannon's War Room

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 56:15


We discuss the history of Veterans Day and commemorate those who served.  Our guests are: Patrick K. O'Donnell, Matt Guedes, Eric Greitens, Ethan Segovia, Sonny Borrellil Stay ahead of the censors - Join us warroom.org/join Aired On: 11/11/2021 Watch: On the Web: http://www.warroom.org On Podcast: http://warroom.ctcin.bio On TV: PlutoTV Channel 240, Dish Channel 219, Roku, Apple TV, FireTV or on https://AmericasVoice.news. #news #politics #realnews

Our American Stories
EP115: The Origins of Veterans Day, America's First True Superhero and Our Nation's Youngest Noncommissioned Officer

Our American Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 38:16


On this episode of Our American Stories, Anne Claire shares the history of Veterans Day and the many ways Veterans have been honored throughout American history with the use of banners; Vince Benedetto shares the time he explained the importance of Veterans Day to an auditorium of kids and how George Washington is responsible for so many of our American traditions today; and Kristin O'Donnell Tubb tells the story of John Lincoln Clem, the United States of America's youngest known soldier in the American Civil War. Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate) Time Codes: 00:00 - The Origins of Veterans Day 10:00 - America's First True Superhero 35:00 - Our Nation's Youngest Noncommissioned Officer Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.