Podcasts about saigon

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  • 829PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about saigon

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Latest podcast episodes about saigon

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Being Open About Mental Health Working In The Challenging Food & Beverage Industry (Live) | Jovel Chan TEASER S7 E8

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 2:19


Join The Seven Million Bikes Community.Jovel Chan is a food marketer, writer and industry speaker who has a decade of working, living and eating across Europe, Asia and the Middle East, and has managed more than 50 restaurants in 10 countries in Head of Marketing roles.Today, she is the founder of Vietnam's only-dedicated F&B industry blog and podcast, is regularly featured in the media and speaks at industry conferences and workshops.Her blog has blown up quickly in Saigon after a flurry of engaging articles about the local scene. She shares the latest industry news and happenings, trends, opinions and interviews with key opinion leaders from places like Mondelez Kinh Do, Unilever Food Solutions and BAEMIN. Her words have been featured in Vietcetera, Vietnam Plus, e27 and Destinations of the World News and she can often be seen speaking at industry conferences (Reimagine: Halal in Asia 2020 APAC) and universities (National Economics University and VinUniversity in Vietnam) or conducting industry workshops and webinars in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.For anyone who follows Jovel on social media you will know she is candidly open about her mental health and how she deals with this. It is refreshing to see such openess to normalise something so common, on something that has been stigmatised to the point when Jovel had her first panic attack she was scared about being a “crazy lady on the train” and being sent to a hospital. We talk about this, how she got into the industry and what's next in the Saigon food and beverage scene after a gruelling lockdown where some didn't survive.Follow Jovel on Instagram and check out her blog at www.jovelchan.comSeason 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Journalist Terence Smith reflects on decades of reporting on American presidents, wars

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 8:52


On our bookshelf tonight, NewsHour's old friend and former longtime media correspondent Terence Smith's memoir: "Four Wars, Five Presidents: A Reporter's Journey from Jerusalem to Saigon to the White House." Smith spoke with Judy Woodruff about the book. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Why The Growing Black Community in Saigon Created Their Own Facebook Group | Hayden Lowry S7 E7

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 76:23


Join the Seven Million Bikes Community. This is another fascinating deep dive into the live of someone who has chosen to make Vietnam home for over a decade.Hayden Lowry runs Caribê Jamaican Patties, is a freelance video post-production specialist, and the admin for the "Black in Saigon" Facebook group."I was bequeathed it by a lovely, smart and intelligent lady named Hillary who is a lawyer and she was living out here. We had the the opportunity to meet each other mere months before I moved to Vietnam in 2005, and at that time you literally could count black Westerners then on one hat, there were so few of us."Among various topics discussed Hayden explains the ‘Black In Saigon' Facebook group was created to give this community a safe space to ask questions that would often be the subject of disdain or even abuse in Expat groups on Facebook. As anyone who has lived in Saigon and used some of these groups, they are familiar with how toxic they can be. So it is understandable why the Black Community in Saigon would want to create their own group.Listen to the full episode wherever you get podcasts!Shout-outs in this show to Nadis Nam, Jwyanza Hobson and Adrie Lopez Mackay (as always)!Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Why The Growing Black Community in Saigon Created Their Own Facebook Group | Hayden Lowry TEASER S7 E7

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 2:37


Join the Seven Million Bikes Community.This is another fascinating deep dive into the live of someone who has chosen to make Vietnam home for over a decade.Hayden Lowry runs Caribê Jamaican Patties, is a freelance video post-production specialist, and the admin for the "Black in Saigon" Facebook group."I was bequeathed it by a lovely, smart and intelligent lady named Hillary who is a lawyer and she was living out here. We had the the opportunity to meet each other mere months before I moved to Vietnam in 2005, and at that time you literally could count black Westerners then on one hat, there were so few of us."Among various topics discussed Hayden explains the ‘Black In Saigon' Facebook group was created to give this community a safe space to ask questions that would often be the subject of disdain or even abuse in Expat groups on Facebook. As anyone who has lived in Saigon and used some of these groups, they are familiar with how toxic they can be. So it is understandable why the Black Community in Saigon would want to create their own group.Listen to the full episode wherever you get podcasts!Shout-outs in this show to Nadis Nam, Jwyanza Hobson and Adrie Lopez Mackay (as always)!Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Parading Around Saigon In Ladies Pyjamas With A Pet Chicken Leads to YouTube Fame | Phúc Mập S7 E6

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 76:39


Join the Seven Million Bikes Community.This episode's guest is another foreigner fluent in Vietnamese who was put forward to us by similarly fluent Nam Den from Season 5, and works with both him and Season 6 guest Micka Chu regularly, including on VTV.Brandon Hurley, known as Phúc Mập is a popular YouTube Content Creator in Vietnam, going viral before he'd even published his first video after parading around Saigon in ladies pyjamas and a “pet” chicken.Phúc Mập tread a similar path to host Niall, and many other expats, in that after travelling around Asia fell in love with Vietnam and never left. While there are a lot of expats who have found themselves in Vietnam for many years and still can't speak the language, some even with a Vietnamese wife, Phuc Map was motivated to speak the local language to communicate with his wife's family.Watch and Subscribe to Phúc Mập Vlog here. Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

99% Invisible
461- Changing Stripes

99% Invisible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:30


Rioters carried many familiar flags during the January 6th insurrection at the United States Capitol -- Confederate, MAGA, as well as some custom-made ones like a flag of Trump looking like Rambo. Except for onlookers who were already familiar with the design, it would have been easy to overlook one particular bright yellow flag with three red horizontal stripes across the center. This was the flag of South Vietnam.There were actually several confounding international flags present at the Capitol riot that day: the Canadian, Indian, South Korean flags, all were spotted somewhere in the mayhem. But what was peculiar about the Vietnamese flag being there was that it's not technically the flag of Vietnam but the Republic of Vietnam, a country that no longer exists. And what this flag stands for (or should stand for) remains a really contentious issue for the Vietnamese American community.Changing Stripes

99% Invisible
461- Changing Stripes

99% Invisible

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 31:30


Rioters carried many familiar flags during the January 6th insurrection at the United States Capitol -- Confederate, MAGA, as well as some custom-made ones like a flag of Trump looking like Rambo. Except for onlookers who were already familiar with the design, it would have been easy to overlook one particular bright yellow flag with three red horizontal stripes across the center. This was the flag of South Vietnam.There were actually several confounding international flags present at the Capitol riot that day: the Canadian, Indian, South Korean flags, all were spotted somewhere in the mayhem. But what was peculiar about the Vietnamese flag being there was that it's not technically the flag of Vietnam but the Republic of Vietnam, a country that no longer exists. And what this flag stands for (or should stand for) remains a really contentious issue for the Vietnamese American community.Changing Stripes

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Parading Around Saigon In Ladies Pyjamas With A Pet Chicken Leads to YouTube Fame | Phúc Mập TEASER S7 E6

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 2:30


Join the Seven Million Bikes Community.This episode's guest is another foreigner fluent in Vietnamese who was put forward to us by similarly fluent Nam Den from Season 5, and works with both him and Season 6 guest Micka Chu regularly, including on VTV.Brandon Hurley, known as Phúc Mập is a popular YouTube Content Creator in Vietnam, going viral before he'd even published his first video after parading around Saigon in ladies pyjamas and a “pet” chicken.Phúc Mập tread a similar path to host Niall, and many other expats, in that after travelling around Asia fell in love with Vietnam and never left.While there are a lot of expats who have found themselves in Vietnam for many years and still can't speak the language, some even with a Vietnamese wife, Phuc Map was motivated to speak the local language to communicate with his wife's family.Watch and Subscribe to Phúc Mập Vlog here.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.Follow us on Facebook.Buy us a coffee.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

RealClearPolitics Takeaway
Saigon vs Kabul: Political and Geopolitical Consequences with Andrew Busch

RealClearPolitics Takeaway

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 28:57


“The Consequences of Failure: The Politics of Saigon and Kabul” Commentary by Andrew Busch on RealClearDefenseRead the RealClear Opinion Research survey on US attitudes toward its military.Subscribe to the RealClearDefense Podcast "Hot Wash"

The Red Line
53 - Vietnam: Frontline of the South China Sea

The Red Line

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 62:02


Vietnam is quickly become the new frontline in the South China Sea, with the nation standing in the direct path of an expansionist China. Will Vietnam be able to once again be the rock great empires crash upon, or will they be pulled into Beijing's gravitational orbit.  On the panel this week  Sebastian Strangio - The Diplomat Huong Le Thu - ASPI Gordon Flake - Perth USAsia Follow the show on @TheRedLinePod Follow Michael on @MikeHilliardAus For more info please visit - www.theredlinepodcast.com  

PBS NewsHour - Segments
How Seattle's Vietnamese community is helping Afghan refugees

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 8:05


The swift fall of the Afghan government to the Taliban and the refugee crisis in the conflict-torn nation is a painful reminder to many Vietnamese-Americans, many of whom were forced to leave their nation after Saigon fell in 1975. Special Correspondent Mike Cerre reports on how the Vietnamese community in Seattle is reaching out to help Afghan refugees. The story is part of our ongoing series 'Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.' PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Horns of a Dilemma
Refuge and Reconciliation

Horns of a Dilemma

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 48:55


In the wake of the American withdrawal from Afghanistan, much attention has focused on the fate of Afghan citizens who risked their lives to aid U.S. forces. The hastily organized evacuation of Afghan refugees has frequently drawn unfavorable comparison to the evacuation and resettlement of Vietnamese refugees after the fall of Saigon in 1975. As the guest in this week's podcast demonstrates, however, the story of how the United States came to accept Vietnamese refugees is far more nuanced than many comparisons suggest. Professor Amanda Demmer is the author of After Saigon's Fall: Refugees and U.S.-Vietnamese Relations, 1975-2000, published this year by Cambridge University Press. In the book, and in her talk, Demmer describes how the process of accepting refugees following the war in Vietnam both shaped and was shaped by significant movements in domestic and international politics, including a re-assertion of Congressional power in foreign relations, changing domestic and international norms regarding refugees, and an interlocking of humanitarian and human rights narratives. Ultimately, Demmer argues, understanding the story of refugees is central to understanding the normalization of relations between the United States and Vietnam.  This talk was sponsored by the Clements Center at the University of Texas, Austin, and was hosted by Mark Lawrence, an associate professor of history at the University of Texas, Austin, and director of the LBJ Presidential Library and Museum.

AlternativeRadio
[Daniel Ellsberg] Origins of the Vietnam War

AlternativeRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 57:01


The 50th anniversary of the Pentagon Papers has brought attention once more to Daniel Ellsberg. His action in 1971 in releasing the Pentagon Papers blew the lid off of Washington's mountain of lies and deceptions about Vietnam and ultimately led to Watergate and Nixon's resignation. In this never before broadcast program we go back into history as Ellsberg describes the origins of the Vietnam War. He traces early U.S. support for the French effort to retain control of its Indochina colony. He talks about U.S. nuclear weapons policy including threats against the Soviet Union as well as Eisenhower's offer of nukes to the French to stave off defeat at Dien Bien Phu in 1954. The U.S. later totally supplanted the French and expanded the war to Laos and Cambodia. Ellsberg looks at the policy of supporting Diem's Saigon regime, first by Kennedy then Johnson. Interview by David Barsamian.

KQED’s Forum
Toward a More Perfect Sanctuary: How To Reform the U.S. Asylum System

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 55:23


The last time Congress re-negotiated who is eligible for asylum in the United States, it came in the aftermath of the fall of Saigon, when an influx of southeast Asian refugees forced changes to how Americans provided sanctuary. Now, as Afghan refugees continue to arrive after the fall of Kabul and amidst the continuing stream of people fleeing violence in the Americas, could this be a moment when our system changes again? And if so, how might we create a better system? In the final show of our series on asylum we talk about how to build a better system for providing humanitarian relief at our borders and inside our country.

Dermot & Dave
Meet The People Who Make Up 'Eire Nua'

Dermot & Dave

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 10:58


For the first time in 20 years, Hector Ó hEochagáin isn't travelling around the globe in the name of television. [audio mp3="https://media.radiocms.net/uploads/2021/09/30131934/Hector_3009.mp3"][/audio] After bringing cameras to Siberia, Saigon, Cuba, The United States and countless other places, the small matter of a global pandemic has grounded the TG4 presenter! But, Hector is a man who won't be stopped, and this time, he's embracing all there is to love about this small country, and the hundreds of thousands who have moved here and have made it home. 'Eire Nua' is a brand new TV show which sees Hector cross the country meeting some incredible people from all around the world who have embraced the Irish sport, culture, hair colour and the language. Speaking to Dermot and Dave, Hector shared some of the stories he heard along the way, including a Russian man who is essentially running a Gaeltacht! You can catch the chat by clicking play above.  

Business Matters
President Biden pledges 500m more vaccines to developing world

Business Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 52:39


President Joe Biden made the pledge at a virtual Covid-19 summit on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, promising an "arsenal of vaccines". The additional jabs will see the total US commitment on vaccine sharing exceed one billion jabs. We'll hear from Lily Caprani, head of Advocacy for Health at UNICEF, Peter Maybarduk at the not-for-profit consumer advocacy organisation Public Citizen, as well as Thomas Cueni, Director General at the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations. Also in the programme: after Canada's most expensive federal election in history, the electoral map is largely unchanged. Guest Takara Small with CBC talks us through the agenda of the new government. Lebanon's inflation rate has become the highest in the world, according to the latest figures from the Lebanon Central Administration of Statistics. Tala Ramadan, a journalist in Beirut, explains how ordinary people in Lebanon are trying to get by, as fuel, food and internet connection become ever more scarce. A multi-billion dollar project to build a new electric train line to link Egypt's Red Sea and Mediterranean coasts, due for completion in 2027, is being described as the Suez Canal on rails. Plus, the east African nation of Kenya has become the first market in which video streaming platform Netflix has launched a free service, in a bid to persuade people to sign up to a full subscription. All through the show we'll be joined by Takara Small with CBC in Toronto, and Lien Hoang with Nikkei Asia in Saigon. (Picture credit: Getty Images)

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Pivoting To Grow Your Business During Lockdown (LIVE) | Martial Ganière S7 E3

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 55:25


Only the second ever Live episode of A Vietnam Podcast!Niall is joined by business consultant Martial Ganière, from Switzerland.Niall and Martial discuss Martial's background, moving for Europe to Vietnam and creating a life and business in Saigon. We also talk about setting up a business in Vietnam and how to deal with the current lockdown, lockdown itself and life in Vietnam.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.https://www.bluedragon.org/donate/https://www.saigonchildren.com/engage/covid-19-crisis-2/Follow us on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/SevenMillionBikesBuy us a coffeehttps://ko-fi.com/sevenmillionbikesSupport the showhttps://www.patreon.com/AVietnamPodcast-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Entendez-vous l'éco ?
Les nouvelles cités géantes 3/3 : Ho Chi Minh ville : entre ruelles et gratte-ciels

Entendez-vous l'éco ?

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 58:41


durée : 00:58:41 - Entendez-vous l'éco ? - par : Tiphaine de Rocquigny, Thibaut Mommeja - Ho Chi Minh-ville, 12 millions d'habitants, est le visage de la réussite économique vietnamienne contemporaine. Ancienne ville coloniale aux ruelles étroites, l'ex-Saigon se définit aujourd'hui par de nombreux projets urbanistiques verticaux qui renforcent les ruptures spatio-sociales de la ville. - réalisation : François Richer

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Pivoting To Grow Your Business During Lockdown (LIVE) | Martial Ganière TEASER S7 E3

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 2:18


Only the second ever Live episode of A Vietnam Podcast!Niall is joined by business consultant Martial Ganière, from Switzerland.Niall and Martial discuss Martial's background, moving for Europe to Vietnam and creating a life and business in Saigon. We also talk about setting up a business in Vietnam and how to deal with the current lockdown, lockdown itself and life in Vietnam.Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.https://www.bluedragon.org/donate/https://www.saigonchildren.com/engage/covid-19-crisis-2/Follow us on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/SevenMillionBikesBuy us a coffeehttps://ko-fi.com/sevenmillionbikesSupport the showhttps://www.patreon.com/AVietnamPodcast-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

AMATEUR NATION
Episode 139: “SPECIAL: (PART 3) U.S. Marine, Sergeant Don Nicholas; Vietnam AND Afghanistan Veteran”

AMATEUR NATION

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 45:10


“SPECIAL: U.S. Marine, Sergeant Don Nicholas; Vietnam AND Afghanistan Veteran”This certainly isn't the funniest episode I've aired, but it's probably the most important one.This is a moving, eye-opening, THREE-PART interview with a soft spoken, gentle man who is as tough as they come; who has served his country as a Marine Guard at the U.S. Embassy in the Vietnam War (having been on the second to last chopper out), AND served in the Army for two tours in Afghanistan: Staff Sergeant Don Nicholas. Joining him is his proud daughter, Marine Sergeant Vanessa Anderson who served in the war in Iraq. This rare combination of guests makes this episode extra special, and it's packed with brutal honesty and frank conversation, with first-hand accounts, and bold predictions for the future of America.Discussion includes: *What and why things went wrong in the Afghanistan evacuation*Who knew and who's to blame*Why we were forced out of Afghanistan*What should have been done*Who should be punished*Lies told to us by the government about the military *How this event affects our military*How this affects America's and the world's safety*The treasonous acts committed by our government *The electric/hybrid car connection *What the U.S. can expect next*Who's really running the show*Who could be President soonGet podcast previews and other fun content every Thursday at 7 a.m. Eastern! Subscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wuyAWqGet the book! https://amzn.to/2qWAOlz 
Facebook: https://facebook.com/lousantinientertainment 
Instagram: @lou.santini3 
Website: www.lousantini.com 
LISTEN ON: Amazon Music & Audible, Anchor, Anghami, Apple Podcasts, Blubrry, Breaker, Captivate, Castbox, Castro, Deezer, Gaana, GooglePodcasts, IHeartRadio, JioSaavn, Luminary, Overcast, Pandora, PlayerFM, Pocketcasts, Podcast Addict, Podcast Index, Podfriend, PodOmatic, Podstation, Podverse, RadioPublic, SoundCloud, Spotify, Stitcher and TuneIn!

AMATEUR NATION
Episode 138: “SPECIAL: (PART 2) U.S. Marine, Sergeant Don Nicholas; Vietnam AND Afghanistan Veteran”

AMATEUR NATION

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 42:28


“SPECIAL: U.S. Marine, Sergeant Don Nicholas; Vietnam AND Afghanistan Veteran”This certainly isn't the funniest episode I've aired, but it's probably the most important one.This is a moving, eye-opening, THREE-PART interview with a soft spoken, gentle man who is as tough as they come; who has served his country as a Marine Guard at the U.S. Embassy in the Vietnam War (having been on the second to last chopper out), AND served in the Army for two tours in Afghanistan: Staff Sergeant Don Nicholas. Joining him is his proud daughter, Marine Sergeant Vanessa Anderson who served in the war in Iraq. This rare combination of guests makes this episode extra special, and it's packed with brutal honesty and frank conversation, with first-hand accounts, and bold predictions for the future of America.Discussion includes: *What and why things went wrong in the Afghanistan evacuation*Who knew and who's to blame*Why we were forced out of Afghanistan*What should have been done*Who should be punished*Lies told to us by the government about the military *How this event affects our military*How this affects America's and the world's safety*The treasonous acts committed by our government *The electric/hybrid car connection *What the U.S. can expect next*Who's really running the show*Who could be President soonGet podcast previews and other fun content every Thursday at 7 a.m. Eastern! Subscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wuyAWqGet the book! https://amzn.to/2qWAOlz 
Facebook: https://facebook.com/lousantinientertainment 
Instagram: @lou.santini3 
Website: www.lousantini.com 
LISTEN ON: Amazon Music & Audible, Anchor, Anghami, Apple Podcasts, Blubrry, Breaker, Captivate, Castbox, Castro, Deezer, Gaana, GooglePodcasts, IHeartRadio, JioSaavn, Luminary, Overcast, Pandora, PlayerFM, Pocketcasts, Podcast Addict, Podcast Index, Podfriend, PodOmatic, Podstation, Podverse, RadioPublic, SoundCloud, Spotify, Stitcher and TuneIn!

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Race in America and International Relations

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021


Travis L. Adkins, deputy assistant administrator for Africa at USAID and lecturer of African and security studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service and in the Prisons and Justice Initiative at Georgetown University, and Brenda Gayle Plummer, professor of history at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, led a conversation on race in America and international relations. FASKIANOS: Welcome to the first session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Travis Adkins and Brenda Gayle Plummer with us to discuss race in America and international relations. Travis Adkins is deputy assistant administrator in the Bureau of Africa at USAID, and lecturer of African and security studies at the Walsh School of Foreign Service, and in the Prisons and Justice Initiative at Georgetown University. As an international development leader, he has two decades of experience working in governance, civil society, and refugee and migration affairs in over fifty nations throughout Africa and the Middle East. Mr. Adkins was a CFR international affairs fellow and is a CFR member. Dr. Brenda Gayle Plummer is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research includes race and gender, international relations, and civil rights. Dr. Plummer has taught Afro-American history throughout her twenty years of experience in higher education. Previously she taught at Fisk University, the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the University of Minnesota. And from 2001 to 2005, Dr. Plummer served on the Historical Advisory Committee of the U.S. Department of State. So, thank you both for being with us today. We appreciate you taking the time to share your thoughts with us. Travis, I thought we could begin with you to talk about the ways in which you've seen race relations in America influence U.S. foreign policy. ADKINS: Sure. Thank you so much, Irina. And welcome to everyone. Thank you for joining. The first thing I would say is that America's long history of violence, exclusion, and barbarism towards Black people and indigenous people and Asian communities and immigrant communities in the United States have worked to give the lie to the notion of who we say we are in terms of freedom, in terms of democracy, in terms of the respect for human rights. And these are the core messages that we seek to project in our foreign policy. And we've not been able to resolve those contradictions because we have refused to face this history, right? And we can't countenance a historical narrative in which we are not the heroes, not the good guys, not on the right side of history. And the challenge that we've had is that we've seen that play out in so many ugly ways domestically. But it also has resonance and relevance in our foreign policy, because what it ends up doing is essentially producing a foreign policy of platitudes and contradictory posturing on the issues of human rights, on the issues of racial justice, on the issues of democratic governance when the world can see not only this history but this present reality of racial discrimination, of police brutality, of efforts to suppress the political participation of specific groups of people inside of America. They can see children in cages at the Southern border. They can see anti-Asian hate taking place in our nation, and they can hear those messages resounding, sometimes from our White House, sometimes from our Senate, sometimes from our Congress and other halls of power throughout the United States. And that works against the message of who we say we are, which is really who we want to be. But the thing that we, I think, lose out on is pretending that where we want to be is actually where we are. And I think back a couple weeks ago Secretary Blinken came out saying to diplomats in the State Department that it was okay for them to admit America's flaws and failings in their diplomatic engagements with other countries. But I would—I do applaud that. But I also think that saying that we would admit it to the rest of the world—the rest of the world already knows. And who we would have to need to focus on admitting it to is ourselves, because we have not faced this national shame of ours as it relates to the historical and the present reality of White supremacy, of racialized violence and hatred and exclusion in our immigration policy, in our education policy, in our law and customs and cultural mores that have helped to produce ongoing violence and hatred of this nature in which our history is steeped. I think the other part of that is that we lose the opportunity to then share that message with the rest of the world. And so, what I like to say is that our real history is better than the story that we tell. So instead of us framing ourselves and our foreign policy as a nation who fell from the heavens to the top of a mountain, it's a more powerful story to say that we climbed up out of a valley and are still climbing up out of a valley of trying to create and produce and cultivate a multiracial, multiethnic democracy with respect for all, and that that is and has been a struggle. And I think that that message is much more powerful. And what it does is it creates healing for us at home, but it also begins to take away this kind of Achilles' heel that many of our adversaries have used historically—the Soviet Union, now Russia, China, Iran—this notion that democracy and freedom and the moral posturing of America is all for naught if you just look at what they do at home. Who are they to preach to you about these things when they themselves have the same challenges? And so I think that we would strengthen ourselves if we could look at this in that way. And I would just close by saying that we often speak of the civil rights movement and the movement for decolonization in the world, and specifically in Africa where I mostly work, speak of them in the past tense. But I would argue that both of them are movements and histories that are continuously unfolding, that are not resolved, and that haven't brought themselves to peaceful kinds of conclusions. And this is why when George Floyd is killed on camera, choked for nine minutes and loses his life, that you see reverberations all over the world, people pushing back because they are suffering from the same in their countries, and they are following after anti-Asian hate protestors and advocates, Black Lives Matter advocates and protestors, people who are saying to the world this is unacceptable. And so even in that way, you see the linked fates that people share. And so I think that the more we begin to face who we are at home, the more we begin to heal these wounds and relate better in the foreign policy arena, because I think that it is a long held fallacy that these things are separate, right? A nation's foreign policy is only an extension of its beliefs, its policies and its aspirations and its desires from home going out into the world. So I will stop there. And thank you for the question. FASKIANOS: Thank you very much. Dr. Plummer, over to you. PLUMMER: Well, your question is a very good one. It is also a very book-length question. I'll try to address that. First of all, I would like to say that I find Mr. Adkins' statement quite eloquent and can't think of anything I disagree with in what he has said. There are a couple of things that we might consider as well. I think there are several issues embedded in this question of the relationship between race relations in the United States and it's policies toward other countries. One of them is, I think there's a difference between what policymakers intend and how American policy is perceived. There is also the question of precisely who is making and carrying out U.S. foreign policy. Now there was a time when that question I think could be very readily answered. But we're now in an age where we have enhanced roles for the military and the intelligence community. We have private contractors executing American objectives overseas. And this really places a different spin on things, somewhat different from what we observe when we look at this only through a strictly historical lens. I think we also need to spend some time thinking about the precise relationship between race and racism and what we might call colonial, more of imperialist practices. You might look, for example, at what is the relationship between the essentially colonial status of places like Puerto Rico and the Marianas and the—how those particular people from those places are perceived and treated within both the insular context and the domestic context. Clearly, everybody on the planet is shaped to a large degree by the culture and the society that they live in, that they grew up in, right? And so it is probably no mystery from the standpoint of attitudes that certain kinds of people domestically may translate into similar views of people overseas. But I think one of the things we might want to think about is how our institutions, as well as prejudices, influence what takes place. People like to talk, for example, about the similarities between the evacuation of Saigon and the evacuation of Kabul and wonder what is it called when you do the same thing over and over again and expect different results? We might want to think about what is it, institutionally, which creates these kinds of repetitions, creates situations in which diplomats are forced to apologize and explain continually about race and other conflictual issues in American society. We might also think about what you perhaps could call a racialization process. Do we create categories of pariahs in response to national emergencies? Do we create immigrants from countries south of the United States as enemies because we don't have a comprehensive and logical way of dealing with immigration? Do we create enemies out of Muslims because of our roles in the Middle East and, you know, the activities and actions of other states? There's some historical presence for this—the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, for example. So it seems to me that in addressing I think, you know, some of this very rich question, there are a number of ways and facets that we might want to look at and discuss more fully. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you very much. And now we're going to go to all of you for questions and comments. So you can either ask your question by raising your hand, click on the raised hand icon and I will call on you, or else you can write your question in the Q&A box. And if you choose to write your question—although we'd prefer to hear your voice—please include your affiliation. And when I call on you, please let us know who you are and your institution. So the first question, the first raised hand I see is from Stanley Gacek. Q: Yes, thank you very much. Thank you very much, Professor Plummer and Mr. Adkins, for a very, very compelling presentation. My name is Stanley Gacek. I'm the senior advisor for global strategies at the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union, representing 1.3 million working women and men in the United States and Canada in the retail, wholesale, food production, healthcare, and services industries. Practically all of our members are on the frontlines of the pandemic. I also served as deputy director and interim director of the ILO mission in Brazil in 2011 to 2016. And my question is this. I wonder if the speakers would also acknowledge that an issue for the United States in terms of its credibility with regard to racial justice, human rights, and of course labor rights, is a rather paltry record of the United States in terms of ratifying international instruments and adhering to international fora with regard to all of these issues. One example which comes to mind in my area is ILO Convention 111 against discrimination in employment and profession, which could—actually has gone through a certain due diligence process in former administrations and was agreed to by business and labor in the United States but still the United States has failed to ratify. I just wondered if you might comment more generally about how that affects our credibility in terms of advocating for racial justice, human rights, and labor rights throughout the world. Thank you very much. FASKIANOS: Who can address that, would like to address that? PLUMMER: Well, I have very little immediate knowledge of this, and I have to say that labor issues and labor rights have been kind of a missing element in terms of being heavily publicized and addressed. I think it has something to do with the fact that over the course of the decades the United States has been less responsive to the United Nations, to international organizations in general. But in terms of the specifics, you know, precisely what has fallen by the wayside, I, you know, personally don't have, you know, knowledge about that. ADKINS: And I would just say more generally, not to speak specifically in terms of labor, where I'm also not an expert, but there is, of course, a long history of the U.S. seeking to avoid these kinds of issues in the international arena writ large as Dr. Plummer was just referring to. I just finished a book by Carol Anderson called Eyes Off the Prize, which is a whole study of this and the ways in which the U.S. government worked through the United Nations to prevent the internationalization of the civil rights movement which many—Malcom X and Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, and others—sought to frame it in the context of human rights and raise it into an international specter, and that was something that the U.S. government did not want to happen. And of course, we know that part of the genius of the civil rights movement writ large was this tactic of civil disobedience, not just to push against a law that we didn't like to see in effect but actually to create a scene that would create international media attention which would show to the world what these various communities were suffering inside of America, to try to create pressure outside of our borders for the cause of freedom and justice and democracy. And so there is that long history there which you've touched on with your question. Thank you for that. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Mojubaolu Olufunke Okome. Q: Good afternoon and thank you for your presentation. I just wonder about U.S. foreign policy, how it lines up with the domestic politics, you know, in terms of race relations, because if one was to believe U.S. propaganda, you know, this country is doing good in the world, it's the country to emulate. But you know, the events of—well, I guess the George Floyd case brought into graphic relief what most astute observers of the U.S. know, that race relations of the U.S. do not line up very well with the constitutional aspirations of the U.S. So what's going to change now, you know? And then there's also this pandemic and the way which race and class is showing us about the real serious inequalities in the U.S. So what's going to change in terms of lessons learned? And then moving forward, is also multilateralism going to come back into U.S. foreign policy in some way? That's it. PLUMMER: I think—I'm getting kind of an echo here. I don't know if other people are. I don't think anyone is—you know, who is thinking about this seriously doubts that the United States is in a crisis at the moment—a crisis of legitimacy not only abroad but also domestically. We have a situation in which an ostensibly developed country has large pockets, geographic pockets where there are, you know, 30, 40, 50 percent poverty rates. We have people who are essentially mired in superstition, you know, with regard to, you know, matters of health and science. And you know, I don't think anyone is, you know—is, you know—who is, you know, thinking about this with any degree of gravity is not concerned about the situation. Once again, I think we're talking here about institutions, about how we can avoid this sort of repetitive and cyclical behavior. But one thing I want to say about George Floyd is that this is a phenomenon that is not only unique to the United States. One of the reasons why George Floyd became an international cause célèbre is because people in other countries also were experiencing racism. There—other countries had issues with regard to immigration. And so really looking at a situation in which I think is—you know, transcends the domestic, but it also transcends, you know, simply looking at the United States as, you know, the sort of target of criticism. FASKIANOS: Do you want to add anything, Travis, or do you want to—should we go to the next question? ADKINS: Go on to the next question. Thank you. FASKIANOS: OK, thank you. Let's go to Shaarik Zafar with Georgetown, and our prior questioner was with Brooklyn—teachers at Brooklyn College. Q: Hey, there. This is Shaarik Zafar. I was formerly the special counsel for post-9/11 national origin discrimination in the Department of Justice Civil Rights Division—sorry, that's a mouthful—and then most recently during the Obama years I was a special representative to Muslim communities. So this—I first applaud the presentation. These issues are very near and dear to me. I think it's clear, you know, we have to own up and acknowledge our shortcomings. And I think, you know, I was really sad to hear that we actually worked against highlighting what I think is really an example of American exceptionalism, which is our civil rights movement and our civil rights community. When I was at State during the Obama years, we had a very modest program where we brought together U.S. civil rights leaders and connected them with European civil rights leaders. And the idea wasn't that we had it all figured out but rather that, you know, in some respects the United States has made some advances when it comes to civil rights organizing and civil society development in that respect—and perhaps more so than other countries. I was just thinking, I would love to get the panelists' thoughts on ways that we can continue to collaborate and—you know, on a civil society level between civil rights organizations in the United States and abroad and the way the U.S. government should actually support that—even if it means highlighting our shortcomings—but as a way to, you know, invest in these types of linkages and partnerships to not only highlight our shortcomings but look for ways that we could, you know, actually come to solutions that need to be, I think, fostered globally. Thanks so much. ADKINS: You know, the first thing I would say, Shaarik—thanks for your question—I thought it was interesting, this idea of framing the civil rights movement as a kind of example of American exceptionalism. And I think there's a way in which I would relate to that in the sense that folks did, at least nominally or notionally, have certain kinds of freedom of speech, certain kinds of rights to assembly. But even those were challenged, of course, when we see the violence and the assassinations and all of the machinations of the government against those who were leaders or participants in that movement. And so in that sense, perhaps I would agree. I might push back, though, in terms of American exceptionalism as it relates to civil rights, because these people were actually advocating against the U.S. government, who actually did not want them to have the rights that they were promised under the Constitution. Of course, many of us would not be free or able to speak up without the 13th and 14th and 15th Amendments. And so there's a sense in which we celebrate them, but there's also a sense in which they are actually indictments of the original Constitution which did not consider any of those things to be necessary elements of our society. In terms of civil society and where the U.S. government is engaged, I think that, you know, sometimes when we deal with these problems that are foreign policy related, you know, sometimes the answer is at home. Sometimes the answer is not, you know, a white paper from some high-level think tank. It's not something that starts ten thousand miles away from where we are, because I don't think that we would have the kind of standing and credibility that we would need to say that we believe in and support and give voice and our backing to civil society movements abroad if we don't do the same thing at home. And so everything that we want to do somewhere else, we ought to ask ourselves the question of whether or not we've thought about doing it at home. And I don't mean to suggest—because certainly no nation is perfect, and every nation has its flaws. But certainly, we would be called to the mat for the ways in which we are either acknowledging or refusing to acknowledge that we have, you know, these same—these same challenges. And so I think there still remains a lot of work to be done there in terms of how we engage on this. And you have seen the State Department come out and be more outspoken. You've seen the Biden administration putting these issues more out front. You have now seen the Black Lives Matter flag flying over U.S. embassies in different parts of the world. And some people might view that as co-optation of a movement that is actually advocating against the government for those rights and those respects and that safety and security that people believe that they are not receiving. And others might see it as a way to say, look, our nation is embracing civil society and civic protests in our nation as an example that the countries in which those embassies are in should be more open to doing the same kinds of things. And so it's a great question. I think it remains to be seen how we move forward on that—on that score. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Molly Cole. Q: Hi. My name is Molly Cole. I am a grad student of global affairs at New York University. I was just curious sort of what y'all thought about what the consequences of foreign policy on punishment systems and institutions as it pertains to race relations in the United States would be, also in tandem with sort of this strive for global inclusivity and equity and just sort of, I guess, hitting those two ideas against each other. ADKINS: Can you clarify the ideals for us, Molly? So one sounded like it was about maybe mass incarceration or the death penalty or things of that nature? You're talking about punitive systems of justice? And then the other seemed to be more about diversity, equity, and inclusion in the foreign policy space? But I don't want to put words in your mouth. I just want to make sure I understand the question. Q: You hit the nail on the head. ADKINS: OK. Do you want to go ahead, Dr. Plummer? PLUMMER: Oh. Well, again, a great question but, you know, one of, you know, it's—could write a book to answer. (Laughs.) Well, if you're talking about the sort of international regime of incarceration—is that what you were referring to? Q: Yes, essentially. So when we're—when we're considering, you know, these punitive systems, I'm thinking in terms of, you know, the death penalty, mass incarceration, private prisons, sort of this culmination of us trying to come up with these ideals, but doing it sort of on our own, while also combatting, you know, what the nation is calling for, what the globe is calling for. PLUMMER: Yeah. I think this sort of pertains to what I had mentioned earlier about just, you know, who is making and carrying out U.S. foreign policy, or domestic policy for that matter. There's a whole question of the state and, you know, what parts of the state are involved in this whole question of incarceration and are involved in the whole question of the death penalty. One of the things that we are aware of is that prisons have—some of the prisons are actually not being operated by civil authorities. They're operated by private entities. We saw this again in—you know, particularly in Afghanistan, where a lot of functions which normally, you know, are carried out by civil authorities are carried out by private authorities. And so this really puts a whole different perspective on the question or the relationship of citizens to the state and, you know, to any other particular group of citizens to the state. So I think that, you know, one of the problem areas then is to tease out what in fact are the obligations and privileges of government, and how do they differ from and how are they distinguished from the private sector. Q: Thank you. ADKINS: And I would just add quickly on this notion of hypocrisy and saying one thing and doing another, there was an interesting anecdote around this when President Obama visited Senegal. And he was delivering a fairly tough message about the treatment of members of the LGBT+ community in Senegal. And President Macky Sall got up essentially after President Obama and was essentially saying that, you know, we kind of appreciate this tough love lecture, but I would remind you, you know, that Senegal doesn't have the death penalty, right? And so on one hand we're actually saying something that has a grounding. Of course, people of all human stripes can have dignity, and have respect and be protected. But he is then hitting back and saying, hey, wait a minute, you kill people who break laws in your own country. And we don't have the death penalty. So who should actually be the arbiter of how is the correct way – or, what is the correct way to be? On the second part of your question, quickly, Molly, especially as it relates to the kind of diversity, equity, and inclusion piece, this is why also there has been a big push to look in our State Department, to look at USAID, to look at the face that America presents to the world. And all too often that face has been male, that face has been White. And that gives a certain perception of America, but it also means that we lose the tremendous treasure and talent of people who have language skills, who come from communities in which their own perspective on the world actually is a talent that they have. Specifically, because many of those communities—whether they've immigrated or come to America by different means—are also from groups who've been marginalized, who've been oppressed, who have a certain frame and a lens with which to engage with other nations in the world, either in terms of partnership, either in terms of deterrence. And so we lose out in many ways because we haven't done a great job in that—in that matter. FASKIANOS: I'm going to take a written question from Morton Holbrook, who's at Kentucky Wesleyan College. His question is: How should the United States respond to international criticism to the U.S.'s racial discrimination? And how will that affect the relationship between the U.S. and the international community? PLUMMER: Well, the United States, I think, has—(laughs)—no choice but to acknowledge this. Historically this has been a problem that when pressed on this issue in the past the response was always, well, you know, we know this is a problem and we're working on it. And the most egregious examples of racism are the responsibility of people who are either at the margins of society or who represent some sort of relic past that is rapidly disappearing, right? That was the message about the South, right? OK, the South is, you know, rapidly developing and so soon these vestiges of violent racism will be over. Well, again, the reason why that doesn't work anymore—(laughs)—is because we're always projecting this future, right, that—you know, it's always being projected further and further into the future. And we're never there yet. And it seems to me, again, that this is a problem of institutions. This is a problem of the embeddedness of racism in American life, and a refusal on the part of so many Americans to acknowledge that racism is real, and that it exists. And you know, I think we see many examples of this. I'm thinking of one instance where a George Floyd commemorative mural was painted on a sidewalk and some folks came along with some paint and painted over it, because they said it wasn't a racism corner, you know, while engaged in a racist act. So, you know, there really needs to be, I think, on a very fundamental level, some education—(laughs)—you know, in this country on the issue of race and racism. The question is, you know, who is—who will be leaders, right? Who will undertake this kind of mission? ADKINS: One thing I would say, quickly, on that, Irina, just an anecdote as well that also relates to really in some ways the last question about who our representatives are and what perspective they bring. Several years ago, I was on a trip—a congressional delegation to Egypt. And I was with several members of the CBC. And we met with President Sisi. And they were giving him a fairly rough go of it over his treatment of protesters who were protesting at that time in Tahrir Square, many of whom had been killed, maimed, abused, jailed. And he listened to them kind of haranguing him. And at the end of that speech that they were giving to him he said basically: I understand your points. And I hear your perspective. But he said, can I ask you a question? They said, sure, Mr. President. We welcome you to ask questions. And he said, what about Ferguson? And the day that he said that Ferguson was on fire with surplus military equipment in the streets of America, with, you know, tear gas and armed military-appearing soldiers in the streets of America who were seen, at least optically, to be doing the same thing, right? Not as many people were killed, certainly, but the point is you have this same problem. However, if that had been a different delegation, he might have scored a point in their verbal jousting. But President Sisi had the misfortune of saying this to two-dozen 70-plus-year-old Black people. And no one in America would know better than they what that is like. And so what they ended up replying to him by saying, exactly. No one knows this better than we do. And this is exactly why we're telling you that you shouldn't do it. Not because our country doesn't have that history, but because we do have that history and it has damaged us, and it will damage you. Which takes on a completely different tone in our foreign relations than if it was simply a lecture, and that we were placing ourselves above the nations of the world rather than among them. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go to Ashantee Smith. Q: Hello. Can you guys hear me? ADKINS: We can. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: OK, perfect. Hi. My name is Ashantee Smith. I am a grad student at Winston-Salem State University. In regards to some of the responses that you guys gave earlier, it gave me a question. And I wanted to know how you guys were putting the correlation between racism and immigration. PLUMMER: Well, yeah. The United States has a history of racialized responses to immigrants, including historically to White immigrants. Back in the day the Irish, for example, were considered to be, you know, something less than White. We know, however, that society—American society has since, you know, incorporated Europeans into the category of Whiteness, and not done so for immigrants from Latin America, Asia, and Africa, who remain racialized, who are perceived as being, in some respects by some people, unassimilable. We also have a phenomenon of the racialization of Muslims, the creation of outcast groups that are subjected to, you know, extremes of surveillance or exclusion or discrimination. So immigration is very much embedded in this, is a question of an original vision of the United States, you know, and you can see this in the writings of many of the founding fathers, as essentially a White country in which others, you know, are in varying degrees of second-class citizens or not citizens at all. So this is, I think, an example of something that we have inherited historically that continues to, you know, be an issue for us in the present. Yeah. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Pearl Robinson. Q: Hello. I am just so thrilled to see the two panelists here. I want—I actually raised my hand when you were talking about the labor rights issue. And I'm at Tufts University. And I'm currently working on an intellectual biography about Ralph Bunche. And I actually ran over here from the U.N. archives where I was actually reading about these issues. (Laughs.) And I wanted to just say that the discussion we're having now, it's sort of disjointed because we're dealing with lots of erasures, things that are overlooked, and they are not enough Carol Andersons and Brenda Gayle Plummer professors out there putting these things in press. But even more importantly, they are not sufficiently in our curriculum. So people who study international relations and people who do international relations don't know most of these things. So my quick point I just wanted to say was during World War II when Ralph Bunche was working for the OSS military intelligence, his archives are full of it, he went and he was interviewing our allies at their missions and embassies in the U.S.—the French, the British—asking them: What are your labor relations policies in your colonial territories? And this was considered important military information for the United States, as we were going to be—as Africa was an important field of operation. When you get to actually setting up the U.N., I was struck in a way I hadn't, because I hadn't read archives this way. (Laughs.) But I'm looking at conversations between Bunche and Hammarskjöld, and they're restructuring the organization of the United States—of the United Nations. And there are two big issues that are determining their response to the restructuring—the Cold War as well as decolonization. And I actually think that those two issues remain—they're structuring that conversation we're having right now. And they—we say the Cold War is over, but I love this phrase, of the racialization of the current enemies or people we think of as enemies. So I actually do think that this is a really good program we're having where we're trying to have the conversation. But the dis-junctures, and the silences, and the difficulties of responding I think speak volumes. The last thing I will say, very quickly, that incident about the discussion with President Sisi that Mr. Adkins—that needs to be canned. That needs to be somehow made available as an example that can be replicated and expanded and broadened for people to use in teaching. ADKINS: Well, I always listen when my teacher is talking to me, Dr. Robinson. Thank you for sharing that. And I'm working on it, I promise you. (Laughter.) FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to—we have lots of questions and raised hands, and we're not going to get to all of you. So I apologize right now. (Laughs.) We'll do the best we can. Jill Humphries. Q: Hello. My name is Jill Humphries. And I'm an adjunct assistant professor in the Africa Studies Program at the University of Toledo, and have been doing Africa-based work, I'm proud to say, for about thirty-three years, starting at the age twenty-two, and have used Dr. Plummer's work in my dissertation. And hello, fellow ICAPer (sp). So my question is this: There's an assumption that I believe we're operating in. And that is race and racism is somehow aberrant to the founding of this country, right? So we know that Saidiya Hartman and Frank Wilderson, the Afropessimist, make the argument that it is clearly key that it is fundamental to the development of our institutions. And so my question is this: You know, the—in the domestic scene the sort of abolitions clearly state that unless we fundamentally transform our norms and values, which impact, of course, our institutions, then we will continue to have the exact outcomes that are expected. The killing of George Floyd and the continuing, I think, need to kill Black bodies is essential to this country. And so my question is, in the context of foreign relations, international relations, are we also looking at the way in which, number one, it is not aberrant that racism is a constituent element in the development of our foreign policy and our institutions? And that unless we fundamentally first state it, acknowledge it, and then perhaps explore the way in which we dismantle, right—dismantle those norms and values that then impact these institutions, that we're going to continue to have the same outcomes, right? So for example, when Samantha Powers visited Ethiopia, if you've been following that whole narrative, there was a major backlash by the Ethiopian diaspora—major. My colleagues and friends, like, I've had intense conversations, right, around that. Same thing about the belief about Susan, former—Susan Rice's role, right, in continuing to influence our foreign policy, particularly towards the Horn of Africa. So my question is: What does that look like, both theoretically, conceptually? But more importantly for me, because I'm a practitioner on the ground, what does that look like in practice? And that's where I think Professor Adkins, working for USAID, could really kind of talk about. Thank you. ADKINS: Thank you. Yeah, you know, I think it goes back to Dr. Robinson's question a moment ago. And that is the first the acknowledgement and the calling out and the putting into relief and contrast the context in which we're operating, especially when we think about not even USAID specifically, but the industry of development—aid and development assistance kind of writ large. Because essentially what we have is a historical continuum that starts with the colonial masters and the colonial subjects. And then that because what is called, or framed, as the first world and the third world, right? And then that becomes the developing world and the developed world. Then that becomes the global north and the global south. All of which suggests that one is above, and one is below. That one is a kind of earthly heaven, the other kind of earthly hell. That one possessed the knowledge and enlightenment to lead people into civilization, and the other needs redemption, needs to be saved, needs to be taught the way to govern themselves, right? That this kind of Western notion of remaking yourself in the world, that your language, that your system of government, that your way of thinking and religious and belief and economics should be the predominant one in the world. And so I think, to me, what you're saying suggests the ways in which we should question that. And this is where you start to hear conversations about decolonizing aid, about questioning how we presume to be leaders in the world in various aspects, of which we may not actually be producing sound results ourselves. And thinking again about this notion of placing ourselves among nations rather than above nations in the ways in which we relate and engage. And I think that it's one of the reasons that we continue to have challenges in the realm of development assistance, in the realm of our diplomacy and foreign policy. Because, again, there is a pushback against that kind of thinking, which is rooted in a deep history that contains much violence and many types of economic and diplomatic pressures to create and sustain the set of power relations which keeps one group of people in one condition and one in another. And so it's a huge question. And how to bring that kind of lofty thinking down to the granular level I think is something that we will have to continue to work on every day. I certainly don't have the answer, but I'm certainly answering—asking, I should say—the questions. PLUMMER: I think I might also think about how is in charge. And this is—you know, it goes back to something we talked about before, when U.S. foreign policy is no longer exclusively rooted in the State Department? So in terms of, you know, who represents the United States abroad and in what ways, and how is that representation perceived, we're really looking at, you know, a lot of different actors. And we're also looking at, you know, changes in the way that the U.S. government itself is perceiving its role, both at home and abroad. And one of the questions was previously asked about the system of incarceration speaks to that, because we have to ask ourselves what are—what are—what are the proper roles and responsibilities and burdens of the state, the government and, you know, what is leased out—(laughs)—in some ways, for profit to private concerns? So I think that, you know, some of this is about, you know, a sense of mission that I don't see out there, that I think will in some respects have to be restored and reinvented. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to go next to Erez Manela. Q: Thank you very much for this really terrific and important panel. My name is Erez Manela. I teach the history of U.S. foreign relations at Harvard. And my question actually—I don't know if Irina planned this—but it follows on directly from the previous question. Because I kept on wondering during this panel what—I mean, the focus that we've had here, the topic that's been defined, is the way in which domestic race relations, domestic racism, have shaped U.S. foreign policy. But of course, U.S. foreign policy has been shaped—as the previous questioner noted—has been shaped directly by racism and perceptions of racial hierarchy for—well, since the very beginning. And Professor Adkins spoke very eloquently about it. And of course, Professor Plummer has written eloquently about that, including in her books on Haiti and international relations. But I guess I'm wondering if you could speak more about the specifics about the history that needs to be recognized in that realm, and then—and this is maybe self-interested—whether you have any recommendations, in the way that you recommended Carol Anderson's really terrific book—for reading that we can read ourselves or give our students to read, that would really drive that point home, the influence of racism, race perceptions, race hierarchies themselves on—directly on the conduct of U.S. foreign relations historically. PLUMMER: Well, Professor Manela, I appreciate your own work on Wilson. And you know, that in some respects—that would be a book that I'd recommend. (Laughs.) Might also think about Mary Dudziak's work on Cold War civil rights, and her law review article, Desegregation as a Cold War Imperative, which, you know, directly addresses these questions. Again, what I would like to see is some work that will—perhaps not necessarily a historical perspective—but will address this whole question of the sort of growing, I don't know what you'd call it, multiplicity or multivariant character of American policymaking, you know, as we—as we go forward, you know, past the Cold War era. There's an interesting item by a man named Andrew Friedman, who wrote a book called Covert Capital. I think the subtitle is something like Landscapes of Power, in which we discussed the rise of Northern Virginia as what he sees as the true capital of, you know, parts of the U.S. government, in being a center for the military and for intelligence community. And their shaping of that environment at home, as well as their influence in shaping U.S. policy abroad. So, you know, there's a lot of room for work on these—on these issues. ADKINS: And I would also just follow up—and thank you for the question—and add another book that I just finished. Daniel Immerwahr, from Northwestern University, How to Hide an Empire, which deals in many ways with U.S. foreign policy and the way in which it is explicitly racialized and ways in which that goes understudied in our—in our policy circles, and certainly in the world of education. FASKIANOS: I'm going to try to squeeze in one last question. And I apologize again for not getting to everybody's question. We'll go to Garvey Goulbourne as our final question. Q: Yes. Hi. Can you hear me? FASKIANOS: We can. Q: Yeah. My name's Garvey Goulbourne. I'm a student at the University of Virginia, actually studying abroad this semester in Rabat, Morocco. And my question to you both is: What mechanisms do we have to orient the narratives that our foreign policy leaders are brought up with? Thinking particularly of American exceptionalism and how we kind of place ourselves on a pedestal, whether they be foreign affairs schools or various institutions at different levels of American education, what tools do we have to address the foundations of American perspectives of themselves and our nation in relation to the rest of the world, particularly the global south? FASKIANOS: Who wants to go first? An easy question, of course, to close with. PLUMMER: Go ahead, Mr. Adkins. ADKINS: Sure, sure. Thank you for your question, Garvey. And congratulations on the move out to Morocco. Great to see you there. I think the first thing I would say, of course, is our tools, as far as I am concerned, relate certainly to education. And it's one of the reasons that I am in the classroom. But I know what that fight is like, because even education is taken over by these notions of White supremacy, by these notions of singular historical narratives. And this is why there's been such a push against the 1619 Project of the New York Times, why there is this kind of silly season around the misunderstood origins and contexts of critical race theory. There is this battle over who gets to tell the story of what America is, because it is more than—but it is more than one thing, obviously, to a multiplicity of people. And so I am kind of remiss—or, not remiss. There's no way for me to elucidate for you now a series of tools that will resolve these problems, because these are challenges that people have been wrestling with before our mothers' mothers were born. And so we only are continuing that fight from where we sit. And certainly, in the classrooms that I am in, whether they are in prisons or on campuses, we are always digging into the origin of these themes. And the main frame through which I teach is not just for students to understand this history for their health, but for them to understand this history as a lens through which to view the current world and all of the events and challenges that we find ourselves facing, to see if we can come up with new ways to address them. PLUMMER: Well, one of the things that Mr. Goulbourne could do, since he is in Morocco, is to make use of his own insights in his conversations with Moroccans. So, you know, there is still a role, you know, for individual actors to play some part in attempting to make some changes. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we unfortunately have to close this conversation. It was very rich. Thank you, Travis Adkins and Brenda Gayle Plummer or sharing your insights and analysis with us. We really appreciate it. To all of you, for your questions and comments. Again, I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you. You can follow Travis Adkins @travisladkins, and that's on Twitter. And our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday September 29, at 1:00 p.m. (ET) with Thomas Graham, who is a fellow at CFR. And we'll talk about Putin's Russia. So in the meantime, I encourage you to follow us at @CFR_Academic, visit CFR.org, Thinkglobalhealth.org, and ForeignAffairs.com for new research and analysis on global issues. So thank you all again and we look forward to continuing the conversation. ADKINS: Take care, everyone. Thank you. (END)

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast
Vietnamese Millennial Making Education Accessible To Everybody & Host on BEFRS | Thuyen Vo S7 E2

Seven Million Bikes; A Saigon Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 59:54


Thuyen Vo is the founder of Easy English Vietnam and Easy Vietnamese - 2 language centers in Saigon. She is also known as the seasonal host at Best Ever Food Review Show, with a background in Digital Marketing. Thuyen has a passion for education and is combining her skills in English and Marketing to make this happen. She predominantly wants to help Viet Kieus living in Vietnam who may want to update their Vietnamese. Season 7 is sponsored by Blue Dragon's Children's Foundation.and Saigon Children's Foundation. Please donate if you are in a position to.-------------------Theme music composed by Lewis Wright.Main Cover Art designed by Niall Mackay and Le Nguyen.Episode art designed by Niall Mackay, with pictures supplied by guests and used with permission.Read the Blog PostSeason 6 is sponsored by Eddie's New York Deli & Diner.Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and TikTok.Buy us a coffee or beer!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/SevenMillionBikes)

Democracy in Danger
S3 E2. Red Pill, Part II – Blind Ambitions

Democracy in Danger

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 42:04


It's hard not to see shades of Saigon in the frenetic evacuation of Kabul last month — and wonder why U.S. leaders seem not to have learned from bungled foreign wars and nation-building efforts. In this second part of a series reflecting on the debacle in Afghanistan, Will and Siva speak with two historians of the post-Vietnam era. They shed light on the grandiose and self-interested visions America has tried to realize abroad and ask what hope there may be for a future of soft power and humanitarian goals.

AMATEUR NATION
Episode 137: “SPECIAL: (PART 1) U.S. Marine, Sergeant Don Nicholas; Vietnam AND Afghanistan Veteran”

AMATEUR NATION

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 38:57


“SPECIAL: U.S. Marine, Sergeant Don Nicholas; Vietnam AND Afghanistan Veteran”This certainly isn't the funniest episode I've aired, but it's probably the most important one.This is a moving, eye-opening, THREE-PART interview with a soft spoken, gentle man who is as tough as they come; who has served his country as a Marine Guard at the U.S. Embassy in the Vietnam War (having been on the second to last chopper out), AND served in the Army for two tours in Afghanistan: Staff Sergeant Don Nicholas. Joining him is his proud daughter, Marine Sergeant Vanessa Anderson who served in the war in Iraq. This rare combination of guests makes this episode extra special, and it's packed with brutal honesty and frank conversation, with first-hand accounts, and bold predictions for the future of America.Discussion includes: *What and why things went wrong in the Afghanistan evacuation*Who knew and who's to blame*Why we were forced out of Afghanistan*What should have been done*Who should be punished*Lies told to us by the government about the military *How this event affects our military*How this affects America's and the world's safety*The treasonous acts committed by our government *The electric/hybrid car connection *What the U.S. can expect next*Who's really running the show*Who could be President soonGet podcast previews and other fun content every Thursday at 7 a.m. Eastern! Subscribe on YouTube: https://bit.ly/3wuyAWqGet the book! https://amzn.to/2qWAOlz 
Facebook: https://facebook.com/lousantinientertainment 
Instagram: @lou.santini3     
Website: www.lousantini.com 
LISTEN ON: Amazon Music & Audible, Anchor, Anghami, Apple Podcasts, Blubrry, Breaker, Captivate, Castbox, Castro, Deezer, Gaana, GooglePodcasts, IHeartRadio, JioSaavn, Luminary, Overcast, Pandora, PlayerFM, Pocketcasts, Podcast Addict, Podcast Index, Podfriend, PodOmatic, Podstation, Podverse, RadioPublic, SoundCloud, Spotify, Stitcher and TuneIn!

Billy Joel A to Z
Goodnight Saigon

Billy Joel A to Z

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 33:29


Goodnight Saigon is the fourth track of Billy Joel's eighth studio album, The Nylon Curtain. Goodnight Saigon was released as a single in February of 1983 and spent 7 weeks on the billboard charts. So then, what do this song, Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd and comedian Artie Lange have in common? Find out on this episode. Exciting! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

French Expat Le Podcast
Should I stay or should I go ? (3/3)

French Expat Le Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 72:43


Should I Stay or Should I Go, c'est LA question à 1 million. La question un peu marécageuse dans laquelle se trouvent bon nombre d'expatriés. Dans l'épisode précédent, on a discuté des raisons de rester, raisons que l'on contrôle ou non d'ailleurs. Et pour rentrer alors ? De la simple idée au fait de tout remballer et de partir, comment ça se passe ? A quelle vitesse peut-on changer de plan et tout plaquer ? Et si finalement, on ne cherchait pas juste à rentrer mais surtout à changer de vie ? Dans ce troisième et dernier épisode de Should I stay or should I go, je vous propose de réfléchir ensemble et avec plusieurs expatrié.e.s de ce retour. On parle avec Julie, basée dans le Tennessee qui est mariée à un américain et qui se pose pas mal de question, à une autre expat qui reste anonyme chez qui le Covid a changé clairement le cours de son expatriation, ainsi qu'à Marion, basée à Saigon au Vietnam, en pleine préparation de son retour. On discutera aussi avec Valérie Bauhain, créatrice du podcast Ciao Paris, de la tendance actuelle du changement de vie. Puis on s'entretiendra avec Marine Michelet, coach de vie pour les expatrié.e.s qui partagera des conseils concrets quand l'idée d'un retour vient envahir nos pensées.Si vous avez aimé l'épisode, rendez-vous sur Apple Podcast, Tumult ou Castbox pour lui donner 5 étoiles et un commentaire. Retrouvez tous les épisodes, découvrez l'équipe et la mission du podcast, ainsi que tous les liens pour nous retrouver sur toutes les plateformes sur le site www.frenchexpatpodcast.com/Suivez les coulisses de French Expat Le Podcast sur les réseaux sociaux :

My Expert Opinion
EP#84: VADO

My Expert Opinion

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 121:18


Vado is in the building!!! We talk about his upcoming battle with Saigon, relationships, his split with Cam'ron and more!! →DONATE TO $HOFFAGANG ON CASH APP← cash.app/app/GXTMJQT →FOLLOW ON SOCIAL MEDIA← YOUTUBE: bit.ly/MathHoffaYouTube TWITTER: twitter.com/mathhoffa INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/Math.Hoffa/ FACEBOOK: www.facebook.com/people/Math-Hoff…100044542324824/

GroundTruth
The Whistleblower - Epilogue: Truth Is the First Casualty

GroundTruth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 19:25


In war, truth is the first casualty. It's a military maxim attributed to Aeschylus, the father of Greek tragedy. In the lead up to the 20th anniversary of 9/11 and ahead of the withdrawal from a war that became the longest in American history, GroundTruth's founder Charlie Sennott returns to Afghanistan and revisits a conflict he has covered on the ground since its first battles and its first casualties. Two decades later, amid an American departure from Afghanistan that many have compared to the fall of Saigon at the end of the Vietnam War, Sennott examines the two conflicts: the government's lies and deceptions about Vietnam revealed by Daniel Ellsberg's Pentagon Papers, the lessons left unheeded by American leaders during the Afghan war, and why it took us so long to see the mounting lies of that war. This episode concludes The Whistleblower, our 10th season of the GroundTruth Podcast, which began with the award-winning series Foreverstan, on-the-ground reporting from Afghanistan examining the first 14 years of the war. Listen to our first season: http://bit.ly/Foreverstan-Podcast Now we're going to take a step back and evaluate this podcast and think about our best way forward. How do we keep going and finding new ways to be there on the ground, telling audio stories that matter in under-covered corners of the world. We'd like to hear your thoughts about the podcast. Call us and leave a voice message with your feedback at ‪(213) 770-8693. We listen to everything you send us and we might even share some of them on this podcast. The Whistleblower podcast series is part of a wider collaboration with UMass Amherst and GBH, including a two-day conference presented by GroundTruth and UMass Amherst on “Truth, Dissent and the Legacy of Daniel Ellsberg,” featuring a conversation between the Pentagon Papers whistleblower himself and NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. Learn more here: https://bit.ly/UMass-Ellsberg-Archive

Southern Vangard
Episode 303 - Southern Vangard Radio

Southern Vangard

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 103:48


BANG! @southernvangard #radio Ep303! No rest for the weary Vangardians - Labor Day weekend or not, it's a twice a week affair and YOU'RE WAAAALCOME! The mix this week has all new crispy crunchy joints carefully selected for your enjoyment, and we head to Jersey to chat with REN THOMAS for our Thursday interview session. Ren has a killer new album out now called “33” which is produced entirely by Nem Nieves. Interview snippets are at the end of the mix to tide you over until the full drops on Thursday. Get up and get involved it's that #SmithsonianGrade #TwiceAWeek #WeAreTheGard // southernvangard.com // @southernvangard on #applepodcasts #stitcherradio #soundcloud #mixcloud #youtube // #hiphop #rap #undergroundhiphop #boombap #DJ #mixshow #interview #podcast #ATL #WORLDWIDE #RIPCOMBATJACK Recorded live September 5, 2021 @ Dirty Blanket Studios, Marietta, GA southernvangard.com @southernvangard on #applepodcasts #soundcloud #youtube #spotifypodcast #googlepodcasts #stitcherradio #mixcloud #SmithsonianGrade #TwiceAWeek #WeAreTheGard twitter/IG: @southernvangard @jondoeatl @cappuccinomeeks Talk Break Inst - "I Love" - DJ JS-1 "Suffer" - Ren Thomas (prod. Nem Nieves) ft. Rasheed Chappell & Silent Knight "Thirty Thr33" - Ren Thomas (prod. Nem Nieves) "Talk Of The Town" - Ren Thomas (prod. Nem Nieves) "Kinglish" - The Bad Seed ft. Sadat X & Jamil Honesty (prod. SoulC1ty) "No Witness" - Saigon & Buckwild ft. Benny The Butcher "Third Streets Finest" - Antlive ft. Johnny Lightnin & Tru Story Talk Break Inst - "M Love" - DJ JS-1 "On Sight" - Luey Price & Tone Beatz "Reservoir Dogs" - Ramson Badbonez ft. Az Izz, Cymarshall Law, Speed Walton & Quip "Psychopathic Maniac" - Stezo ft. Edo G, Craig G & Masta Ace (prod. Chris Lowe) "Enchanted Spirits" - Damu The Fudgemunk ft. Insight "Freeze" - MIC Johnson Jr. ft. Chris Rivers & Rockness Monsta (prod. Vic Grimes) Talk Break Inst - "W Love" - DJ JS-1 "Birkshire Blanket" - DNTE ft. Black-I (prod. DrkTheLegend) "All Blakk" - S Eyes Finest ft. Rome Streetz & Daniel Son "Cult Classic" - Grubby Pawz ft. Al.Divino, The Hidden Character, Estee Nack & Pounds "18-Year Aged Potion" - Bub Styles & Farma Beats "Primo" - Mondo Slade ft. Pro Dillinger & Prime Minister "Love & Fake" - O Dawg & Wavy Da Ghawd "Growth" - J. Arrr x Elzhi (prod. Produced by Shamir) "Just Say Dope" - Let The Dirt Say Amen Talk Break Inst - "H Love" - DJ JS-1 ** INTERVIEW SNIPPETS - REN THOMAS - FULL INTERVIEW DROPS THURS 9/7 **

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics
Snack, Dessert, Dinner, Supper: The Paris Peace Accords

My History Can Beat Up Your Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 72:06


Nixon's first bombing campaigns had the names of mealtimes which seem to also correspond with the years of his first term: 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972. In this episode we look at Nixon, Kissinger and the Paris Peace Accords that ended the Vietnam War. In addition to providing some additional context for the Saigon 1975 situation so much in the news today, we revisit whether the accord was a sham peace or a true deal. The deal left hundreds of thousands of enemy troops in South Vietnam as U.S. troops exited. Could a better deal have been etched? Or could the same deal have been made sooner. And what about those leopard spots? The great debate over the negotiating table? and the dingy carpet? All this and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The History Hour
Surviving the fall of Saigon

The History Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 50:16


When South Vietnam fell in 1975, most could not escape. In the last days, the US airlifted its remaining personnel and some high ranking Vietnamese officials - but millions were left behind to await their fate. Hear the account of one South Vietnamese veteran who remained in Saigon as North Vietnamese forces took the city. Also on the programme: the 1990s electric car that was taken out of production, we go up close with North Korea's Kim Il Sung, the Gdansk shipyard strike in Poland, and the Sicilian businessman who tried to defy the Mafia. Photo: A South Vietnamese soldier helps his wounded friend during fighting with communist forces in Saigon, 28th April 1975 (Bettmann/Getty Images)

Witness History
Surviving the fall of Saigon

Witness History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 13:49


When South Vietnam fell in 1975, most could not escape. In the last days, the US airlifted its remaining personnel and some high ranking Vietnamese officials - but millions were left behind to await their fate. This is the account of one South Vietnamese veteran who remained in Saigon as North Vietnamese forces took the city. Dr Tran Xuan Dung served as a doctor in the South Vietnamese Marines. He would spend three years imprisoned in a "re-education" camp before fleeing with his family in 1978. Photo: A South Vietnamese soldier helps his wounded friend during fighting with communist forces in Saigon, 28th April 1975 (Bettmann/Getty Images)

The John Batchelor Show
1641: Saigon again. Liz Peek @TheHill

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 6:50


Photo:   Saigon again. Liz Peek @TheHill  https://www.wfla.com/news/washington-dc/saigon-all-over-again-biden-criticized-as-taliban-retakes-power/

KQED’s Forum
Looking to Past Military Withdraws for Hints on the Future of Afghanistan

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 55:29


The United States military has officially pulled out of Afghanistan and the withdrawal has brought comparisons to the fall of Saigon in 1975. But a superficial historical analogy can be as misleading as it is enlightening. We'll look back at the end of American interventions with scholars of Vietnam, Afghanistan and the Middle East. We'll ask what can happen after the military leaves and what we can learn about the possible future of Afghanistan by looking at examples from history. 

The Documentary Podcast
World of Wisdom: Peace of mind

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 18:47


Keeping some peace of mind when the world around you is in turmoil is a great challenge. Mohammed finds it hard to maintain concentration, he sleeps 12 hours a night but awakes exhausted. He lives in Afghanistan, which is in a state of conflict, and spends a lot of time on social media. Sister Dang Nghiem offers advice on how to make your mind a beautiful refuge from the chaos and insecurity in the outside world. She discusses the North Korean communists taking over Saigon when she was a child and the BBC's Sana Safi compares her own experience of life in Afghanistan under the Taliban.

PBS NewsHour - Segments
Comparing strategies and challenges of evacuating Afghanistan with Vietnam exit

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 6:05


For more on the evacuation operation in Kabul and the challenges the U.S. military faces in light of Thursday's attacks, Amna Nawaz turns to retired Col. Mark Cancian. He had a 38-year career in the Marine Corps and was involved in the evacuation of Saigon in the early 1970s. He's now a senior advisor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington, D.C. think tank. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Axios Today
The latest from Kabul after deadly blasts

Axios Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 11:47


Two explosions at the Kabul airport yesterday left at least 100 people dead -- including 13 U.S. service members -- and 150 more wounded. The blasts came from at least two suicide bombers, and The Islamic State has claimed responsibility. Plus, the last marine to escape Saigon in 1975 on the evacuation crisis in Afghanistan. And, the rising role of women in the gig economy. Guests: Axios' Dave Lawler and Russell Contreras. Credits: Axios Today is produced in partnership with Pushkin Industries. The team includes Niala Boodhoo, Sara Kehaulani Goo, Dan Bobkoff, Alexandra Botti, Nuria Marquez Martinez, Sabeena Singhani, and Ben O'Brien. Music is composed by Evan Viola. You can reach us at podcasts@axios.com. You can text questions, comments and story ideas to Niala as a text or voice memo to 202-918-4893. Go deeper: Biden promises retaliation for attacks in Kabul The last Marine in Saigon on Afghanistan The rise of women in the gig economy Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Glenn Beck Program
Help or Step Aside, Biden | Guests: Rudy Atallah & Saber Nasseri | 8/23/21

The Glenn Beck Program

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 120:16


Glenn and Stu discuss President Biden's recent Afghanistan statements. Pat Gray joins to further discuss what the Taliban have been doing since their Afghanistan takeover and how a major terrorist is helping shape Afghanistan's future. Nazarene Fund COO Rudy Atallah gives an update on the rescue mission, but the two things holding the organization back from fulfilling its mission are the Taliban and America's own State Department. Glenn discusses a disturbing order that was issued over the weekend. Afghan interpreter Saber Nasseri calls to discuss his experiences in Afghanistan and how his family is being targeted. Glenn and Stu compare Americas' response to Saigon and America's response to Afghanistan. What has happened to America? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Andrew Klavan Show
Ep. 1044 - JOE BIDASTAN

The Andrew Klavan Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 100:15


A venal and demented old fool of a president single-handedly creates an American debacle that is 70's Saigon, Carter's Iran and Obama's Iraq disaster all rolled into one.

American Conservative University
Dennis Prager- The Afghan Disaster.

American Conservative University

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 49:20


Dennis Prager- The Afghan Disaster. Dennis Prager Podcasts The Dennis Prager Show 20210818 – 1 No Fear  Aug 18 2021   Terrorists and bad actors throughout the world, no longer fear the US. Why should they?... We left the terrorists vast stores of weapons. What will they do with them?... Terrorists everywhere have been inspired by the Taliban victory…   The Dennis Prager Show – 1 Afghan Disaster Aug 17 2021  We are back in “Saigon.” Only this time might be worse… The Secretary of State adamantly denies that is a “Saigon moment.” Sure looks like one… The “withdrawal” is an unmitigated disaster.   The Dennis Prager Show -Biden's Saigon Aug 16 2021  It took the Taliban a weekend to overrun Kabul. This national disgrace rests squarely on the shoulders of our current President. He promised those who supported us that they would be evacuated. That's not going to happen. Most will now be stuck in Afghanistan. Many will die. --------------------------------------------------------------------  Visit Pragertopia  https://pragertopia.com/member/signup.php  The first month is 99 cents. After the first month the cost is $7.50 per month. If you can afford to pay for only one podcast, this is the one we recommend. It is the best conservative radio show out there, period. ACU strongly recommends ALL ACU students and alumni subscribe to Pragertopia. Do it today!  You can listen to Dennis from 9 a.m. to Noon (Pacific) Monday thru Friday, live on the Internet  http://www.dennisprager.com/pages/listen  ------------------------------------------------------------------------ For a great archive of Prager University videos visit- https://www.youtube.com/user/PragerUniversity/featured   Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h Get PragerU bonus content for free! https://www.prageru.com/bonus-content Download Pragerpedia on your iPhone or Android! Thousands of sources and facts at your fingertips. iPhone: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsnbG Android: http://l.prageru.com/2dlsS5e Join Prager United to get new swag every quarter, exclusive early access to our videos, and an annual TownHall phone call with Dennis Prager! http://l.prageru.com/2c9n6ys Join PragerU's text list to have these videos, free merchandise giveaways and breaking announcements sent directly to your phone! https://optin.mobiniti.com/prageru Do you shop on Amazon? Click https://smile.amazon.com and a percentage of every Amazon purchase will be donated to PragerU. Same great products. Same low price. Shopping made meaningful. VISIT PragerU! https://www.prageru.com FOLLOW us! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/prageru Twitter: https://twitter.com/prageru Instagram: https://instagram.com/prageru/ PragerU is on Snapchat! JOIN PragerFORCE! For Students: http://l.prageru.com/2aozfkP JOIN our Educators Network! http://l.prageru.com/2aoz2y9 -------------------------------------------------------------------- The Rational Bible: Exodus by Dennis Prager   NATIONAL BESTSELLER "Dennis Prager has put together one of the most stunning commentaries in modern times on the most profound document in human history. It's a must-read that every person, religious and non-religious, should buy and peruse every night before bed. It'll make you think harder, pray more ardently, and understand your civilization better." — Ben Shapiro, host of "The Ben Shapiro Show" "Dennis Prager's commentary on Exodus will rank among the greatest modern Torah commentaries. That is how important I think it is. And I am clearly not alone... It might well be on its way to becoming the most widely read Torah commentary of our time—and by non-Jews as well as by Jews." — Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, bestselling author of Jewish Literacy Why do so many people think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is outdated? Why do our friends and neighbors – and sometimes we ourselves – dismiss the Bible as irrelevant, irrational, immoral, or all of these things? This explanation of the Book of Exodus, the second book of the Bible, will demonstrate that the Bible is not only powerfully relevant to today's issues, but completely consistent with rational thought. Do you think the Bible permitted the trans-Atlantic slave trade? You won't after reading this book. Do you struggle to love your parents? If you do, you need this book. Do you doubt the existence of God because belief in God is “irrational?” This book will give you reason after reason to rethink your doubts. The title of this commentary is, “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. As Prager says, “If something I write does not make rational sense, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible to people of every faith, and no faith. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world and to your life. His goal: to change your mind – and then change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Exodus-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621577724     The Rational Bible: Genesis by Dennis Prager  USA Today bestseller Publishers Weekly bestseller Wall Street Journal bestseller Many people today think the Bible, the most influential book in world history, is not only outdated but irrelevant, irrational, and even immoral. This explanation of the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, demonstrates clearly and powerfully that the opposite is true. The Bible remains profoundly relevant—both to the great issues of our day and to each individual life. It is the greatest moral guide and source of wisdom ever written. Do you doubt the existence of God because you think believing in God is irrational? This book will give you many reasons to rethink your doubts. Do you think faith and science are in conflict? You won't after reading this commentary on Genesis. Do you come from a dysfunctional family? It may comfort you to know that every family discussed in Genesis was highly dysfunctional! The title of this commentary is “The Rational Bible” because its approach is entirely reason-based. The reader is never asked to accept anything on faith alone. In Dennis Prager's words, “If something I write is not rational, I have not done my job.” The Rational Bible is the fruit of Dennis Prager's forty years of teaching the Bible—whose Hebrew grammar and vocabulary he has mastered—to people of every faith and no faith at all. On virtually every page, you will discover how the text relates to the contemporary world in general and to you personally. His goal: to change your mind—and, as a result, to change your life.   Highly Recommended by ACU. Purchase his book at- https://www.amazon.com/Rational-Bible-Genesis-Dennis-Prager/dp/1621578984

The Chad Prather Show
Ep 494 | Afghanistan CONTINUES to Burn & the Biden Administration Doesn't Learn | Guest: Jason Buttrill

The Chad Prather Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 46:58


As Afghanistan continues to burn, Jake Sullivan, Biden's national security adviser, spoke with the media and tried to cover for the Biden administration. Jake also blamed the fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban on the country's army. The Biden administration also agrees that Americans should receive a booster shot eight months after being fully vaccinated. Can President Biden come back from this? As the world looks at the fall of Afghanistan, President Biden hasn't talked with other world leaders. Jason Buttrill, an Afghanistan war veteran, former intelligence analyst for DOD, and head writer for Glenn Beck, compares Afghanistan with Vietnam and this could be Biden's Saigon moment. Will we see President Kamala in the near future? Will a booster shot stop the mask mandates? Pope Francis took to the internet and partnered with Ad Council to create a PSA to hype the vaccine. Pope Francis calls getting the vaccine as “an act of love.” Will people listen to the pope? And our “favorite” soccer player Megan Rapinoe is back in the news after the former U.S. women's goalkeeper said that Megan would bully teammates into kneeling during the national anthem. Does this surprise you? Today's Sponsors Visit https://CowboyWines.com and get three bottles of wine for 50% off while supplies last. Visit https://PrepareWithChad.com to save $70 off the 4-Week-Food Kit Go to https://Purple.com/watchchad10 and use promo code watchchad10. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Liz Wheeler Show
Ep. 38: Afghanistan Is Worse Than Vietnam

The Liz Wheeler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 47:52


After days of silence, Joe Biden finally surfaces to speak on his very own Kabul catastrophe, and—not surprisingly—it is nothing short of a disaster. From claiming that there is no national interest for America in Afghanistan to saying he supports human rights for women and girls (!!!) with a straight face, Biden's pathetic excuses are false, stupid, and disgraceful. And if he really wants to talk about Vietnam, let's talk about how much WORSE Kabul is looking than Saigon. Plus, while Facebook is restricting Liz's page for spreading “COVID misinformation” (scary!), only Locals VIPs get access to Liz breaking down the truth about the CDC's latest “studies” and ongoing lies. This is The Liz Wheeler Show. -- Join the Moink Movement today! Choose what meats you want delivered with your first box and get free bacon for a year: https://moinkbox.com/liz. -- Grow thicker, healthier hair with Nutrafol. Get $15 off your first month's subscription with the promo code LIZ: http://nutrafol.com.

Breaking Points with Krystal and Saagar
8/17/21: Biden's Afghanistan Speech, MAGA Reactions, Vaccine Update, Newsom Recall, George W. Bush's Legacy, Lessons From Saigon, Afghanistan Papers, and More!

Breaking Points with Krystal and Saagar

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 89:44


To become a Breaking Points Premium Member and watch/listen to the show uncut and 1 hour early visit: https://breakingpoints.supercast.tech/To listen to Breaking Points as a podcast, check them it on Apple and SpotifyApple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/breaking-points-with-krystal-and-saagar/id1570045623Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/4Kbsy61zJSzPxNZZ3PKbXlMerch: https://breaking-points.myshopify.com/Craig Whitlock's Book: https://www.amazon.com/Afghanistan-Papers-Secret-History-War/dp/B08WTDGSFH/ref=sr_1_1?crid=30S357ZCC32DH&dchild=1&keywords=the+afghanistan+papers&qid=1629147122&sprefix=the+afghanist%2Caps%2C235&sr=8-1

The Savage Nation Podcast
BIDENS BIGGEST BLUNDER: THE FALL OF KABUL

The Savage Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 63:09


This blockbuster podcast deals with the biggest foreign policy failure of our lifetimes … a terrible time in the world. That is, Biden's collosal blunder in Afghanistan. Today we saw Afghanistan falling and people dying in their desperate attempts to escape the cruel wrath of the Taliban. Savage deconstructs this unmitigated disaster that will forever live in infamy. Many are saying it is worse than the helicopter evacuation of Saigon back in 1975. Biden is not even taking responsibility for it, nor for lying to us just 3 weeks ago saying “under no circumstances will we have a Vietnam like event.” What happened to military intelligence while the Pentagon was busy looking for white supremacists and handing out sex-change surgeries? To help us understand the history leading up to this terrible day Savage hosts retired Army Major General Jeff Schloesser who commanded the 101st Airborne Division for thirty-three months, including fifteen months in combat in Afghanistan. He understands the country, its people, and the failures in U.S. policy very well, and he has some dire predictions to make regarding the consequences of today's events. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Ruthless
Biden's Saigon

Ruthless

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 45:48


The fellas slam Biden's catastrophic Afghanistan withdrawal and welcome guest Sen. Tom Cotton to give his thoughts.

The Liz Wheeler Show
Ep. 37: Biden's Afghanistan Catastrophe Is Worse Than You Think

The Liz Wheeler Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 43:59


BREAKING: Joe Biden “stands by his decision” to allow the Taliban to take up residence in Kabul's presidential palace and round up, rape, and execute America's Afghani allies. As America evacs our personnel in a clear callback to Saigon, let's be crystal clear—the Taliban's toppling of Afghanistan, a direct result of Joe Biden's actions, is the most horrific and preventable foreign policy disaster in modern history. Plus, the DHS calls “lockdown skeptics” (read: more than half of Americans) terrorists, and Biden was "just discussing” vaccine mandates for interstate travel. This is The Liz Wheeler Show. -- Setting up an estate plan with Trust & Will is easy. Get 10% off plus free shipping on your customized legal documents: http://trustandwill.com/liz. -- Never go online without using ExpressVPN. Protect your online activity today with 3 FREE months at http://expressvpn.com/liz.

The Rush Limbaugh Show
Clay Travis and Buck Sexton Show H1 – Aug 16 2021

The Rush Limbaugh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 45:10


PODCAST SUMMARY HOUR 1: Disaster in Afghanistan. Biden said there was no comparison to Saigon, country wouldn't fall to Taliban. Biggest foreign policy disaster in our lifetimes. Biden is starting to make Jimmy Carter look like some kind of a strategic genius by comparison. SecState Blinken: We succeeded in Afghanistan! Veterans flood the phone lines to vent on Afghanistan. C&B hope Biden & Jen Psaki are enjoying their vacation while Afghanistan burns. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

The Ben Shapiro Show
Ep. 1319 - Biden's Saigon

The Ben Shapiro Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 48:54


Afghanistan falls to the Taliban in the worst foreign policy debacle for the United States since America's withdrawal from Vietnam. Check out Debunked. Where Ben Shapiro exposes leftist fallacies in 15 minutes or less. Watch the full season available only on The Daily Wire: utm.io/uc9er  My new book, 'The Authoritarian Moment: How the Left Weaponized America's Institutions Against Dissent,' is now available! Secure your copy here: https://utm.io/udsnA Or get a signed copy for only $30: https://utm.io/udAtM Subscribe to Morning Wire, Daily Wire's new morning news podcast, and get the facts first on the news you need to know: https://utm.io/udyIF

Pat Gray Unleashed
Afghanistan: Joe Biden's Saigon | 8/16/21

Pat Gray Unleashed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 94:56


Pat had a rough weekend in the emergency room with kidney stones. In a matter of a couple of days, Afghanistan has become an absolute disaster. Of course, the Joe Biden administration blames the Trump administration. Thousands of Americans have been left in Kabul. Even CNN is starting to disagree with Biden. Did the Biden administration photoshop an image to cover something up? Tom Hanks' son speaks out against vaccine mandates. Fauci asks Americans to “put aside” personal liberties. There are now 74 new cases of COVID connected with Obama's birthday celebration at Martha's Vineyard. DHS raises the terror threat in America and warns about religious extremists and anti-vaxxers. A January 6 protester makes a confession and claims that he was paid to riot. Honolulu's fire chief cries as he talks about the vaccine mandates for first responders. Sydney, Australia, ramps up lockdowns after only FIVE deaths. A sports fan gets attacked for saying the name of a baseball mascot. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices