Podcasts about marine corps

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Military service branch specialized in amphibious warfare

  • 2,803PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about marine corps

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Latest podcast episodes about marine corps

All Of It
The True Story and Creative Team Behind New Musical '¡Americano!'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 27:51


The new musical, "¡Americano!," tells the true story of Tony Valdovinos, who didn't learn he was an undocumented immigrant until he attempted to enlist in the Marine Corps. We are joined by Valdovinos, actor Sean Ewing, who plays Tony in the show, and composer Carrie Rodriguez, who created the score. "¡Americano!" runs at New World Stages through June 19.

Eye on Veterans
NOW HIRING: Veteran Mechanics to keep America truckin'

Eye on Veterans

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 19:24


Supply Chain issues can be bad news for the delivery of online shopping orders, but it also highlights the explosive growth in the trucking and transportation industry. Marine Corps vet Kevin Clark, SVP Cox Automotive Fleet Mobility Services, shares how he's looking to train and fully equip military veteran mechanics for incredible careers right now.To learn more about killer opportunities with Cox Automotive Mobility Fleet Services, check out:https://dickinsonfleet.com/And their career page has more info about their "FleeTec Academy"https://dickinsonfleet.com/careers/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Chatting with Sherri
Chatting With Sherri welcomes award-winning author; Sean Patrick Hazlett!

Chatting with Sherri

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 56:00


Chatting With Sherri welcomes award-winning author and Writers of the Future winner, Sean Patrick Hazlett!  What if there were a war after Armageddon? How would the survivors emerging from World War III's radioactive slag heaps fight in this conflict? Would they wage it with sticks and stones . . . and sorcery? Or would they use more refined weapons, elevating lawfare to an art and unleashing bureaucratic nightmares worse than death? Would they struggle against themselves or inter-dimensional invaders? What horrors from the desolate darkness might slither into the light? Wipe away the ashes of civilization and peer into a pit of atomic glass to witness the haunting visions of World War IV from today's greatest minds in science fiction, fantasy, and horror. Sean Patrick Hazlett is an US Army veteran, speculative fiction writer and editor, and finance executive in the San Francisco Bay area. He holds an AB in history and BS in electrical engineering from Stanford University, and a master's degree in public policy from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. As a cavalry officer serving in the elite 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, he trained various Army and Marine Corps units for war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sean is a 2017 winner of the Writers of the Future Contest. More than forty of his short stories have appeared in publications such as The Year's Best Military and Adventure SF, Year's Best Hardcore Horror, Terraform, Galaxy's Edge, Writers of the Future, Grimdark Magazine, Vastarien, and Abyss & Apex, among others.

Multiple Calls Podcast
Episode 47 - Manny Barajas

Multiple Calls Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 75:19


Manny is a nozzleman with San Antonio Fire. Born, raised, and still lives and works in the city's inner west side close to his home. Engine and Nozzle work is his passion. A true believer that the basics are where the fight is won. A Marine Corps combat veteran and first-generation college graduate. He is a proud husband and father of 3. A field training officer with his dept. Lead instructor for The First Line: Engine Company Ops with MV Fire Rescue TX. Manuelbarajas210@gmail.com FB: The First Line Engine Ops, San Antonio Fire Attack IG: @manny_b210, @mvfirerescuetx Editing Credit: @bradshea Marketing: @premiummixmarketingco

Dog Whistle Branding
Lessons Learned From the Front of Lines of Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) with Abraham Kamarck, Founder & CEO of True Made Foods

Dog Whistle Branding

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 44:07


Today on DWB, I'm joined by Abe Kamarck, Navy Veteran and Founder of True Made Foods, a cpg company that produces a full line of condiments and sauces with no added sugar or artificial ingredients, including their flagship sugar free ketchup and barbecue sauce.I invited Abe on the show to share the story of True Made Foods, along with the lessons he's learned scaling up CPG company. Be sure to subscribe to the Dog Whistle Brand Newsletter on Substack here: www.dogwhistlebranding.com Add me on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iron-mike-steadman-3387586a/ Learn more about True Made Foods here: https://www.truemadefoods.com/

Locked and loaded diaries
The death of PFC Evan Bath-Infantryman-and 8 other Marines and 1 Sailor-Camp Pendleton

Locked and loaded diaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 126:35


Since he was a little boy, Evan Bath knew he wanted to be a Marine. Sadly, that dream was only realized for one year. On July 30, 2020, Evan was one of eight Marines. A sailor from the Battalion Landing Team 1/4 of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit who drowned as their assault amphibious vehicle sunk near California's San Clemente Island coast during a training exercise ahead of deployment. The Marine Corps released its investigation into the training accident that led to their deaths. The 1,743-page report cites numerous failures, from maintenance to leadership to not following policies and procedures.The losses started months before their deaths. The investigation determined the 34-year-old vehicle that the troops used had several maintenance problems. As a result, when the vehicles were given to the platoon as the unit was assigned to the 15th MEU, most of them were “in horrible condition,” not fit for operations, and needed repair. We talked to his mother, Aleta Bath- One of Aleta's most essential questions was why procedures were not being followed and why there was such a rush to do a waterborne exercise for which the troops were not properly trained. She tells us about the lack of proper accountability and how the USMC tried to pin it on the lowest ranking man.

The Rise Guys
I'M 28, AND PROBABLY TOO OLD TO BE ADOPTED: HOUR THREE: 05/19/22

The Rise Guys

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 33:53


Open Phones brings us a lady who's Step Dad wants to adopt her, but she's only known him a couple of years and she's 28 damn years old We catch up with Anonymous who got out of the Marine Corps to find out he has a kid that's a couple of years old Paige reveals something that set the room off in laughter

The Transition
How An Army Combat Medic is Utilizing Technology To Create Equity in Healthcare for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color w/ Yusuf Henriques, Founder of IndyGeneUS AI

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 62:15


On this episode of the Transition, I'm joined by Yusuf Henriques, A former Army Combat Medic and Founder of IndeygeneUS AI, is a Black-Owned & Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business (SDVOSB) genomics company that's building a block-chain encrypted bio-repository of Indigenous and African genetic data for early disease prevention, detection, and drug discovery. After his twin daughters, Kayla and Keyara, were diagnosed at 14- years old with a rare, incurable, eye disease, Yusuf set out to find a cure. After getting frustrated watching his daughters jump from one medicine to the other, because their bodies didn't react well to the various medicines due to their genetic makeup, he set out on a mission to study the human genome, find a cure for his daughters,  and provide equity in healthcare for black and indigenous people across the world. Find out more about IndyGeneUS at: https://indygeneus.ai/

Send Me
44: MGySgt Cory Paskvan "Swift, Silent, Deadly"

Send Me

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 62:16


On this episode of the "Send Me" Podcast by SOCOM Athlete, host Jason Sweet is joined by Force Reconnaissance Marine MGySgt Cory Paskvan, one of the most elite & fittest Marines in the entire Marine Corps; currently serving over 27 years in active duty. MGySgt Paskvan supervises & oversees all the training that goes into becoming a Recon Marine; the senior enlisted member of the USMC RTC (Reconnaissance Training Company) where BRC (Basic Reconnaissance Course) is accomplished., Marines & Navy SARC/SOIDC candidates must graduate BRC in order to officially earn the elite title of "Reconnaissance Marines." With multiple combat deployments all over the globe, as well as counter piracy operations, MGySgt Paskvan has earned combat medals to include: Meritorious Service, 2 Combat Action Medals, 2 Navy Commendation Medals with Valor, and more.  In addition to his years of instructor experience training Reconnaissance Marines, he was also an instructor at the United States Army's Military Freefall School, and is a tandem/barrel qualified jumpmaster & master combat diver/SCUBA supervisor. MGySgt Paskvan has joined SOCOM Athlete as a Hell Day instructor & mentor over the last 3 years, and is a huge asset to the SOCOM Athlete community. We're honored to interview him in today's episode as he discusses physical fitness, mental toughness, and what it takes to become a United States Reconnaissance Marine; "Swift, Silent, Deadly!"• Become a Patreon Donor to support us & keep the podcast going: https://www.patreon.com/socomathlete• Follow us on Instagram: https://instagram.com/socomathlete/• Website: https://www.socomathlete.com/• Subscribe to our YouTube Channel:(With One Click!): http://www.youtube.com/c/SOCOMAthlete?sub_confirmation=1• Listen to our new Podcast on any platform: https://sendme.buzzsprout.com/• Check out our Reviews on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/socomathlete/reviews/SOCOM Athlete LLC is America's #1 resource in Special Operations career preparation. A combat-veteran owned, nationwide program, the SOCOM Athlete platform has a vast online & in-person community of individuals aspiring to become Special Operators in the United States military. Conducting over 50 nationwide “Hell Day” events in 12 states since 2018, SOCOM Athlete has trained over 1,000 of America's top special operations candidates varying from ages 15 to 39. Training Chats utilize a messaging app & feature free membership access. With over 1,400 members training for Special Operations in 35 locations across the United States, members have the ability to train & bond with a team of like-minded individuals in their city/state. Hundreds of former SOCOM Athlete students have graduated special operations training to become Navy SEALs, Combat Controllers, Army Rangers, Green Berets, Recon Marines, Navy SARC, USAF PJ, TACP, and more. Got what it takes for a career in Special Operations? We'll see..."Send Me!"

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts
THE ALL MARINE RADIO HOUR: CSIS’s Mark Cancian discusses Monday’s “On the Future of the Marine Corps: Assessing Force Design 2030” forum

ALL MARINE RADIO - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 162:06


Here is the link to the CSIS's forum entitled:  ON THE FUTURE OF THE MARINE CORPS: ASSESSING FORCE DESIGN 2030 Col Mark Cancian, USMCR (Ret) joined ALL MARINE RADIO to discuss Monday's forum (cited above)…

Millennial Manhood
#130 | Bring Others With You | Blake Hogan

Millennial Manhood

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 49:00


Blake Hogan is the Chief Executive Officer of Bunker Labs, a former Marine and all-around fascinating guy. Blake's goal is to ensure that the American dream can be a reality for military veterans and military spouses and, that in doing so, we build a truly inclusive economy. He is focused on guiding Bunker Labs to help close the systemic gaps military veterans and military spouses face, such as access to capital.”. Blake is also the co-founder of a safety product company, BreakAway Safety Solutions, which provides emergency exits for outdoor events making it easy to get fans out of fenced in events. He served as an officer in the Marine Corps from 2008–2012. Connect w/ Blake: LI: linkedin.com/in/blakehogan Web: https://bunkerlabs.org/ Connect w/ Jovica: LI: linkedin.com/jdjurdjevic TW: @TheJovPost IG: @asap_jovi Music Credit: Title: Clean Break Artist: Density & Time

The Faster Than Normal Podcast: ADD | ADHD | Health

Miles Mendoza is an author and freelance writer living in New York City. His writing often draws upon experiences as a veteran and various other emergency service roles he's occupied. His poetic essay, “Escape From Harlem,” was published in The Void magazine's December 2020 edition. Another, “Exotic Fruit,” was featured in the AT THE PITH art exhibit at the Nook Gallery in Oakland, California. Most recently, the author collaborated with artist and Professor Tiffany Lin to develop a satirical news story highlighting workers' rights issues (www.tlinart.com/fight-santorg). In September of 2021, Miles published his first book. "Speaking in Midnight Tongues and Other Symptoms of Neon Fever" is a collection of poetry, essays, and short stories that address themes of addiction, trauma, and creativity. When not freelancing, the author maintains a poetry and fiction website: www.MilesWrites.Blog. His work can also be found on his Instagram account: @mileswrites. Today he's sharing about hyper-vigilance, a different- maybe more observant side/speed of the ADHD brain, and advice on how your anxiety can kind of direct you towards being more efficient, if not productive. Enjoy!   In this episode Peter and Miles discuss:     1:17 - Intro and welcome Miles Mendoza! Ref: “Escape From Harlem” 3:20 - What's it like to be a freelance writer and be working on everything all the time & have ADHD? 5:49 - Ref: Ten Ways to be Happier When You Live/Love Someone Diagnosed With ADHD 6:09 - When were you diagnosed? 8:00 - upon joining the military 9:20 - What did you learn in the Marine Corps that you still apply to your daily routines? 11:00 - Ref: FTN episode with Jack Walston 12:25 - on processing everything at the same time 12:33 - on processing speeds 14:05 - on hyper vigilance 15:10 - about the effectiveness of flash cards 16:24 - Tell us more about how you processed the Will Smith slap? 17:42 - How can people find more about you and what you're doing? Web: [17:42 - How can people find more about you and what you're doing? Web: www.MilesWrites.Blog  Socials: @mileswrites on INSTA  18:21 - Thank you Miles! Guys, as always, we are here for you and we love the responses and the notes that we get from you; so please continue to do that! Tell us who you want to hear on the podcast, anything at all; we'd love to know.  Leave us a review on any of the places you get your podcasts, and if you ever need our help I'm www.petershankman.com and you can reach out anytime via peter@shankman.com or @petershankman on all of the socials. You can also find us at @FasterNormal on all of the socials. It really helps when you drop us a review on iTunes and of course, subscribe to the podcast if you haven't already! As you know, the more reviews we get, the more people we can reach. Help us to show the world that ADHD is a gift, not a curse!  18:55 - Faster Than Normal Podcast info & credits — TRANSCRIPT: Oh, hellooooo-Ladies and gentlemen my name is Peter Shankman and this is Faster Than Normal. Welcome to another episode! I am your host. I said that already. I am exhausted. I flew in last night from Montana. Boy are my arms tired. It was a three-hour delay on the flight. Um, I got home around 2:00 AM. I had to be up at six to get my kid to school. Um, oh. And by the way, I'm in the middle of an 120 hour water fast. So I am about 60 hours in and I am just exhausted. So don't come near me. I will kill you. But that being said, we have a phenomenal guest.  Y'know.. there are some sites out there on the internet that are just amazing in terms of knowledge and things you can learn. And then there are sites that are just cesspools of filth and depravity. And I was on the cesspool side of the coin a few a month ago or so, and I was on Reddit and I was reading about it. It was right around the time of the Chris Rock Will Smith slap. And I was reading an article about it or a story about it, and I read it and I saw this quote that came from a guy and ran into his quote, said, dude, I have ADHD. So maybe this is just a me thing, but do you know how many of my day-to-day interactions slash reactions are autopiloted while my brain is working on a delay to process what was actually said. So.. what that told me, first of all, the brothers from another mother type thing, but what was amazing about that is that there really are two types of ADHD. There's the ADHD that says, oh my God, someone's not even halfway through their sentence, but I know I have to respond. I know what they're gonna say. And let me just respond right now and lemme interrupt. And then there's the other half. That says I'm just going to watch this because I, my brain has to catch. Everything is moving so fast and my brain moves so fast. But in this situation, I'm going to catch up and make sure I know all the facts. That is what our guest was talking about on Reddit. His name is Miles Mendoza and Miles is an author and a freelance writer. He's living in New York city. We met on Reddit. He lives like 20 blocks for me and his writing draws upon experiences and various other emergency service roles he's occupied. His poetic essay Escape from Harlem was published in The Void magazines' December 2020 edition. And another exotic fruit was featured at the, At the Pith Art exhibit at The Nook gallery in Oakland, California. He's from the Bay area. He lives in New York city and in September of 2021, he published his first book Speaking in Midnight Tongues and Other Symptoms of Neon Fever: Poetry & Essays, which is a collection of poetry, essays, and short stories that address themes. Trauma and creativity; pretty much sounds ADHD to me. Every single theme in that, in that, uh, book of short stories is something that we've all dealt with as ADHD and that whole brain thing- we're in talk about it. Miles. Welcome. Glad to finally have you on the podcast, buddy.  Nice to meet you.Thank you for having me.  So talk let's let's go back. So you live in New York city. You're married. Um, you're a journalist slash a freelance writer slash author. Let's talk for starters about what it's like to be freelance and to be working on any given thing at any given time when you have ADHD.  Well in many ways, it's great. You, um, you're working on a bunch of different things. Your brain is stimulated on a bunch of different subjects all the time. I wouldn't be able to do this 10 years ago though, because I had to develop a bunch of different skills that I.. like to overcompensate for what would have been a very messy approach to business. So I, I, I work off of, I think I have multiple to do lists every single day and in a lot of those to do lists, uh, have to do with like, Take my dog out for the second time today, you need to go up three times. So I need to put that on the list. You need to go up three times. So every single, I didn't hear everything from like haircut to have lunch is on this to-do list. And if there's not enough yellow check marks on that list at the end of the day, I know I did a bad job. Uh, so, but then there's the great thing of like, I get to research different subjects which is. Essentially, I've tried to commodify what I did with my days anyways. So I I'm the kind of person who falls into, um, an obsession on a new subject every other day, I'll fall down rabbit holes. So I try to like, to really kind of take that momentum and just try to commodify it. And, uh, for my own business, it has worked to a certain degree. Um, I do get myself into a lot of situations where I am, uh, I over-packed myself at work because I feel best when I don't have any idle hands, idle parents for at least myself, as some of the ADHD tends to lead to trouble. And, uh, and that's what I was kind of writing about. Um, I wrote a, uh, an essay about, um, what it's like to live with a wife who does not have ADHD in any way, in fact, a very, she's a great student. She's about to finish her, um, nurse anesthesiology master's program. And when she picks up a book, that's what she's going to read until it's time to put it down. Whereas I have hundreds of books I've read most of them, but I have not finished..most of them, you know, that's, that's just kind of how my brain works.  It's funny. You mentioned that I wrote, uh, one of them when I was going through my divorce success at 16, one of the most read articles I published on medium was, um, Ten Ways to be Happier When You Live/Love Someone Diagnosed With ADHD. You know, it was, it was the whole premise that, you know, there'll be times when I have this great experience and all I want to do is share it with the person I love and I'll call and they'll be in a meeting, but they're not answering their phones so obviously it's because they know that I'm calling they don't want to talk to me and they hate me and in my mind I've already broken up gotten divorced moved on with my life um, you know, and then they call me back and they're like, you know, th'f*ck's wrong with you? So yeah, I totally, I totally get that. But. When were you diagnosed? You know, interesting story on that. I, uh, I came, I come from that generation where like, it seemed like every other kid in the class was diagnosed, uh, right about right about when I was in middle school. So what was that; in the late nineties, early two thousands. And I was already. I clearly had it, but I don't think it was just coming into the national conversation um, so, you know, I, I did well on tests. I was a nice enough kid with my family. I just didn't do my homework. I'd either forget about it or just could not get up to the point of performing it. And as I got older, that became more and more of an issue. And so I think that somewhere around fifth or sixth grade, I went to a doctor. And that was a pediatrician, but the problem was that I was? able to keep up with  conversation with him. He put me down in like the lower range. He was like, if he has ADHD that he's like, I, I can give you the prescription, um, on the diagnosis, but he's on the lower range. And so I remember getting Ritalin when I was a child and it, it, I, it didn't react well with me. I, I don't know if you've ever seen the episode of the King of The Hill where Bobby gets a Ritalin.  Oh my God favorite show!  Yeah, exactly. So like, it was pretty much that I was like, I was just sitting, staring at a wall. My parents freaked out. They were like, no, get him off of this. Uh, so I never really thought about it too much.I kind of knew that I had, it was in the back of my head. Um, but it really didn't become an issue for me because, uh, my approach to school was all over the place, but, uh, it didn't become an issue until I impulsively joined the Marine Corps. And then suddenly having your ducks in order is very, very important. And yeah. And there were a lot of moments where to this day, I think back to bootcamp, I, I'm not a religious guy per se, but, uh, I almost turned to Jesus in that sense, because there were these moments where. I did not know, like you have to have your things, like, they will tell you, you need, you know, here's the 10 things on the gear list and you have to have them when you had asked for. And I was like, cool, I've got my 10 things. And then there would just be nine things and like, okay, now w where is it? And like, I need this right now. And then something would just appear. So I, I, I remember at one point I was like, there is a supernatural force looking out for me. I now realize it was probably some dude next to me going, I got to help this idiot. But, yeah, so I thought  I want to stop. I let's stop and talk about that for a minute.  Of course.  So you joined the military, [[microphone rustles across entire frequency spectrum]] and I have said multiple times on this podcast that if I was smarter about what was actually going on in my brain when I was younger, because ADHD didn't exist when I was a kid. Right. You're disturbing the class did.. and I have a feeling that if I had been smarter about this and been more knowledgeable, I might've done the same thing because today my life is entirely based on rituals calendars alarms, set ups, do this, then do this. Then, you know, when COVID hit and I had, I would give a speech on zoom and then have the three days of travel that I'd normally be traveling busy to do nothing it was, it was hard, right? The calendar had to be full. So it seems me like Tell me what you learned. I'm fascinated by this. Tell me what you learned in the military that you were able to then apply, especially in the Marines, they were able to apply to life everyday. I mean, is that where you got the concept of the to-do list and the calendars and all that? Yeah, exactly. So what the military does is it creates like a huge amount of consequences for when you screw up. So suddenly you're kind of always in a fight or flight reflex, and I'm not just talking, I'm not talking about combat or anything. I'm just talking about day-to-day life about living in the fleet is you need to, you need to be places 15, sometimes 30, 45m early. And so you start building buffers into your life and you start realizing like, okay, I don't want to spend my weekend on duty, or I don't want to get my ass chewed out by a staff Sergeant or something like that. So you start to like build in all these things, so you can live a decent life and not everything comes out of the military with you. You do relax a bit. I certainly relaxed quite a bit, but, um, And you do keep these certain things. Like I have like internal timers that tell me like, Hey, you're getting close to that meeting per se for like for today, I knew I had to be at a certain place to do a certain thing. And I started having like internal alarm clocks go off before and it's like, you should be ready 15 minutes beforehand, because what if, you know, you get mugged on the way back to your apartment and you're, you know, now you're late for the worst thing possible is to be late. And you start to worry about how you appear to the world around you because that perception and military.. is often “perception is reality”.  Right? Wow. Okay. Interesting. We do a lot of the same things and, and it, it, it, it. Back in 2001, a former Navy seal who's since passed away a man named Jack Walston, I've had him on the podcast. Very, very, influential man in my life, he started a course, uh, for civilians, uh, where he'd come to.. he was based in Houston and he'd bring it to New York for two weeks or two weeks, four times a year where you'd basically just go and play in central park from 4:00 AM to 7:00 AM and get your ass kicked. Right. It was basically bootcamp. And, you know, for someone who you know, up until the early two thousands, you know, only ran by pressing X on a joystick, um, you know, and to the store for cigarettes, like wanting to do this and actually enjoying it and needing it in my life and doing it like 15 times was massive for me. And, you know, they're totally unexpected, but I get it now. And then the more I talked to the people like you, the more, I totally understand it. You, these rituals, these things that, you know, I'm a free spirited, are actually what ground you and what allow you to be creative because you're not worried about, okay, I'm going to miss this meeting or that miss this appointment or go down this rabbit hole. Uh, absolutely. It's uh, to me, I, I think we live in a pretty anxious society and I I'm sure part of that internally. Uh, but I it's like weaponizing your anxiety. Like let that anxiety kind of direct you towards being productive, or at least being efficient.  Very cool. So let's talk for a second about sort of that slower brain.  Do you think that the concept of ADHD is faster than normal? It's faster brain? The, the, the, the premise that we are always thinking 20 steps ahead and, and that's what we need to control because otherwise, you know, we're going to crash into a tree, um. In your, from what I'm hearing from you, you're actually sitting and processing the reason you might have a, you mentioned something that, where you said, uh, you know, there'll be times when when you know, you've been called out or you're about to get into a fight and you don't, you don't even flinch and everyone thinks that oh wow, he's so, he's so brave, but no, you just haven't really processed what's been going on yet. Yeah. So for me, it is still an issue of like doing too many things too fast. A lot of times when I'm having a conversation, I, I have like, uh, I've been diagnosed with hyper vigilance, so I'm paying attention to everything in the room. I'm listening to conversations next to me. I'm watching people walk into the room. Uh, and, and I know that that sometimes comes with ADHD. You don't necessarily have to have like, Uh, trauma necessarily to spark this, but it is, it's an over-processing, it's like more Ram than, than hard drive. It's operating with one and not the other. So it's, I am, I am paying attention, but it is possible that I may have rehearsed inter-reaction already. So like, I mean, you know, I'm going to go meet with a friend for lunch. Uh, I know how long it's been since I met that friend. I know the questions that I should ask. I am then applying like I am, I'm now deploying that social plan or that social plan while interacting with them.  And then as I'm doing that, I am also getting dragged, congratulating myself for deploying that correctly and not listening to the answers. It's not that I don't want to; it's not that I don't value what they have to say; it's just that my brain is sometimes applying more focus on some background things that are going on as well.  Well, I think that happens in, in terms of, you know, we're constantly, when you're able to see a lot of what you're doing also is figuring out what the next question you ask is what the next, where the conversation is going. Um, and I've noticed that happens to me when I meet someone for the first time and I ask them to name right as they're about, tell me the name I've already moved on to think about what I'm gonna say next and I will never remember the name. Ever. Absolutely. Uh, the names, uh, spouses names. If I, I I'm sorry. A lot of my friends is, uh, third spouses.. I probably will never truly know their names. I will always be asking other friends or my wife, what is that person's, uh, girlfriend or boyfriend's name, you know, or before we even get there.  That's funny. You're very fortunate to have a wife who's a, who's got your back like that.  Oh, she's incredibly tolerant for someone who just learns.. that's what I've noticed is that, um, a lot of ADH deers are, I don't know how we describe ourselves. Um, we, we absorb information. We can interact with it very intensely and then five years later, have no idea how to do that again, like our brain dumping abilities are quite impressive almost. Uh, and, and.  No. It's funny, many times I remember in school, one of the things that was was, you know, I hated tests and things like that, but when I had one, I would sit down.. once I discovered flashcards, right  my life changed. I'd sit down. I've learned it. I get tested on it, I'd pass and then puke it up. It's gone, right?  Right? It's like, it's like your brain does a deep fragmenting and it just like just tosses it and there might be shreds of it there, and you can fall back on it. But for me, I, it, it meant that I needed for a career to rely on internal skills that were actual, like baseline talents that I would always kno. For me, that was always writing so I that's what I, what I ended up going to ultimately, I also have, had I had a very adventurous personality. So for a long time emergency services for EMS, all of that, I loved it because I was just excited to be out there on the street and see what was going on right now that I'm, I'm calming down a little bit and I want a little bit of a safer career choice it's I had to go back again to the thing that never left me. It was my ability to write, edit and whatnot, but, uh, learning actual new skills and then just holding onto them for years at a time. Never really been my forte.  Interesting. Tell us about more about the slowing brain. You, you can use Will Smith as an example. You're watching it happen in real time and yet  you weren't processing. I, I think in all fairness, millions of us watching in real time didn't process it.  Uh yeah.. It's one of those things where it's like, I, I identified mostly because like in real life, when, when events like that happen, they don't, they don't make sense. And they don't make narrative sense. If you're making a movie, the first thing you're going to do is show Will Smith, like getting angry at the joke. Right. But in real life, yeah. He's going to laugh with you. Uh, people react to things illogically sometimes. And I just identified with that for me. When I, when my wife's telling me a story, I sometimes I I'm trying to process and keep in mind everything that's going on. And it makes what her words coming out of her mouth it's a little like watching a washout VHS tape. And it's you kind of, you know it because you've seen the, you've seen that video so many times, but you're not getting grasping all the details in the weight of everything that's going on. So you kind of have to say either stop or say that to me again, or in my case, I often am able to replay back events. So I'm just operating on like a 15 to 22nd delay before I fully understand what's going on.  Very, very interesting. Tell us, uh, I know you have a website that I mentioned earlier. Tell us again, tell us where people can find you things like that.  [17:42 - How can people find more about you and what you're doing? Web: https://www.nontradaccelerator.com/academic-coaching Socials: @mileswrites on INSTA www.tlinart.com/fight-santorg ]  In September of 2021, Miles published his first book. "Speaking in Midnight Tongues and Other Symptoms of Neon Fever" is a collection of poetry, essays, and short stories that address themes of addiction, trauma, and creativity. When not freelancing, the author maintains a poetry and fiction website: www.MilesWrites.Blog.] Oh, uh, Myles writes DOB blog is where I post, uh, I try to curate the best of my material at the mind, poetic essays, um, poetry, uh, some fiction I write in a broad spectrum. And then, uh, you can also find me at miles writes on. Instagram, uh, which is where I usually, that's more of my, my rough draft contents are, you'll hear me scream about some political opinions here or there, but for the most part, you can find all my best material on mileswrites dot blog right.  Awesome. Very cool. Well Miles, thank you so much for taking the time!  Guys. You've listened to Miles, man. I really appreciate you coming in and being so honest and you know, that's, I guess that's the one, my one, you get one shot a year where you find something worthwhile on Reddit. So I guess that was it, um, for this year. So I appreciate you taking the time, man. Thank you so much. Of course, thank you.  Guys, listening to Faster Than Normal as always you know the drill. If you like what you hear then leave us a review. If you want more info or advanced a dog just jumped in my lap oh hello Waffle. And we would love to know more, feel free to share uh what you're thinking. We will see you next week with a brand new interview. Thank you for listening. Stay safe, stay well. — Credits: You've been listening to the Faster Than Normal podcast. We're available on iTunes, Stitcher and Google play and of course at www.FasterThanNormal.com I'm your host, Peter Shankman and you can find me at petershankman.com and @petershankman on all of the socials. If you like what you've heard, why not head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and leave us a review, come more people who leave positive reviews, the more the podcast has shown, and the more people we can help understand that ADHD is a gift, not a curse. Opening and closing themes were composed and produced by Steven Byrom who also produces this podcast, and the opening introduction was recorded by Bernie Wagenblast. Thank you so much for listening. We'll see you next week!

Moments in Leadership
Moments in Leadership - Major General Dale Alford, USMC

Moments in Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 111:27


Book mentioned in this episode (not an affiliate link)With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa by E. B. Sledge(2012-03-12): Books - AmazonToday, I have Major General Dale Alford, USMC on the podcast. He is currently the commanding general of Training Command in Quantico Virginia, which is not to be confused with training and education command or T com. Training Command touches the entire marine corps both officer and enlisted which includes close to 90, regionally aligned formal learning centers aligned under 17 unique O6 level commands with 15 commanded by marine colonels and two commanded by Navy captains. These learning centers are spread across the continental United states with additional detachments in Hawaii and Okinawa. At any given time there can be more than 28,000 marines and sailors under the command of Major General Alford. This includes both the instructor staff and students. All of these personnel are engaged in training associated with 242 different military occupational specialties. While I certainly can't list all of the formal learning centers, some of the more recognizable ones are officer candidate school, the basic school, the weapons and training battalions, school of infantry both east and West coast, three marine aviation training support groups, the different Marine Corps intelligence schools, Marine corps communication-electronics school, the engineer school, combat service support schools to include the all the different training at Ft Leonard Wood for motor transport and MPs, artillery training at Fort Sill, and field medical training battalions which train our corpsman on both the East and West Coast, and the assault amphibian school.

Veterans  Radio
Hope For The Warriors strives to give life balance to Military Families

Veterans Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:00


Robin Kelleher, President and CEO of Hope For The Warriors, believes those touched by military service can succeed at home by restoring their sense of self, family, and hope. Nationally, Hope For The Warriors provides comprehensive support programs for service members, veterans, and military families that are focused on transition, health and wellness, peer engagement, and connections to community resources. Robin talks with host Jim Fausone about the programs offered and ways you can help by going to www.hopeforthewarriors.org. 

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast
Episode 105: Tango Alpha Lima: Marine Corps Combat Correspondent and Journalist Amy Forsythe

Tango Alpha Lima Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 58:17


IN THE NEWS A discussion of the military's history of toxic exposure and The American Legion's push for a Senate vote for the Honoring our PACT Act to address these issues for generations of military veterans. THIS WEEK'S GUEST Award-winning multimedia journalist, former U.S. Marine Corps Combat Correspondent and current U.S. Navy Reserve PAO Amy Forsythe stops by to talk about her new book, "Heroes Live Here: A Tribute to Camp Pendleton Marines Since 9/11" Amy shares stories about her career as a military and civilian journalist, her inspiration for her new book, and a case of stolen valor she helped uncover. RAPID FIRE Parris Island Marine Corps Band nominated for an Emmy VA Confirms Vital EHR Computer System Has Gone Down More Than 50 Times Since Launching in Spokane Airman slays ‘tedious repetitive tasks' for comrades stuck in paperwork hell SHOUTOUTS Post 176 in Springfield, Va. Post 539 in New Bern, N.C. Special Guest: Amy Forsythe.

Defense One Radio
Phil Klay

Defense One Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 20:58


Our guest is award-winning author and U.S. Marine Corps veteran Phil Klay, whose new book of essays, "Uncertain Ground: Citizenship and an Age of Endless, Invisible War," was just published by Penguin Random House.

Military to Corporate Survival Guide
Resign the Classy Way + Interview Successfully

Military to Corporate Survival Guide

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 19:01


Shoremates,There is a right and a wrong way to resign. In this episode, I go through the proper way to do it plus a few tips on interviewing.If you would like to be included on my weekly career tip + job distribution list emails, head to militarytocorporatepodcast.comIf you would like to contact me directly, you can reach me at joshua.elliott@kornferry.comUntil next time my friend,You've got this

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Building Businesses While Living a Balanced Life

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 16:16


Is it possible to be in four companies and still have time for important things in life?   Edwin Carrion's expertise in all aspects of managing operations of startups, from development, design, organization, legal, financial, marketing, capital financing, and strategic negotiations with client and vendor partners, has made him the key player in growing four of his most notable companies from start-up to annual revenues exceeding $15,000,000.   With all of these, he's still able to focus on making himself and his loved ones happy. In this episode, he talks about how creating a replicable business model and finding the right partner and team helped him to achieve success while still living his best life. [00:01 - 05:19] Living Life to the Fullest Having an early head start in business The secret to diversifying Making a model of success Creating a team   [05:20 - 08:04] Bringing in a Technical Partner Why you need a technical partner The value you can offer as the business-side partner Growth mindset Capital resources   [08:05 - 15:19]  Important Lessons for Business Owners Edwin on why he's not interested in service-type businesses Instead of reinventing the wheel, perfect the wheel Building the way he wants to Managing risks Learn from your mistakes   [15:20 - 16:16] Closing Segment Reach out to Edwin!  Links Below Final Words Tweetable Quotes    “Once you create a model of success, that model can be duplicated into whatever you do. And as long as you follow the same business model that got you to success, everything else is going to work the same way.” - Edwin Carrion “I will not change one thing because I know that today I will change one thing in my life. My life wouldn't be the way it is right now. And I don't regret anything that I have done in my life and I'm happy for those mistakes.” - Edwin Carrion -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Edwin through his website. Follow him on Facebook, Instagram, and LinkedIn.    Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   Edwin Carrion  00:00 Once you create a model of success, that model can be duplicated into whatever you do. And as long as you follow the same business model that got you to success, everything else is going to work the same way. And I have created that so I don't go crazy and I start four things at once. What I do is I focus on one of them, become really good at that one. Once I create a team that is able to sustain a step back, and then I'm able to go into the next investment, on to the next thing that I want to create.   Intro  00:27 Welcome to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Show. Whether you are an active or passive investor, we'll teach you how to scale your real estate investing business into something big.     Sam Wilson  00:39 Edwin Carrion is an entrepreneur, a businessman, and deal maker with more than 20 years of successful experience in multiple industries. Edwin, welcome to the show.    Edwin Carrion  00:48 Hey, Sam, thank you for having me. Appreciate it. How are you?   Sam Wilson  00:51 Hey, I'm great. The pleasure is mine. Three questions I ask every guest who comes on the show: in 90 seconds or less, where did you start? Where are you now? And how did you get there?   Edwin Carrion  00:59 I started in real estate in 2002. I started enterpreneurship when I was 14 years old. Where am I now? I'm living life to the fullest. And you probably wonder what that means is having a balance of my life, enjoying all aspects of my life, working 20 hours a week and spending a lot of time and creating a lot of memories with my family.   Sam Wilson  01:20 That is fantastic. And that was gonna be my next question is what is life to the fullest mean to you?   Edwin Carrion  01:26 It means having a balanced life, as entrepreneurs, as business owners, you know, at the beginning, we've focused into making a big, you know, and we put aside and that becomes our number one priority. And we forget about everything else, we forget about our health, we forget about being happy. We forget about spending time with our family being present for our kids, be present for our wife if you have one and we lose sight of all of that. It comes to the point that yeah, we get the success, but success is not fulfilling, you know, at a very early age, I was fortunate enough to go bankrupt and realize that when I went back about 27 years old when the real estate market crash, and from there on I've been living, you know, the YOLO life when you only live once meaning that I've been making myself happy. And through that of making myself happy, I'm able to make my family, my kids, my employees, my business and just the growth is continuously going.   Sam Wilson  02:18 That is interesting. You said you've been involved in multiple businesses. What were some of those businesses outside of real estate?   Edwin Carrion  02:25 Started when I was 14 years old. Like I mentioned, my first company was a DJ company. I was a DJ. I played throughout South Florida radio stations, clubs, had an entertainment company. So that was my first company. Carwash prior to that, actually I started doing washing cars when I was 13 years old. And 14 my DJ company. When I was in the military in the United States Marines, I used to sell calling cards because without cell phones back in the day, so I will sell calling cards to the marine so they could go home, especially because I was stationed in Japan. From there left the Marine Corps, started real estate development. Before real estate development, I went into the jewelry business, built a massive company, sold that company in 2014. Back into real estate development, from there on, I bought a transportation company. With a transportation company, we got into the InC 5000. As you can see back here behind me, we are in the Inc 5000 in the transportation company. Opened up an investment firm into the forex market. And that's what I do. So today nowadays are four things transportation, real estate development, forex investment and business consulting and education.   Sam Wilson  03:31 That's a lot of moving pieces. And going back to your idea here that you want to live life to the fullest. It sounds like you've kind of like the lots of variety and a lot of things going on. And that's part of your living life to the fullest. Is that right?   Edwin Carrion  03:45 It's not gonna like there's a lot... It is in everything in life. And you learn a lot, even the financial planners tell you you have to diversify, right can't put all eggs into one basket. So what I learned with me is that once you create a model of success, that matter could be duplicated into whatever you do. And as long as you follow the same business model that got you to success, everything else is going to work the same way. And I have created that. So I don't go crazy. And I start four things at once. What I do is I focus on one of them become really good at that one, the ones I create the team that is able to sustain I step back, and then I'm able to go into the next investment on to the next thing that I want to create.   Sam Wilson  04:25 When you talk about team, what does that mean to you and who is the first person when you're starting a new business that you always bring on?   Edwin Carrion  04:34 It all depends on the business that I'm starting. But let's talk about the transportation company because I did mention transportation. In the transportation company, I have no knowledge and I didn't have a lot of experience in transportation. So when I bought the transportation company, the first person that came in was my technical partner because I am the business partner. I have all the knowledge in business but I don't have the knowledge into like the Forex for example, my Forex investment partner. I am not a trader, I don't know anything about Forex trading. Now that I've been in business for two years, I have learned a lot. But I still cannot, you know, be responsible for other people's money and for my money into the business side. So what do I do is I bring in a technical partner. So that will be the first person that I'll bring into any business is a technical partner, if I don't have the experience on the technical side of the business,   Sam Wilson  05:19 How do you find a technical partner that wants to work with you that if they already possess the technical skills, what value do you offer them, maybe that they haven't already self-created in their own life?   Edwin Carrion  05:33 There's a lot of things that a business partner brings to the table, that a lot of times a technical partner doesn't see. And again, is not just partnering with somebody. It's finding the person that is looking for the growth. So on the transportation side of the business, my business partner, he grew his company to eight trucks. And that's all he was able to handle. He didn't know how to scale from a truck to 40 trucks or a trucks to 100 trucks, he didn't have the mindset. So when I talked to him, you know, when he explained to me the business model, I told him, why don't you have 50 trucks? Why don't you have 100 trucks? And his mind just went no, no, no, that could never happen we can ever get to that level is too much. So that's where I come in, and I bring the value in, number one, I've seen the value. And as far as being able to know how to scale a business and know how to sustain, how to create a team to sustain the scale of a business. That was number one. Number two, I could bring the capital, you know, I have earned the financial freedom and being successful at what I have done in the past. So I have capital resources that I'm able to raise capital, to bring the capital into the joint ventures and the businesses that are part of. What the other one is, how do I find that, besides me jumping in with anybody, I make sure that we do share the same values, because I only work with people that share my values, like my business partner in the Forex business. This is somebody that I mentored six years ago, and into business and real estate, actually, deciding real estate wasn't for him. He liked it. But it wasn't for him. It wasn't his passion. So he got into the Forex trading, he became really good at it, he got to the point where he was making good money. But again, he goes talking to him, if this is such a great business model, why haven't you taken it this far? And again, the mindset is not there. So once I partnered up with him, in less than two years, we grew that company really big. And just as again, because I know how to scale things. I know how to create a system. And I know how to bring the capital in for projects like that.   Sam Wilson  07:22 Right. You find the technical partner, when you bought the transportation company, had you already identified the technical partner? Or was it Hey, I'll buy it. And then I'm sure there's somebody out here that could find?   Edwin Carrion  07:33 Well, when I bought the transportation company, the person that I bought it from that became a business partner, he was the technical point. And the transportation company, you know, I could break it down into three components, logistics, maintenance, and administration. So I took over the administration part, he started with the logistic and maintenance. And that's how we grew.   Sam Wilson  07:53 Right. Yeah. Because you had the mindset on the administrative side, maybe how to bring in more business, how to grow the company, and he knew how to run it, and just was growth, growth-minded? That's really interesting. Is there any business right now that you would say, hey, that's too difficult, or has too many moving parts to just say, No, that's not of interest. Or is there anything on the table now as a possibility, because you know, how to grow and scale companies.   Edwin Carrion  08:18 I mean, the businesses that I personally don't like to get involved with are the service-type businesses, hair salons, nail salons, restaurants, because the profit margins are too small. So one of the things that I learned throughout being in business for over 20 years is that you need to learn what each customer is going to bring you. What is the average revenue per customer? And in the restaurant business, in the nail business, the average revenue per customer is very small. That's one of the things that I tend to stay away from. And I learned that when I had my jewelry business, again, I was the business partner. And I had a technical partner in the business. And we realized that our average client was around 100, to $1,000. And that's a good number to have, because that means that we don't have to have a lot of quantity. So with time you learn about that is better to have quality versus quantity. And it goes the same thing for my development. When I started in real estate development, I used to build so many houses, I was crazy, like all over the place, trying to find land. And I was doing like all these small little houses, which they were you know, $200 to $300,000. Nowadays, you know, I don't do that anymore. I built one house every year and a half, two years. But the house is a $3 to $5 million project. Like my next project I'm starting to work on right now. It's going to be a $10 million project. And it's only one house so I don't have to go crazy building 10-15 houses, I only do one project and it's going to need me the same amount of money as the other ones would. But at the same time I work a lot less because I do not like to work.   Sam Wilson  09:49 Right, that makes a heck of a lot of sense. On the development side, what have been some of your favorite developments and why?   Edwin Carrion  09:56 My favorite developments have been the first ones that I built. And I'm going to tell you why. Because I realized at the time I was building 1600 square foot houses, four bedrooms, two bathrooms with one car garage. And I didn't create the floor plan for those. What I did was, I always understood that you have to add value to everything that you doing life. So I used to go to these big developers, the Lennar, the Schumacher homes, the Better World Builders right now, which are some of the big ones, D. R. Horton's. I used to go to their developments. And I will pick a model that I like, and I will take the model, and instead of reinventing the wheel, I perfected the wheel. And what I mean by perfecting the wheel was I added things that didn't have, little things meaning like in their bedrooms, they used to put carpet. So instead of me putting carpet in the bedrooms, I used to put tile, so when somebody that was buying their first house, they would walk into this house and be like, Oh my god, he has tile on the bedrooms. He's like crazy, like this so much money, maybe it cost me an extra 1%. to add that, you know. In the closets, instead of putting the wires closets, I used to put the rod, the metal rod, which cost about the same amount of money. And people were like, oh my god, he has a cloth. He has a rod it has ever been the wire mesh. So those were my favorite projects, because I realized that I was building somebody's dream. And in America,to own your house or to buy your first house. It's like you accomplished the American dream, right? Especially because I'm coming from another country, coming here and buying your first house like wow, I made the American dream. So I was building and I was creating people's American dreams.   Sam Wilson  11:30 That's awesome. Absolutely awesome. never really think about it from that perspective. So you're building right now your $10 million home, that's your next project. If people just come to you and say, Hey, I've got this big, giant home I want to build will you build it for me?   Edwin Carrion  11:43 No, like I told you, I don't like to work. And one of the things that I do is I don't build for people. I build for myself. So every project that I do now is a spec project, meaning that I'm going to build it the way that I want to. And when it's 90% complete, that's when I put it for sale on the market. And the reason I put it for sale on the market when it's 90% complete, because there's very little changes that the new owner could make. Versus that me put it on our market, like a lot of developers do, you know, before it breaks ground or when it's the beginning stages, people come in, and they want to make all these changes. And it just prolongs the process. And it makes it more tedious. So to me, I said I have good taste. My wife has amazing taste as an interior designer, and we just build the way we like it. And if you build it, it will sell.   Sam Wilson  12:25 What are your risks in that? Let's say the economy takes it... What are your risks and building a high end luxury home?   Edwin Carrion  12:32 Risk is like anything else in business, there's always a risk, right? So as long as your key with your risk, and you know, for me, my risk tolerance could be 30%. For you, it could be 10%. So as long as I'm okay with my risk tolerance, I try to mitigate that risk. Since the beginning, I try to figure out what is going to be my risk. So in this case, my worst-case scenario could be that. Well, number one, let me explain a couple of things. I'm doing development, right. So I'm not flipping, I'm not wholesaling. Flippers or getting an old house, putting some paint here and there and making it look pretty, right. So the profit margins are very little right and you're a developer, you profit margins are larger than that. So we got about 30% profit margins from the total costs of construction. So my project profit margins are huge. So if  the market was to crash, which now everybody's talking about a real estate bubble coming up, which there might be a bubble, but I don't think it's going to crash like it did back in 2007, 2008. So let's say a crash 30%. I'm still at breakeven. And if the market crashes, that way, I can rent a house because high-end luxury homes, a lot of people I didn't know that before it started building higher luxury homes. But there's a huge rental market for that there's a lot of companies that bring their CEOs and CFOs to other states, and they pay for all these luxury homes, and they pay a lot more than you were to sell the house because they don't want to have the liability on their books. So they rather rent, right. So there's two parts to this. The third part is you can always rent it for movie shoots, video shoots, all those things. Because I have done that in the past with one of the houses that I used to own. We film a couple of music videos in there and everything else, there's multiple options on the high end luxury market. And the last one that I always tell everyone is that even though let's say we're in a bad economy, there's a lot of people making a lot of money when there's a bad economy, just like when there's a good economy, right? I made millions of dollars from 2008 to 2012. When everybody was suffering, we had, of course, the economy, the United States, you know, I made millions of dollars in the jewelry industry during that economy and I was buying real estate I was buying properties and taking advantage of the fire that there were out there.   Sam Wilson  14:33 If you could look back and your business career and there was one mistake that you would rather not repeat again, what was it? And then how can you help our listeners avoid that?   Edwin Carrion  14:42 I love this question. And I don't know why everybody likes asking this question. And my answer is nothing. I will not change one thing because I know that today I will change one thing in my life. My life wouldn't be the way it is right now. And I don't regret anything that I have done in my life and I'm happy for those mistakes. But the one thing you have to remember is that as long as you learn from that mistake, you're going to be better off. But if you do not learn from that mistake and you keep making the same mistakes over and over again, you're not going to get anywhere. So it's not about changing or doing something different is about learning from that mistake and make sure you don't commit and you don't make the same mistake again.   Sam Wilson  15:19 Absolutely. Edwin, if our listeners want to get in touch with you or learn more about you, what is the best way to do that?   Edwin Carrion  15:25 The best way to do that is join me on my social media, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn @edwincarrion78. Or you could just go to my website, Edwin Carrion and send me a message and you could connect to me. If you have any questions about real estate, live business, relationship, marriage, kids, anything, send me a message I'm very easy to get in contact with. I love to help people out.    Sam Wilson  15:45 Edwin, thank you so much for your time. Certainly appreciate it.   Edwin Carrion  15:48 Oh, thank you for having me. Have a great day.    Sam Wilson  15:50 Hey, thanks for listening to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate Podcast. If you can do me a favor and subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, whatever platform it is you use to listen, if you can do that for us, that would be a fantastic help to the show. It helps us both attract new listeners as well as rank higher on those directories so appreciate you listening. Thanks so much and hope to catch you on the next episode.

Your Truth Revealed podcast
40) Know Your PTSD: Being Vulnerabe is Courageous with Manny Marrero, OT/L (part 2)

Your Truth Revealed podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 24:15


Suffering with PTSD from fighting in the War in Iraq, former marine Manny Marrero, OTR/L shares his story of recovery. Everyone has expereinced some form of trauma. And we may need help to adapt once we're in a safe and better place. This is the 2nd part of his interview. Manny received his master's degree in occupational therapy from Bay Path University in Massachusetts. He's currently an MBA candidate at Boston university's Questrom school of business. He has a mental health occupational therapist at Cape Cod Healthcare and a yoga instructor. ➤RESOURCES Manny Marrero: https://www.instagram.com/manny_marrero Free Worksheet: https://www.YourTruthRevealed.com/listen ➤SUMMARY 1. What is your role and how do you help people? · Mental Health Occupational Therapist. Yoga and Meditation Teacher, Trauma Informed Care, Sensory Modulation, Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy, work for NAMI. · Vulnerability is a sign of strength and not of weakness. Lack of insight and awareness as to what is out there. Especially men, it's time to say that you need help. It's okay to be vulnerable say that you're struggling. It was me at one point. 2. What is your personal journey with PTSD? · Marine Corps 2001 - 2009. 4 years active duty. My first day of boot camp was just before 9/11. At 18 years old I was in the war zone at the Iraq-Kuwait border. I was in the front lines for 7 months in intense combat. · I returned to California and didn't have time to process. Went back into training. In 2007, I was deployed to Falluja in Iraq for 8 months. I lost my friend, which hit me hard. After I left the marines, I wasn't  sleeping well and had anxiety all the time. · I didn't know about PTSD and there was more stigma then. The marines weren't concerned about mental health. · At 22 years old, I was on active duty and drifting as a civilian. Self-medicating with alcohol, in toxic relationships, reckless and impulsive. I struggled from 2005 - 2009. Was dating my now wife who was studying psychology. She said I had PTSD yet I was in denial. I later told the VA that I needed help. · I was in therapy for a year and stopped drinking. I gained insight and self-awareness. I had been blaming yourself and felt broken in some way, thinking I'd never get better. I did the inner work and researched. Medications helped for a small period of time. Then I did yoga, exercise, medication, and mindfulness. I went to a veteran silent retreat. This helped me cope and be more mindful, kind, and gentle to myself and then to others. People started to notice a difference. · I finished college, whereas before I failed out. I graduated top of my class. I went to graduate school for OT and graduated top of my class. Now I'm getting my MBA. How do you define PTSD? · PTSD is a natural response to unnatural events. · Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a terrifying event — either experiencing it or witnessing it. · Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares, and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about the event. · If the symptoms get worse, last for months or even years, and interfere with your day-to-day functioning, you may have PTSD. · Most people who go through traumatic events may have temporary difficulty adjusting and coping, but with time and good self-care, they usually get better. · Getting effective treatment after PTSD symptoms develop can be critical to reduce symptoms and improve function. What would you like men and specifically veterans to know? · We all suffer, it's the human condition. Many suffer in silence. But there are solutions to problems we face, there are resources and programs. Like occupational therapy, NAMI, counseling, medications, and yoga. · Mindfulness - once you have awareness of thinking and behaviors, use awareness to make changes. Respond verses react. People are surprised that they have inner resources and can access it.

Locked and loaded diaries
justice for Ronny: The Marine Corps coverup of the murder of LCpl Ronny Vanletin-Okinawa, Japan

Locked and loaded diaries

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 119:50


LCpl Ronald Valentin was found murdered almost three and a half years ago in a ditch 200 feet away from a Sergeant's barracks where he attended a party on the Labor Day weekend at a Marine base in Okinawa, Japan on September 6th, 2018. He had been missing for five days before his roommate reported him missing. Once it was made aware, his body was found very quickly but so badly decomposed it couldn't be identified by physical markers, only by his dental records. The family have a closed casket funeral and never personally identified him in person, only by video of a tattoo. When they received his body from the Marines at the airport it was revealed that they had THE WRONG BODY and the wrong casket. They did the entire bereavement for the wrong body; LCpl Ronald Valentin never got his bereavement the right way. It has been almost THREE AND HALF YEARS, and they still have no answers, no justice. The cause of death was BLUNT FORCE TRAUMA to the back of his head. NCIS says the case is still ongoing after almost three and half years! No one saw anything, and the cameras in the area "weren't working" per usual. There is plenty of evidence, and the NCIS is dragging its feet. The Marines and NCIS aren't able to hold anyone accountable.

Eye on Veterans
More proof Hyperbaric Oxygen heals PTSD and more!

Eye on Veterans

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 40:31


Is the cure for PTSD, and other mental health issues like depression, all around us ... and we don't even utilize it? This week we look another example of how Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy is successfully treating PTSD in veterans. We hear the story of Retired Army Colonel Andy Smith. We examine Colonel Smith's life experiences and the treatment he received from Dr. Mohammed Elamir, Director of Aviv Clinics, in The Villages retirement community in central Florida. And we'll learn how their new twist on HBOT therapy works. Plus some startling facts about how teenage screen use and social media is proving to be seriously damaging to their brains. For more info see Aviv-clinics.comTo reach CBS Eye on Veterans host, Phil Briggs phil@connectingvets.comFollow on Twitter @philbriggsVetSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Small Town Dicks Podcast
Politically Incorrect

Small Town Dicks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:31


An undercover drug investigation leads to a web of political corruption that has ties to an international crime syndicate. As the case unfolds, our two detectives, Matt, who's working undercover, and Blake, his handler, begin to wonder if the corruption reaches into their own department, too.The detectives: Detective Matt grew up in Pennsylvania. He joined the police department in the town where this story takes place shortly after graduating college. He worked in patrol at first and then moved to the street crimes unit before he started as an undercover narcotics investigator. After he worked this case, he went to a DEA task force and worked to infiltrate a major political party conference. He received a medal of valor for his efforts. He is now a deputy in another state.Detective Blake started working as a police officer in 1987 after serving four years in the Marine Corps. He worked in one department for 26 years and then moved to the area where this story took place. There he started out as a patrol officer and then took a role in vice and narcotics. He finished his career as a lieutenant while in the same area. He was married for 35 years and has two grown children. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Equipping the Corps
17. Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch with Lt. Col. Scott Graniero

Equipping the Corps

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 46:16


Conducting amphibious operations is part of the Marine Corps DNA and amphibious vehicles have been a critical component to Marine Corps operations since their introduction during WWII. The names and models have changed but one thing has remained constant since their development. Before many of them first crossed the surf in the Pacific, they most likely spent some time in the shores of California at a small test facility called the Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch, or AVTB. During the preceding decades, AVTB maintained an integral role in testing many variants and upgrades of the Amphibious Assault Vehicle, the Expeditionary Fighting Vehicle, the Marine Personnel Carrier, the Amphibious Assault Vehicle Survivability Upgrade and most recently the Amphibious Combat Vehicle. Manny has the pleasure of speaking with the AVTB Director, LtCol Scott Graniero. The views expressed in this podcast reflect those of the speakers and do not necessarily reflect the views, policies, or positions or the United States Marine Corps or Department of Defense. Recommended Reading- Defense Acquisition Research Journal https://www.dau.edu/library/arj/ U.S. Naval Institute https://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings?gclid=Cj0KCQjwjN-SBhCkARIsACsrBz6Z8ARFydAiPTdfAVzN76Vl33m_2SFk7fs5aWCQrcwjAWWqwiZg1bcaAnJEEALw_wcB Marine Corps Gazette https://mca-marines.org/magazines/marine-corps-gazette/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/equipping-the-corps/message

The Transition
Brewing Beer, Having Fun, And Making An Impact with Air Force Veteran, Co-Founder of 1700 Brewing

The Transition

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 59:13


Today on the show, I'm joined by Air Force Veteran Kevin Mead, from 1700 Brewing , A Veteran-Owned Nano Brewery based in Newport News, Virginia, that offers a high turnover on fresh brews with a relaxing atmosphere. Kevin is one of four co-founders, all military veterans, that came together to bootstrap the business, instead of taking out a loan. All the owners share a passion for brewing and drinking beer, and decided to launch the company while still maintaining their full-time jobs. On the Transition, Kevin talks about the origins of 1700 Brewing Company, the challenges of running the business while dealing with turmoil in his personal life, and  why despite all the hardships that come with running the company, he's still having fun brewing beer. Find out more about 1700 Brewing: https://www.1700brewing.beer/

Dog Whistle Branding
What It Takes To Build An E-Commerce Brand From Zero To One with Navy Veteran and Inc. 500 CEO David Hunt, Founder of Crossrope

Dog Whistle Branding

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 54:37


On today's show, Bill and I are joined by David Hunt, A Navy Veteran and Founder of CrossRope, a fitness company that sells weighted jump ropes to help users pursue their fitness goals. Founded in 2012, David bootstrapped CrossRope into one of the Inc. 500's fastest growing companies and Best Places to work. He knows what it takes to build a brand from the ground up and drive revenue through online sales. Be sure to subscribe to the Dog Whistle Brand Newsletter on Substack here: www.dogwhistlebranding.com Add me on Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iron-mike-steadman-3387586a/ Learn more about Crossrope here: https://www.crossrope.com/

NOW Charleston
Ashley River bike bridge fully funded; Iconic Gullah cook gets new cookbook; Military ship in town; Statehouse winds down; more

NOW Charleston

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:40


Subscribe to NOW Charleston on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or via RSS.Follow the podcast on Twitter and Instagram.SC legislators could consider banning abortion in a special session after justices rule - P&CSC Senate OKs abortion, rejects hate crimes in extra session - APSC senators pass medical ‘freedom' bill opposed by LGBTQ advocates - P&CCharleston to vote on using tourism dollars to fund pedestrian bridge - Live 5Earlier story: Charleston now just $1M shy of funds needed to build Ashley River pedestrian bridge - P&CInternal investigation underway after police officer ran man over on Dorchester Road - P&CSheriff issues statement on mother, daughters killed in Savannah Highway crash - Live 5 NewsSLED investigating after man in custody at Charleston County jail dies - Live 5 NewsA Cook Who Never Used a Cookbook Now Has Her Own - NYTEmily Meggett interview - The Southern ForkALSO: This Matriarch of Gullah Geechee Food Has Been Cooking Farm-To-Table For Decades - SaveurNavy destroyer named for Marine Corps' 1st Black aviator to be commissioned in Charleston - P&CWhere Did Robert Smalls Live in 1862 Charleston? - Charleston Public LibraryFOLLOW:twitter.com/nowcharlestoninstagram.com/nowcharlestonWE WANT YOUR FEEDBACK:sam@nowchs.com843-474-1319INFO AND SHOW NOTES:nowchs.com

AgEmerge Podcast
083 AgEmerge Podcast - Paul Greive Pasturebird

AgEmerge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 60:05


Thanks for joining us, today we welcome Paul Greive, Pasturebird's Co-founder and VP of Sales and Marketing, located in Temecula, California. Paul shares with us Pasturebird's awesome story and what has driven their team to reinvent American poultry production. They've worked to scale the production of regenerative poultry, raising over two million chickens without antibiotics or drugs. They've kept their focus on the land, the animal, and the consumer all while improving the soil every year. Paul says, “we use nature as our template, and move animals to fresh pasture every day.” Listen in and Monte and Paul discuss this great American story of passion, innovation, and regeneration. Paul grew up in downtown Seattle and was a college athlete with no interest in food or agriculture. His farming journey began after contracting Lyme disease from a tick bite during Marine Corps sniper training and experiencing the joint pain, brain fog, and decreased performance common with the autoimmune condition. After returning from Iraq in 2009, he and his family started eating paleo and grew frustrated with the lack of pasture raised meat available in Southern California. In 2012, they ordered 50 chicks and raised them in the backyard as a fun project. Mimicking their mentor, Joel Salatin, they raised the birds in mobile coops on pasture, moving them every single day. The birds sold out instantly, and the business started to take shape, especially when the LA Lakers and LA Dodgers players became their first wholesale accounts. Pasturebird has continued to grow into the largest pasture raised chicken operation in the world, and they're hyper focused 2 things: 1) making true pasture raised + nutrient dense chicken more accessible and affordable, and 2) re-integrating animals and crops in a regenerative, closed loop system. The primary means for accomplishing this is Pasturebird's Automated Range Coop (ARC), a 6,000 bird floorless mobile coop that drives itself to fresh pasture every daily using solar power. https://www.pasturebird.com/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/paulgreive/ Got questions you want answered? Send them our way and we'll do our best to research and find answers. Know someone you think would be great on the AgEmerge stage or podcast? Send your questions or suggestions to kim@asn.farm we'd love to hear from you.

The Cognitive Crucible
#95 LtGen Matthew Glavy on MCDP 8 Information

The Cognitive Crucible

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 36:41


The Cognitive Crucible is a forum that presents different perspectives and emerging thought leadership related to the information environment. The opinions expressed by guests are their own, and do not necessarily reflect the views of or endorsement by the Information Professionals Association. During this episode, the Deputy Commandant for Information, Lt. Gen. Matthew Glavy discussed the Marine Corps newest doctrinal pub: MCDP 8 Information. MCDP 8 is the Marine Corps' capstone service doctrine that describes the purpose and mechanics of the Information warfighting function. The Marine Corps information warfighting function is a framework that Marines use to plan and execute operations for the purpose of creating and exploiting information advantages in pursuit of mission objectives, in any warfighting domain. Resources: Cognitive Crucible Podcast Episodes Mentioned #38 Lori Reynolds on Operations in the Information Environment #70 William Hess on the Information Environment and Adapting the Military #13 Brian Russell on Behind Enemy Lines Marine Corps Deputy Commandant for Information ESTABLISHMENT OF THE INFORMATION MANEUVER 1700 OCCUPATIONAL FIELD 17XX Guide posted on the DC I Website for your reference Information as a Joint Function MARINE CORPS BULLETIN 5400 ESTABLISHMENT OF INFORMATION AS THE SEVENTH MARINE CORPS WARFIGHTING FUNCTION MCDP 8, Information: A new Marine Corps doctrine for the information warfighting function by Mr. Eric X. Schaner https://mca-marines.org/wp-content/uploads/MCDP-8-Information.pdf Link to full show notes and resources https://information-professionals.org/episode/cognitive-crucible-episode-95 Guest Bio: Lieutenant General Glavy was commissioned in May 1986 through the United States Naval Academy. Upon receiving his wings in September of 1988, he was selected to fly the CH-46 Sea Knight. Assignments in the Operating Forces include: Weapons and Tactics Instructor and Embark Officer, HMM-261 (REIN); Aircraft Maintenance Officer, and Executive Officer, HMM-265 (REIN); Current Operations Officer, G-3, 1st MAW; Commanding Officer, HMM-265 (REIN); Commanding General, 2d Marine Aircraft Wing, and Commanding General, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command. Assignments in the Supporting Establishment include: Platoon Commander, Officer Candidate School; Operational Test Director, White House Liaison Officer, Presidential Command Pilot and Commanding Officer, HMX-1. Headquarters and Staff Assignments: Plans, Policy and Operation, HQMC; Information Operations, Joint Staff J3; HQMC Aviation, Expeditionary Enablers Branch; Assistant Deputy Commandant for Aviation, Marine Corps Staff; Deputy Director of Current Operations, United States Cyber Command. Military Education: The Amphibious Warfare School, Marine Corps Command and Staff College and Marine Corps War College. Master's degrees in both Military Studies and Strategic Studies and a Bachelor of Science in Systems Engineering from the United States Naval Academy About: The Information Professionals Association (IPA) is a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring the role of information activities, such as influence and cognitive security, within the national security sector and helping to bridge the divide between operations and research. Its goal is to increase interdisciplinary collaboration between scholars and practitioners and policymakers with an interest in this domain. For more information, please contact us at communications@information-professionals.org. Or, connect directly with The Cognitive Crucible podcast host, John Bicknell, on LinkedIn.

FatMan Chronicles
FMC Runs Chicago: Chapter 14

FatMan Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 60:47


Episode 142 – FMC Runs Chicago: Chapter 14 This week, Dave doesn't leave you hanging until the end to find out what race he is now signed up for. Back to Chicago? Marine Corps? Philly? Or… Then Pete and Dave somehow slip into a walk down baseball's memory lane. They enjoyed it. Will you? Then the bulk of the rest of the show is the normal update from the guys. How's training? Food? Alcohol? Are there enough question marks in these show notes? Yep, so let's just on with it. Now, get out there and #bebettertoday! This episode is sponsored by The No Fear Project podcast, the Be Better Today podcast, and That Wine Pod. Subscribe now in your favorite podcast app! Join The No Fear Project on Facebook or shoot Pete a note for more information.   Listen, subscribe, share, rate & review! Please subscribe to the podcast and leave us a review on iTunes/Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, Podbean, Stitcher, or in your favorite podcast app! Find FatMan Chronicles at: Fatmanchronicles.com Facebook.com/fatmanstories Twitter & Instagram - @fatmanstories Email – fatmanchronicles@outlook.com Music – “You Got Me Wrong” by Sifar Copyright 2022 Paragon Media – All Rights Reserved

Break It Down Show
Ripley Rawlings – The Kill Box

Break It Down Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 60:51


Ripley Rawlings – The Kill Box - Lt Col Hunter "Rip" Rawlings, IV (Ret.) is the New York Times bestselling author of the Tyce Asher series and co-author of RED METAL with Mark Greaney. With over twenty-three years of active duty service as a Marine Corps infantry and Reconnaissance Officer, he completed ten combat and peacekeeping deployments to Afghanistan (OEF), Iraq (OIF), Saudi Arabia, and Northern Africa (OEF), among others. Get all of Rip's work on his website at: Pete and Ripley talk about…Duh! His combat experience, but besides that, his writing experiences, future plans or books that lurk on his computer, so stay tuned. Please support the Break It Down Show by doing a monthly subscription to the show  All of the money you invest goes directly to supporting the show!   For the  of this episode head to  Haiku Combat writer's on Has the years to back it up Books from own knowledge   ​Similar episodes: Adrian Goldsworthy  DW Wilber  Anna Simons Join us in supporting Save the Brave as we battle PTSD.  Executive Producer/Host: Pete A Turner  Producer: Damjan Gjorgjiev  Writer: Dragan Petrovski  The Break It Down Show is your favorite best, new podcast, featuring 5 episodes a week with great interviews highlighting world-class guests from a wide array of shows.

How'd She Do That?
Episode 85: Erin Oprea

How'd She Do That?

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


Erin Oprea: Celebrity Fitness TrainerOn today's episode, our host Emily Landers welcomes guest, Erin Oprea onto the show! Erin found a passion for fitness at a very young age and at 18 years old, she became a certified personal trainer! She then enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps where she served our country with two tours in Iraq. In 2006, Erin began using her unique fitness and nutrition plans to train an elite group of clients. In a matter of no time, word spread and she began training top business executives, celebrities, and others who live busy lives. Working with celebrities like Kasey Musgraves, Maren Morris, and Carrie Underwood, Erin is known as the “Trainer to the Stars!” This is an episode don't want to miss!

The VeteranCrowd Spotlight
153 - Daniel & Priscilla Schrubb, Marine Corps Veteran, Founders & Owners Popcorn Friday

The VeteranCrowd Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 30:01


Daniel started his military service in the Army. After over 28 years serving he retired from the United States Marine Corps. During the transition into the civilian world, he knew he wanted to “chart his own course”. He utilized the program boots to business, an entrepreneurial education program for transitioning service members.  At the time popcorn wasn't on the horizon. He was looking to use his experience as a combat cameraman to launch a real estate photographer business, but as he pursued this he knew it wasn't the right path.  In the meantime some close friends encouraged both he and his wife, Priscilla to contact a fellow veteran, who owned a popcorn store owner in Fredericksburg, VA. It was through this mentorship they were able to launch Popcorn Friday.  Between Daniel's passion and Priscilla's, personal finance background and BS in Business Management they have continued to persevere through the challenges of being entrepreneurs and found great success. Popcorn Friday The name was inspired by a PTA event at Crossroads Elementary on Marine Corps Base, Quantico. Priscilla had volunteered when the kids were young and the name stuck in her head. So when the business was launched there was no question what it would be named. Popcorn Friday opened its doors in 2014 in Spring Branch, Texas. Just a few years it began being sold online, which paved the way for the success they have achieved today. They offer a wide variety or popcorn flavors from savory to sweet and anything in between. Interested in trying some out for your own popcorn Friday, fundraising need or your next corporate event. Check them out below. Learn More Website: https://www.popcornfriday.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PopcornFridaySanAntonio Instagram:  @popcorn_friday VeteranCrowd Network Our "forever promise" is to build the veteran and military spouse community a place to connect and engage. VeteranCrowd is simply a national network of veterans, veteran led businesses and the resources they need to prosper. Subscribe to stay in touch, or consider if Individual or Corporate Membership in the Network is a fit for you. About Your Host Bob Louthan is a VMI Graduate, Army veteran, and executive with over 25 years of experience in mergers, acquisitions and private capital formation. He founded the VeteranCrowd Network to bring veterans and veteran-led businesses together with each other and the resources they need to prosper.

Something (rather than nothing)
Episode 144 - David Bellino

Something (rather than nothing)

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 59:01


David Bellino began his career as a music video director-producer for various recording artists, management companies and record labels. During this time, Virgin Records selected Bellino to direct the Rolling Stones “Voodoo Lounge” interactive media title. He continued with Virgin as a production consultant on the band's multimedia-enhanced ”Stripped” album. Bellino then became the creative force and producer behind a number of digital media products for Universal, MCA, EMI/Capitol and Hasbro. In 2013, he founded Left of Creative to expand creative and production services for corporate and government clients. This growth has resulted in improved communications within the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps and U.S Department of Justice through dynamic storytelling, documentary filmmaking, and digital media. Left of Creative remains a pioneer in virtual reality concepts, applications and production logistics. Bellino was one of the first filmmakers to showcase an immersive VR experience inside the cockpit of the F/A-18 aircraft and on the deck-plate of The Navy's premier aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson. He's an award-winning director-producer, having received Billboard accolades for his interactive media work. With a proven track record across industry sectors, his work has made an impact for Universal Pictures, Lionsgate, Sony, BMG, MCA, Shell, VISA, U.S. Navy, U.S. DOJ, NASA/JPL, Hasbro, Virgin and more. Bellino's documentary film “The Guest List”, the story of America's deadliest rock concert, was recently acquired for broadcast with a television premiere slated for early 2021 and a theatrical / VOD version in post-production in preparation for subsequent release. As a filmmaker and multimedia producer, Bellino continues his work for high profile clients and develops original documentary and unscripted programming.

Wealth Matters By Alpesh Parmar
237: How to invest in Boutique Resorts and cabins with Alex Jarbo

Wealth Matters By Alpesh Parmar

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 33:09


Alex Jarbo is a short-term rental developer and manager. He was born and raised in Detroit Michigan. He served in the Marine Corps for 4 ½ years where he was stationed in Washington DC as part of the Marine Corps Honor Guard. He left the Marine Corps at 22 years old to pursue his career as a real estate professional. He is the founder and CEO of Sargon Investments and he has a goal of developing 650 cabins in the next 3 years. Alex holds an MBA with a concentration in Real Estate Development and is currently finishing a Doctorate in Business with a concentration in Leadership. He is the host of the YouTube Channel Alex Builds where he teaches the ins and out of short-term development and management. *DISCLAIMER - We are not giving any financial advice. Please DYOR* (00:00 - 01:56) Opening Segment -Introducing Alex as the guest Host -Alex shares something interesting about himself (01:56 - 26:56) Discover your best real estate strategy -Alex shares how did you get started in short-term rentals? -Alex was asked why building cabins when purchasing is so much easier? -He shares about Sargon Investments -Also he shares if he sells the properties after they are built? -Alex talks about the best areas to invest in -He shares as well about When it comes to building a property yourself, what are a couple of things to consider when it comes to property selection? -Alex shares also about short-term rentals are still profitable with what happened in the world in the last couple of years? -Lastly, Alex shares How can people connect with him (27:14 - 32:08) Fire round -Alex shares his investment strategy after the pandemic -he also shares his favorite Finance, real estate book, or any related book -he shares about the website and tools that he can recommend -Alex gave her advice to beginner investors -Also he shares how he gives back (32:08 - 33:09) Closing Segment -If you want to learn more about the discussion, you can watch the podcast on Wealth Matter's YouTube channel and you can reach out to Alpesh using this link. Check us out at: Facebook: @wealthmatrs IG: @wealthmatrs.ig Tiktok: @wealthmatrs

Forgotten Darkness
101 - The Mystery of J.C.R.

Forgotten Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 32:01


An unidentified, mostly noncommunicative man in a Minnesota mental hospital, known as J.C.R., was the plaintiff in a case to prove his identity as a North Dakota rancher's son.  Who was J.C.R.?  Will we ever know? Twitter: https://twitter.com/PodcastDarkness Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/agable_fd/ Part of the Straight Up Strange Network: https://www.straightupstrange.com/ Opening music from https://filmmusic.io. "Dark Child" by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com). License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Closing music by Soma. SOURCES “Accused of Writing Bogus Checks.” Washington Post, January 7, 1905. “Aphasia Victim May Be Naval Officer.” New York Tribune, May 26, 1913. “Are Positive of Identity.” Long Beach Telegram (California), May 23, 1913. “Bullets Write New Chapter in 'J.C.R.' Mystery.” Leavenworth Times (Kansas), May 4, 1917. “Caldwell Will Case Postponed.” Grand Forks Herald (North Dakota), August 27, 1917. “Dorothy Harris Claims to be Daughter of 'J.C.R.' and Heir to a Large Fortune.” Minneapolis Star-Tribune, November 16, 1919. “Famous Identity Case Concluded Late Last Week.” Dickinson Press (North Dakota), January 20, 1917. “Found Paralyzed.” La Crosse Tribune (Wisconsin), July 13, 1907. “Four Others Identify 'Aye-Hee' as Ramsey.” Oregon Daily Journal, May 23, 1913. “Girl, 18, Claims 'J.C.R.' Mystery man as Father.” Maurice Times (Iowa), December 11, 1919. “Hopes of Fortune Depend on Flute.” Spokane Daily Chronicle, November 17, 1919. “Insane Prisoner Attacks Sheriff.” Billings Gazette (Montana), August 10, 1917. “Is He? Or Is He Not? Week of Court Serves to Deepen Mystery of 'J.C.R.'.” Dickinson Press (North Dakota), January 6, 1917. “'J.C.R. Again in Our City.” Dickinson Press (North Dakota), July 31, 1915. “'J.C.R.' Face to Face With Lost Identity.” Chicago Inter Ocean, January 17, 1914. “J.C.R. Identified as James Harris Now Making Home with Former Wife.” Ward County Independent (Minnesota), August 26, 1920. “'J.C.R.' in Visit to Dickinson.” Bismarck Tribune, November 14, 1921. “'J.C.R.' on Co. Wants to Let Go.” Dickinson Press (North Dakota), April 10, 1915. “'J.C.R.,' the Man of Mystery, Declared Seen in Spokane.” Spokane Chronicle (Washington), January 24, 1920. “'J.C.R.' Walks to Dickinson.” Williston Graphic (North Dakota), August 5, 1915. “Man of Mystery Found.” Seattle Star, January 27, 1920. “Mrs. Pitkin Has an Unenviable Record.” Fargo Forum and Daily Republican (North Dakota), December 14, 1914. “Mysterious 'J.C.R.' Identified as Man Missing since 1906.” St. Louis Star and Times (Missouri), November 19, 1914. “Mystery Man for 13 Years is Brought Home.” Minneapolis Morning Tribune, August 18, 1920. “Mystery Man of Stark is Paralyzed.” Bismarck Tribune, January 31, 1921. “Noted Murder Case in North Dakota.” Rapid City Journal (North Carolina), June 19, 1917. “Says She is Wrong.” Long Beach Telegram (California), May 22, 1913. “'Silent Man' an Oklahoman?” Oklahoma Weekly Leader, May 29, 1913. “Slayer of Two Caldwells Held Insane by Jury.” August 14, 1917. “State News and Comment.” Bismarck Daily Tribune (North Dakota), April 10, 1915. “Strange Case of 'J.C.R.' the Man of Mystery Who Has Apparently Lost All Track of Himself.” Asheville Citizen-Times (North Carolina), November 9, 1913. “Trial of Mike Chumack Likely to be Postponed.” Hope Pioneer (North Dakota), June 14, 1917. “Wife Looks for Jas. P. Harris.” Tampa Times, January 13, 1920. Burnett, W. Fulton. “The Case of the Mysterious J.C.R.” North Dakota Law Review, volume 25, number 4 (1949). Callahan, Edward W. List of Officers of the Navy of the United States and of the Marine Corps, from 1775 to 1900. New York: L.R. Hamersly & Co., 1901. James H. Caldwell - Facts (ancestry.com) Waseca County Minnesota Railroad Stations (west2k.com) Strange Company: Who Was J.C.R.?

Respark Your Life
Ep. 158: Chef Jagger Gordon - Feed It Forward

Respark Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 29:01


After several years serving in the Canadian Marine Corps and travelling to 32 countries, something important stood out to today's guest: Good food is being wasted and destroyed within the range of people who are starving. Driven by a growing passion to find solutions to this problem, Jagger Gordon became a chef and began looking for opportunities to bridge the gap between the various food industry sectors and hungry people. The Feed It Forward charity was born from this passion. Now, Feed It Forward includes a ‘pay-what-you-can' grocery store and several bottomless soup bars in university campuses throughout the Greater Toronto Area. In partnership with Greenwood Farm, volunteers plant and grow organic vegetables to supply their grocery stores. Finally, there are 33 vehicles including food trucks and food rescue vehicles.   How can you get involved: Go to https://feeditforward.ca and click the ‘Get Involved' tab on the right to find links to donating food, money, or volunteering. You can also download the app and then rate and review to help get the message out. https://apps.apple.com/ca/app/feed-it-forward-free-food-app/id1573703493 https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=ca.feeditforward.freefood   Raymond Aaron has shared his vision and wisdom on radio and television programs for over 40 years. He is the author of over 100 books, including Branding Small Business For Dummies, Double Your Income Doing What You Love, Canadian best-seller Chicken Soup for the Canadian Soul, and he co-authored the New York Times best-seller Chicken Soup for the Parent's Soul. www.Aaron.com

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate
Use Partnership To Scale Your Multifamily Syndication Business!

How to Scale Commercial Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 15:49


When the uniform comes off, who is left underneath?    Shelon Hutchinson, or Hutch the Marine Investor, gives us the challenge that we still have a duty to build wealth for our families and create futures. That's just what Hutch is doing by creating strategic relationships (and building “core-petitors”) that build wealth and opportunities, not only for him and his family but for the future of his investors.    In this powerful episode, find out how Hutch builds into people and into his vision to scale in multifamily and build generational wealth.     [00:01 - 05:06] From Serving America to Owning a Part of It Hutch's journey from a slave plantation in Jamaica to immigrating to the US The idea of “owning a part of America”  How Hutch balanced being an active marine and building H Squared Capital   [05:07 - 08:45] Building Partnerships to Fuel Success in Business  Hutch defines his view on success and how it ties into realizing your potential From having ‘competitors' to building ‘core-petitors'  How Hutch and his co-founder work in tandem to close deals   [08:46 - 12:59] What's in a Name Hutch reveals the core idea behind his nickname and why it's important  How to translate core values from the Marines to the real estate world  Tying what you do to a something bigger than yourself    [13:00 - 14:38] Own Nothing but Control Everything  How Hutch is working to build generational wealth  Exploring the concept of owning nothing yet controlling everything    [14:39 - 15:49] Closing Segment Reach out to Hutch!  Links Below Tweetable Quotes   “You get to create, you get to impact your family's future and also the future of the investors that you bring on in the investment world.” - Shelon Hutchinson   “This uniform comes off or the uniform comes off and yet still you remain. And your responsibility and your obligation and your duty [is] to continuously provide for your family and also improve the trajectory of your family bloodline.” - Shelon Hutchinson   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------   Connect with Hutch on LinkedIn for passive commercial real estate investment opportunities! Visit hsquaredcapital.com and start owning a bit of America.    Connect with me:   I love helping others place money outside of traditional investments that both diversify a strategy and provide solid predictable returns.     Facebook   LinkedIn   Like, subscribe, and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or whatever platform you listen on.  Thank you for tuning in!   Email me → sam@brickeninvestmentgroup.com   Want to read the full show notes of the episode? Check it out below:   Hutch  0:00   We look to build solid relationships 'with,' you know. So we bring the piece in where we bring some seed capital to where we invest our own money, due diligence capital as well. My partner, Dr. Jones, he's really really good with numbers, because he does a lot of research. So he assists our company with underwriting. I focus on building relationships, and we bring all this stuff together.    Intro  0:20   Welcome to the How to scale commercial real estate show. Whether you are an active or passive investor, we'll teach you how to scale your real estate investing business into something big.   Sam Wilson  0:32   Hutch the Marine investor is a master Gunnery Sergeant E9 in the United States Marine Corps. He's still on active duty, though he focuses on building his real estate portfolio by co-sponsoring the acquisition of multifamily property. Hutch, welcome to the show.   Hutch  0:46   Oh, man, thank you so much for having me, my brother.   Sam Wilson  0:49   Pleasure's mine! Three questions I asked every guest who comes on the show? Where did you start? Where are you now? How did you get there? But you gotta tell me in less than 90 seconds.    Hutch  0:57   Ooh, man. I don't know if I can do that. My stuff goes really deep, man. So look, in 90 seconds. This is who Hutch the Marine Investor is. This whole thing, man, this whole thing that we have going on started on what used to be a slave plantation on the island of Jamaica. I spent the early year of my life walking into school with bare feet. Then I came to immigrate to America in 1998. Shortly after that out to join the Marine Corps, traveled the world, but I've not been to Africa yet. I'm super excited to go to Africa one day. Might need to go there on a vacation. Right? You know, so I was fortunate when I came to America, my dad kind of got me thinking about owning more, owning some or more of America through real estate, you know, so I got a seed planted in my head real early on when I came to America. So the paradigm was single-family space. But it was not until 2019 That it transitioned to the multifamily space and just focused on growing right now.   Sam Wilson  1:45   Wow, that's fantastic. So in 2019, you'd had enough of single-family? Correct. Do you still own a single-family portfolio?   Hutch  1:54   Just two right now. One in Cali, one in Florida.   Sam Wilson  1:57   Gotcha. So you've divested of those assets. And now you're going long in the multifamily space? How have you been able to do that? Being active in the Marine Corps and probably getting deployed at least a few times?   Hutch  2:10   Yeah. So one thing if you know anything about the Marine Corps, is that Marine Corps expect and appreciate nothing less than 100% commitment, right, and effort. You know, so I learned a quote, not too long ago by Arnold Schwarzenegger, right? A lady asked him a question like, "Where do you find time to work out? my busy schedule is XY and Z." And he asked the lady, "Do you sleep?" And the lady said, "Yes." And he said, "Sleep faster." Right so, H Squared Capital, we started off at a masterminding, my partner, Dr. Jones and I, we started off masterminding and at 4 am in the morning, you know. So wake up, and we will make notes, we were working on content, podcast recording, or just creating the business in general. Right. And, we worked on it also late at night, you know, because my partner, Dr. Jones, he has a GS 14, he does Auditory Research for the Army out in Fort Rucker, Alabama. So E2 have a large commitment throughout the day, you know, so I'm focused more in the morning. But we have promoted ourselves to a point where we can create more flexibility in the days to where our lunch hours can actually be lunch hours. And we can take some time to make investor calls, property managers, so on and so forth.   Sam Wilson  3:15   That's awesome. Now, you're co-sponsoring or you have gone out and started to buy deals on your own?   Hutch  3:20   Yes. So we did our first lead sponsor back in the last quarter of 2021, which is a small 26 unit we purchased in Augusta, Georgia. Right? We do have a team that was syndicated but Heath and I are one of the lead sponsors and that deal.   Sam Wilson  3:35   That's awesome. Very, very cool. What do your marine buddies think about what you do?   Hutch  3:40   Man, the absolute they're fascinated with it. No, so there is a split, right? Because in the Marine Corps, anything that does not have to do with winning a country's war, right? And making a Marine is our second nation, right. So needless to say, there's a portion of it, there's a portion of my peers, that frown on it, right. Because they see it as a distraction. But when you wake up at four in the morning, and when you're working on the business after the kids go to sleep, then you are not really affecting the mission, right. But you get to create, you get to impact your family's future and also the family - the future of the investors that you bring on with us in the investment world. But there's a certain population in the Marine Corps that understands that at one point, this uniform comes off or the uniform comes off, right? And yet still you remain and your responsibility and your obligation and your duty are to continuously provide for your family and also improve the trajectory of your family bloodline, you know. So it's mixing, depends on who you're talking to. Right? So, you got to feel those conversations out to feel what will this conversation be about? Will it be an overall motivated conversation about a Marine Corps talking about, you know, just the polar and future projection of the Marine Corps, or do we talk about mindset? And do we mix the mindset in with our responsibility to the ones that care most about us, which is our family, you know. So the conversation is different and we have to choose who we had those conversations with.   Sam Wilson  5:07   Yeah, that's really well said. Tell me about - when I ask you when I say the word 'success, ' what does that mean?    Hutch  5:14   Oh, man. So I'll tell you right now, Sam, we could say that success looks like XYZ. But what do we really know? I think if I should describe success right now, it would be based on my limited understanding of what's possible, right? So, I gradually change what I believe success looks like? Well, one of the things that always remains constant is not getting to the end of my life, and, you know, meeting the person that I could have been, and not recognizing that individual, I would like to be it at the end of my life. And wherever we go heaven, hell, or to a next realm or next dimension, whatever the case may be, right, I would like to meet, you know, what I could be and I can identify with that guy. Be like, man, you look like me, in the spiritual form. Whatever it is. It could be a black, white, Asian, whatever the spiritual form looked like, right. I would like to be able to say, we have similar qualities and I've grown to what my expectation was. I believe that's what success looked like. But for me, it continues to change while we're in this realm.   Sam Wilson  6:15   Oh, for sure. I think success is a constantly morphing term. But I was just curious what it sounds like for you. And I think the way - I like the way you've put that, when you meet your future self, you will want to know who you are then in such a way that you're like, Oh, hey, I became - I met my potential. I think that's maybe - does that sound like a fair synopsis of that?   Hutch  6:36   Yeah, absolutely is. So it's good to have somebody in your life to chase. But I think a lot of times we burden ourselves with looking at, we're trying to be honest. I'm a firm believer that we can only be the best version of our current self. Right? So I'm also chasing that person as well. So my paradigm of what I can be continuously changed as well. So you know, that's why we all set goals, right? Michael blanc talks about, you know, "Planning is going into the future, bring it to the present, and then doing something about it." And if we continue chasing our future self, then success would always be improving, as we set bigger and better goals for ourselves.   Sam Wilson  7:15   That's awesome. I love that. Tell me how you guys are finding opportunity right now? I mean, the multifamily space is currently not known for its lack of competition.    Hutch  7:26   Yeah. So it's really cool that you bring up the word competition, because when we have the abundance mindset, right, and I know I saw you at The Best Ever Conference, we didn't really get an opportunity to speak, but when we in an environment like that, we get people sharing this abundance of information, right? So what happened is that a lot of us were there to create better relationships, we see a lot of folks in this virtual world, but we get to get a firm handshake and look people square in the face and, you know, kind of get the feel of their character. So we get to realize that we are more 'core-petitors' than we are 'competitors,' you know. So at H Squared Capital, we look for more 'core-petitors,' folks who are actually, day in day out in the market, underwriting deals, underwriting markets, analyzing markets, and those are the folks. We look to build solid relationships 'with,' you know. So we bring the piece in where we bring some seed capital to where we invest our own money, due diligence capital as well. My partner, Dr. Jones, he's really really good with numbers, because he does a lot of research. So he assists our company with underwriting. I focus on building relationships, and we bring all this stuff together. So we help to get the deal past closing. And then after closing, we manage our investor relations, you know. So that's what we're doing right now we focus on making good relationships with folks who're underground in the market every day and building more core-petitors.   Sam Wilson  8:45   I like the play on words there. Tell me about your nickname.   Hutch  8:49   So, let me tell you earlier, it's Shelon or ‘Hutch.' So everything has to be memorable, I believe, you know, the ones who crave the most attention in marketing, I believe will come out on top, or actually, not necessarily come out on top - will stay top of mind. Right? I don't believe Shelon is a memorable name, but Hutch the Marine Investor is, I believe, is a memorable name. Now look, the reason why I got to Hutch is that my wife built some awareness in my life a long, long time ago in our relationship. She asked me and you know, 20 years of marriage, I've never once called him up called her out of her name. We never once had a fight. We have had some solid moments, right? But we've had some really deep conversations that helped us to build a better understanding of who we are as spiritual beings. And in one of our conversations, really early in our relationship, she asked me this question she said, "Can you help me to understand why whenever you introduce yourself to a female, you introduce yourself as Shelon, but when you meet a guy, who's real manly, I'm Hutch. You know, so she raised awareness and awareness is a foundation for changing or improving who you can be, right? So right then and there, I said, you know, really thank you for bringing that to my attention. I will go by Hutch from now on to eliminate any explanation going into the future. You know, so when I started investing, like yep, what can make the name Hutch a little more memorable? And that's why I transitioned to Hutch the Marine Investor, because once a Marine, always a Marine. So I could be a former Marine, used to be Marine, used to be active duty, whatever the case may be, right. But I will always be Hutch the Marine Investor because once you go to boot camp and complete a successful completion of training, that is one thing no one can ever take away from you. I will always be a Marine, under whatever circumstances.   Sam Wilson  8:57   What are the systems? What are the processes that you feel like, they're kind of cross-discipline skills from the Marines to real estate investing?    Hutch  10:08   Look, so there's a couple of things, Sam, and one of the things I want to focus on is morale. So morale is a confidence and enthusiasm. You know, it's also the discipline in a group, but not only in a group is about - it's in yourself. And when you have the confidence by enthusiasm and discipline, right, that builds competence. And competence is something that as you know, Sam, investors are looking for. So I think morale, right. I mean, the confidence, enthusiasm, and discipline to build competence as a real estate investor, I believe, investors look to that, for people who they want to invest with. And I believe that directly transfers over from the morale that we have in the Marine Corps, right, from being a go-getter, never quits, to being successful on a mission. Right? I believe that's a skill that's transferred. But look, also, as a Marine, everyone needs a friend, a purpose, and an opportunity to belong to something greater than himself. And that's why in the Marine Corps if you transfer from the army or any branch of service to the Marine Corps, you have to go through the Marine Corps Bootcamp. Right? That is by design, because of the way Marines are created. Because we accept nothing less than 100% commitment. You know, so everyone in the Marine Corps, we believe that we're part of something greater than ourselves, you know, everyone needs a friend, a purpose, and some opportunity to belong to something greater than himself. And I believe we have impact investing in real estate syndication, right, like H Squared Capital, the way we give back to our community is that 10% of all our acquisition fee, goes to a nonprofit organization that benefits our veterans. I believe that a lot of folks can get behind that. So, a lot of these skills transferred over. And I can go down a rabbit hole of a lot more skills. And yes!   Sam Wilson  12:34   That's really, really cool. I love what you guys are doing. I love building in the ability to, you know, we've done that on all of our deals as well, where it's, Hey, this is what we're supporting. It doesn't impact investor returns, because it comes out of the general partnership side. But as limited partners get involved, it's like, hey, by investing with us, you can make a difference, you know, again, without it impacting your return. So I think that's really, really cool. Tell me something along these lines: what's something you're curious about right now? Is there something economically? Is there something in the business? What's something you're curious about?   Hutch  13:10   So a way - I wish we had a crystal ball to see what the future projection of the economy of the United States looks like? But one of the things that I'm absolutely curious about, Sam, is how do I create a family office to where when my grandkids graduate from whatever high level of education they choose to go to, whether it be high school, and they want to start a business, or they go to university and they want to start a business after that - I never want them to worry about how their education will be paid for. I never wanted to worry about where would they get the seed money to buy their first investment property or start their own business? And I believe a family office is a way to do that. So that's one of the things that I have my curiosity in. And also how do I own nothing but control everything? Right? I'm super fascinated by that concept. And it's the things that I'm pulling together a lot of information to actually execute in the very near future.   Sam Wilson  14:03   Owb nothing but control everything. Can you elaborate on that?   Hutch  14:07   So we hear a lot, a lot of folks that would have these got these trust funds, right? And they don't really own it, but they get to benefit from it. Right, or a family office where it's controlled by a trustee to navigate certain elements, one to tax advantages, right, and certain ways of getting it to transcend it several bloodlines? Right, and that's kind of what I'm focused on. Look, I don't have all the details yet. But as he said, that's something that I'm super fascinated and curious about. How that really works and how can I incorporate that into the Hutchinson bloodline?   Sam Wilson  14:38   I love it. Oh, nothing but control everything. That's a brilliant model there. Hutch, thanks for coming on today. It's been a blast. Last question for you. If listeners want to get in touch with you or learn more about you, what's the best way to do that?   Hutch  14:49   The best way to do that is to connect with me on LinkedIn at Hutch the Marine Investor on LinkedIn or you can shoot me an email at hutch@hsquaredcapital.com. We also got a website and a podcast. Our website is www.hsquaredcapital.com. And our podcast, The Multifamily Real Estate Experiment podcast. Heath and I, we interview 63 guests, and each topic dissects aspects of multifamily real estate that, whether you're a passive investor or an active investor, will be of interest to you.    Sam Wilson  15:19   Awesome. Hutch, thanks for your time today. I do appreciate it.   Hutch  15:22   Thank you so much, my brother.   Sam Wilson  15:23   Hey, thanks for listening to the How to Scale Commercial Real Estate podcast if you can do me a favor and subscribe and leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google podcasts, whatever platform it is you use to listen if you can do that for us. That would be a fantastic help to the show. It helps us both attract new listeners as well as rank higher on those directories. So I appreciate you listening and thanks so much and hope to catch you on the next episode.