Podcasts about pacific islanders

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Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Islands

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Latest podcast episodes about pacific islanders

The Underworld Podcast
How Meth Turned New Zealand's Biker Gang Scene Upside Down: Mongrels, Black Power and Killer Beez

The Underworld Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 60:58


For decades, New Zealand's biker gangs fought each other for turf, cash and kudos. Violence between its two biggest outfits, the Mongrel Mob and Black Power, often turned deadly, and acts of cruelty shocked the public. Then, in the mid-90s, a new, potent drug worth billions arrived on the country's pristine shores - and with it a wave of foreign narcos looking to take control of what might be the world's most profitable black market. The gangs gave thousands of disaffected Maori and Pacific Islanders an identity. Meth—known locally as P—changed everything.

Collective Impact Forum
Bringing an Anti-Racist Approach to Collective Impact: Interview with Dr. Zea Malawa

Collective Impact Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 59:00


How can the collective impact approach put anti-racism at the center of its work?  How can collective impact work authentically center Black and Pacific Islander families, as it focuses on improving infant and maternal health? In this podcast interview, FSG Senior Consultant Miya Cain, MPH, explores these questions and more with the Executive Director of Expecting Justice, Zea Malawa, MD, MPH, building on their time working together on the early stages of the initiative. This interview is an unbridged version of an article shared in the Stanford Social Innovation Review titled Bringing an Anti-Racist Approach to Collective Impact. Resources and FootnotesArticle: Centering Equity in Collective ImpactExpecting JusticeResource: Racial Equity Impact Assessment (Race Forward)Resource: White Supremacy Culture by Tema OkunMore on Collective ImpactInfographic: What is Collective Impact?Resource List: Getting Started in Collective ImpactThe Intro music, entitled “Running,” was composed by Rafael Krux, and can be found here and is licensed under CC: By 4.0.The outro music, entitled “Deliberate Thought,” was composed by Kevin Macleod. Licensed under CC: By.Have a question related to collaborative work that you'd like to have discussed on the podcast? You can send it to our short podcast listener survey or at info@collectiveimpactforum.org.

Radicle Narrative
3.4: Kamuela Enos on Hawai'ian Strengths and History and Creating Indigenous Infrastructure and Systems

Radicle Narrative

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 83:42


Kamuela Enos was born and raised in Waianae, on the island of O`ahu. He received his AA from Leeward Community College, BA in Hawaiian Studies from UH Manoa, MA in Urban and Regional Planner. His masters thesis is titled "Utilizing Traditional Hawaiian Land Use Practices to Create Sustainability Paradigms for the 21st Century." He sits on the boards of numerous community based non-profits, and was recently a commissioner on President Obama's White House Initiative on Asians and Pacific Islanders. He is a llecturer at UH Manoa's Dept of Urban and Regional Planning. Currently, Kamuela Enos is the Director of the Office of Indigenous Innovation for the University of Hawaii. His work focuses on repositioning ancestral practice as contemporary innovation. Kamuela previously worked at MA`O Farms- a community run social enterprise. Show Notes:  https://www.maoorganicfarms.org News Article on Center for Indigenous Innovation: https://www.hawaii.edu/news/2021/09/23/center-for-indigenous-innovation/ Email: kenos@hawaii.edu Music:  Intro by Local Indigenous Band, Boss of Three https://linktr.ee/BossofThree

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
QTAPIs: The Personal and the Political

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 65:43


Welcome to Hearts and Minds—A QTAPI Community Conversation Series, Session Three: FTAPIs—The Personal and the Political. Join us for an intergenerational panel discussion of QTAPI (queer and trans Asian Pacific Islander) people discussing and sharing stories of their personal involvement in politics and community organizing. The Asian and the Pacific Islander communities are not monoliths unto themselves, so no program can possibly speak to the breadth of diversity and uniqueness in those communities. But we will explore certain moments in the panelists' own personal histories and lived experiences as they reflect on questions such as: What got them involved in API and/or LGBTQ issues? Was there a specific moment that moved you to become involved? Who were your mentors? How has your involvement changed from when you started? What is the most rewarding aspect of this work? And more. SPEAKERS James Coleman Member, South San Francisco City Council Valli Kalei Kanuha Ph.D., Teaching Professor and Assistant Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, University of Washington Sammie Ablaza Wills Community Organizer; Outgoing Executive Director, APIENC Willy Wilkinson M.P.H., Writer; Public Health Consultant; Cultural Competency Trainer; Author, Born on the Edge of Race and Gender: A Voice for Cultural Competency Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show" on KBCW/KPIX TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Twitter @msmichellemeow—Host In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on November 16th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
QTAPIs: The Personal and the Political

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 65:43


Welcome to Hearts and Minds—A QTAPI Community Conversation Series, Session Three: FTAPIs—The Personal and the Political. Join us for an intergenerational panel discussion of QTAPI (queer and trans Asian Pacific Islander) people discussing and sharing stories of their personal involvement in politics and community organizing. The Asian and the Pacific Islander communities are not monoliths unto themselves, so no program can possibly speak to the breadth of diversity and uniqueness in those communities. But we will explore certain moments in the panelists' own personal histories and lived experiences as they reflect on questions such as: What got them involved in API and/or LGBTQ issues? Was there a specific moment that moved you to become involved? Who were your mentors? How has your involvement changed from when you started? What is the most rewarding aspect of this work? And more. SPEAKERS James Coleman Member, South San Francisco City Council Valli Kalei Kanuha Ph.D., Teaching Professor and Assistant Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, University of Washington Sammie Ablaza Wills Community Organizer; Outgoing Executive Director, APIENC Willy Wilkinson M.P.H., Writer; Public Health Consultant; Cultural Competency Trainer; Author, Born on the Edge of Race and Gender: A Voice for Cultural Competency Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show" on KBCW/KPIX TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors; Twitter @msmichellemeow—Host In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on November 16th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Experience of the Soul
Real Grief – Real Healing, with Mindy Corporon #44 | Change Your Narrative with Knowledge

Experience of the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 43:06


On March 16, 2021, eight people lost their lives, six of whom were of Asian descent. “The spa shootings only fueled a surge in racially motivated hate crimes against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, or AAPI, during the pandemic.” - Annika Kim Constantino, CNBCMost days my faith and love of humankind sustains me. My faith in God, humanity and loving one another enough to make a difference for the better. In Episode 44, I am in conversation with JiaoJiao Shen (sounds like Jow Jow with a hard J like jump) about her deep interest in making a difference in the lives of others.Who is the other? Actually, we all are the “other” at one time or another. I can say this mostly because I am a woman and have been “othered” in my life. However, as a white girl, I have also come to know about the privileges afforded me. I am keenly aware of not being considered the “other” as often as marginalized humans. “Hate is Unacceptable and Proven so With Love” in Episode 40 with the 2 for Seder founder, Marnie Fienberg speaks to the power of love in the midst of life's traumas.My guest, JiaoJiao Shen, is Chinese. She knows about being the “other” and in our conversation offers thoughtful insight and reflection from her childhood and teenage years as a Chinese girl growing up in America.My desire to interview JiaoJiao came about after she presented her story of realizing she had suppressed grief from years of being on the receiving end of microaggressions. Years of microaggressions tossed her way by those of us who knew better and didn't care and those of us who care but didn't know better. We each have more to learn. By the way, I have been both of these people in my life.The murders in Atlanta and the almost 150% increase in hate crimes against Asians pierced an area of pain and grief in JiaoJiao she had subconsciously silenced.Our conversation weaves together the pains and joys of her childhood, teenage years and now her concerns as a Chinese mother, wife and daughter working in corporate America. JiaoJiao sounds like me and any other mother who loves their children...how do we best protect them, teach them to protect themselves while bravely loving openly our amazing world?I ask each of my guests, how can we help you? JiaoJiao easily offers us the following:Consider the material we are consuming...are we educating ourselves about cultures different from our own in books, social media and movies?Cultivate relationships over a coffee, a tea or at your children's activities. Finding a common denominator and expanding this to a relationship provides valuable lessons for each of us.Take specific interest and time to learn about meaningful cultural events associated with a culture different from yours. For example, in 2022, pay close attention to Chinese holidays and festivals.As each of us become more aware of the “other”, we treat them with care, concern and compassion - as we would want to be treated. JiaoJiao encourages us to change the narrative about Asians with understanding, acceptance and respect.Resources for this episode:JiaoJiao Shen - LinkedInAsian American Pacific Islander history•Find Mindy on Social Media:Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MindyCorporonLLCInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/mindycorporon/Twitter: https://twitter.com/MindyCorporonLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mindycorporon/•This channel is made possible because of listeners just like you. If you would like to support the channel with your tax-deductible contribution on an ongoing basis or through a one-time gift, head over to ExperienceOfTheSoul.com/support.Real Grief - Real Healing is copyright 2021, Mindy Corporon. All Rights Reserved. Our theme music is composed by Dave Kropf and used with permission.The Experience of the Soul Podcast Channel is a production of 818 Studios.

KQED's The California Report
Recent Criticism of Vice President Kamala Harris May Not Tell the Whole Story

KQED's The California Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 18:10


Media reports this week are painting a picture of dysfunction, disappointment, and confusion surrounding Vice President Kamala Harris and her role in the Biden administration. Sources inside the White House told CNN that Harris is struggling, and low approval numbers are adding to alleged problems.     Guest: Marisa Lagos, Political Correspondent, KQED The state's Citizens Redistricting Commission is hearing feedback on its proposed district lines for Congress and the state legislature -- and that has major implications for the state's big and growing Latino population.  Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED  One in five Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the U.S. has experienced a hate incident in the last year. That's according to a new report out from the California-based coalition Stop AAPI Hate. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, The California Report One of the problems that's causing disruptions in the global supply chain is a severe shortage of truckers. In San Diego, one driving school is working to keep up with demand. Reporter: Alexandra Rangel, KPBS

MVP - Mass Violence Podcast
Hate crimes and mass violence

MVP - Mass Violence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 26:29


The National Mass Violence Victimization Resource Center's Dr. Dan Smith is joined by Georgia state Senator Michelle Au. Months after being sworn into office, Sen. Au's district faced a shooting spree that primarily targeted Asian-owned businesses. Sen. Au talks about the Atlanta spa shootings and the simmering, hate-based violence the Asian American and Pacific Islander community has faced over the last two years.

Insight with Beth Ruyak
Infrastructure bill's impact to California counties | Redistricting maps | Author “Wallet Activism: How to Use Every Dollar You Spend, Earn, and Save as a Force for Change”

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021


How the Biden Administration infrastructure bill will impact California counties. An overview of the first official draft of congressional and legislative districts. A breakdown of the City of Sacramento's redistricting process and changes to city council boundaries, and how redistricting affects Sacramento's AAPI community. New book “Wallet Activism: How to Use Every Dollar You Spend, Earn, and Save as a Force for Change,” on ethical consumerism and responsible investing. Today's Guests Chris Lee, Legislative Representative for the California State Association of Counties, on how the Biden Administration infrastructure funding will improve roads and transportation in California. CapRadio Politics Reporter Nicole Nixon, with an overview of the first official draft of congressional and legislative districts and how it affects congressional seats, plus how to submit feedback on the maps. CapRadio News Editor Kris Hooks, with a breakdown of where the City of Sacramento is in its own redistricting process and if we should expect major changes to the city council boundaries. CapRadio Race and Equity Reporter Sarah Mizes-Tan, shares her reporting on how redistricting affects Sacramento's Asian American and Pacific Islander community. Tanja Hester, author of “Wallet Activism: How to Use Every Dollar You Spend, Earn, and Save as a Force for Change,” on ethical consumerism and responsible investing. 

Onward Podcast
Support the Asian-American Civil Rights Movement: Actions We All Can Take

Onward Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 60:26


Listen to this Onward Podcast episode and learn actions we all can take to support the Asian-American Civil Rights Movement. The Asian-American National Committee, Inc., (AANC), is a non-profit, non-partisan 501(c)(3) federal tax-exempt organization. Furthermore, it functions as a: national educational, business and legal services, political, privacy/civil rights, and advocacy organization.    Their national office is authorized by the United States federal and state governments to represent all Asian-Americans, Pacific Islanders, Native-Americans, and others, along with minority small and medium-sized businesses throughout the United States and abroad. Also, they're an official NGO of the United States government.    Listen to the painful, honest, and inspiring stories shared by my guests and learn about how listening, understanding, and compassion can help us all move onward together to create a better world.     Resources Mentioned:  Asian-American National Committee, Inc., (AANC) Email: info@aancinc.org Phone: (855) 702-2262 Champion of Women Award Guest profiles on LinkedIn: Tuan D. Nguyen, A.L.M., Linda Ngo, Kristina C. Manansala, Chi Luu, Yifan Zhao Stop Asian Hate Connect with Emily on LinkedIn  Emily Harman Positive Intelligence Coaching Program  Onward Accelerator Coaching Program Onward: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Onward Movement Facebook Group | YouTube Buy Emily's Best Selling Book Step Into the Spotlight Schedule a Complimentary Coaching Call with Emily Music by Soul Pajamas Enjoyed the show? Please remember to leave a rating and review in Apple Podcasts. Listen to this Onward Podcast episode and learn actions we all can take to support the Asian-American Civil Rights Movement. The Asian-American National Committee, Inc., (AANC), is a non-profit, non-partisan 501(c)(3) federal tax-exempt organization. Furthermore, it functions as a: national educational, business and legal services, political, privacy/civil rights, and advocacy organization.    Their national office is authorized by the United States federal and state governments to represent all Asian-Americans, Pacific Islanders, Native-Americans, and others, along with minority small and medium-sized businesses throughout the United States and abroad. Also, they're an official NGO of the United States government.    Listen to the painful, honest, and inspiring stories shared by my guests and learn about how listening, understanding, and compassion can help us all move onward together to create a better world.     Resources Mentioned:  Asian-American National Committee, Inc., (AANC) Email: info@aancinc.org Phone: (855) 702-2262 Champion of Women Award Guest profiles on LinkedIn: Tuan D. Nguyen, A.L.M., Linda Ngo, Kristina C. Manansala, Chi Luu, Yifan Zhao Stop Asian Hate Connect with Emily on LinkedIn  Emily Harman Positive Intelligence Coaching Program  Onward Accelerator Coaching Program Onward: Instagram | Twitter | Facebook | Onward Movement Facebook Group | YouTube Buy Emily's Best Selling Book Step Into the Spotlight Schedule a Complimentary Coaching Call with Emily Music by Soul Pajamas Enjoyed the show? Please remember to leave a rating and review in Apple Podcasts.

Save The D8
Episode 29- Timid Terror at the Tower

Save The D8

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 57:01


After all the havok and broken hearts from their shopping trip, the gang moves surreptitiously on the banned Tower of Teleportation. Kragl also confronts the 1 Armed Bandit! Our own Kendall Uyeji is running a full-on 24 hr play festival this weekend! With only 24 hours, a Zoom call and some prompts, 40 thespians will create seven new plays centered on Asian American and Pacific Islander resilience. Then immediately afterward, they will perform their plays live for a virtual audience. You can get tickets for this online event here: https://pork-filled.ticketleap.com/resilience2021/get-there/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/savethed8pod/support

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 11.03.21

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 58:37


Supplementation with vitamins C and E associated with decreased risk of cognitive impairment, dementia  CHU de Québec Research Center, November 1, 2021.   An article that appeared in the Annals of Pharmacotherapy reports an association between the intake of vitamin C and E supplements and a lower risk of developing cognitive decline among men and women aged 65 years and older.   The current investigation included 5,269 men and women who were free of dementia upon enrollment in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging from 1991 to 1992. Follow-up examinations conducted during 1996-1997 and 2001-2002 provided post-enrollment diagnoses of dementia or cognitive impairment without dementia. Information concerning current use of prescription drugs and vitamins was ascertained from interview or questionnaire responses at the beginning of the study.   Approximately 10% of the subjects reported using vitamin C or E. Over up to 11 years of follow up, 821 cases of all-cause dementia (including 560 Alzheimer's disease cases) were diagnosed and 882 cases of cognitive impairment without dementia developed. In comparison with those who did not report supplementing with either vitamin, the use of vitamin C and/or vitamin E was associated with a 38% lower adjusted risk of all-cause dementia and a 40% lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. For cognitive impairment without dementia, the risk was 23% lower among those who used either or both vitamins. Evaluation of the effects of using either vitamin alone resulted in associations with similar risk reductions.    “This study supports a protective role of vitamin E and C supplements in the risk for Alzheimer's disease and all-cause dementia,” authors Luta L. Basambombo, MSc, of CHU de Québec Research Center and colleagues conclude. “In addition, these supplements may contribute to a reduced risk of CIND [cognitive impairment, not dementia]. Overall, these findings indicate additional support for the use of antioxidants as a preventive strategy against cognitive decline.”       Research suggests calorie restriction may be better than keto for cancer patients Massachusetts Institute of Technology, October 22 2021.    Findings reported in Nature revealed that restricting the intake of calories, including fats, rather than adopting a regimen of restricted carbohydrates and increased fats as characterized by a ketogenic diet, was associated with slower tumor growth in mice.  Evan Lien, PhD, and associates evaluated the effects of calorie restricted, ketogenic or normal diets in mice with pancreatic tumors. While both glucose and plasma and tumor lipid levels declined in calorie-restricted animals, ketogenic diet-fed mice had lower glucose levels, but an increase in lipids.  In comparison with mice given ketogenic diets, slower tumor growth occurred in the calorie-restricted mice. The finding can be explained by the animals' reduced levels of lipids, which are needed by cancer cells for membrane production. Diet-induced lipid depletion decreases cellular levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids because they can't be manufactured by the body and must be obtained from food. When these lipids aren't available, cells make their own in a process that requires the enzyme SCD, which converts saturated fatty acids into unsaturated fatty acids. Since both diets lowered SCD activity, mice that received calorie restricted diets couldn't obtain enough fatty acids from their diet or produce their own, whereas animals on the ketogenic diet had abundant lipids. “Not only does caloric restriction starve tumors of lipids, it also impairs the process that allows them to adapt to it,” Dr Lien explained. “That combination is really contributing to the inhibition of tumor growth.”  “The purpose of these studies isn't necessarily to recommend a diet, but it's to really understand the underlying biology,” Dr Lien stated. “They provide some sense of the mechanisms of how these diets work, and that can lead to rational ideas on how we might mimic those situations for cancer therapy.”       Widespread fast-food restaurants linked to higher rates of type 2 diabetes New York University, November 1, 2021 An increasing number of studies suggest a link between a neighborhood's built environment and the likelihood that its residents will develop chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and certain types of cancers. A new nationwide study led by researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine published online today in JAMA Network Open suggests that living in neighborhoods with higher availability of fast-food outlets across all regions of the United States is associated with higher subsequent risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Findings also indicated that the availability of more supermarkets could be protective against developing T2D, particularly in suburban and rural neighborhoods. The study—notable for its large geographic breadth—uses data from a cohort of more than 4 million veterans living in 98 percent of U.S. census tracts across the country. It counted fast-food restaurants and supermarkets relative to other food outlets, and is the first, according to the researchers, to examine this relationship in four distinct types of neighborhoods (high-density urban, low-density urban, suburban, and rural) at the hyperlocal level nationwide. "Most studies that examine the built food environment and its relationship to chronic diseases have been much smaller or conducted in localized areas," said Rania Kanchi, MPH, a researcher in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone and lead author of the study. "Our study design is national in scope and allowed us to identify the types of communities that people are living in, characterize their food environment, and observe what happens to them over time. The size of our cohort allows for geographic generalizability in a way that other studies do not."  How the study was conducted The research team used data from the U.S. Veterans Health Administration (the largest single-payer healthcare system in the country) that captures more than 9 million veterans seen at more than 1,200 health facilities around the country. Using this data, the researchers then constructed a national cohort of more than 4 million veterans without diabetes from the VA electronic health records (EHR) between 2008 and 2016. Each veteran's health status was followed through 2018 or until the individual either developed diabetes, died, or had no appointments for more than two years. Within each of four distinct neighborhood types, the proportion of restaurants that were fast food, and the proportion of food outlets that were supermarkets were tabulated within a one-mile walk in high- density urban neighborhoods, a two-mile drive in low-density urban neighborhoods, a six-mile drive in suburban communities, and a 10-mile drive in rural communities. Veterans were followed for a median of five and a half years. During that time, 13.2 percent of the cohort were newly diagnosed with T2D. Males developed T2D more frequently than females (13.6 versus 8.2 percent). Non-Hispanic Black adults had the highest incidence (16.9 percent), compared to non-Hispanic Whites (12.9 percent), non-White Asian and Hispanics (12.8 percent), Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders (15 percent), and Native American and Alaskan Indians (14.2 percent). When stratifying by community types, 14.3 percent of veterans living in high density urban communities developed T2D, while the lowest incidence was among those living in suburban and small town communities (12.6 percent). Overall, the team concluded that the effect of the food environment on T2D incidence varied by how urban the community was, but did not vary further by region of the country. "The more we learn about the relationship between the food environment and chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes, the more policymakers can act by improving the mix of healthy food options sold in restaurants and food outlets, or by creating better zoning laws that promote optimal food options for residents," said Lorna Thorpe, Ph.D., MPH, professor in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone and senior author of the study. One limitation of the study, according to the authors, is that the study may not be fully generalizable to non-veteran populations, as U.S. veterans tend to be predominantly male and have substantially greater health burdens and financial instability than the civilian population. They are also at greater risk of disability, obesity, and other chronic conditions. The next phase of the research, say Thorpe and Kanchi, will be to better understand the impacts of the built environment on diabetes risk by subgroups. They plan to examine whether or not the relationships between fast-food restaurants, supermarkets and community types vary by gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status.   Researchers have discovered neurons needed for acupuncture's anti-inflammatory response Harvard Medical School, October November 1, 2021 Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese technique that has been used for millennia to treat chronic pain and other health problems associated with inflammation, yet the scientific basis of the technique remains poorly understood. Now, a team of researchers led by neuroscientists at Harvard Medical School has elucidated the underlying neuroanatomy of acupuncture that activates a specific signaling pathway. In a study conducted in mice and published Oct. 13 in Nature, the team identified a subset of neurons that must be present for acupuncture to trigger an anti-inflammatory response via this signaling pathway. The scientists determined that these neurons occur only in a specific area of the hindlimb region—thus explaining why acupuncture in the hindlimb works, while acupuncture in the abdomen does not. "This study touches on one of the most fundamental questions in the acupuncture field: What is the neuroanatomical basis for body region, or acupoint, selectivity?" said lead investigator Qiufu Ma, HMS professor of neurobiology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. One area of particular interest to the research team is the so-called cytokine storm—the rapid release of large quantities of cytokines that frequently drives severe, systemic inflammation, and can be triggered by many things, including COVID-19, cancer treatment, or sepsis. "This exuberant immune response is a major medical problem with a very high fatality rate of 15 percent to 30 percent," Ma said. Even so, drugs to treat cytokine storm are lacking. Adapting an ancient technique to treat aberrant inflammation In recent decades, acupuncture has been increasingly embraced in Western medicine as a potential treatment for inflammation. In this technique, acupoints on the body's surface are mechanically stimulated, triggering nerve signaling that affects the function of other parts of the body, including organs. In a 2014 study, researchers reported that electroacupuncture, a modern version of traditional acupuncture that uses electrical stimulation, could reduce cytokine storm in mice by activating the vagal-adrenal axis—a pathway wherein the vagus nervesignals the adrenal glands to release dopamine. In a study published in 2020, Ma and his team discovered that this electroacupuncture effect was region-specific: It was effective when given in the hindlimb region, but did not have an effect when administered in the abdominal region. The team hypothesized that there may be sensory neurons unique to the hindlimb region responsible for this difference in response. In their new study, the researchers conducted a series of experiments in mice to investigate this hypothesis. First, they identified a small subset of sensory neurons marked by expression of the PROKR2Cre receptor. They determined that these neurons were three to four times more numerous in the deep fascia tissue of the hindlimb than in the fascia of the abdomen. Then the team created mice that were missing these sensory neurons. They found that electroacupuncture in the hindlimb did not activate the vagal-adrenal axis in these mice. In another experiment, the team used light-based stimulation to directly target these sensory neurons in the deep fascia of the hindlimb. This stimulation activated the vagal-adrenal axis in a manner similar to electroacupuncture. "Basically, the activation of these neurons is both necessary and sufficient to activate this vagal-adrenal axis," Ma said. In a final experiment, the scientists explored the distribution of the neurons in the hindlimb. They discovered that there are considerably more neurons in the anterior muscles of the hindlimb than in the posterior muscles, resulting in a stronger response to electroacupuncture in the anterior region. "Based on this nerve fiber distribution, we can almost precisely predict where electrical stimulation will be effective and where it will not be effective," Ma explained. Together, these results provide "the first concrete, neuroanatomic explanation for acupoint selectivity and specificity," Ma added. "They tell us the acupuncture parameters, so where to go, how deep to go, how strong the intensity should be." He noted that while the study was done in mice, the basic organization of neurons is likely evolutionarily conserved across mammals, including humans. However, an important next step will be clinical testing of electroacupuncture in humans with inflammation caused by real-world infections such as COVID-19. Ma is also interested in exploring other signaling pathways that could be stimulated by acupuncture to treat conditions that cause excessive inflammation.  "We have a lot of tough chronic diseases that still need better treatments," he said, such as inflammatory bowel syndrome and arthritis. Another area of need, he added, is excessive immune reactions that can be a side effect of cancer immunotherapy. Ma hopes that his research will ultimately advance scientific understanding of acupuncture and provide practical information that can be used to improve and refine the technique.   Happy childhood memories linked to better health later in life Michigan State University, November 5, 2018   People who have fond memories of childhood, specifically their relationships with their parents, tend to have better health, less depression and fewer chronic illnesses as older adults, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. "We know that memory plays a huge part in how we make sense of the world—how we organize our past experiences and how we judge how we should act in the future. As a result, there are a lot of different ways that our memories of the past can guide us," said William J. Chopik, Ph.D., from Michigan State University and lead author of the study. "We found that good memories seem to have a positive effect on health and well-being, possibly through the ways that they reduce stress or help us maintain healthy choices in life." The findings were published in the journal Health Psychology. Previous research has shown a positive relationship between good memories and good health in young adults, including higher quality of work and personal relationships, lower substance use, lower depression and fewer health problems, according to Chopik. He and his co-author, Robin Edelstein, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, wanted to see how this would apply to older adults. Also, much of the existing research focused on mothers and rarely examined the role of fathers in child development. Chopik and Edelstein sought to expand on the existing studies to include participants' reflections of their relationships with both parents. The researchers used data from two nationally representative samples, the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States and the Health and Retirement Study, with a total of more than 22,000 participants. The first study followed adults in their mid-40s for 18 years and the second followed adults 50 and over for six years. The surveys included questions about perceptions of parental affection, overall health, chronic conditions and depressive symptoms. Participants in both groups who reported remembering higher levels of affection from their mothers in early childhood experienced better physical health and fewer depressive symptoms later in life. Those who reported memories with more support from their fathers also experienced fewer depressive symptoms, according to Chopik. "The most surprising finding was that we thought the effects would fade over time because participants were trying to recall things that happened sometimes over 50 years ago. One might expect childhood memories to matter less and less over time, but these memories still predicted better physical and mental health when people were in middle age and older adulthood," said Chopik. There was a stronger association in people who reported a more loving relationship with their mothers, noted Chopik, but that might change. "These results may reflect the broader cultural circumstances of the time when the participants were raised because mothers were most likely the primary caregivers," said Edelstein. "With shifting cultural norms about the role of fathers in caregiving, it is possible that results from future studies of people born in more recent years will focus more on relationships with their fathers." Chopik and Edelstein found that participants with positive childhood memories also had fewer chronic conditions in the first study of 7,100 people, but not in the second study of 15,200, making the results less straightforward   Researchers outline the connection between inflammation and depression Emory University, October 28, 2021 In a paper published recently in Pharmacological Reviews, Emory University School of Medicine researchers outlined the impact of inflammation on motivation as it relates to depression. The researchers propose that low grade inflammation affects brain chemicals and brain circuits that regulate motivation, ultimately leading to motivational deficits and a loss of interest or willingness to engage in usually pleasurable activities including work and play. These motivational deficits are reflected as anhedonia, a core and likely the most disabling symptom of depression, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The paper also outlines how these effects of inflammation on the brain are an adaptation to the energy demands of inflammation that require conservation of energy resources, and thus the shutting down of behavior. Low grade inflammation can be caused by lifestyle changes such as poor diet and sedentary behavior. "A vicious cycle can occur where poor lifestyle habits lead to increased inflammation that in turn reduce the wherewithal or motivation to change those habits. Such a vicious cycle may be especially relevant during pandemic life when even greater energy resources are required to sustain healthy eating and physical activity," says Andrew H. Miller, MD, William P. Timmie Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine. Miller co-authored the paper, along with his colleagues in the Department of Psychology and the Emory Behavioral Immunology Program, where he serves as director. Miller says novel treatment strategies to break this vicious cycle are currently under development. He and his colleagues raise the possibility of developing treatments specifically for the motivational deficits caused by inflammation, thus moving to a much more targeted approach to therapeutic development in psychiatry, as now seen in the oncology field, versus the current use of outdated and non-specific diagnostic categories of psychiatric disease such as "depression." "We believe more therapies targeted to specific pathophysiologic pathways and symptoms will lead to better outcomes and more precision care. Non-specific therapies as represented by conventional antidepressants, which are still embraced by regulatory agencies, do not instill the confidence that a more personalized approach does. There is widespread interest in moving in this direction internationally," says Miller.

Moxielicious with Alexia Vernon
406: Centering Asian American and Pacific Islander Voices in DEI with Carissa Begonia

Moxielicious with Alexia Vernon

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 50:06


Carissa Begonia is a first-generation Filipina-American who is committed to centering Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) voices. She is the founder of CONSCIOUSXCHANGE and serves as an executive, leadership, and business coach helping BIPOC leaders and entrepreneurs pursue meaningful careers, build their own values-driven businesses, and design a life of purpose. Carissa is a certified Emotional Intelligence coach and the former head of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) of Zappos. As a fractional COO and equity consultant with over 15 years of experience working on both the operations and the human side of business, Carissa helps organizations develop and operationalize their DEI strategy with an anti-racist, anti-oppression lens. Carissa is the co-founder of Green Mango International, a 501 (c)(3) non-profit supporting educational opportunities for underserved school children in the Philippines. She is also the co-founder of AARISE – Asian American Racialized Identity and Social Empowerment for AAPIs, a holistic program centering Asian American experiences, emotional processing, and somatic healing in pursuit of justice and liberation for all. Carissa and I met half a decade ago when she had just started a women's Employee Resource Group (ERG), before that was really a “thing”, during her time at Zappos. It's been a privilege and a joy to watch Carissa find her voice and grow her thought leadership in the DEI space. In episode 406 of Moxielicious®, Carissa and I discuss her work as a coach for BIPOC leaders and the importance of centering AAPI voices, plus: How the lack of AAPI (and immigrant) business coaches motivated Carissa to pave a path in coaching (and DEI) for those who look like her How Carissa created her position at Zappos as the head of DEI – and her sage advice for other entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs who want to do something similar How being an independent contractor first enabled Carissa to merge her experiences in operations & DEI while she began to grow a coaching business Why somatic healing is a core part of Carissa's AARISE program and community, and why it belongs in racial and social justice and leadership development conversations, coaching, and training Resources Mentioned in This Episode: Learn more about centering AAPI voices and connect with Carissa on LinkedIn. Learn more about Carissa's three ventures: CONSCIOUSXCHANGE, AARISE, and Green Mango International. Get Step into Your Moxie® certified and support your clients (or employees) to amplify their voices, visibility, and influence (while you do the same). Apply here. Please leave a review and subscribe to Moxielicious® via Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Google Play, or Spotify so you never miss an episode!

Pacific Beat
Pacific Beat: Friday

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 50:32


On today's program: A senior official at Port Vila's main hospital says the facility would be quickly overwhelmed if COVID-19 escaped from hotel quarantine into the community; the head of the Australian medical response team in PNG warns COVID-19 is going to "roll through" the country; PNG's finance minister says the government has not paid a ransom to hackers that froze his department's key payments system; Pacific Islanders express fears for the survival of their ancestral lands ahead of the COP26 climate summit; and Tongan players and coaches from around the world converge in Scotland for the Ikale Tahi's European rugby tour.

Pacific Beat
Pacific Beat: Wednesday

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 38:33


On today's program: There's been a lukewarm response from Pacific Islanders to the Australian government's new plan to reduce carbon emissions; Torres Strait Islanders take the Australian government to court to prevent the loss of their communities due to climate change; PNG's health department looks to retired health workers and graduate nurses to help with the growing COVID-19 caseload; Pacific workers help save Australia's blueberry crop; and Willie Poching takes the reins at English Super League club Trinity Wakefield, the first Samoan to be appointed head coach to a first grade rugby league side anywhere in the world.

Copilots Review
Copilots Review Episode 37- Helix

Copilots Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 75:24


New episodes on the 2nd and 22nd of every month, with interstitial episodes released on the 12th.And now you can find us on Youtube. Check us out here --> Copilots Review on YoutubeIf you would like to contact us or recommend a series for us to watch/listen/play/otherwise interact with and review you can email us at CopilotsReview@gmail.com or reach us on Twitter at @copilotsreview, or join the Discord or find all of these options at copilotsreview.simplecast.com. Thanks again!Also, even though the social media hype has died down, protests have lessened in frequency and it's no longer "trending"; discrimination based on race is still an issue in our country. In fact in addition to our usual link to BLM we are supplying links to organizations that seek to help with the problems of violence against the Asian American and Pacific Islander populace, violence that has only unfortunately skyrocketed within the COVID-19 Pandemic. To help and/or educate yourself please follow these links.The Asian American Legal Defense and Education FundAsian Americans Advancing JusticeAsian Pacific FundLastly we want to thank Jessica Kuczynski! She designed our awesome podcast art. You can find her other work, her shop or commission her for original art at her website jessicakuczynski.com or at her twitter

KQED’s Forum
California Pioneers Mandatory Testing for Hepatitis B and C

KQED’s Forum

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 21:00


Earlier this month, Governor Gavin Newsom signed legislation that makes California the first state in the nation to require health care facilities to offer screening for hepatitis B and C, which if left untreated can lead to fatal liver disease and cancer. Almost 90% of people with chronic hepatitis B in California are members of the Asian American and Pacific Islander community. Black Americans have the second highest rate of chronic infection. We'll talk about how the law will work and take your questions.

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Lessons from Concurrent Pandemics of COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:06


Join us for an important intergenerational conversation with LGBTQ Asians and Pacific Islanders and their allies. Our panelists will share QTAPI stories and experiences of the dual pandemics of HIV/AIDS and COVID-19; their histories as Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States; their past and current roles in community organizing and the political process; as well as other issues that are part of the current cultural and political shifts and relevant to the experiences of QTAPI individuals. Meet the Speakers Ignatius Bau was the HIV prevention program coordinator at the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum in the mid-1990s, and served as a member of the President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS and advisory groups about HIV/AIDS for the federal Office of Minority Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Institutes for Health. He also has served on the board of directors for the Gay Asian Pacific Alliance Community HIV Project, Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center, National Minority AIDS Project, and Funders for LGBTQ Issues. Cecilia Chung is the senior director of strategic initiatives and evaluation at Transgender Law Center, a health commissioner of San Francisco and an internationally recognized civil rights leader in the LGBT and HIV community. Chung has served as the co-chair of GNP+ and is currently a member of the WHO Advisory Council of Women Living with HIV. Vince Crisostomo is a gay Chamorro (Pacific Islander) long-term HIV/AIDS survivor who believes in the healing power of community and has dedicated more than 30 years to HIV/AIDS activism and LGBTQ communities. He is passionate about bringing health care to all and social justice equity to people of every sexual identity, HIV status, gender, race and age. Crisostomo is SFAF's director of aging services and previously managed the Elizabeth Taylor 50 Plus Network for long-term HIV survivors. He co-chaired the HIV & Aging Work Group and was an active member of the Mayor's Long-Term Care Coordinating Council. Crisostomo has led a number of grassroots HIV advocacy and LGBTQ organizations in the United States and overseas. He was executive director of the Coalition of Asia Pacific Regional Networks on HIV/AIDS, founded the Pacific Island Jurisdiction AIDS Action Group, and served as a United Nations NGO delegate for the Asia Pacific. In 2019, having won the popular vote, he was community grand marshall for San Francisco Pride. In July 2021, he was appointed to the San Francisco Human Rights Commission's LGBTQI+ Advisory Committee. NOTES This is a free program; any voluntary donations made during registration will support the production of our online programs. A complimentary lunch will be provided before the program for in-person attendees. The Commonwealth Club thanks Gilead Sciences, Inc. for its generous support of The Michelle Meow Show.  Program presented in partnership with GAPA Theatre, The Connection at the San Francisco Community Health Center, the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, and The Commonwealth Club of California. This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, nonprofit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. SPEAKERS Ignatius Bau Former HIV Prevention Program Coordinator, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum; Former Member, President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS Cecilia Chung Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives and Evaluation, Transgender Law Center; Health Commissioner, San Francisco Vince Crisostomo Director of Aging Services, San Francisco AIDS Foundation Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Host and Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 6th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Lessons from Concurrent Pandemics of COVID-19 and HIV/AIDS

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 62:06


Join us for an important intergenerational conversation with LGBTQ Asians and Pacific Islanders and their allies. Our panelists will share QTAPI stories and experiences of the dual pandemics of HIV/AIDS and COVID-19; their histories as Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States; their past and current roles in community organizing and the political process; as well as other issues that are part of the current cultural and political shifts and relevant to the experiences of QTAPI individuals. Meet the Speakers Ignatius Bau was the HIV prevention program coordinator at the Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum in the mid-1990s, and served as a member of the President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS and advisory groups about HIV/AIDS for the federal Office of Minority Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Institutes for Health. He also has served on the board of directors for the Gay Asian Pacific Alliance Community HIV Project, Asian & Pacific Islander Wellness Center, National Minority AIDS Project, and Funders for LGBTQ Issues. Cecilia Chung is the senior director of strategic initiatives and evaluation at Transgender Law Center, a health commissioner of San Francisco and an internationally recognized civil rights leader in the LGBT and HIV community. Chung has served as the co-chair of GNP+ and is currently a member of the WHO Advisory Council of Women Living with HIV. Vince Crisostomo is a gay Chamorro (Pacific Islander) long-term HIV/AIDS survivor who believes in the healing power of community and has dedicated more than 30 years to HIV/AIDS activism and LGBTQ communities. He is passionate about bringing health care to all and social justice equity to people of every sexual identity, HIV status, gender, race and age. Crisostomo is SFAF's director of aging services and previously managed the Elizabeth Taylor 50 Plus Network for long-term HIV survivors. He co-chaired the HIV & Aging Work Group and was an active member of the Mayor's Long-Term Care Coordinating Council. Crisostomo has led a number of grassroots HIV advocacy and LGBTQ organizations in the United States and overseas. He was executive director of the Coalition of Asia Pacific Regional Networks on HIV/AIDS, founded the Pacific Island Jurisdiction AIDS Action Group, and served as a United Nations NGO delegate for the Asia Pacific. In 2019, having won the popular vote, he was community grand marshall for San Francisco Pride. In July 2021, he was appointed to the San Francisco Human Rights Commission's LGBTQI+ Advisory Committee. NOTES This is a free program; any voluntary donations made during registration will support the production of our online programs. A complimentary lunch will be provided before the program for in-person attendees. The Commonwealth Club thanks Gilead Sciences, Inc. for its generous support of The Michelle Meow Show.  Program presented in partnership with GAPA Theatre, The Connection at the San Francisco Community Health Center, the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, and The Commonwealth Club of California. This project was made possible with support from California Humanities, nonprofit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. SPEAKERS Ignatius Bau Former HIV Prevention Program Coordinator, Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum; Former Member, President's Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS Cecilia Chung Senior Director of Strategic Initiatives and Evaluation, Transgender Law Center; Health Commissioner, San Francisco Vince Crisostomo Director of Aging Services, San Francisco AIDS Foundation Michelle Meow Producer and Host, "The Michelle Meow Show," KBCW TV and Podcast; Member, Commonwealth Club Board of Governors—Host and Moderator In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 6th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pushing The Limits
Preventing Cancer with Better Health Choices with Katherine Sowden

Pushing The Limits

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 48:31


We are living through multiple crises. Not only are we going through the COVID-19 pandemic, but there is also a hidden epidemic going on. Over the years, people have become more obese. In 2013, only 34% of our population was within a healthy BMI range, and this statistic is falling exponentially over the years. We need to take action now because obesity is not about how you look — it's about real health consequences.  Dr Katherine Sowden joins us in this episode to talk about women's and public health. She explains how obesity changes our bodies and causes various diseases and cancers. She shares that it's often not even people's fault. There's a range of factors that encourage this epidemic. Exacerbating the socioeconomic and cultural factors is the food industry. Dr Katherine emphasises that we need to start educating ourselves on our health. Only then can we make better choices to prevent these diseases. If you want to know more about taking preventive measures against cancer and other diseases, this episode is for you.    Here are three reasons why you should listen to the full episode: Learn about the current state of public health and how to be a proactive patient. Discover the ways obesity can lead to an increased risk of cancer, particularly in women. Know how you can make better health choices to avoid developing cancer.   Resources Gain exclusive access and bonuses to Pushing the Limits Podcast by becoming a patron!  A new program, BoostCamp, is coming this September at Peak Wellness! Listen to other Pushing the Limits episodes with Dr Elena Seranova:  #183: Sirtuin and NAD Supplements for Longevity  #189: Understanding Autophagy and Increasing Your Longevity   Connect with Dr Katherine: Auckland Women's Gynaecology I Ormiston Specialists I Email   Get Customised Guidance for Your Genetic Make-Up For our epigenetics health programme, all about optimising your fitness, lifestyle, nutrition and mind performance to your particular genes, go to  https://www.lisatamati.com/page/epigenetics-and-health-coaching/.   Customised Online Coaching for Runners CUSTOMISED RUN COACHING PLANS — How to Run Faster, Be Stronger, Run Longer  Without Burnout & Injuries Have you struggled to fit in training in your busy life? Maybe you don't know where to start, or perhaps you have done a few races but keep having motivation or injury troubles? Do you want to beat last year's time or finish at the front of the pack? Want to run your first 5-km or run a 100-miler? ​​Do you want a holistic programme that is personalised & customised to your ability, goals, and lifestyle?  Go to www.runninghotcoaching.com for our online run training coaching.   Health Optimisation and Life Coaching If you are struggling with a health issue and need people who look outside the square and are connected to some of the greatest science and health minds in the world, then reach out to us at support@lisatamati.com, we can jump on a call to see if we are a good fit for you. If you have a big challenge ahead, are dealing with adversity, or want to take your performance to the next level and want to learn how to increase your mental toughness, emotional resilience, foundational health, and more, then contact us at support@lisatamati.com.   Order My Books My latest book Relentless chronicles the inspiring journey about how my mother and I defied the odds after an aneurysm left my mum Isobel with massive brain damage at age 74. The medical professionals told me there was absolutely no hope of any quality of life again, but I used every mindset tool, years of research and incredible tenacity to prove them wrong and bring my mother back to full health within three years. Get your copy here: https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books/products/relentless. For my other two best-selling books Running Hot and Running to Extremes, chronicling my ultrarunning adventures and expeditions all around the world, go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/books.   Lisa's Anti-Ageing and Longevity Supplements  NMN: Nicotinamide Mononucleotide, an NAD+ precursor Feel Healthier and Younger* Researchers have found that Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide or NAD+, a master regulator of metabolism and a molecule essential for the functionality of all human cells, is being dramatically decreased over time. What is NMN? NMN Bio offers a cutting edge Vitamin B3 derivative named NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) that can boost the levels of NAD+ in muscle tissue and liver. Take charge of your energy levels, focus, metabolism and overall health so you can live a happy, fulfilling life. Founded by scientists, NMN Bio offers supplements of the highest purity and rigorously tested by an independent, third-party lab. Start your cellular rejuvenation journey today. Support Your Healthy Ageing We offer powerful, third party tested, NAD+ boosting supplements so you can start your healthy ageing journey today. Shop now: https://nmnbio.nz/collections/all NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 capsules NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 250mg | 30 Capsules 6 Bottles | NMN (beta Nicotinamide Mononucleotide) 500mg | 30 Capsules Quality You Can Trust — NMN Our premium range of anti-ageing nutraceuticals (supplements that combine Mother Nature with cutting edge science) combats the effects of ageing while designed to boost NAD+ levels. Manufactured in an ISO9001 certified facility Boost Your NAD+ Levels — Healthy Ageing: Redefined Cellular Health Energy & Focus Bone Density Skin Elasticity DNA Repair Cardiovascular Health Brain Health  Metabolic Health   My  ‘Fierce' Sports Jewellery Collection For my gorgeous and inspiring sports jewellery collection, 'Fierce', go to https://shop.lisatamati.com/collections/lisa-tamati-bespoke-jewellery-collection.   Episode Highlights [04:06] The Current State of Women's Health One of the most significant issues in women's health is the normalisation of obesity.  This situation comes from a lack of understanding of the importance of nutrition and movement to our health.  Endometrial cancer is a progressive order that is caused by having too much estrogen. One of its leading causes is obesity.  Obesity can also decrease fertility since it affects the ovulatory cycle by affecting the production of progesterone.  Before, we used to see endometrial cancer affecting women over 40, but now there are cases as young as under 20.  [07:59] Effects of Obesity Women's relative risk for endometrial cancer is one if they have a normal BMI. However, when they're in the range of 30-35 and over 40, this is raised to 2.5 and 7.1 respectively.  There are now many obese young women who are in this constant state of a hyper estrogenic environment.  The definitive treatment of this cancer is hysterectomy, making a huge impact on women's choice for reproduction.    In addition, obesity can increase the risk of breast cancer too. [10:43] What Changes Does Obesity Make?  Obesity leads to an abnormally high aromatase gene expression, which is in charge of estrogen production.  With obesity, the body converts more of the androgen peripheral tissue into estrogen too.  This problem does not apply only to women. Obese men also have hormone issues and tend to have feminine features. [14:04] How the Food Industry Affects Our Health One of the main drivers of the obesity epidemic is the wide availability of obesogenic food.  Lower-income families tend to consume more of these foods since they are cheaper than healthier options.  We can remove taxes on fruits and vegetables to help address the problems in the food industry — as other countries have done.  Even if junk foods seem cheap, these are costing the country more. Public health will collapse as more young people develop diseases.  Obesity doesn't just cause cancer — it can also lead to diabetes and heart disease.  [16:19] What Needs to Change?  The market needs to change to make healthy foods more accessible. The food industry also needs to assess the way they use additives and preservatives.  It's not totally our fault that we're obese. This epidemic is driven by socioeconomic and cultural factors, in addition to the food industry.  Widespread normalisation of a high BMI is also harmful since people don't understand its consequences.  While doctors can help treat your diseases with pills and surgeries, it will always come with risks. It's your responsibility to prevent hospitalisation. Medication should not be your first and only option.  [23:19] Start with Educating Yourself Preventing disease progression starts at an early stage.  Some medical interventions may not be the cure to fix your health. There is a need for a holistic approach to health.  In public health settings, most doctors only have 20 minutes to get to know a patient. This amount of time does not give them a complete picture of what the patient needs.  Personalised health care starts with self-education. Do your research so you can ask specific questions to your doctor within the limited timeframe given to you. Dr Katherine shares that not only does obesity have compounding effects on health, it can also affect surgeries! Learn more about this in the complete episode.   [31:13] How Obesity has Risen Over the Years Even if our lifespans have increased because of medicine, people are also dying earlier because of diseases.  A study in New Zealand found that the standardised incidence of endometrial cancer used to be 1.9 per 100,000 population in 1996.  This rate increased to 24.2 in 2012, with the Pacific Islanders' at 46.06.  In 2013, around 34% of the population were within the range of a healthy BMI. This percentage has decreased sharply over the years.  Preventing cancers, such as endometrial cancers, starts with losing weight and changing lifestyles.  [37:05] Start Early It's more difficult to reverse cancers and diseases than taking preventive measures.  Diseases and cancers don't happen overnight. It's the result of malignant states developing over time.  Not all cancers are preventable, but we can decrease our chances of developing them, especially with estrogen-dependent cancers.  [40:20] Stop the Vicious Cycle Nowadays, it's commonly seen as politically incorrect to discuss obesity. Remember that our physical states impact our health, whether we like to hear them or not.  Understand the consequences of obesity. These include the increased likelihood of infertility, cancer risk, diabetes, dementia, heart disease, and many more illnesses.  Start with adopting lifestyle changes in terms of nutrition and movement.  Eating unhealthy foods can cause a vicious cycle of degrading health, both physically and mentally.  You can also seek more personalised healthcare from health coaches and other allied health professionals.    7 Powerful Quotes ‘We tax cigarettes, we take alcohol. Why aren't we taxing some of this junk food? It is of no benefit to people whatsoever.' ‘We need to do something and even if it is unpopular. So for example, taxing sugary food and drinks. It's got to be worthwhile.' ‘We can do operations that do amazing things, and really cure people of cancer, and improve their quality of life, but equally it shouldn't be the first option.' ‘But I think we've always got to look at the patient as a whole person. The least invasive cure, the better.' 'The more people we can keep out of the hospital, the better because it means we can deliver quality personalised health care.' ‘The more you can educate yourself, the better. So that when you get that 20 minutes in the public system, you've got the questions to ask, you know what you're going in for.' ‘It's also seen as politically incorrect to discuss obesity. But it's not politically incorrect. That's factual and it's a crisis. We need to stop pussyfooting around it.'   About Katherine Dr Katherine Sowden is a highly respected gynaecologist and has been the Clinical Lead in Counties Manukau Health since 2014. She is also a Consultant Gynaecologist in Auckland Women's Gynaecology and Ormiston Specialist Centre.  Dr Katherine is a fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists. She is currently the departmental lead for non-tertiary gynaecological oncology and focuses on the management of premalignant gynaecological conditions.  She provides a wide range of gynaecology services. You can find out more about her practice in Auckland Women's Gynae and Ormiston Specialists.  You can also reach Katherine by email.       Enjoyed This Podcast? If you did, be sure to subscribe and share it with your friends! Post a review and share it! If you enjoyed tuning in, then leave us a review. You can also share this with your family and friends so they can make better health choices to prevent cancer. Have any questions? You can contact me through email (support@lisatamati.com) or find me on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube. For more episode updates, visit my website. You may also tune in on Apple Podcasts. To pushing the limits, Lisa

AmiTuckeredOut
Sonal Shah and The Asian American Foundation

AmiTuckeredOut

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 48:20


One of the foremost global leaders on social impact and innovation, Sonal Shah has started and led social impact efforts in academia, government, and the private and philanthropic sectors for over twenty-five years.  She is the President of TAAF-The Asian American Foundation (TAAF), a convener, incubator, and funder committed to accelerating opportunity and prosperity for AAPI communities. TAAF supports advocates and organizations committed to AAPI causes so that together they can more effectively take action against hate and violence, and build the infrastructure needed to improve AAPI advocacy, power, and representation across American society.We talk about the huge spike of anti-hate crimes against the Asian American community the past few years, the main focus areas for TAAF, and how far back the history of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders goes in the United States.We also talk about our own childhood growing up in Houston as South Asians, how our generation perhaps internalized those feelings of being "the other", and why our own parents may have not had the bandwidth to comprehend racism when they immigrated to this country.Sonal discusses the importance of the Asian American narrative and certain cultural ideas that need to change, her own journey working with Obama and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, what she ultimately wants to be known for, and why she's ready to start a band.www.taaf.org

Ladies Who London Podcast
Ep 56 - Rotherhithe - Prince Lee Boo & Omai, from far flung lands to London life

Ladies Who London Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 50:32


Emily has kept it close to home this week with the story of Prince Lee Boo, who lies buried in Rotherhithe, and Omai, the second only Pacific Islander to visit Europe. Two different men from far flung lands chose to travel to London - what will their fates be? Will they return home, or will they stay in the vastly different metropolis of Georgian London? We take a look at these two men, and find out why they came here, and what they became. Plus we find out who won the Podcast Pedestal, and we spin the Wheel of Destiny to find out where we are going next. WE HAVE A NEW WEBSITE! Check out www.ladieswholondon.com and take a look at the blog which accompanies each episode, plus links on how to get in touch and what we are all about.  Get in touch! Instagram; @ladieswholondonpodcast Email; ladieswholondon@gmail.com Websites; www.ladieswholondon.com  www.guideemily.com and www.alexlacey.com/podcast where you can also book for our virtual and real life walking tours. Thanks to Susie Riddell for our voiceover jingles www.susieriddell.com and our jinglemeister Ben Morales Frost, can be found on www.benfrostmusic.com See you next week Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ABG - AsianBossGirl
Episode 136: Let's Talk About Addiction, feat. Yvette Enrique from AADAP

ABG - AsianBossGirl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 72:42


**Disclaimer: This episode contains discussion about drug, alcohol use, sexual abuse, and addiction.** The topic of addiction is rather taboo in Asian culture, so it is often unaddressed and misunderstood. Many people are unaware, uneducated, unprepared, and suffer alone. Research has found that Asian-Americans between 18 and 25 drank heavily although they were considered a “low-risk group” with alcohol abuse, and that 14% of Asian-Americans or Pacific Islanders between 18 to 25 need substance abuse treatment — which is only slightly lower than the 21% average of other ethnic groups. September was National Recovery Month, and we were lucky to have Yvette join us in this conversation. Yvette is a Filipino-American, and certified addiction specialist. Yvette works with AADAP - The Asian American Drug Abuse Program dedicated to serving Asian Pacific Islanders and other under-served communities with substance abuse services throughout Los Angeles County. She's here with us today to share her personal experience with addiction. This episode was edited by Michelle Hsieh. ___ P A R T N E R S mentioned in this episode: - Audible: Visit audible.com/abg or text abg to 500 500. - Aurate: Get 20% off your first order at AurateNewYork.com/abg with code abg. - Betterhelp: Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/abg10. - Jinjer Oil: Get 20% off your first order at jinjer.us/abg. - LinkedIn Creator Accelerator: Visit LinkedIn.com/creators to apply today. - Skillshare: Get 1 month free trial of premium membership at skillshare.com/abg. S H O U T OU T ! - Give a shoutout on the podcast here. S U B S C R I B E T O U S ! - @asianbossgirl on Apple Podcasts / Spotify / YouTube / Instagram / Twitter / Facebook - More about us at asianbossgirl.com E – M A I L U S ! - hello@asianbossgirl.com S U P P O R T U S ! - merch: asianbossgirl.myshopify.com - donation: anchor.fm/asianbossgirl/support Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ASCO Daily News
Key Interventions and Patient Perspectives From #ASCOQLTY21

ASCO Daily News

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 23:01


Dr. Gabrielle Rocque, chair of the 2021 ASCO Quality Care Symposium, breast oncologist and health services researcher at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and symposium chair-elect, Dr. Stephanie Wheeler, professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, discuss key interventions in quality care and compelling patient perspectives presented at #ASCOQLTY21. Transcript ASCO Daily News: Welcome to the ASCO Daily News podcast. I'm Geraldine Carroll, a reporter for the ASCO Daily News. On today's episode, we'll discuss promising interventions to improve the quality of care for patients and survivors and other key takeaways from the 2021 ASCO Quality Care Symposium. I'm delighted to welcome the chair and chair-elect of the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium, Dr. Gabrielle Rocque and Dr. Stephanie Wheeler, for this discussion. Dr. Rocque is a breast oncologist and health services researcher. She is also associate professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology and Oncology and Gerontology, Geriatrics, and Palliative Care at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. Wheeler is a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She also serves as associate director of community outreach and engagement at the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center. My guests' full disclosures are available in our show notes, and disclosures relating to all episodes of the podcast are available on our transcripts at asco.org/podcasts. Dr. Rocque and Dr. Wheeler, thanks for being on the podcast today. Dr. Gabrielle Rocque: Thank you for having us. ASCO Daily News: Dr. Wheeler, it was wonderful to have a hybrid event this year, with people participating in person in Boston and virtually. This is surely a sign of things to come. Can you tell us about some of the most important interventions in quality improvement that were presented at the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium? Dr. Stephanie Wheeler: Absolutely, and thank you so much for hosting us. It was a really terrific [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium. And the fact that we had hybrid engagement from investigators all over the country and internationally was really exciting. There's a couple of intervention classes, if you want to call it that, that I think were particularly inspiring and interesting to me. The first were sets of interventions that focused on strategies to improve goals of care conversations and advanced care planning directives for patients with cancer or people with terminal illness in particular. And I just wanted to highlight a couple of those that I thought were particularly innovative. One was Abstract 8, which focused on using computer modeling and care coaches to increase advanced care planning conversations for people with advanced cancer. And this was presented by Dr. Divya Gupta. And it was just a wonderful example of how we can utilize technology and also care coaches. And in many cases, these don't necessarily have to be clinicians. They sometimes can be community health workers and others who can help direct those conversations and make it more comfortable for people living with advanced disease, and also their families, to consider next steps. In a similar vein, there were two other presentations--Abstract 1 delivered by Dr. Manali Patel and Abstract 2 delivered by Dr. Divya Parikh--that also utilized a similar model in a different care setting. And in those cases, the care settings ranged from VA to integrated health care settings. And we even had a conversation about how to do this work in community rural oncology practices. And I think that this kind of intervention has the potential for translation across a variety of settings. And the next steps are going to be figuring out exactly how to implement it in these settings. So, that's one class that I thought was particularly interesting. And I just want to highlight another group of interventions and studies that I found really innovative. And those were the presentations about hospital at-home models and how we can better deliver oncology care in the comfort of individuals' homes. And I thought Dr. Cardinale Smith did a great job from Mount Sinai describing the landscape of those interventions and the future for this kind of care delivery (“Overview of Programs and Ethics”). ASCO Daily News: Excellent. Great to hear about those promising new approaches. Dr. Rocque, the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium captured many trends in quality care, including patient-reported outcomes measurement as an important way to monitor quality of care and patients' experiences. Can you highlight the studies that will help inform our listeners about how to integrate patient-reported outcomes into real-world settings? Dr. Gabrielle Rocque: Yeah. This was a major topic of the conference this year to think about how patient-reported outcomes are informative both in traditional research settings and in real-world settings. So, I was really intrigued by the Abstract 154 by Joy Jarnagin. And that abstract talked about how the changes in patient-reported outcomes actually had a very strong association with patients' treatment response, and in fact, was even more informative than those patients' tumor markers and I think show a novel way that patient-reported outcomes can be used. We also saw some more traditional abstracts on patient-reported outcomes. I'd like to highlight Abstract 152 by Valerie Lawhon, which really used patient-reported outcomes to identify patients' experience and their mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic, and I think provided us some really important insight into the experiences of our patients. And then as you mentioned, there is a lot of focus on real-world settings and how to transition from typical research patient-reported outcomes to a more broad scale implementation. And the session implementing PROs in oncology practice was really outstanding in terms of considering how this can be done. So, Dr. Terry Mulvey from Massachusetts General Hospital presented their experience on how to get these patient-reported outcomes into routine care, and what are some of the challenges associated with that, and how did they have to adapt to make sure that this was doable in real-world settings (“Challenges to Getting Started in a Practice Setting”). I was also impressed with the study by Dr. Raymond Osarogiagbon on the potential populations where there can be barriers of care and their study looking at an intervention in which they're implementing patient-reported outcomes over a wide variety of different practice types across the country (“Potential Populations Where This Can Be a Barrier to Care”). And I think these early insights also pointed us to future questions. Dr. Wynne Norton did a wonderful job of outlining some of the future questions that are likely to come up as we move into an era where patient-reported outcomes are a part of standard of care, and really think about how do we refine these for maximal benefit (“Overview of Current Strategies”). So, I think all of these sessions were highlighting the promise of patient-reported outcomes, as well as the future questions in this space. ASCO Daily News: Excellent. As a specialist in gerontology, geriatrics, and palliative care, please tell us about new approaches that oncologists should be aware of as they strive to provide high quality care for older patients and those receiving palliative care. Dr. Gabrielle Rocque: Absolutely. So, we've talked a bit about the patient-reported outcomes. And I think we'd be remiss in not highlighting the presentation on geriatric assessment--the presentations on the geriatric assessments into clinical practice by Dr. [Rawad] Elias (“Incorporating Geriatric Assessments Into Practice”). And I think this highlights another opportunity for us to move the field forward and take better care of our older adults. In terms of palliative care, there were multiple very informative abstracts. Dr. Wheeler has highlighted a few in the space of care guides or lay health coaches providing support in advanced care planning. In addition, we saw an interesting discussion of caregiver interventions for patients that are receiving--with cancer treatment by Dr. Nick Dionne-Odom (“Caregiver Interventions”). And I think it's important that we remember both the patients and the caregivers who are affected by cancer and by the amount of work that has to be done to support a patient with cancer going through their journey. ASCO Daily News: Absolutely, so important to remember caregivers and their needs and resources that could be available to them as well. Dr. Wheeler, financial toxicity is an enormous concern for many patients and their families, and the oncology care community has been trying for some time to figure out how best to address the concerns of patients and the health care system. Are there any new interventions that we should be aware of? Dr. Stephanie Wheeler: Yes, and I think that the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium was an opportunity to hear about several of those. And some of them didn't make it onto the main stage but were featured in abstract sessions and poster sessions. So, as we're all well aware, financial toxicity is a multidimensional set of constructs that includes patients and their family's material out-of-pocket burden, as well as the psychological distress and potentially harmful care altering behaviors that financial hardship induces. And so, we continue to hear at the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium multiple talks about the strain that patients are undergoing, including the non-medical hardship that's introduced by a cancer diagnosis. And that was really interesting, and I think important to document. But I think that where the field is moving is more towards interventions, both behavioral interventions and systems interventions, multilevel approaches to dealing with the hardship itself as well as the importance of policy. So, there were several abstracts that talked about the introduction of biosimilars and generics and how that affected price of many of the oncologic drugs available on the market. And frankly, the message is a bit discouraging. Prices continue to rise. And in some cases, the price increases are not limited to pharmacologic products. In some cases, we saw abstracts presenting the increased cost of surgery, of outpatient care appointments, and things like that as well. So, we're not going to fix the problem by managing drug pricing alone. In terms of patient and family-directed interventions, I thought that there were some interesting abstracts. I want to highlight a number 53--or excuse me, Abstract 43 by Melissa Beauchemin that focused on the existence of hospital specialty pharmacies and partnering with freestanding care coordination organizations to improve access to oncology medications, as well as Abstract 96 presented by Ms. Rachel Marquez which was focused on resolving transportation disparities and access to cancer treatments. These kinds of interventions are obviously patient directed but have tremendous potential. And then I also want to just note a couple of additional studies that are ongoing that are important to recognize in this field. There are at least five National Cancer Institute (NCI)-funded R01 trials underway right now investigating the role of financial navigation and various iterations of it in different care settings. So, I think we will want to look to this meeting as an opportunity to hear about that work as it moves forward. And how that work is implemented is going to be vital, because the types of care settings where it's being done--ranging from AYA populations in Utah, to urban populations in Washington state, to integrated care organizations in Northern California, all the way to parts of rural North Carolina--we're going to see a diversity of outcomes and different ways in which those types of interventions can manifest in those different studies. I also want to note that the NCI has funded a series of supplements through its Cancer Center Core Grant Initiative that are all focused on identification, timely identification of financial toxicity in practice. And many of the investigators leading that work were attending the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium, and so that will be important to keep an eye on as we move forward as well. ASCO Daily News: Excellent. Dr. Rocque, let's focus on health equity and access. I'd like to ask you about the session on eliminating barriers to clinical trial access. The presenters of this session shared strategies to directly address inclusion and diversity in cancer care. Can you tell us about approaches that caught your attention? Dr. Gabrielle Rocque: Absolutely. So, this was a really great session talking about clinical trial access and barriers, and particularly as it relates to health equity. And so, in Abstract 74, Dr. Joe Unger presented a really interesting conceptual model that highlighted that the barriers to clinical trial access are not necessarily always at the patient level, but they are at the system level, the provider level. And this framework for considering how do we target in the future our ability to engage patients in clinical trials was really important, and I think was complemented well by the patient perspective from Rick Bangs, who's worked closely with SWOG, in thinking about how do patients view clinical trials and how can we better engage them. And I think folding together these different experiences and models to develop future interventions. I also thought the Abstract 75 looking at survival in the real-world analysis was noteworthy. And in particular, the ability to consider patients who are typically excluded from clinical trials based on their laboratory criteria and potentially having something like chronic kidney disease, and how little data there is on those patients who actually, in this study, had different outcomes after chemotherapy for breast cancer. I think when you think about clinical trial access and inclusion, I also think you need to think about how we collect our data and how we consider race and other social determinants of health. So, there were a few other abstracts that, although not in this session, I think were incredibly important for us to consider. The first is Abstract 78 by Ms. Niveditta Ramkumar that talked about the association between rurality and race and surgical treatment and outcomes for non-metastatic colon cancer. And so, she talked a bit about the intersectionality between race and rurality, and I think brings up an important topic that we need to think about these constructs, not only as individual constructs but how they impact each other as we consider analysis in the future. And also Abstract 80 by Dr. Kekoa Taparra, which was a really interesting abstract that talked about the disaggregation of Pacific Islanders in major Asian subpopulations to reveal hidden cancer disparities. So, in this abstract, he discussed how we often lump together different populations, potentially because of small numbers, who really may have very different experiences and characteristics. And I think challenges us to move the field forward by identifying populations in groups that are, in fact, very similar to each other and not just pulling this together. And I think that will have an impact on how we view engaging patients in clinical trials, as well as reporting those clinical trial results that allows our providers to understand how the trial results fit for the patient that is sitting in their clinic for whom they're making their decisions. ASCO Daily News: Indeed. Dr. Wheeler, is there anything that you'd like to add on the issue of access to clinical trials? Dr. Stephanie Wheeler: So, there was an abstract that particularly sparked my attention, [Abstract] 79 presented by Dr. Jenny Xiang about the VA Connecticut Cancer Experience, where universal pre-screening and using computer algorithms to identify patients who might be eligible for clinical trials was used. And I think that this is an important approach that can help us rely less on the assumptions and the biases that exist in clinical care practice about whether a patient may or may not participate in a clinical trial, and instead use the vast amounts of information that we know about them in their electronic health record to try to preemptively identify them and approach them. We know that when patients are asked and invited to be part of trials, they are much more likely to say yes than people assume. And this could be a more unbiased way of assessing that eligibility, and then proactively identifying people, ideally, with a trial navigator. I think that would enable us to potentially overcome some of the barriers that exist and that are, frankly, institutionally biased in many cases. ASCO Daily News: Thank you, Dr. Wheeler. Dr. Rocque, the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium featured an excellent keynote address by Dr. Ben Corn of Hebrew University of Jerusalem (“Integrating Hope – Real Hope! – Into Clinical Oncology”) and a wonderful lecture by Dr. John Cox, who was honored with the Joseph V. Simone award for advancing quality cancer care (“Reshaping Practice: Necessary Trouble”). Can you share some highlights from their talks? Dr. Gabrielle Rocque: Definitely. So, the keynote address by Dr. Ben Corn was perfectly timed for this meeting. I think everyone has had a difficult past 2 years with the pandemic. And his message of the importance of hope really struck a chord with me and many of the attendees, and how this is something that we can strategically work to improve, and that hope is something we can modify and train for. And so, I'm really excited to both hear this lecture and then also see what's to come in the future in this domain of hope-related research. Another session that I would like to highlight as well is Dr. Cox's talk after receiving the Joe Simone Achievement Award. And his lecture highlighted that change is coming. And he emphasized the importance of changing payment structures to be able to improve the quality of care that patients receive and to be able to leverage those changes for infrastructure that allows us to enable our health system to have a more patient-centered approach with many of the types of interventions that we've been talking about here today. So, I think both of those sessions are really must-watch sessions that I would like to highlight today. ASCO Daily News: Excellent. Well, the [ASCO Quality Care] Symposium also heard some compelling patient perspectives. Dr. Wheeler, can you share some of these messages with us? Dr. Stephanie Wheeler: One of the most powerful sessions in the entire meeting was the very first one, which was focused on the metavivor experience (“The Patient Voice: “Metavivors” and Long-Term Survivorship Care”). And I think because part of the intention of the planning committee was to proactively feature patients' voices at this meeting, this particular session was almost entirely comprised of patients and survivors. And living with advanced disease, as we know now, is very different than it was in the past. And we know that patients living with incurable disease may sometimes go on to live 15, 20, 25 years. And their needs are quite different than patients who have early-stage cancer. And so, this session was impactful because it represented a range of experiences. We heard from a caregiver. We heard from a young woman who's living with stage four melanoma, Dr. Tarlise Townsend (“An AYA Perspective”). And one of the things that I took away from this session in particular was that our approaches in the way that we talk to metavivors has to be fundamentally different, that they want providers to be truthful, they want providers to acknowledge the uncertainty and prognosis and the sometimes complex and rapidly changing regimens that may be available for them in terms of dealing with their disease. But they don't want to be condescended to, they don't want to feel like there's information that is being withheld. One of the things that Dr. Townsend shared that was very powerful was that she talked about how her providers, in many cases, outlined an optimistic future for her and would give her maybe unfair expectations about what the future might hold and think about it in terms of the outlier effect. But that's not the case for many people with her condition. And so, she talked about having to do her own death work--and that's her term--and how much time she spent really trying to understand for herself what the future looked like. And it just resonated so much with me. And everybody on this panel had similar stories to share about their experiences. And it reminded me that at the end of the day, we're all human. None of us deal with uncertainty well. None of us deal with death well, or the prospect of death. But the best that we can do in these situations is to be open and honest and straightforward and recognize the fear and the hope and all of that being intermingled, and really respect the person's autonomy and the person's experience and their ability to make plans for themselves going forward. ASCO Daily News: Thank you, Dr. Wheeler. We will have links to these important patient perspectives in the transcript of this episode, as well as the other abstracts discussed today. Dr. Rocque and Dr. Wheeler, thank you very much for sharing these important highlights from the 2021 ASCO Quality Care Symposium. Dr. Stephanie Wheeler: Thank you for having us. Dr. Gabrielle Rocque: Thank you so much. ASCO Daily News: And thank you to our listeners for your time today. If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. Disclosures: Dr. Gabrielle Rocque: Consulting or Advisory Role: Pfizer, Flatiron Research Funding: Carevive Systems, Genentech, Pfizer Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Carevive (an immediate family member) Dr. Stephanie Wheeler: Research Funding (institution): Pfizer Foundation Travel, Accommodations, Expenses: Pfizer Disclaimer: The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

POLITICO Dispatch
How trauma and Trump mobilized AAPI voters

POLITICO Dispatch

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 12:20


A year of violence and fear has reshaped the way Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders look at themselves and politics. POLITICO's Rishika Dugyala breaks down the key takeaways from a new POLITICO/Morning Consult poll. Plus, Fauci sees hope in Merck's new Covid drug. And Trump says he'd beat DeSantis in a potential GOP primary. Rishika Dugyala  is a digital strategy editor for POLITICO. Jeremy Siegel is a host for POLITICO Dispatch. Irene Noguchi is the executive producer of POLITICO audio. Jenny Ament is the senior producer of POLITICO audio. Raghu Manavalan is a senior editor for POLITICO audio. Read more:  Trauma and Trump make Asian American voters a more cohesive bloc, new poll reveals Take part in our 2021 podcast survey.

Copilots Review
Copilots Review Episode 36- Surreal Estate

Copilots Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 51:21


New episodes on the 2nd and 22nd of every month, with interstitial episodes released on the 12th.And now you can find us on Youtube. Check us out here --> Copilots Review on YoutubeIf you would like to contact us or recommend a series for us to watch/listen/play/otherwise interact with and review you can email us at CopilotsReview@gmail.com or reach us on Twitter at @copilotsreview, or join the Discord or find all of these options at copilotsreview.simplecast.com. Thanks again!Also, even though the social media hype has died down, protests have lessened in frequency and it's no longer "trending"; discrimination based on race is still an issue in our country. In fact in addition to our usual link to BLM we are supplying links to organizations that seek to help with the problems of violence against the Asian American and Pacific Islander populace, violence that has only unfortunately skyrocketed within the COVID-19 Pandemic. To help and/or educate yourself please follow these links.The Asian American Legal Defense and Education FundAsian Americans Advancing JusticeAsian Pacific FundLastly we want to thank Jessica Kuczynski! She designed our awesome podcast art. You can find her other work, her shop or commission her for original art at her website jessicakuczynski.com or at her twitter.

Solwata Kin
S1E2 - Seuta'afili Dr Patrick Thomsen

Solwata Kin

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 72:34


Our second episode features the amazing, Seuta'afili Dr Patrick Thomsen. He is a lecturer in Pacific studies at the University of Auckland, Principal Investigator for the Manalagi Aotearoa Pacific Rainbow LGBTIQA+ MVPFAFF Health and Wellbeing Project, the Pacific data co-lead for the Human Rights Measurement Initiative. PhD from the University of Washington - Seattle and lived in South Korea for 9 years. Freelance writer and consultant for many projects including SOGI rights, and the Pacific. Links to the articles mentioned in our talanoa: https://www.tepapa.govt.nz/discover-collections/read-watch-play/history/lgbtqi-histories-aotearoa-new-zealand/there-are-ghosts https://www.manalagi.org/ Links to Patrick's website: https://www.patrickthomsen.com/ Vinaka vakalevu to our platforming partners South Pacific Islander Organisation . South Pacific Islander Organization (SPIO) is a 100% grassroots nonprofit founded in December 2018 by four Indigenous and Pacific Islander Stanford alumni who believe in democratizing Pacific Islander access to higher education and economic opportunities, globally. They came together in response to the lack of cohesive Pacific representation in higher education, professional fields, and in the media. Follow SPIO on Twitter and Instagram for updates, or sign up to their Higher Education network. Music: Underground Stars by Loxbeats https://spoti.fi/34tPBBO Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/underground-stars Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/vpJDMD2EzkA This is an independently produced podcast, so if you like our work - you can buy us a coffee to show your appreciation and keep us going! If you buy us a coffee, leave your name and we will give you a shoutout on our podcast!: https://ko-fi.com/solwatakin Find out more at https://solwata-kin.pinecast.co

RNZ: Saturday Morning
Dr Doug Wilson: the medical miracles are not for everyone

RNZ: Saturday Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 16:22


Doug Wilson is a medical academic author and our regular correspondent from the other side of 80. Wilson graduated from Otago University 60 years ago, and since then there have been significant changes in life expectancy thanks to medical marvels - yet only some people benefit. The figures remain quite different for Māori and Pacific Islanders.

RNZ: Morning Report
Study tracks Pacific peoples' voyages

RNZ: Morning Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 3:16


A new study has teased out the voyages that Pacific peoples took by studying present-day genomes. The study estimates that voyagers from Samoa, Fiji, and Tonga first migrated to Rarotonga around the year 830. Two hundred years later, one group went further east to Papa Nui, or Easter Island. The researchers identified rare genetic traits present on only some Pacific Islands in order to trace ancestry and migration routes. Lead author Alexander Ioannidis, a research fellow at Stanford Medical School, says that medical researchers should use similar ancestry genetic analysis to provide more personalised patient care. He says that the category of "Pacific Islander" may paint too broad of a brush on a medical chart, because some genetic risk factors occur only among those from particular nations. Ioannidis spoke to Susie Ferguson.

Copilots Review
Copilots Review Episode 35- The Dresden Files

Copilots Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 79:01


New episodes on the 2nd and 22nd of every month, with interstitial episodes released on the 12th.And now you can find us on Youtube. Check us out here --> Copilots Review on YoutubeIf you would like to contact us or recommend a series for us to watch/listen/play/otherwise interact with and review you can email us at CopilotsReview@gmail.com or reach us on Twitter at @copilotsreview, or join the Discord or find all of these options at copilotsreview.simplecast.com. Thanks again!Also, even though the social media hype has died down, protests have lessened in frequency and it's no longer "trending"; discrimination based on race is still an issue in our country. In fact in addition to our usual link to BLM we are supplying links to organizations that seek to help with the problems of violence against the Asian American and Pacific Islander populace, violence that has only unfortunately skyrocketed within the COVID-19 Pandemic. To help and/or educate yourself please follow these links.The Asian American Legal Defense and Education FundAsian Americans Advancing JusticeAsian Pacific FundLastly we want to thank Jessica Kuczynski! She designed our awesome podcast art. You can find her other work, her shop or commission her for original art at her website jessicakuczynski.com or at her twitter.

Copilots Review
Inside the Cockpit 15: An Elite Conversation

Copilots Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 54:21


New episodes on the 2nd and 22nd of every month, with interstitial episodes released on the 12th.And now you can find us on Youtube. Check us out here --> Copilots Review on YoutubeIf you would like to contact us or recommend a series for us to watch/listen/play/otherwise interact with and review you can email us at CopilotsReview@gmail.com or reach us on Twitter at @copilotsreview, or join the Discord or find all of these options at copilotsreview.simplecast.com. Thanks again!Also, even though the social media hype has died down, protests have lessened in frequency and it's no longer "trending"; discrimination based on race is still an issue in our country. In fact in addition to our usual link to BLM we are supplying links to organizations that seek to help with the problems of violence against the Asian American and Pacific Islander populace, violence that has only unfortunately skyrocketed within the COVID-19 Pandemic. To help and/or educate yourself please follow these links.The Asian American Legal Defense and Education FundAsian Americans Advancing JusticeAsian Pacific FundLastly we want to thank Jessica Kuczynski! She designed our awesome podcast art. You can find her other work, her shop or commission her for original art at her website jessicakuczynski.com or at her twitter.

Island Block Podcast
EVERYONE LOVES LULU, Ep. 22 - HIRAM TRAVIS

Island Block Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 58:55


#MyzLulu welcomes #HiramTravis to #EveryoneLovesLulu, Episode #22 to talks about his entrepreneurial Pre Covid ventures of Food Market Express in Long Beach, the first Pacific Islander food festival called South Bay Food Market, and then during the Pandemic starting his own agency called EPIC Life Insurance teaching financial literacy. https://www.instagram.com/mister__aloha https://www.facebook.com/hiramtravis ----------------------------------------------------------------- SUBSCRIBE TO OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL https://www.youtube.com/islandblocktv LISTEN TO OUR LATEST PODCAST https://www.islandblockpodcasters.com CHECK OUT OUR ONLINE STORE https://www.shopislandblock.com LOG ONTO OUR WEBSITE http://www.islandblocktv.com DOWNLOAD OUR MOBILE APP https://apps.apple.com/np/app/island-block-radio/id1540183647 (iOS) https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.islandblock.player (ANDROID) ------------------------------------------------------------ FOLLOW US ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA https://www.facebook.com/islandblocktv https://twitter.com/islandblocktv/ https://www.instagram.com/islandblocktv https://www.linkedin.com/in/islandblockradio/ https://www.tiktok.com/@islandblock ------------------------------------------------------------- FOLLOW MYZ LULU https://www.instagram.com/myzlulu https://www.facebook.com/myzlulu --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/islandblockpodcasters/message

Well Rounded
Racism and Residency: A Trainee's Take on AAPI Advocacy

Well Rounded

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021


In this episode, Dan and Isobel talk with Dr. Amy Zhang about her experience with anti-Asian American and Pacific Islander racism as a resident physician. Dr. Zhang is an anesthesiology resident physician at the University of Washington, president of the Resident and Fellow Physician Union Northwest, and a fierce advocate for anti-racism in medicine. She discusses personal experience, how positive change can be made, and what trainees can do to take action. Content warning: This episode contains explicit language.

Copilots Review
Copilots Review Episode 34- Heels Part 2

Copilots Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2021 45:40


New episodes on the 2nd and 22nd of every month, with interstitial episodes released on the 12th.And now you can find us on Youtube. Check us out here --> Copilots Review on YoutubeIf you would like to contact us or recommend a series for us to watch/listen/play/otherwise interact with and review you can email us at CopilotsReview@gmail.com or reach us on Twitter at @copilotsreview, or join the Discord or find all of these options at copilotsreview.simplecast.com. Thanks again!Also, even though the social media hype has died down, protests have lessened in frequency and it's no longer "trending"; discrimination based on race is still an issue in our country. In fact in addition to our usual link to BLM we are supplying links to organizations that seek to help with the problems of violence against the Asian American and Pacific Islander populace, violence that has only unfortunately skyrocketed within the COVID-19 Pandemic. To help and/or educate yourself please follow these links.The Asian American Legal Defense and Education FundAsian Americans Advancing JusticeAsian Pacific FundLastly we want to thank Jessica Kuczynski! She designed our awesome podcast art. You can find her other work, her shop or commission her for original art at her website jessicakuczynski.com or at her twitter.

Copilots Review
Copilots Review Episode 33- Heels Part 1

Copilots Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 74:24


New episodes on the 2nd and 22nd of every month, with interstitial episodes released on the 12th.And now you can find us on Youtube. Check us out here --> Copilots Review on YoutubeIf you would like to contact us or recommend a series for us to watch/listen/play/otherwise interact with and review you can email us at CopilotsReview@gmail.com or reach us on Twitter at @copilotsreview, or join the Discord or find all of these options at copilotsreview.simplecast.com. Thanks again!Also, even though the social media hype has died down, protests have lessened in frequency and it's no longer "trending"; discrimination based on race is still an issue in our country. In fact in addition to our usual link to BLM we are supplying links to organizations that seek to help with the problems of violence against the Asian American and Pacific Islander populace, violence that has only unfortunately skyrocketed within the COVID-19 Pandemic. To help and/or educate yourself please follow these links.The Asian American Legal Defense and Education FundAsian Americans Advancing JusticeAsian Pacific FundLastly we want to thank Jessica Kuczynski! She designed our awesome podcast art. You can find her other work, her shop or commission her for original art at her website jessicakuczynski.com or at her twitter.

Copilots Review
Copilots Review Episode 32- Reservation Dogs

Copilots Review

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 52:30


New episodes on the 2nd and 22nd of every month, with interstitial episodes released on the 12th.And now you can find us on Youtube. Check us out here --> Copilots Review on YoutubeIf you would like to contact us or recommend a series for us to watch/listen/play/otherwise interact with and review you can email us at CopilotsReview@gmail.com or reach us on Twitter at @copilotsreview, or join the Discord or find all of these options at copilotsreview.simplecast.com. Thanks again!Also, even though the social media hype has died down, protests have lessened in frequency and it's no longer "trending"; discrimination based on race is still an issue in our country. In fact in addition to our usual link to BLM we are supplying links to organizations that seek to help with the problems of violence against the Asian American and Pacific Islander populace, violence that has only unfortunately skyrocketed within the COVID-19 Pandemic. To help and/or educate yourself please follow these links.The Asian American Legal Defense and Education FundAsian Americans Advancing JusticeAsian Pacific FundLastly we want to thank Jessica Kuczynski! She designed our awesome podcast art. You can find her other work, her shop or commission her for original art at her website jessicakuczynski.com or at her twitter.

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People
Episode 82: A Conversation on Race With Jeff Le, Victim of anti- Asian hate

Everyday Conversations on Race for Everyday People

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 57:38


In this conversation on race, I'm joined by Jeff Le, to talk about anti-Asian hate. He has been featured in Political magazine, The New York Times USA Today,  and the Washington Post. Jeff shares his personal experience with  being a victim of anti-Asian hate and no one offering any help. “Last March we were completely overwhelmed with the lockdown with the COVID-19. But there was a second thing going on at the same time, not just from public health in pandemic issue, but also there was a real hate issue. January, February, when there was rhetoric about the Kung Flu- the China virus, there was some scapegoating." If you think about American history, and you look at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the country, there's been a long-standing history of xenophobia and discrimination.  Chinese Americans and Japanese Americans have been here since the 1850s.Building railroads going across the country to California, for example, Japanese Americans, really setting up shop in the Bay Area, for example, face significant discrimination. That is something that's been around for quite some time. And if you fast forward if you look at American history there have been instances where, whenever there are issues in the world that affect Asia and the United States, there has been a direct moment of disdain, disagreement, and unfortunately acts of hate and violence that have happened. I was traveling for my last work trip before the pandemic really laid in. And I was walking through an airport. I needed to get to San Francisco, and a woman came up to me, spit on my face. And she told me to go back where I came from."  "And as a proud Californian  I wanted to tell her  yes, I'm excited to go back to California, very much miss Mexican food. Unfortunately, she meant it in a more literal way. She meant, you know, based on what you Look, I know you're not from here, go back to China. Essentially. I'm Vietnamese American. That's a separate issue. But I was scapegoated, specifically for the virus, spit on in front of people in a public place that was federally regulated.   Being spit on is something that's really debasing ,demeaning, dehumanizing, but that's not the issue. The issue is, and this is the conversations I know you've been leading. It's about creating environments that allow for that to happen. And unfortunately, there were about a dozen people who saw what happened. And not a single one of them did anything.”   Key topics covered: • The history of discrimination against Asians in the US • The Chinese Exclusionary Act • The internment of Japanese-Americans during World War Two. • How his parents who are Vietnamese-Americans started a chicken farm in Georgia, build relationships with neighbors only to be accused of being responsible for COVID 19 • The relationship between the US relationship with China, anti-Asian hate, and blame for COVID 19 • Relationship between mental health and attacks against Asians • Role of white supremacy in anti-Asian hate and physical attacks against Asians • The fear that Asian Pacific Islanders are living with, particularly the elderly • The murder of Vincent Chin in Detroit • History of unity amongst People of Color • Asian support of Black Lives Matter • How he has been verbally harassed in his neighborhood • The importance of being an active ally and not a silent bystander If you like what you hear on this show, please go to RaceConvo.com and download more episodes. Please share the show with at least one or two other people. Help us get our message across about spreading love across the globe, and stopping hate. If you would like to bring me to your organization to facilitate a panel or conversation on race or consult with you on inclusive leadership, please contact me at Simmalieberman.com. You can hit me up on Twitter, @theinclusionist or Instagram @simma.lieberman, or find me on LinkedIn.   Jeff Le Bio Jeff Le has had a career at the highest levels of public policy and politics at the state, federal and international levels. A recognized thought leader in political advocacy and representation, his analysis and opinion-writing has been featured in POLITICO Magazine, The New York Times, USA Today, The Washington Post, FOX News, The Hill, Washingtonian, Roll Call, Bustle, Forbes, and local and regional newspapers in 30 states. During the height of the #StopAsianHate movement, Jeff penned an opinion piece that received national attention in POLITICO Magazine called I Thought I Knew How to Succeed as an Asian in U.S. Politics. Boy, Was I Wrong. that highlighted his experiences in workplace discrimination in politics and racism throughout his life.   Jeff is now an executive leader in technology where he is Vice President of Public Policy and External Affairs for Rhino, a fintech startup working to give renters everywhere greater financial freedom through affordable insurance options. Prior to joining Rhino, Jeff was U.S. State and Local Public Policy Lead for VMware, a digital technology and infrastructure company, and managed the company's gubernatorial, state, county, and local relationships across all 50 states and Canada. Jeff focused on emerging technology policy, including privacy, 5G, broadband, cyber, sustainability, workforce development, diversity and inclusion, education, and IT modernization.

Pixel Therapy Pod
Envisioning Our Best Selves in Mass Effect with Professional Trekkie Swapna Krishna

Pixel Therapy Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 100:57


Can YOU nonchalantly say that LeVar Burton has been a steadfast friend to you? This week's guest can, and we're still recovering. But before we get to that, Jamie and Spencer kick things off by diving into two 10-hour visual novel-esque games that couldn't be more different in their content and execution: Kitfox Games' Boyfriend Dungeon and Modern Storyteller's The Forgotten City! Join us as we date weapons and sink our teeth into some queer subtext, and work to escape a time loop while evading avenging angels, respectively. Is humanity truly capable of taking responsibility for each other? Is a polyam queer utopia possible? Join us as we discuss all this and more! Quick content note: Since we recorded this episode, Boyfriend Dungeon discourse has emerged around the role of content warnings in games. Our discussion didn't touch on the more challenging and/or possibly triggering aspects of the game, so if our episode inspires you to check it out, we just encourage you to do your own research before playing to make sure it's the right choice for you! Then, we're joined by the incredibly delightful Swapna Krishna (she/her), a journalist who writes for outlets including SyFy Wire, The Verge, Engadget, and StarTrek[.]com at the intersection of technology, space, and pop culture. She's also the co-editor of Sword Stone Table: Old Legends, New Voices, an anthology of inclusive retellings from the vast lore surrounding King Arthur, Camelot, and the Knights of the Round Table. AND she's the co-host of the geek pop-news podcast Desi Geek Girls! We had so much fun with Swapna, covering everything from pandemic parenting, to gaming while anxious, to looking to the stars, gushing about Sir Patrick Stewart, and so much more. Join us to find out why Mass Effect (and other space stories) work so well at helping us see our best selves and get outside of our own heads. Learn more about Swapna: https://www.swapnakrishna.com/ Check out Sword Stone Table: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/634028/sword-stone-table-by-edited-by-swapna-krishna-and-jenn-northington/ Side Quest "In response to the alarming escalation in xenophobia and bigotry resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON), Chinese for Affirmative Action (CAA), and the Asian American Studies Department of San Francisco State University launched the Stop AAPI Hate coalition on March 19, 2020. The coalition tracks and responds to incidents of hate, violence, harassment, discrimination, shunning, and child bullying against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States." Learn more and donate at https://stopaapihate.org/ About Pixel Therapy New episodes drop every other Tuesday. Learn more at pixeltherapypod.com or follow us on social media @pixeltherapypod. We're proud members of the But Why Tho? Podcast Network: visit ButWhyThoPodcast.com for everything pop culture in an inclusive geek community! If you like what you hear, please take a moment to rate us, leave us a review on Apple Podcasts (or your listening app of choice) & subscribe! Want more? Unlock monthly bonus episodes for $2/mo and help us save up for streaming equipment at patreon.com/pixeltherapypod ! Support this podcast

Insight with Beth Ruyak
New Census Data Shows California Population Growth, More Diversity / AAPI High Vaccination Rates / Delta Variant Sending More Children To Hospital / Japanese WWII Exhibit

Insight with Beth Ruyak

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


The number of children hospitalized with COVID-19 in the U.S hit a record high of more than 1,900 over the weekend amid outbreaks caused by the highly transmissible Delta Variant. The U.S. Census Bureau also released new raw data last week showing a more diverse country. Latinos now make up nearly 40% of the population in California, while the state's Asian population has grown by 25% in the past decade. Plus, a closer look at why the Asian American and Pacific Islander community has such high vaccination rates for COVID-19, and photojournalist Paul Kitagaki joins us with more on the encore of his traveling exhibition "Gambatte! Legacy of an Enduring Spirit."  Today's Guests Public Policy Institute of California Demographer and Senior Fellow Hans Johnson breaks down the newly released census data and what it means for California  Medical Director of Children's Services at Sutter Medical Center Dr. Craig Swanson on COVID-19 in children and why the Delta Variant is sending more kids to the hospital CapRadio's Race and Equity reporter Sarah Mizes-Tan with her reporting on why the AAPI community has such high vaccination rates for COVID-19 Photojournalist Paul Kitagaki Jr. discusses the encore of his traveling exhibition "Gambatte! Legacy of an Enduring Spirit," covering the mass incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War Two and the resilience of those who went through it

Marvel's Voices
Darren Shan on Marvel's Voices: Identity

Marvel's Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 30:29


Angelique talks to comics editor Darren Shan about the making of Marvel's Voices: Identity #1 and what it means to him to edit the anthology spotlighting Asian, Asian-American, and Pacific Islander characters and creators.

Moving Medicine
Data disaggregation: Why counting is crucial, Part I

Moving Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 56:16


There is extensive diversity among Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and consequently, their health behaviors, beliefs, and challenges deserve distinct attention. In this episode, AMA Sr. policy analyst Joaquin Baca and emergency medicine resident Dr. Anna Yap, discuss the foundation that aggregating data has set in creating health inequities in the U.S. and the need for its disaggregation for physicians to fully attend to the unique needs of AANHPI patients.

Progressive Opinions of Color (POC Podcast) - Politics and Economics with Underrepresented Voices
How AAPI Helped Swing the 2020 Election, Media Perceptions of Andrew Yang, and Mobilizing AAPI in Politics with Varun Nikore, President of the AAPI Victory Fund

Progressive Opinions of Color (POC Podcast) - Politics and Economics with Underrepresented Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 50:37


Nancy is joined by Varun Nikore, the President of the AAPI Victory Fund and Executive Director of the AAPI Victory Alliance. Varun discusses the importance of AAPI voter turnout in the 2020 election, why the AAPI vote matters, the importance of funding to turn out the AAPI vote, Andrew Yang's run for NYC Mayor,  media perceptions of AAPI candidates, and more. Varun Nikore:https://aapivictoryfund.com/leadership/varun-nikore/https://aapivictoryfund.com/https://aapivictoryalliance.com/For more than 25 years, Mr. Nikore has been involved in national, state and local politics as a campaign strategist, fundraiser and policy advisor. In 1998, Mr. Nikore was appointed to serve in the Clinton Administration.He is founder and past-President of the Indian American Leadership Initiative, the largest Indian American network of Democrats in the U.S. Varun also served as President of the Democratic Business Council of Northern Virginia from 2011-2013 and currently serves on their Board of Directors. In 2008, Varun served as a Transportation Policy Advisor for Obama for America. In 2012, he served as co-Chair of the Small Business Owners Council for the Democratic National Committee. Appointed by Governor Terry McAuliffe in 2015, Varun currently serves on the Board of the Virginia Commercial Space Flight Authority as well as the Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority. Contact Progressive Opinions of Color at:      Instagram      TwitterEmail: opinionspoc@gmail.comNancy: Website, Instagram, Twitter Welcome to Progressive Opinions of Color (POC), a podcast that creates space for people of color in conversations about economics, politics, and culture. Your host is Nancy Wu. Nancy is an Asian American woman, an economist, and a huge politics and policy nerd. Nancy triple majored in Economics, Government (Political Science) and Gender Studies at Dartmouth and has a Master's in Development Economics from Oxford. She works as an Economist full time and has previously worked in economic policy at the White House (under Obama, of course) and progressive think tanks.  The goal of this podcast is to engage the state of the economy, and other pressing topics in politics, economics, and culture, all through perspectives inclusive of the lived experiences of people of color. Whether you're new to politics or already a huge politics nerd, we hope this podcast inspires community and conversation among us. Join us in reimagining politics and economics with underrepresented voices.

Self Evident: Asian America's Stories
Self Evident Presents: “Juicy Fruit: The Ripe Time to Talk About Relationships ”(by the Dragon Fruit Podcast)

Self Evident: Asian America's Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 63:15


We're playing an episode from an exciting new podcast by our friends at APIENC, an organization that builds transgender, non-binary, and queer power for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the Bay Area (you might've heard their director, Sammie, on one of our previous episodes). The new podcast is called Dragon Fruit, and it's all about the history of trans and queer Asian and Pacific Islander organizing, some juicy conversations about love and relationships, and reclaiming space for healing. In this episode, community members explored love, intimacy, and relationships. What does love mean for each of us and what does love beyond romance look like? How has our understanding of love changed over time? And how do we navigate being in relationship with each other? Content warning: This episode mentions issues of sex, touch, and conflict. There is a gentle reminder before each section so you can skip certain parts if you like. Check out Dragon Fruit Podcast wherever you listen to podcasts! 

Charged: Stories from the Women Leading Health Care
Racism Against the Asian American and Pacific Islander Community

Charged: Stories from the Women Leading Health Care

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 36:18


Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) have faced more than 6,000 hate incidents since the start of the pandemic, which is about a 149% rise since the last year. The racially motivated incidents range from verbal harassment virus to physical attacks. In this special episode of Charged, a panel of guests discuss the history of racism against the AAPI community, how the pandemic has fueled it and why this group has been widely excluded from conversation and policy intended to foster racial equality.

Feeling Asian
I Was Told I Was Black, But Then I Found Out I Was Asian Pacific Islander (feat. Logan Sandoval, Chef)

Feeling Asian

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 59:29


Logan Sandoval is a talented chef and co-founder of Zef BBQ, which was recently named by Eater as one of California's best new restaurants. Logan grew up thinking he was Latino, then Black then discovered he was, in fact, Asian. We know it sounds confusing lol but it will all make sense once you hear Logan share his incredibly unique story. We also discuss how chefs avoid gentrification of cuisines! Follow Logan at on ig at @zef_hawaiian. Also please like, subscribe and support us on Patreon :)

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry
#StopAAPIHate with Varun Nikore of the AAPI Victory Alliance

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 35:29


As a direct result of the racist and hateful lies and rhetoric Donald Trump and his followers spread about COVID, violence and hate directed at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in this country is on a terrifying rise. We've invited Varun Nikore, Executive Director of the AAPI Victory Alliance on the show to discuss this rise and how we can fight back against this hate. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/alyssa-milano-sorry-not-sorry/message

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
549: Dr. Heidi Jannenga: Key Findings from the State of Rehab Therapy Report

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2021 43:02


In this episode, Co-Founder and CCO of WebPT, Heidi Jannenga, talks about the trends that were revealed in the State of Rehab Therapy Report done by WebPT. Today, Heidi gives an overview of the Rehab Therapy Report, and she talks about how technology has benefitted the industry, business continuity and growth, and the reality of burnout. How has the pandemic impacted business revenue, budget, and employment. Hear about the lack of diversity in the industry, the disparities in advocacy and associations, and the tech adoption boom of 2020, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways Survey results show that 77.4% of rehab professionals identify as white, 6% as Asian, 5.5% as Hispanic/Latino, 2.8% as Black/African American, and smaller percentages as American Indian, Alaskan Native, Native Hawaiian, and other Pacific Islander. “There are huge gaps in terms of not reflecting who our patients really are in every area of the nation.” “40% of the [women] respondents said that they now hold C-Level executive positions. That's a 10% improvement.” “Almost every clinic leader I talk to today are at pre-Covid numbers, and most of them are above pre-Covid numbers.” 50% of therapists, and 42% of therapy assistants reported feeling more burntout now than they did prior to the pandemic. “60% of rehab professionals said that they didn't participate in any of the numerous advocacy efforts from last year.” “Even if you disagree with some of the decisions or directions of APTA, that's all the more reason to be involved.” “It takes a lot of vulnerability and confidence to say ‘I don't know.'” “As a leader, you shouldn't have all the answers. You become a crutch to those that work with you if you're the only one who has all the answers.”   More about Heidi Jannenga Dr. Heidi Jannenga is a physical therapist and the co-founder and Chief Clinical Officer of WebPT, an eight-time Inc. 5000 honoree, and the leading software solution for physical, occupational, and speech therapists. As a member of the board and senior management team, Heidi advises on WebPT's product vision, company culture, branding efforts and internal operations, while advocating for rehab therapists, women leaders, and entrepreneurs on a national and international scale. Heidi has guided WebPT through several milestones, including three funding rounds: an angel round with Canal Partners, a venture capital round with Battery Ventures, and a private equity round with Warburg Pincus; five acquisitions; and numerous national corporate and industry awards. In 2017, Heidi was honored by Health Data Management as one of the most powerful women in IT, and she was a finalist for EY's Entrepreneur of the Year. In 2018, she was named the Ed Denison Business Leader of the Year at the Arizona Technology Council's Governor's Celebration of Innovation. She also is a proud member of the YPO Scottsdale Chapter and Charter 100 as well as an investor with Golden Seeds, which focuses on women-founded or led organizations. Her latest venture is called Rizing Tide, which is a foundation dedicated to fostering diversity and inclusiveness in the physical therapy workforce. Heidi is a mother to her 9-year-old daughter Ava, and she enjoys traveling, hiking, mountain biking, and practicing yoga in her spare time.   Suggested Keywords Covid, Survey, APTA, Rehab Therapy, Report, Data, WebPT, Diversity, Physiotherapy, Advocacy, Technology, Burnout, Business, Healthy, Wealthy, Smart,   Recommended Resources The State of Rehab Therapy 2021: https://www.webpt.com/downloads/state-of-rehab-therapy-2021 The State of Rehab Therapy Webinar: https://www.webpt.com/webinars/the-state-of-rehab-therapy-in-2021   To learn more, follow Heidi at: Website:          https://www.webpt.com Instagram:       @heidi_jannenga Twitter:            @HeidiJannenga LinkedIn:         Heidi Jannenga   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here:  Speaker 1 (00:03): Hey, Heidi, welcome to the show podcast. I'm so excited to have you on today. Speaker 2 (00:08): Thanks Karen. So excited myself to be here. So thanks for the invite. I really appreciate it. Of course. Speaker 1 (00:14): And today we're going to talk all about the key trends that were revealed in the state of rehab therapy report powered by web PT. But before we get to those trends, can you tell the listeners how all of this information was compiled? Speaker 2 (00:32): Sure. So we actually started conducting this industry-wide survey of the rehab therapy industry and what we consider rehab therapy is PT, OT, and speech back in 2017 that was the first time we released the state of rehab therapy report. And essentially we were trying, we had a lot of questions about the industry that we just honestly couldn't find the answers. And so we decided, well, we're just going to put out a survey to ask the questions we want answered topics ranged from business financials, operational structure, patient volumes, job satisfaction, technology trends, demographics, like we just really wanted to dive into sort of slice and dice the industry a little bit more as far as data goes. And we took a little bit of a pause in 2020, obviously due to COVID. But we did actually launch the survey at the end of the year. And so that's what we're talking about now. As far as the results go and we collected, I think over 6,700 responses, the majority of, of whom treat patients directly. So either as therapist or assistance, and 60% of them were from outpatient private practice. So the other 40% were from other therapists who work in other areas of the industry. So we feel like the findings really you know, give a good sort of breakdown of what's going on in the profession as a whole. Speaker 1 (02:10): Let's just dive in, then let's talk about some of those trends. So I will just kind of throw it over to you and we'll go through the major trends that you found. So let's, let's start. Speaker 2 (02:22): Yeah, let's just kick it off with something that's top of mind. I know for a lot of businesses and not just in the PT world, based on some of the occurrences within 2020, and that's really focusing on diversity. I think we've talked about it a lot that we, we all sort of know that there's this issue of lack of diversity within our profession as a whole. We're pretty much racially, very homogeneous. Our survey results showed that 77.4% of rehab professionals identify as white. Our results showed 6% identify as Asian five and a half to identify as Hispanic or Latino 2.8% identify as black or African-American. And then smaller percentages of the American Indian or Alaska native and native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander. And so if you sort of then contrast that right with the overall society of, of the U S I mean, there's just huge gaps in terms of not reflecting who our patients really are and in every area of the nation. Speaker 2 (03:42): So, you know, we, we asked a little bit of why some of the factors that are leading to that, and, and I, I think that, you know, we can sort of hypothesize a lot on, you know, the flood student recruitment. Like we're just not getting them in. We're not, for whatever reason. They don't know how cool it is to be a physical therapist. They're not attracted to it. So the recruitment is kind of broken. And so from there you just have a limited hiring pool. And so of course, you know, I think what a lot of people are sort of now attacking also is just, do we have some unconscious bias, like, do we need more training of our, our teams and recruiting processes within our own organizations to sort of eliminate and hopefully put a little more attention on trying to, to become more diverse in our employee base. Speaker 1 (04:33): Yeah. And you know, like you said, that this is not unexpected to continue to show this lack of diversity and, and yeah. Where, where does this start? Does this start with recruiting teenagers out of high school, into undergrad and then recruiting from undergrad into grad school? Is it exposing more you know, people of color just to the profession in general? You know, there are some people doing great job with that, like Jasmine tools in Southern New Jersey. I don't know if you know Jasmine, but she created a girl scout badge, a physical therapy girl scout badge. And she works mainly with girl scout troops in inner cities in Philadelphia. So you've got all these young girls who now know what physical therapy is because they're getting their physical therapy badge. Speaker 2 (05:25): That's awesome. I love that. Yeah. And we need more of that obviously happening at an earlier age to just, I mean, we've talked a lot about it. I knew you've talked about it on this podcast about sort of the brand problem of actually attracting patients in, but that also is reflected in attracting amazing people of all, you know races, color, everything like, you know, into our profession as a whole. Now I will say Karen, that we did see something positive you know, we, you and I have talked a lot about sort of the misrepresentation of women in leadership within our profession. And we did see a pretty good uptick. We we've also always talked about it in terms of you know, 70% of therapists are women and yet only 30% of them hold any kind of leadership position whether it's clinic, director or above manager. But we did see that number go up from where it was. And so 40% of the respondents said that they now hold a C level executive positions, which I thought was mean that's a 10% improvement. So huge. That was awesome to see. Speaker 1 (06:45): Yeah. I love hearing that. That's a huge, that's a huge jump. 10%. Excellent. Well, that's a, that's definitely a positive. Okay. So let's go to another trend that came out of this report and it has to do with technology. So can you expand on that? Speaker 2 (07:04): Yeah. So I'm sure that a lot of your listeners can relate. Telehealth was an explosion that had to happen during COVID. We were all stuck at home and people were in the midst of rehab, some hurt themselves doing, you know, working out at home using their, their Peloton or whatever it was, and they still needed therapy. It wasn't like people stopped needing PT, right. Or rehab therapy. And so tele-health exploded. So the use of, of platform tele-health technology platforms spiked significantly over the last year, although we saw about 75% of clinics that actually implemented tele-health during this time, we've now seen that number completely plummet down to two pretty low numbers. So people are going back to status quo. Now that most cities and states are, have opened back up. So it's going to be interesting to see how this trend continues. Speaker 2 (08:14): I do a whole tangent, we could do a whole nother podcast, I'm sure on how do you, how can we put, how can tell a health be you lies a, from a patient experience perspective, but also from a reimbursement payment perspective, like how do we make sure that is there, is there a hybrid potential in the future to, in, in my assessment, reach more people like we, you know, we always talk about the 90% problem, right? If 90% of patients who have a diagnosis that could be beneficial in rehab therapy, aren't getting to us. So how do we expand that opportunity? Tele-Health has it, has it, has the potential to be a of that? Yeah. I experienced Speaker 1 (08:57): That over. COVID that exact thing now I still am. I am still using tele-health because I'm in New York city as a lot of people know, and there are still people who are like, not, not just not comfortable, you know? Right. So I'm still using it. But what I found was that, so I have a cash based practice. And so some people were like, Ooh, it's a little pricey. Do you have a way around this? And I said, well, why don't we do one session in person? And then we can move to tele-health and maybe do half hour sessions on tele-health, which will be less expensive. Right. And it was a great mix. I do that. I did that a lot with kids. I mean, you can't keep a kid's attention for more than a half an hour in person or on telehealth and teenager, forget it. Right. So I found, oh, this is a perfect use of tele-health. So it's, it's still allows me to create the revenue I need for my business. And it's certainly a less expensive option. And I would argue a very very convenient and, and maybe just the perfect option for that subset of people. Speaker 2 (10:04): Yeah. I agree. I'm, I'm very much in favor of understanding the patient experience and the flexibility that telehealth can allow patients. Right. I think that there's just a lot of discussion right now on how do we get paid for that? Right. And whether or not does it tele-health is, should we be paid the same amount as an in-person in-person visit versus a tele-health visit? And I think it's still up in the air. Like, I, I, I fully can see it from both sides. Right. but to your point, the expense side of what your, your cost as a individual business owner on tele-health is significantly less. Right. And you could, the volume of people that you can kind of stack up to be able to see is significantly more. Right. And so, I guess also the, there's still a lot to be known about the outcome, right. Speaker 2 (11:03): Is it truly beneficial for the patient experience? Because, you know, there's, there's data now coming out that telehealth is actually expanding the utilization of care of in-person. So people aren't getting Nessus it's, it's increasing the number of visits in a episode of care because it's not taking the place of in-person it's adding to in person. Right. So we still need to understand and pull the data 2020 to understand how it fully impacted. Cause you know, insurances are always leery about adding more visits and paying out a little bit more for treatment, but if the outcomes are better, that to me always speaks volumes as Speaker 1 (11:48): Well. Yeah, absolutely. Now, was there any other technology aside from tele-health that reported being used more like, were there any apps or any, you know, other types of, of tech or was tele-health really the, the main thing? Speaker 2 (12:04): Well, telehealth was the big one. But I think there were a lot more folks that decided to ramp up their direct access marketing efforts. So I thought that was really interesting, like in order to, to keep in contact with your patients, right. And also keep some volume coming in. Again, we, it, it sort of pushed people in areas that they knew they should be doing, but now had the opportunity to do during this sort of time. You know, we, we were talking a lot about it at web PT. This is the time to work on your business when maybe you can't work in your business. Right. And so we saw, you know, marketing significantly ramp up for a lot of clinics, whether it was, you know, working on their website to their digital marketing strategy things like that. Speaker 2 (12:59): And then figuring out some different ways to offer more non-traditional services, whether that's, you know, like you cash-based services, ride share you know, nutritional counseling, like additives sort of things to their repertoire of services that they could add add on additionally to the clinic, which, you know, all great things. So I think it's just expanding the opportunity for more revenue streams through the use of technology mainly via their site or zoom or, you know, other things where they can have a larger audience all at one time versus having to only have a few that you had to physically come into the practice. So that's really cool to see. Speaker 1 (13:49): Yeah. I think it COVID sort of forced people to think outside the box. So instead of just sticking with, well, it's been working and then all of a sudden, wait a second, this literally can't work at the moment. So what do we have to do? So it may be, it, it sparks some more creative thinking from people. Absolutely. Yeah. That's a good thing. Speaker 2 (14:10): That's a good thing right. Out of your, out of your proverbial Speaker 1 (14:14): Box. Yeah. Yeah. And, and oftentimes you'll have business growth from that, which leads us to our next point. Let's talk about what a great segue let's talk about. Business continuity and growth, which when I read this, I was like a little boy. So go ahead. Let's talk about that. Speaker 2 (14:35): Okay. Well, as you can imagine, it was a bit of a mixed bag, right? I mean, there were quite a few unfortunate closed doors that happened at practices. It was also a huge opportunity for some of our larger organizations, enterprise organizations in the profession to continue with their consolidation and bringing more clinics into the fold. But we did find, you know, we, we've been doing a lot of education over the years on the business side and really have talks about how important it is to have that rainy day fund of, you know, at least three months of expenses. Now we all know that COVID happened longer than that. We've been under this COVID umbrella for longer than that, but truly having to close your doors probably did not have to happen for more than 90 days, depending on what state you were in, but essential, we were essential workers. Speaker 2 (15:32): Right. So, you know, the bright side of that was that I think 38% of leaders that took the survey said they did have that. So 40% of respondents said, yep, we had what we needed to do. We hunker down, we did some of that. There's other things that we could outside of the box during that time. Right. and we survived. Right. And so that, to me, it was just really heartwarming to see, like you hear horror stories and other industries, restaurant, and other things where man, they just suffered big time. Right. And so it was good to see that from the private practice sector there were still significant amount of businesses that were remained viable during this time found ways to continue on with some other revenue streams. And as a matter of fact, 34% of our clinic leaders said they were already starting to open more practices and locations within the next five years. Speaker 2 (16:37): So they're not, you know, struggling right now. And as you know even though our visits completely plummeted for a few months, like they quickly ramped back up and almost every clinic leader that I talked to today are at cope pre COVID numbers. And most of them are above COVID numbers. They can't keep up with the volume right now for the most part, so good problems to have. I'm just excited that, you know, again, we we were at the forefront of, of essential workers helping people in need, whether it was specifically in orthopedic you know, rehab, but also there's so many great stories of how clinics, you know, were out there helping folks. And now we have the post COVID long haulers that we're now getting into our practices. So the value of PT did not dwindle during this time, which is, which is great to see. Yeah, Speaker 1 (17:38): Absolutely. And now, as we talk about these clinics ramping up and more patients coming in and more work for the PTs, well, oftentimes you can kind of see where I'm going here that can lead to burnout. So talk about the, the topic of burnout that you found within this report. Speaker 2 (17:59): Well, this was a problem pre COVID, so it's not even anything super new. We we've continued to report on this. It can, you know, the, the slope is on the RA is going in the wrong direction. Based on our, our, our survey 50% of therapist and 42% of therapy assistants reported feeling more burned out now than they did prior to the pandemic. Most of them cited reasons for that burnout or fear of contracting COVID and just reminder, you know, this survey was taken at early this year, end of last year. So we were still sort of in the thick of things changes in their work hours and sort of change in the whole overall clinic morale. Speaker 2 (18:51): We're all experiencing some, you know, mental health sort of pieces fall out great word fallout from all of this. Right. And so, as you can imagine, that was reflected in the survey. So, you know, at the, at the same time, even though they reported this, this burnout most of them have said that they obviously still love our industry. They don't have any necessarily thoughts of, of potentially leaving. Although we do, we are seeing some, a little bit of that. I think just like every other industry, when you couldn't work, people picked up their heads and said, Hmm, what else is out there? And we are seeing, you know, a few, a few more percentages of people looking outside of clinical care, which I I'm, I don't think is necessarily a bad thing to, to continue, you know, projecting a, an awesome brand for PT professionals. But outside or doing things now in nonclinical care nonclinical work. Speaker 1 (20:00): Yeah. And I've definitely seen a lot. I've seen that sort of trend as well as moving away from patient care and going into nonclinical roles, which, like you said, there's nothing wrong with that. You have to do what feels good for you. What, what advice would you give to a PT who is maybe they are one of those 50% who are feeling burnout or feeling like we hope it's not feeling apathetic towards the profession and their patients, but that is part of, of the burnout feeling burned out. Is that real, like apathy for just doing the job? So what advice would you have? Speaker 2 (20:48): Yeah. You know, most of the time and I'll speak to myself and when I feel burned out, I have to get back to the root of passionate around why I'm doing it. Why, why do I love, why, why did I get into this in the first place? What is my purpose sort of in being a PT and you know, and figure out, you know, what's causing, what are the root causes of, of, of these feelings of burnout? Is it the current position I'm in? Do I just not like who I'm working for? Do my values, not line up with my employer. Like some of these things like people, you just, you still feel so lucky to have a job sometimes during time. And then, and then now that, you know, things are kind of opening back up. I think a lot of people are coming out of COVID experiencing like, holy crap. Speaker 2 (21:38): Like, what am I doing with my life? They they've lost their family members. They've lost friends. Like it's, it's kind of this wake up call for a lot of people to say, holy crap, what am I doing with my life? Like, is this really what I want to do and love to do? And so you see a lot of people struggling with that and maybe not perhaps loving what, where they are and what they're doing. And so they're kind of in this burnout phase and I, again, this was taken in like December, January, right? You've been hunkered down for a whole year with not a positive end in sight, even at that point. Right. I mean, it's starting to come out of it. So things were kind of doom and gloom in the country. We're just transitioning out of, you know, a present presidential race. Speaker 2 (22:27): There was a lot of change and a lot of turmoil going on in the, in the country at that point in time. So I think that's also reflected here, Karen. I would say this is probably similar to what you might ask any average American during this time. Right. So I would just take that into consideration as we look at these numbers, but you know, one of the things we didn't talk about here with regard to demographics is also just the, the student debt that is still a, such a huge problem in our profession. And it's just, it's not getting any better necessarily. And so again, compounding your student debt on top of, oh my gosh, do I really love my job? Like, there's an COVID and everything else, like, there's just you just, you feel kind of in despair. Right. And so I think that's, what's really reflected here again. What would I tell people I'm like, again, go back to the roots. Like what, what do you, why do you love what you do? Or why, why do, what did you get into this profession to do and find a path to be able to make that happen? Speaker 1 (23:40): Yeah. It's like you said, it's sort of stress upon stress upon stress with uncertainty. Yes. And that's really difficult for people, especially when you have a boatload of student loans and wait, no, one's hiring now. Right. When this was taken, when the survey was taken, we weren't at those pre COVID levels yet because the vaccine hadn't been widespread yet. And so yeah, I can understand why a lot of people felt burnout and, and quite honestly, I agree with you, I would say 50% plus of Americans felt burned out at that time as well. Speaker 2 (24:20): Yeah. And, and going back to some of the COVID impacts, like when the survey was taken, you know, our survey results showed that a lot of clinics were in that uncertainty phase of not exactly knowing when they were going to actually meet or exceed or even get close to their budget that they had projected for 20, 21. Right. And so there were cutbacks being made perhaps, you know raises were on hold. Right. There's just a lot of factors as an employee or as a therapist that you're kind of like that uncertainty really does not make you feel good. Right. So I think all of that is reflected. I mean, there's so many facets that that can be reflected in that burnout number, especially after the year we just had. Speaker 1 (25:07): Yeah. Yeah. It's not just one thing. It's a lot. Yeah. It's a lot. Okay. Is there, what were, are there any other sort of major trends from the report that we didn't hit on yet that you want to make sure the listeners get? Speaker 2 (25:22): Well, you know, I'm a huge advocate on advocacy as you are. And you know, we always kind of want to know, like where, and how are people doing advocacy? How do they get involved with the profession? How did they get involved to, to stand up for where the profession and no, no difference in, in years past, you know, the, unfortunately the PTA and the OTA and even ashes to some point, Ashleigh actually has done a fabulous job as far as galvanizing their SLP base. But AP TA and, and almost 50% of those responded to our, our survey said that they were either not members or had no intention of being members. Cause they didn't feel like it added value for the cost of, of being a member. And so, you know, from an advocacy perspective I, it was also a dismal number to sit to show that 60% of rehab professionals said that they didn't participate in any of the numerous advocacy efforts from last year, Speaker 3 (26:43): Which was Speaker 2 (26:45): Again to my heart. I will say though, that that is a significantly yeah. Lower number, which is still sad because we did rally a lot of people last year around the 9% cuts and all of that. I think more people than ever, I guess, if you look at the, you know, the positive side of this, more people than ever did get involved whether it was, you know, to provide tele-health to have an avenue for more for revenue, the 9% cuts, you know, all of those things definitely rallied folks to become more involved, but we still have, you know, to your words earlier, some apathetic PTs that just don't understand, maybe it's just don't even understand how advocacy works. They don't feel like they have time. It doesn't make a difference, like all the excuses that people want to give. So it's always a point of contention for me, whether it's, you know, if you want to be a member, I believe everybody should be a member of the PTA. Speaker 2 (27:45): It's your association. They represent all everyone in, in the profession as a whole. I know they struggle because it's just, there's so many opportunities for PT and, and specializations within our profession that everybody wants to raise their hand and say, you need to represent me. But at the end of the day, we're all physical therapists and that's what we need to, I feel like we must come back to and so, and also with the PT pack, you know, and, and having been a previous trustee, I know how hard it is to in the small, small percentages of people that do contribute to this hugely important effort of how advocacy has to be done in meetings and people knowing who you are as an association and as a group, and why it's so important to, to not have cuts to our profession. Right. I mean, they are just ignorant to, to essentially what we do on a regular basis and how much we get paid for it, or lack thereof. Speaker 1 (28:56): Yeah. And, and what I would say to people listening, even if you disagree with some of the decisions or directions of a PTA, that's all the more reason to be involved so that your vote, your voice can be heard. And, and maybe you can change some of those things that you don't like. I mean, I understand it's a slow ship to steer. It's a big organization. Like, you know, it's not like a nimble small private practice owner who can change things on a dime, you know, but it is a big ship to steer, but the more and more people, especially younger therapists that can get involved and have their voices heard. I think that there's a good to make a difference Speaker 2 (29:43): For sure. And I, I think just understanding how you can get involved, whether it's, there's lots of ways to be involved, even if it's financial for now, or maybe a kind of, maybe it's just time, like there's lots of different ways to, to add your voice and your voice does matter. And I think that more than ever is important to, for people to understand. I think we had the most it's not just even therapist's voices, but patient voices. We had the most number of patients that was something we, we rallied so well with this year is to get the patient voice heard with regards to the 9% cut, especially on the Medicare side. And so I think that was pretty impressive and made a huge, huge impact with the legislators, with regard to the effect and why we've had some significant progress in, in mitigating those cuts. Speaker 1 (30:40): Yeah. And oftentimes, like you can be involved in like the easiest way possible by just like going onto a website and putting in your zip code, finding the people and pressing a button and it sends it up. Like to me, it sends it off to like Chuck Schumer and, and Kiersten Gillibrand. And I don't know. Yeah. Speaker 2 (31:01): It's so easy. Even if you don't know who your legislators are, the apt [inaudible] like, there's so many sites now that are help making this so much easier to become involved to, to, to lend your voice right. In a way that is super impactful and only takes a couple minutes. Yeah. Speaker 1 (31:24): If that, and you don't have to be a member to do that yes. Nor do your parents or your friends tune in seconds and it's free. And if you have a smartphone, it literally takes two seconds and a LA it's all pre-written. So, yeah, I agree. I think positive advocacy efforts are so needed and like you said, they, they make a difference, you know? So, okay. I think we talked about a lot. We talked about diversity technology, COVID advocacy business growth. Anything else that really jumps out at you from this report? Speaker 2 (32:09): No. I think those are the big highlights. You know, we look forward to, to now be able to compare this is a a great sort of slice in time, immediately post kind of post COVID bef just immediately prior to the, you know, getting back to quote unquote normal as far as visit numbers and things like that. So we definitely look forward to doing this again next year. So I, your listeners to participate in the future again, to get your voice heard and to, to really be able to reflect more of what's going on in the industry. Speaker 1 (32:53): Yeah. I think it's great. And where can people find this report if they wanted to read the whole thing? Speaker 2 (33:00): Yeah. If you go to web pt.com/state of rehab therapy or if you just go to our blog page you'll find it and it's a free to download. It's actually a 60 page report full of graphics. And like, if you're a data nerd, like dive in, because they're there, we have sliced and diced it and made this beautiful. Our team is just awesome. And did a lot of work to, to make this digestible from anyone, even if you're not a data nerd to bring out the highlights. And then also Karen, we're going to be doing a webinar coming up in just a couple of weeks. So you'll find that on our website as well. You can sign up for the webinar. We'll, we'll go in much deeper depth as far as the details of, of more of these topics that you and I have talked about today. Speaker 1 (33:57): Excellent. Excellent. And they can, all that can be found on the web PT website. Yep. Perfect. And where can people find you on social media, things like that if they want to follow you or get in touch or ask you questions? Yeah, Speaker 2 (34:12): I'm on LinkedIn. I'm also on Instagram at hydrogen Nanga. So it's J a N N E N GA. And yeah, happy to engage on social, do it quite a bit, especially on via LinkedIn. So love to connect with any of your listeners. Speaker 1 (34:31): Excellent. And then finally, last question. What advice knowing where you are now in your life and career, what advice would you give to your younger self? Maybe you're that PT right out of PT school. Speaker 2 (34:47): Yeah. it's a great question, man. I have to reflect back quite a few years when I was a young TT now. But I think that the biggest piece of advice I would give is really around not thinking that you have to have all the answers. So I had a hard time when I first came out of the, I felt like, okay, I'm a, I'm a physical therapist. Now I'm in front of my patient. That credibility of any question they have are going to ask me, I have to know the answer. And that's not always, that's not true, actually the, the ability to say, I'm not sure that gets, let me get back to you and truly providing research, great response versus an off the cuff, maybe not perfect response. I think sometimes it can be so much more valuable in your overall long-term credibility with that, that particular patient or other therapist or leader. Speaker 2 (35:59): It takes a lot of vulnerability to say, I don't know. And a lot of confidence to say, I don't know, but I wish I would have been able to do that maybe a little bit more on the beginning and not felt the pressure of having to feel like I needed to know all the answers because Lord knows, I didn't know all the answers back in the day. I still don't know them today. Right. And you know, one of the other interesting things, just from a, as my growth, as a leader in this same sort of vein is what I've learned over time is that as a leader, you shouldn't have all the answers, right? It's my people come to me now and they've learned over time, like you become a crutch to those that work with you or for you. If you're the only one who has all the answers, right. Versus putting it back on to them to say, well, what do you think? Like, what do you think the answer is? Coming to me with solutions, not just a problem. And so to me, that's training and bringing in new leaders. I learned that from, from a leader who was a mentor to me quite a few years ago. And so that's another sort of way that now I've shifted that same response from a leadership perspective. Speaker 1 (37:24): Oh my gosh. I could talk all day on this from a leadership perspective who may have to do another podcast on it. So I think people would love it. Well this was Heidi, this was great. Thank you so much such good, good information for anyone in any of the rehab therapies, PT, OT speech to download this report, dive in and, and use this report for your own business or your own practice, you know, that's what these reports are for, right. To kind of not just look at it and say, oh, that was cool report, but to actually use the report and use it to be a guide maybe to your business or to your practice. Yes. Speaker 2 (38:04): Yeah. That's exactly right. Like how, how in your business decision trends that you're seeing in industry that you can validate some of your decision-making on is exactly why we've, we've put this out there to the public with no cost to you. Like it's, it's really just to, to benefit and give back to this industry that we love so much and want to see flourish. So Karen, thank you so much for having me. I really appreciate the opportunity. Congratulations on all your, can't say enough, how awesome you are with your advocacy and as an influencer and, and true thought leader in our industry. So thanks for everything you're doing with this podcast and, and, and all of your other ventures. It's, it's awesome to watch you and see how much of an impact you've been able to have in our profession. Speaker 1 (38:57): Thank you. That's so nice making me blush aside from the large scratch for my cat on my cheek, where it's already red. Thank you so much. I really appreciate that. And everyone, thank you so much for listening to this episode, go download the report today. We'll have all the links to it at the podcast at podcast on healthy, wealthy, smart.com under this episode. Thanks for tuning in, have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy, and smart.  

The Double Shift
Our Moms

The Double Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 43:15


Katherine and Angela have built their careers thinking about motherhood, career and identity. Today, we hear from the Double Shifters who have influenced them most — their own mothers.   Angela interviews Kay Goldstein about her trailblazing careers (plural!) as a second wave feminist, how she looks back at her life as a mom in the workforce now, and the lessons she shared with Katherine about not leaving anything on the table. Josie Garbes tells Katherine about her experiences as an immigrant who found her calling as a hospice nurse, the complexities of caring for the dying at work while raising three kids at home, and her new interest in activism during this time of targeted violence toward Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Turns out, the influence between mother and daughter is truly a two-way street. Thanks: Listen to Home. Made. a podcast that explores the meaning of home and what it can teach us about ourselves and each other, wherever you get your pods. https://link.chtbl.com/homemade?sid=podcast.thedoubleshift Listen to Goodnight, World, an original podcast from Headspace Studios designed to get kids age 3-6 to sleep by the end of each adventure. https://link.chtbl.com/goodnightworld?sid=doubleshift Need a COVID-19 Vaccine? Go to vaccines.gov.  https://www.vaccines.gov/

The NPR Politics Podcast
Weekly Roundup: April 23rd

The NPR Politics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2021 27:58


In a 94-to-1 vote, the Senate passed a bill aimed at reducing hate crimes directed at Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. And more than half of American adults have received at least one dose of a coronavirus vaccine; reaching the rest will be harder.This episode: White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional reporter Claudia Grisales.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.orgJoin the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Listen to our playlist The NPR Politics Daily Workout.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station. Lauren Sommer.

Stay Tuned with Preet
Asian American Life and Death (with Viet Thanh Nguyen and Janelle Wong)

Stay Tuned with Preet

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2021 63:44


On this week’s episode of Stay Tuned, “Asian American Life and Death,” Preet answers listener questions about prosecutorial conduct in the Derek Chauvin murder trial and the allegations against Congressman Matt Gaetz.  Then, Preet interviews Viet Thanh Nguyen and Janelle Wong.  Nguyen is the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist of The Sympathizer and its new sequel, The Committed. He is also the Aerol Arnold Chair of English and an English Professor at the University of Southern California. Wong is a political scientist and a Professor of American and Asian American studies at the University of Maryland. She’s also a Senior Researcher at AAPI Data, where she collects demographic data and policy research on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.   After the March 16th killing of six Asian American women in Atlanta, Nguyen and Wong penned a joint op-ed for the Washington Post that outlined how bipartisan rhetoric about geopolitical events has historically led to spikes in violence against Asians and Asian Americans.   In the Stay Tuned bonus, Nguyen and Wong discuss the importance of Asian American representation in popular culture, including in the cult 2004 comedy Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle.  To listen, try the CAFE Insider membership free for two weeks and get access to the full archive of exclusive content, including the CAFE Insider podcast co-hosted by Preet and Anne Milgram.  For show notes and a transcript of the episode, head to: cafe.com/stay-tuned/asian-american-life-and-death-with-viet-thanh-nguyen-and-janelle-wong/ Listen to the entirety of Doing Justice, Preet’s new free six-part podcast based on his bestselling book of the same name. You can hear Preet’s stories from his time as U.S. Attorney on Apple Podcasts (apple.co/doingjustice), Spotify (spoti.fi/3p9Xwja) or wherever you get your podcasts. To listen to Stay Tuned bonus content, become a member of CAFE Insider at: CAFE.com/Insider  Sign up to receive the CAFE Brief, a weekly newsletter featuring analysis by Elie Honig, a weekly roundup of politically charged legal news, and historical lookbacks that help inform our current political challenges: CAFE.com/Brief. As always, tweet your questions to @PreetBharara with hashtag #askpreet, email us at staytuned@cafe.com, or call 669-247-7338 to leave a voicemail. Stay Tuned with Preet is produced by CAFE Studios.  Executive Producer: Tamara Sepper; Senior Editorial Producer: Adam Waller; Technical Director: David Tatasciore; Audio Producer: Matthew Billy; Editorial Producers: David Kurlander, Noa Azulai, Sam Ozer-Staton. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.