Podcasts about Dublab

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Best podcasts about Dublab

Latest podcast episodes about Dublab

Big Table
Episode 42: Nick Drnaso

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 28:51


Nick Drnaso, acclaimed author of Sabrina, is back with Acting Class, his third book on Drawn & Quarterly. A tapestry of disconnect, distrust, and manipulation, Acting Class brings together 10 strangers under the tutelage of John Smith, a mysterious and morally questionable leader. The group of social misfits and restless searchers have one thing in common: They are all out of step with their surroundings and desperate for a change.With mounting unease, the class sinks deeper into Smith's lessons, even as he demands increasing devotion. When the line between real life and imagination begins to blur, the group's fears and desires are laid bare. Exploring the tension between who we are and how we present, Drnaso cracks open his characters' masks and takes us through an unsettling American journey.Like Sabrina—the first graphic novel short-listed for the Man Booker Prize—Drnaso's latest offering is an extremely sharp study of our everyday existence and how we live. His minimalist comic-drawing style is nevertheless awash in a cinematic haze of melancholy and the color palette is hued in a realism that is uniquely his.  A friend handed me Sabrina, several years ago, knowing I was somewhat of an outsider in the realm of underground comic culture, telling me, “You will love the book in the same way you love certain novels.” And he was right.While Drnaso is revered all over the world for his bleak honestness and sly, dark humor, he grew up in the suburbs of Chicago. Although we are of different generations, the subtlety of his style is familiar to me as a fellow Midwesterner and Chicagoan.Notably, this is Big Table's first episode centered around a graphic novel. It's certainly a change from our focus on nonfiction books, but Drnaso's storytelling pulls so effortlessly from real life that one feels his characters are meta comics versions of people encountered in our everyday lives.Here's my conversation with Nick Drnaso discussing his new book, Acting Class.Music by Japan

Beats of All-Nations
DJ Gabe Real & Mike Styles | Beats of All-Nations Radio 074 Live on Dublab

Beats of All-Nations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 114:19


After a month off, DJ Gabe Real and Mike Styles return with the goods for an end of summer 'cool down'. Enjoy a heavy stack of new music and some deep international digs in this two hour dig. This show is dedicated to the eternal sound and memory of our brother Nectali "Sumohair" Diaz.

Live at dublab Radio
Veranda Culture — dublab's 21st anniversary (10.03.20)

Live at dublab Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 19:57


Veranda Culture performed live for the very first time at the dublab 21st Anniversary. All new music performed at his loft studio in Melbourne, Australia, alongside close friend and studio partner Luke Coleman. Veranda Culture is a musical project established by Australian electronic music artist and dublab resident DJ Griffin James (known mostly for his work under his Francis Inferno Orchestra). The project emerged in 2017 with a album and record label that was a compelling escape from the regular programming of James's previously known works, trading off late night dance music for an emotive bed of sound that is hard to pin down but effortless to absorb as a whole. For the past 3 years since its entrance in to the music sphere (while remaining in a low key state of existence), little trickles of new music and teasers of a follow up VC album have appeared via the projects Bandcamp and on social media platforms but nothing with complete confirmation. Watch the video youtu.be/0dwvP0gbpbA dublab is a listener supported radio station, consider becoming a Sustaining Member today: www.dublab.com/support/memberships

G Talks!
Gulniyal - gtalks! radio w/ Gemma Castro

G Talks!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 59:52


In this episode of gtalks! radio, Gulniyal presents an interview with Gemma Castro, a Mexican-American artist and audio engineer working at the intersection of sound and video. Gemma has self released music and has had compositions placed in a Netflix, public television, and commercials. She has also performed and DJ'd extensively at venues including the Getty, Zebulon, and Red Bull Music Festival. As an installation artist, she has shown her work and participated in collaborations at Vincent Price Art Museum, MASS MocA, and Human Resources (description provided by Gemma Castro). Artist IG: https://www.instagram.com/gemmacastro__/ Radio IG: https://www.instagram.com/gtalksradio/ Dublab: https://www.dublab.com/shows/gtalks-radio Promo Picture Credit: https://www.instagram.com/michel.alanis_/

Big Table
Episode 41: Ada Calhoun and Frank Ohara, Her Father and the New York School of Poets and Painters

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 20:48


In her latest book, Also a Poet: Frank O'Hara, My Father, and Me (Grove Atlantic, 2022), Ada Calhoun traces her fraught relationship with her father, New Yorker art critic Peter Schjeldahl, and their shared obsession with the poet Frank O'Hara. The book features exclusive material from archival recordings of literary and art world legends, living and dead.Having stumbled upon old cassette tapes of interviews her father had conducted for his never-completed biography of O'Hara, Calhoun set out to finish the book he had started 40 years earlier. As a lifelong O'Hara fan who grew up amid his bohemian cohort in the East Village, she thought the project would be easy, even fun, but the deeper she dove, the more difficult it became: Calhoun had to confront not just O'Hara's past, but also her father's and her own.The result is a kaleidoscopic memoir that weaves compelling literary history with the moving, honest, and tender story of a complicated father-daughter bond. In reckoning with her unique heritage, as well as providing new insights into the life of one of our most important poets, Calhoun has offered a brave and hopeful meditation on parents and children, artistic ambition, and the complexities of what we leave behind. For the Reading, Ada Calhoun reads from Also a Poet: Frank O'Hara, My Father, and Me.Music by Ryuichi Sakamoto**Other audio:Frank O'Hara reads Ode to Joy:Frank O'Hara Reads His Poems 

Big Table
Episode 40: Alexandra Lange on America's Malls

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 24:17


In The Design of Childhood, acclaimed writer, architecture critic, and historian Alexandra Lange uncovered the histories of toys, classrooms, and playgrounds. Lange now turns her sharp eye to another subject we thought we knew. Chronicling the invention of the mall by postwar architects and merchants, Lange reveals how the design of these marketplaces played an integral role in their cultural ascent. Meet Me By the Fountain: An Inside History of the Mall (Bloomsbury, 2022) is Lange's perceptive account of how these shopping centers became strange and rich with contradiction. In it, Lange describes America's malls as places of freedom and exclusion—but also as places of undeniable community, and rampant consumerism.Few places have been as nostalgized, or as maligned, as shopping malls. Since their birth in the 1950s, they have loomed large as temples of commerce. In their prime, they proved a powerful draw for creative thinkers such as Joan Didion, Ray Bradbury, and George Romero, who understood the mall's appeal as critics and consumers. Yet today, amid the aftershocks of financial crises and a global pandemic, as well as the rise of online retail, the dystopian husk of an abandoned shopping center has become one of our era's defining images. Conventional wisdom holds that the mall is dead. But what was the mall, anyway? And have rumors of its demise been greatly exaggerated?Here's Episode 40: The Big Table conversation with architecture critic, writer, and historian Alexandra Lange, discussing Meet My by the Fountain.Reading by Alexandra LangeMusic by OMD

Live at dublab Radio
La ReDaDa — dublab's 21st anniversary (10.03.20)

Live at dublab Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 21:08


Listen in and watch La ReDaDa's special live performance, created specially for dublab's 21st anniversary celebration. La ReDaDa is a musical multi-region commando and danzón sextet located in the remains of Mexico City´s colonia de Los Doctores. Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yffgoyptv6U&list=PLwv1SuXh4kHx4MlmcDYjKKeTHEwGROqln&index=7

Big Table
Episode 39: Ben Shattuck on Thoreau

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 27:21


A 170-plus years ago, Henry David Thoreau began his legendary hermit walks in New England. Many of these walks were published later as some of his most cherished works as a naturalist: Walden, The Maine Woods, and Cape Cod.Artist, writer and New England native Ben Shattuck does the same in Six Walks: In the Footsteps of Henry David Thoreau, published by Tin House Books, which charts six journeys taken by Shattuck, each one inspired by a walk once taken by Thoreau. With little more than a loaf of bread, brick of cheese, and a notebook, Shattuck sets out to retrace Thoreau's path through the Cape's outer beaches, from the elbow to Provincetown's fingertip.After the Cape, Shattuck walks down the coastline of his hometown, and then through the Allagash. Along the way, he encounters unexpected characters, landscapes, and stories, seeing for himself the restorative effects that walking can have on a dampened spirit. Shattuck finds himself uncovering new insights about family, love, friendship, and fatherhood, and understanding more deeply the lessons walking can offer through life's changing seasons.Shattuck splits his time between Los Angeles and Coastal Massachusetts, where he also runs a Davoll's General Store in Dartmouth. We caught up during the Spring to discuss his first book, Thoreau and the therapeutic nature of walking.Reading by Ben ShattuckMusic by Jürgen Müller

Quotomania
Quotomania 303: C. P. Cavafy

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 2:23


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!C.P. Cavafy is widely considered the most distinguished Greek poet of the 20th century. He was born on April 29, 1863, in Alexandria, Egypt, where his Greek parents had settled in the mid-1850s, and died on the same day in 1933. During his lifetime Cavafy was an obscure poet, living in relative seclusion and publishing little of his work. A short collection of his poetry was privately printed in the early 1900s and reprinted with new verse a few years later, but that was the extent of his published poetry. Instead, Cavafy chose to circulate his verse among friends.Cavafy is the leading poet of the periphery, writing in Greek far from Greek lands. The body of his poetry includes the 154 poems of the “canon”; 37 “repudiated poems,” most of which are juvenilia written in romantic katharevousa; 75 “hidden” poems that were found finished in his papers; and 30 “unfinished” poems. His poems often feature historical figures or creations of the poet's imagination, with frequent references to elements of Homeric, Hellenistic, and Byzantine years. Today, his poetry occupies a prominent place in both Greek and world literature.You may read the complete C. P. Cavafy bio here https://cavafy.onassis.org/creator/cavafy-c-p/and discover the digital collection of the Cavafy Archive here https://cavafy.onassis.org/.From https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/c-p-cavafy and https://cavafy.onassis.org/creator/cavafy-c-p/.For more information about C. P. Cavafy:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Daniel Mendelsohn about Cavafy, at 11:50: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-096-daniel-mendelsohn“Che Fece … Il Gran Rifiuto”: https://www.onassis.org/initiatives/cavafy-archive/the-canon/che-fece-il-gran-rifiuto“Cavafy Archive”: https://www.onassis.org/initiatives/cavafy-archive/The Collected Poems, translation by Evangelos Sachperoglou: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-collected-poems-9780199555956?cc=us&lang=en&

Quotomania
Quotomania 302: Lucille Clifton

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 2:02


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Lucille Clifton (1936–2010) was an American poet known for her work focusing on the African American experience and family life. Winner of the National Book Award and the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, Clifton is the only author to have two books of poetry nominated for a Pulitzer Prize in the same year. She is best known for her collections Two-Headed Woman, Next, Good Woman, and Quilting. In addition to her several poetry collections, Clifton also wrote numerous books for children, including her Everett Anderson series.From https://www.nyrb.com/collections/lucille-clifton. For more information about Lucille Clifton:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Thelma Golden about Clifton, at 25:22: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-174-thelma-goldenHow to Carry Water: Selected Poems of Lucille Clifton: https://www.boaeditions.org/products/how-to-carry-water-selected-poems-of-lucille-clifton“Lucille Clifton”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/lucille-clifton“Listening for Ms. Lucille”: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2020/08/13/listening-for-ms-lucille/

Quotomania
Quotomania 301: Primo Levi

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 2:36


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Primo Levi, (born July 31, 1919, Turin, Italy—died April 11, 1987, Turin), was an Italian-Jewish writer and chemist, noted for his restrained and moving autobiographical account of and reflections on survival in the Nazi concentration camps.Levi was brought up in the small Jewish community in Turin, studied at the University of Turin, and graduated summa cum laude in chemistry in 1941. Two years later he joined friends in northern Italy in an attempt to connect with a resistance movement, but he was captured and sent to Auschwitz. While there, Levi worked as a slave labourer for an I.G. Farbenindustrie synthetic-rubber factory. Upon the liberation of Auschwitz by the Soviets in 1945, Levi returned to Turin, where in 1961 he became the general manager of a factory producing paints, enamels, and synthetic resins; the association was to last some 30 years.Levi's first book, Se questo è un uomo (1947; If This Is a Man, or Survival in Auschwitz), demonstrated extraordinary qualities of humanity and detachment in its analysis of the atrocities he had witnessed. His later autobiographical works, La tregua (1963; The Truce, or The Reawakening) and I sommersi e i salvati (1986; TheDrowned and the Saved), are further reflections on his wartime experiences. Il sistema periodico (1975; The Periodic Table) is a collection of 21 meditations, each named for a chemical element, on the analogies between the physical, chemical, and moral spheres; of all of Levi's works, it is probably his greatest critical and popular success. He also wrote poetry, novels, and short stories. A court in Turin ruled his death in 1987 a suicide, a verdict broadly accepted but debated by some. The Complete Works of Primo Levi (2015) contains English translations of his entire oeuvre, including pieces never previously available to Anglophone readers.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Primo-Levi. For more information about Primo Levi:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Edward Hirsch about Levi, at 11:05: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-173-edward-hirschIf this Is a Man: https://www.amazon.com/This-Man-Truce-Primo-Levi/dp/0349100136“The Art of Witness”: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/09/28/the-art-of-witness“Why Primo Levi Survives”: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/12/why-primo-levi-survives/413134/

Quotomania
Quotomania 300: Janet Malcolm

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 2:25


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Janet Malcolm (1934–2021) was the author of many books, including In the Freud Archives; The Journalist and the Murderer; Two Lives: Alice and Gertrude, which won the 2008 PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography; and Forty-One False Starts, which was a finalist for the 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism. She was a frequent contributor to The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books. In 2017, Malcolm received the Gold Medal for Belles Lettres and Criticism from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.From https://us.macmillan.com/author/janetmalcolm. For more information about Janet Malcolm:Forty-one False Starts: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374534585/forty-one-false-starts“Thoughts on Autobiography from an Abandoned Autobiography”: https://www.nybooks.com/daily/2010/03/25/thoughts-on-autobiography-from-an-abandoned/“The Legacy of Janet Malcolm and Her Journalistic Masterworks”: https://newrepublic.com/article/162790/legacy-janet-malcolm-journalism-masterworks

Quotomania
Quotomania 299: F. Scott Fitzgerald

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 1:57


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!F. Scott Fitzgerald, (born Sept. 24, 1896, St. Paul, Minn., U.S.—died Dec. 21, 1940, Hollywood, Calif.) was a U.S. novelist and short-story writer. Fitzgerald attended Princeton University but dropped out with bad grades. In 1920 he married Zelda Sayre (1900–48), daughter of a respected Alabama judge. His works, including the early novels This Side of Paradise (1920) and The Beautiful and Damned (1922) and the story collections Tales of the Jazz Age (1922) and All the Sad Young Men (1926), capture the Jazz Age's vulgarity and dazzling promise. His brilliant The Great Gatsby (1925; film, 1926, 1949, 1974; TV movie 2001), a story of American wealth and corruption, was eventually acclaimed one of the century's greatest novels. In 1924 Scott and Zelda became part of the expatriate community on the French Riviera, the setting of Tender Is the Night (1934; film, 1962). His fame and prosperity proved disorienting to them both, and he became seriously alcoholic. Zelda never fully recovered from a mental breakdown in 1932 and spent most of her remaining years in a sanitarium. In 1937 Scott moved to Hollywood to write film scripts; the experience inspired the unfinished The Last Tycoon (1941; film, 1976). He died of a heart attack at age 44.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/F-Scott-Fitzgerald. For more information about F. Scott Fitzgerald:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Pico Iyer about Fitzgerald, at 04:35: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-004-pico-iyer“Essay: The Crack-Up”: https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/f-scott-fitzgerald-essay-the-crack-up/1028/The Crack-Up: https://www.ndbooks.com/book/the-crack-up/“F. Scott Fitzgerald: That Sad Young Man”: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1926/04/17/that-sad-young-man

Quotomania
Quotomania 298: Hart Crane

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 1:39


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Harold Hart Crane was born on July 21, 1899 in Garrettsville, Ohio and began writing verse in his early teenage years. Though he never attended college, Crane read regularly on his own, digesting the works of the Elizabethan dramatists and poets William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, John Donne and the nineteenth-century French poets Charles Vildrac, Jules Laforgue, and Arthur Rimbaud. His father, a candy manufacturer, attempted to dissuade him from a career in poetry, but Crane was determined to follow his passion to write.Living in New York City, he associated with many important figures in literature of the time, including Allen Tate, the novelist and short story writer Katherine Anne Porter, E. E. Cummings, and Jean Toomer, but his heavy drinking and chronic instability frustrated any attempts at lasting friendship. An admirer of T. S. Eliot, Crane combined the influences of European literature and traditional versification with a particularly American sensibility derived from Walt Whitman. His major work, the book-length poem, The Bridge, expresses in ecstatic terms a vision of the historical and spiritual significance of America. Like Eliot, Crane used the landscape of the modern, industrialized city to create a powerful new symbolic literature.Hart Crane died by suicide on April 27, 1932, at the age of thirty-two, while sailing back to New York from Mexico.From https://poets.org/poet/hart-crane. For more information about Hart Crane:“Hart Crane”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/hart-craneThe Complete Poems of Hart Crane: https://wwnorton.com/books/9780871401786“A Discussion with Hart Crane”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/browse?volume=29&issue=1&page=46

Beats of All-Nations
DJ Gabe Real & Mike Styles | Beats of All-Nations Radio 073 Live on Dublab

Beats of All-Nations

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 119:57


Gabe Real and Mike Styles are back representing for the team. Gabe sonically takes us to new places and spaces with his trademark mix of funky new music from around the globe and Mike Styles digs deeper into the vintage Brazilian selections direct from the source in the second hour. We're kicking off this episode with the palate cleansing song of the summer, "Let the Sunshine In" by Jimetta Rose and The Voices of Creation from the upcoming release HOW GOOD IT IS.

Quotomania
Quotomania 296: Simone Weil

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 2:21


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Simone Weil, (born February 3, 1909, Paris, France—died August 24, 1943, Ashford, Kent, England), was a French mystic, social philosopher, and activist in the French Resistance during World War II, whose posthumously published works had particular influence on French and English social thought.To learn the psychological effects of heavy industrial labour, she took a job in 1934–35 in an auto factory, where she observed the spiritually deadening effect of machines on her fellow workers. In 1936 she joined an anarchist unit near Zaragoza, Spain, training for action in the Spanish Civil War, but after an accident in which she was badly scalded by boiling oil, she went to Portugal to recuperate. Soon thereafter Weil had the first of several mystical experiences, and she subsequently came to view her social concerns as “ersatz Divinity.” After the German occupation of Paris during World War II, Weil moved to the south of France, where she worked as a farm servant. She escaped with her parents to the United States in 1942 but then went to London to work with the French Resistance. To identify herself with her French compatriots under German occupation, Weil refused to eat more than the official ration in occupied France. Malnutrition and overwork led to a physical collapse, and during her hospitalization she was found to have tuberculosis. She died after a few months spent in a sanatorium.Weil's writings, which were collected and published after her death, fill about 20 volumes. Her most important works are La Pesanteur et la grâce (1947; Gravity and Grace), a collection of religious essays and aphorisms; L'Enracinement (1949; The Need for Roots), an essay upon the obligations of the individual and the state; Attente de Dieu (1950; Waiting for God), a spiritual autobiography; Oppression et Liberté (1955; Oppression and Liberty), a collection of political and philosophical essays on war, factory work, language, and other topics; and three volumes of Cahiers (1951–56; Notebooks). Though born of Jewish parents, Weil eventually adopted a mystical theology that came very close to Roman Catholicism. A moral idealist committed to a vision of social justice, Weil in her writings explored her own religious life while also analyzing the individual's relation with the state and God, the spiritual shortcomings of modern industrial society, and the horrors of totalitarianism.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Simone-Weil. For more information about Simone Weil:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Naveen Kishore about Weil, at 15:38: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-007-naveen-kishoreNaomi Shihab Nye about Weil, at 06:17: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-073-naomi-shihab-nye“The Iliad, or the Poem of Force”: http://biblio3.url.edu.gt/SinParedes/08/Weil-Poem-LM.pdfWar and the Iliad: https://www.nyrb.com/products/war-and-the-iliad?variant=1094933081“Simone Weil”: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/simone-weil/

Quotomania
Quotomania 295: Lou Reed

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2022 1:47


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Lou Reed, byname of Lewis Allan Reed, (born March 2, 1942, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.—died October 27, 2013, Southampton, New York), was a singer-songwriter whose place in the rock pantheon rests primarily on his role in guiding the Velvet Underground, a New York City-based quartet that produced four poor-selling but enormously influential studio albums under Reed's direction from 1965 to 1970.After quitting the Velvets, he reemerged as a solo performer in England, where he was adopted by admirers such as glam rock pioneer David Bowie, who produced and performed on Reed's breakthrough hit, “Walk on the Wild Side” (1973), and Mott the Hoople, who covered Reed's Velvets classic “Sweet Jane.” His albums embraced everything from rote pop to heavy metal and included an orchestrated song cycle about a sadomasochistic love affair, Berlin (1973), and a double album of guitar drones, Metal Machine Music (1975), that are among his most notorious works. At the onset of the 1980s, Reed recruited his finest post-Velvets band, including guitarist Robert Quine and bassist Fernando Saunders, and reimmersed himself in raw guitar rock on The Blue Mask (1982), addressing his fears, ghosts, and joys with riveting frankness. No longer bedeviled by his addictions, Reed adopted a more-serious if less-daring tone on his recordings, peaking with three releases that were less concept albums than song cycles: New York (1989), about the spiritual death of his hometown; Songs for Drella (1990), an elegy for his 1960s mentor, Pop art conceptualist Andy Warhol, done in collaboration with former Velvets bandmate John Cale; and Magic and Loss (1991), inspired by the deaths of two friends. A romantic relationship with American performance artist and musician Laurie Anderson rejuvenated him again in the mid-1990s, resulting in the playful Set the Twilight Reeling (1997) and the harder-hitting Ecstasy (2000).In 2000–01 Reed collaborated with director Robert Wilson to bring to the stage POEtry, which was based on the work of Edgar Allan Poe. The songs from the show were also packaged, with spoken-word interludes, on The Raven (2003)—an ambitious if critically panned experiment. It was followed by Animal Serenade(2004), an excellent live recording that echoed Reed's landmark 1974 concert album Rock 'n' Roll Animal. In 2006 Reed celebrated New York City in a book, Lou Reed's New York, which collected his photography. Reed was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Velvet Underground in 1996 and as a solo performer in 2015.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Lou-Reed. Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:“I'll Be Your Mirror”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZudHYTya-dQ“I'll Be Your Mirror Lyrics”: https://genius.com/The-velvet-underground-ill-be-your-mirror-lyrics“Lou Reed, 1942-2013”: https://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/28/arts/music/lou-reed-dies-at-71.html

Quotomania
Quotomania 294: Ingeborg Bachmann

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 2:26


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Ingeborg Bachmann, (born June 25, 1926, Klagenfurt, Austria—died Oct. 17, 1973, Rome, Italy), was an Austrian author whose somber, surreal writings often deal with women in failed love relationships, the nature of art and humanity, and the inadequacy of language. Bachmann grew up in Kärnten during World War II and was educated at the Universities of Graz, Innsbruck, and Vienna. She received a doctoral degree in philosophy from Vienna in 1950. Bachmann's literary career began in earnest in 1952, when she read her poetry to members of the avant-garde Gruppe 47. She produced two volumes of verse, Die gestundete Zeit (1953; “Borrowed Time”), about the sense of urgency produced by the passage of time, and Anrufung des grossen Bären (1956; “Invocation of the Great Bear”), featuring poems of fantasy and mythology. Of her several radio plays, the best known is Der gute Gott von Manhattan (1958; “The Good God of Manhattan” in Three Radio Plays). First broadcast on May 29, 1958, it is about a couple attacked by a covert group that seeks to destroy all traces of love.Following Bachmann's five landmark lectures on literature at the University of Frankfurt in 1959–60, she shifted her focus from poetry to fiction. During this period she also wrote the libretti for Hans Werner Henze's operas Der Prinz von Homberg (1960; from a play by Heinrich von Kleist) and Der junge Lord(1965; from a fable by Wilhelm Hauff). Among her prose writings are Das dreissigtse Jahr(1961; The Thirtieth Year) and the lyrical novel Malina (1971; Eng. trans. Malina). She also published essays, stories, and more radio plays. Her death by fire may have been a suicide.Much attention was given to Bachmann's work both in her lifetime and after her death, and several of her writings were translated into English. A volume of selected poems, In the Storm of Roses, was published in 1986; it was the inspiration for Elizabeth Vercoe's composition In the Storm: Four Songs on Texts by Ingeborg Bachmann for medium voice, clarinet, and piano. Some of Bachmann's stories were translated in Three Paths to the Lake (1989), and a bilingual edition of her collected poems, translated and introduced by Peter Filkins, was published as Songs in Flight(1995). Fragments of two novels intended to complete the trilogy begun with Malina were translated and published together in a single volume entitled The Book of Franza & Requiem for Fanny Goldmann (1999).From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ingeborg-Bachmann. For more information about Ingeborg Bachmann:“Every Day”: https://www.guernicamag.com/ingeborg_bachmann_7_1_11/“Ingeborg Bachmann”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/ingeborg-bachmann“Feminize Your Canon: Ingeborg Bachmann”: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2019/07/09/feminize-your-canon-ingeborg-bachmann/

Quotomania
Quotomania 293: Hafez

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 3:35


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Persian lyric poet Hafez, or Hafiz, (born Khwāja Šamsu d-Dīn Muḥammad Hāfez-e Šīrāzī) grew up in Shiraz. Very little is known about his life, but it is thought that he may have memorized the Qur'an after hearing his father recite passages. When his father died, he left school to work at a bakery and as a copyist. Hafiz became a poet at the court of Abu Ishak and also taught at a religious college. He is one of the most celebrated of the Persian poets, and his influence can be felt to this day. As the author of numerous ghazals expressing love, spirituality, and protest, he and his work continue to be important to Iranians, and many of his poems are used as proverbs or sayings. Hafiz's tomb is in Musalla Gardens in Shiraz.From https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/hafez. For more information about Hafez:A Year with Hafiz: Daily Contemplations: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/305695/a-year-with-hafiz-by-renderings-of-hafiz-by-daniel-ladinsky/“Hafez”: https://poets.org/poet/hafez#poet__works

Quotomania
Quotomania 292: Eugenio Montale

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Eugenio Montale was born into a family of businessmen in Genoa, Italy, on October 12, 1896. During World War I, he served as an infantry officer on the Austrian front. Orginially Montale had trained to be an opera singer, but when his voice teacher died in 1923, he gave up singing and concentrated his efforts on writing.After his first book, Ossi di seppia (Cuttlefish Bones), appeared in 1925, Montale was received by critics as a profoundly original and experimental poet. His style mixed archaic words with scientific terms and idioms from the vernacular. He was dismissed from his directorship of the Gabinetto Vieusseux research library in 1938 for refusing to join the Fascist party. He withdrew from public life and began translating English writers such as Shakespeare, T. S. Eliot, Herman Melville, and Eugene O'Neill. In 1939, Le occasioni (The Occasions) appeared, his most innovative book, followed by La bufera e altro (The Storm and Other Things, 1956). It was this trio of books established him as a founder of the hermetic school of Italian poetry.In 1948 he moved from Florence to Milan, where he became chief literary critic for Italy's primary newspaper, Corriere della Sera. In addition to writing poems, Montale was also a prolific essayist, writer of stories and travel sketches, distinguished music critic, translator, and amateur painter. He corresponded with Ezra Pound (despite Pound's Fascist sympathies), Italo Svevo, and Salvatore Quasimodo. In 1961, Montale was awarded an honorary degree at the University of Rome and shortly afterwards, at the universities of Milan, Cambridge, and Basel. In recognition of his work, as well as his courageous opposition to fascism, he was made a lifetime member of the Italian Senate in 1967.After a long break from writing poetry, Montale published four collections during the last ten years of his life: Satura (Miscellany, 1971), Diario del '71 e del '72 (Diary of 1971 and 1972, 1973), Quaderno di quattro anni (Notebook of Four Years, 1977), and Altri versi e poesi disperse (Other and Uncollected Poems, 1981). In 1975 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature "for his distinctive poetry which, with great artistic sensitivity, has interpreted human values under the sign of an outlook on life with no illusions." Montale died in Milan in 1981 at the age of 85.From https://poets.org/poet/eugenio-montale. For more information about Eugenio Montale:From “Cuttlefish Bones/Movements” collection, The Collected Poems, 1920-1954: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374533281“Eugenio Montale”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/eugenio-montale“Eugenio Montale”: https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/literature/1975/montale/biographical/

Big Table
Episode 38: Paul Morley on Tony Wilson

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 27:31


To write about Tony Wilson, aka Anthony H. Wilson, is to write about a number of public and private characters and personalities, a clique of unreliable narrators, constantly changing shape and form. At the helm of Factory Records and the Haçienda, Wilson unleashed landmark acts such as Joy Division and New Order into the world as he pursued myriad other creative endeavors, appointing himself a custodian of Manchester's legacy of innovation and change.To writer, broadcaster and cultural critic Paul Morley he was this and much more: bullshitting hustler, flashy showman, aesthetic adventurer, mean factory boss, self-deprecating chancer, intellectual celebrity, loyal friend, shrewd mentor, insatiable publicity seeker. It was Morley to whom Wilson left a daunting final request: to write this book.From Manchester with Love, then, is the biography of a man who became one with his hometown of Manchester, England—the music he championed and the myths he made, of love and hate, of life and death. In the cultural theatre of Manchester, Tony Wilson broke in and took center-stage.Morley has written about music, art and entertainment since the 1970s. He wrote for the New Musical Express from 1976 to 1983. A founding member of the Art of Noise and a member of staff at the Royal Academy of Music, he collaborated with Grace Jones on her memoirs and is the author of a number of books about music, including The Age of Bowie, his history of classical music A Sound Mind, and a biography of Bob Dylan, You Lose Yourself, You Reappear.Our man in London, Dermot McPartland, fills in for interviewing duties and helps Morley unpack the many minds and lives of Tony Wilson. Here's Dermot's conversation with Paul Morley. Reading by Paul MorleyMusic by Joy Division

Quotomania
Quotomania 291: Kenneth Koch

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Kenneth Koch was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on February 27, 1925. He studied at Harvard University, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree, and attended Columbia University for his PhD. As a young poet, Koch was known for his association with the New York School of poetry. Originating at Harvard, where Koch met fellow students Frank O'Hara and John Ashbery, the New York School derived much of its inspiration from the works of action painters Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, and Larry Rivers, whom the poets met in the 1950s after settling in New York City. The poetry of the New York School represented a shift away from the Confessional poets, a popular form of soul-baring poetry that the New York School found distasteful. Instead, their poems were cosmopolitan in spirit and displayed not only the influence of action painting, but of French Surrealism and European avant-gardism in general. In 1970 Ron Padgett and David Shapiro edited and published the first major collection of New York School poetry, An Anthology of New York Poets, which included seven poems by Koch.Koch's association with the New York School worked, in effect, as an apprenticeship. Many critics found Koch's early work obscure, such as Poems (1953), and the epic Ko, or A Season on Earth (1959), yet remarked upon his subsequent writing for its clarity, lyricism, and humor, such as in The Art of Love (1975), which was praised as a graceful, humorous book. His other collections of poetry include New Addresses (Alfred A. Knopf, 2000), winner of the Phi Beta Kappa Poetry Award and a finalist for the National Book Award; Straits (1998); One Train and On the Great Atlantic Rainway, Selected Poems 1950-1988 (both published in 1994), which together earned him the Bollingen Prize in 1995; Seasons of the Earth (1987); On the Edge (1986); Days and Nights (1982); The Burning Mystery of Anna in 1951 (1979); The Duplications (1977); The Pleasures of Peace(1969); When the Sun Tries to Go On (1969); Thank You (1962); and Seasons on Earth(1960).Koch's short plays, many of them produced off- and off-off-Broadway, are collected in The Gold Standard: A Book of Plays. He has also published Making Your Own Days: The Pleasures of Reading and Writing Poetry (Scribners, 1998); The Red Robins (1975), a novel; Hotel Lambosa and Other Stories (1993); and several books on teaching children to write poetry, including Wishes, Lies and Dreams and Rose, Where Did You Get That Red? Koch wrote the libretto for composer Marcello Panni's The Banquet, which premiered in Bremen in June 1998, and his collaborations with painters have been the subject of exhibitions at the Ipswich Museum in England and the De Nagy Gallery in New York. His numerous honors include the Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry, awarded by the Library of Congress in 1996, as well as awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters and the Fulbright, Guggenheim, and Ingram-Merrill foundations. In 1996 he was inducted as a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Kenneth Koch lived in New York City, where he was professor of English at Columbia University. Koch died on July 6, 2002, from leukemia.From https://poets.org/poet/kenneth-koch. For more information about Kenneth Koch:“Kenneth Koch”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/kenneth-kochThe Collected Poems of Kenneth Koch: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/94568/the-collected-poems-of-kenneth-koch-by-kenneth-koch/“An Interview with Kenneth Koch”: https://writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/koch.html

Quotomania
Quotomania 290: Jan Morris

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Journalist, historian, and travel writer, Jan Morris was the renowned author of more than forty books. Her work ranges from such classics as Pax Britannica, The World of Venice, Hong Kong, and The Matter of Wales to the masterly essays published in Journeys, Destinations, and Among the Cities. She has also written a novel, Last Letters from Hav. An Honorary Litt.D. of the University of Wales and Glamorgan, a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE), she lived in Wales. Jan Morris died in 2020.From https://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Jan-Morris/1287676. For more information about Jan Morris:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Pico Iyer about Morris, at 24:20: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-004-pico-iyerJan Morris on A Phone Call From Paul: https://a-phone-call-from-paul.simplecast.com/episodes/a-phone-call-from-paul-23-jan-morrisTrieste and the Meaning of Nowhere: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Trieste-and-the-Meaning-of-Nowhere/Jan-Morris/9781439136935“The Many Lives of Jan Morris”: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/25/books/jan-morris-in-my-minds-eye.html

Quotomania
Quotomania 289: Virgil

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Virgil, or Vergil orig. Publius Vergilius Maro, (born Oct. 15, 70 BCE, Andes, near Mantua—died Sept. 21, 19 BCE, Brundisium), was the Greatest of Roman poets. The well-educated son of a prosperous provincial farmer, Virgil led a quiet life, though he eventually became a member of the circle around Octavian (later Caesar Augustus) and was patronized by Maecenas. His first major work, the 10 pastoral Eclogues (42–37), may be read as a prophecy of tranquility, and one has even been read as a prophecy of Christianity. The Georgics (37–30) point toward a Golden Age in the form of practical goals: the repopulation of rural lands and the rehabilitation of agriculture. His great epic, the Aeneid (begun c. 29, but unfinished at his death), is one of the masterpieces of world literature. A celebration of the founding of Rome by the legendary Aeneas at the request of Augustus, whose consolidation of power in 31–30 unified the Roman world, it also explores the themes of war and the pathos of unrequited love. In later centuries his works were regarded in the Roman Empire as virtually sacred. He was taken up reverently by Christians as well, including Dante, who, in his poem The Divine Comedy, made Virgil his guide through hell and purgatory.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Virgil. For more information about Virgil:“Virgil”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/virgilThe Aeneid: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/291193/the-aeneid-by-virgil-translated-by-robert-fagles-introduction-by-bernard-knox/“Public Lives; A Bridge Between the Classics and the Masses”: https://www.nytimes.com/2004/04/13/nyregion/public-lives-a-bridge-between-the-classics-and-the-masses.html

Quotomania
Quotomania 288: Baltasar Gracián

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Baltasar Gracián, in full Baltasar Gracián y Morales, (born January 8, 1601, Belmonte de Calatayud, Spain—died December 6, 1658, Tarazona), was a philosopher and writer known as the leading Spanish exponent of conceptism (conceptismo), a style of dealing with ideas that involves the use of terse and subtle displays of exaggerated wit.After studying at Calatayud and Zaragoza, Gracián entered the Jesuit order at the age of 18 and later became rector of the Jesuit college at Tarragona. His early works—El héroe (1637; The Hero), El discreto (1646; The Compleat Gentleman), and El oráculo manual y arte de prudencia (1647; The Art of Worldly Wisdom: A Pocket Oracle)—were largely efforts to educate people in the ethics of worldly life. His literary ideas on conceptism and the art of conceited writing (writing that continually shocks the reader by the use of startling metaphor) were clearly set forth in Agudeza y arte de ingenio (1642, 2nd ed. 1648; “Subtlety and the Art of Genius”). In defiance of his superiors, he published pseudonymously El criticón (1651, 1653, 1657; The Critick), a three-part philosophical novel considered by the 19th-century German pessimistic philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer one of the most important books ever written. In it he examined society from the standpoint of a savage and gave the clearest statement of his pessimistic philosophy with its emphasis on willpower and struggle. From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Baltasar-Gracian.  For more information about Baltasar Gracián: The Art of Worldly Wisdom: A Pocket Oracle: ​​https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-art-of-worldly-wisdom-baltasar-gracian/1139765748?bvstate=pg:2/ct:r “The Art of Prudence”: https://fs.blog/art-of-prudence/ 

Quotomania
Quotomania 286: Marina Tsvetaeva

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva (also Marina Cvetaeva and Marina Tsvetayeva) was born in Moscow. During her lifetime she wrote poems, verse plays, and prose pieces; she is considered one of the most renowned poets of 20th-century Russia. Tsvetaeva's life coincided with turbulent years in Russian history. She married Sergei Efron in 1912; they had two daughters and later one son. Efron joined the White Army, and Tsvetaeva was separated from him during the Civil War. She had a brief love affair with Osip Mandelstam, and a longer relationship with Sofia Parnok. During the Moscow famine, Tsvetaeva was forced to place her daughters in a state orphanage, where the younger, Irina, died of hunger in 1919. In 1922 she emigrated with her family to Berlin, then to Prague, settling in Paris in 1925. In Paris, the family lived in poverty. Sergei Efron worked for the Soviet secret police, and Tsvetaeva was shunned by the Russian expatriate community of Paris. Through the years of privation and exile, poetry and contact with poets sustained Tsvetaeva. She corresponded with Rainer Maria Rilke and Boris Pasternak, and she dedicated work to Anna Akhmatova.In 1939 Tsvetaeva returned to the Soviet Union. Efron was executed, and her surviving daughter was sent to a labor camp. When the German army invaded the USSR, Tsvetaeva was evacuated to Yelabuga with her son. She hanged herself on August 31, 1941.Critics and translators of Tsvetaeva's work often comment on the passion in her poems, their swift shifts and unusual syntax, and the influence of folk songs. She is also known for her portrayal of a woman's experiences during the “terrible years” (as the period in Russian history was described by Aleksandr Blok). Collections of Tsvetaeva's poetry translated into English include Selected Poems of Marina Tsvetaeva, translated by Elaine Feinstein (1971, 1994). She is the subject of several biographies as well as the collected memoirs No Love Without Poetry (2009), by her daughter Ariadna Efron (1912–1975).From https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/marina-tsvetaeva. For more information about Marina Tsvetaeva:“A kiss on the forehead”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/poems/55422/a-kiss-on-the-forehead“Translator's Notes: Eight Poems by Marina Tsvetaeva”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poetrymagazine/articles/145547/translator39s-note-ldquoan-attempt-at-jealousyrdquo-by-marina-tsvetaevaDark Elderberry Branch: Poems of Marina Tsvetaeva: https://www.alicejamesbooks.org/bookstore/dark-elderberry-branch

Quotomania
Quotomania 285: Franz Kafka

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Franz Kafka, (born July 3, 1883, Prague, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary—died June 3, 1924, Kierling, near Vienna, Austria), was a Czech writer who wrote in German. Born into a middle-class Jewish family, he earned a doctorate and then worked successfully but unhappily at a government insurance office from 1907 until he was forced by a case of tuberculosis to retire in 1922. The disease caused his death two years later. Hypersensitive and neurotic, he reluctantly published only a few works in his lifetime, including the symbolic story The Metamorphosis (1915), the allegorical fantasy In the Penal Colony (1919), and the story collection A Country Doctor (1919). His unfinished novels The Trial (1925), The Castle (1926), and Amerika (1927), published posthumously against Kafka's wishes, express the anxieties and alienation of 20th-century humanity. His visionary tales, with their inscrutable mixture of the normal and the fantastic, have provoked a wealth of interpretations. Kafka's posthumous reputation and influence have been enormous, and he is regarded as one of the great European writers of the 20th century.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Franz-Kafka. For more information about Franz Kafka:“Kafka, the Artist”: https://lareviewofbooks.org/article/kafka-the-artist/“On Translating Kafka's ‘The Metamorphosis'”: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/on-translating-kafkas-the-metamorphosis“Franz Kafka”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g4LyzhkDNBM

Quotomania
Quotomania 284: Mahmoud Darwish

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 1:46


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Palestinian Mahmoud Darwish was born in al-Birwa in Galilee, a village that was occupied and later razed by the Israeli army. Because they had missed the official Israeli census, Darwish and his family were considered “internal refugees” or “present-absent aliens.” Darwish lived for many years in exile in Beirut and Paris. He is the author of over 30 books of poetry and eight books of prose, and earned the Lannan Cultural Freedom Prize from the Lannan Foundation, the Lenin Peace Prize, and the Knight of Arts and Belles Lettres Medal from France.In the 1960s Darwish was imprisoned for reciting poetry and traveling between villages without a permit. Considered a “resistance poet,” he was placed under house arrest when his poem “Identity Card” was turned into a protest song. After spending a year at a university of Moscow in 1970, Darwish worked at the newspaper Al-Ahram in Cairo. He subsequently lived in Beirut, where he edited the journal Palestinian Affairs from 1973 to 1982. In 1981 he founded and edited the journal Al-Karmel. Darwish served from 1987 to 1993 on the executive committee of the Palestinian Liberation Organization. In 1996 he was permitted to return from exile to visit friends and family in Israel and Palestine.Mahmoud Darwish's early work of the 1960s and 1970s reflects his unhappiness with the occupation of his native land. Carolyn Forché and Runir Akash noted in their introduction to Unfortunately It Was Paradise (2003) that “as much as [Darwish] is the voice of the Palestinian Diaspora, he is the voice of the fragmented soul.” Forché and Akash commented also on his 20th volume, Mural: “Assimilating centuries of Arabic poetic forms and applying the chisel of modern sensibility to the richly veined ore of its literary past, Darwish subjected his art to the impress of exile and to his own demand that the work remain true to itself, independent of its critical or public reception.” Mahmoud Darwish died in 2008 in Houston, Texas.From https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/mahmoud-darwish. For more information about Mahmoud Darwish:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Fatima Bhutto about Darwish, at 19:15: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-116-fatima-bhutto“Mahmoud Darwish”: https://poets.org/poet/mahmoud-darwishIn the Presence of Absence: https://archipelagobooks.org/book/in-the-presence-of-absence/“Mahmoud Darwish”: https://bombmagazine.org/articles/mahmoud-darwish/

Quotomania
Quotomania 283: G. K. Chesterton

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!G.K. Chesterton was an English writer, philosopher, and theologian who lived and wrote at the turn of the 20th century. He was a prolific writer, producing fiction and nonfiction along with essays, poetry, and plays. Chesterton is best known for his creation of the priest-detective character Father Brown and for his book Orthodoxywhich has become a classic of Christian apologetics.From https://us.macmillan.com/author/gkchesterton. For more information about G. K. Chesterton:“G. K. Chesterton”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/g-k-chesterton“The Troubling Genius of G. K. Chesterton”: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2008/07/07/the-back-of-the-world

Quotomania
Quotomania 282: Philostratus, the Athenian

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Flavius Philostratus, (born AD 170—died c.245) was a Greek writer of Roman imperial times who studied at Athens and some time after AD 202 entered the circle of the philosophical Syrian empress of Rome, Julia Domna. On her death he settled in Tyre.Philostratus's works include Gymnastikos, a treatise dealing with athletic training; Ērōïkos(“Hero”), a dialogue on the significance of various heroes of the Trojan War; Epistolai erōtikai(“Erotic Epistles”), one of which was the inspiration for the English poet Ben Jonson's To Celia(“Drink to me only with thine eyes”); and two sets of descriptions (ekphraseis) of paintings of mythological scenes, attributed to two men named Philostratus, possibly the well-known figure and his grandson. Flavius Philostratus's Bioi sophistōn (Lives of the Sophists) treats both the Sophists of the 5th century BC and the later philosophers and rhetoricians of the Second Sophistic, a name coined by Philostratus to describe the art of declamation in Greek as practiced in the Roman Empire from the time of Nero (AD 54–68) to Philostratus's own day.Philostratus's work on the life of the Pythagorean philosopher Apollonius of Tyana (1st century AD), which was commissioned by Julia Domna, is revealing of religious attitudes in a transitional period. His idealized portrait of Apollonius as an ascetic miracle worker was taken up with enthusiasm by the pagan elites of the next centuries—when Christianity had become of political significance—as a counter figure to the Christian Jesus. In Philostratus's moderately Atticizing prose (i.e., aspiring to the Classical style of 5th-century-BC Athens and opposed to the florid and bombastic style of Greek associated especially with Asia Minor), formal elegance was a way to give new significance and validity to the traditional cultural heritage of the pagan Greek world.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Flavius-Philostratus. For more information about Philostratus, the Athenian:“The Life of Apollonius of Tyana”: https://www.loebclassics.com/view/LCL017/2005/volume.xml“Life of Apollonius 8”: https://www.livius.org/sources/content/philostratus-life-of-apollonius/philostratus-life-of-apollonius-8.7.vi-x/Lives of the Sophists: https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674991491

Quotomania
Quotomania 281: Fran Lebowitz

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Fran Lebowitz is a writer and social commentator. Her essays and interviews offer her acerbic views on current events and the media – as well as pet peeves including tourists, baggage-claim areas, after-shave lotion, adults who roller skate, children who speak French, or anyone who is unduly tan. The New York Times Book Review calls Lebowitz an "important humorist in the classic tradition."Her first book, a collection of essays titled Metropolitan Life, was a bestseller, as was a second collection, Social Studies. By turns ironic, facetious, deadpan, sarcastic, wry, wisecracking, and waggish, Lebowitz's prose is wickedly entertaining. Her two books are collected in The Fran Lebowitz Reader, with a new preface by the author. The Fran Lebowitz Reader has been published in nine languages including French, Korean, Russian, Spanish, and Turkish. Lebowitz is also the author of the children's book, Mr. Chas and Lisa Sue Meet the Pandas.Between 2001 to 2007, Lebowitz had a recurring role as Judge Janice Goldberg on the television drama Law & Order. She also had a part in the Martin Scorsese-directed film, The Wolf of Wall Street (2013). She can also be seen in various documentary films including the American Experienceseries on New York City, as well as Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures (2016), Regarding Susan Sontag (2014), and Superstar: The Life and Times of Andy Warhol(1990), among others. In 2010 Martin Scorsese directed a documentary about Lebowitz for HBO titled Public Speaking. A limited documentary series, Pretend It's a City, also directed by Martin Scorsese, premiered on Netflix in 2021, and was nominated for the 2021 Emmys in the Outstanding Documentary Or Nonfiction Series category.Lebowitz was named to Vanity Fair's International Best Dressed List Hall of Fame in 2008. She remains a style icon. Lebowitz lives in New York City, as she does not believe that she would be allowed to live anywhere else.From https://franlebowitz.com/bio. For more information about Fran Lebowitz:The Fran Lebowitz Reader: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/99063/the-fran-lebowitz-reader-by-fran-lebowitz/“Fran Lebowitz is Never Leaving New York”: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/the-new-yorker-interview/fran-lebowitz-is-never-leaving-new-york“Fran Lebowitz: A Humorist at Work”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/1931/a-humorist-at-work-fran-lebowitz

Quotomania
Quotomania 280: Graham Greene

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Graham Greene, (born Oct. 2, 1904, Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, Eng.—died April 3, 1991, Vevey, Switz.), British author. After studying at the University of Oxford, he converted to Roman Catholicism in 1926. Beginning c. 1930 he worked principally as a freelance journalist for several decades, during which he traveled widely. Stamboul Train (1932; also titled Orient Express; film, 1934) was the first of his “entertainments,” thrillers with considerable moral complexity and depth; others included A Gun for Sale (1936; also titled This Gun for Hire; film, 1942), The Confidential Agent (1939; film, 1945), and The Third Man (1949; film, 1949). His finest novels—Brighton Rock (1938; film, 1948), The Power and the Glory (1940; film, 1962), The Heart of the Matter(1948; film, 1954), and The End of the Affair (1951; film, 1999)—all have distinctly religious themes. Several of his novels set in “third-world” nations on the brink of political upheaval were also adapted as films.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Graham-Greene. For more information about Graham Greene:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Julian Sands about Greene, at 02:35: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-013-julian-sandsMeredith Monk about Greene, 06:50: ​​https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-meredith-monk-054David Harrington about Greene, 09:10: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-073-david-harringtonThe Power and the Glory: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/321542/the-power-and-the-glory-by-graham-greene-introduction-by-john-updike/“Graham Greene, The Art of Fiction No. 3”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/5180/the-art-of-fiction-no-3-graham-greene“Where to start with Graham Greene's Books”: https://www.penguin.co.uk/articles/2019/10/where-to-start-reading-graham-greene

Quotomania
Quotomania 279: Mae West

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Mae West, original name Mary Jane West, (born August 17, 1893, Brooklyn, New York, U.S.—died November 22, 1980, Los Angeles, California), was an American stage and film actress, a sex symbol whose frank sensuality, languid postures, and blasé wisecracking became her trademarks. She usually portrayed women who accepted their lives of dubious virtue with flippant good humor.West made her debut with a Brooklyn stock company about 1901, and by 1907 she had become a performer on the national vaudeville circuit in partnership with Frank Wallace. She made her Broadway debut as a singer and acrobatic dancer in the revue A la Broadway in 1911. For the next 15 years she alternated between vaudeville and Broadway shows, and she did an occasional nightclub act.In 1926 West began to write, produce, and star in her own plays on Broadway. In the first of these, Sex (1926), her performance as a prostitute created a sensation but also earned her an eight-day jail sentence for “corrupting the morals of youth,” from which she emerged a national figure. Her plays Diamond Lil (1928) and The Constant Sinner (1931) were also successful. For all the variety of the scripts she wrote, the constant factor was West's own ironic, languorous personality and her ability to ridicule social attitudes, especially toward sex.In 1932 West moved to Hollywood. Her first film there, Night After Night (1932), showed the lighthearted approach that was characteristic of her subsequent pictures. She Done Him Wrong (1933), a screen adaptation of Diamond Lil, is memorable for her amusing ability to charge such lines as “Why don't you come up sometime and see me?” with suggestive implications. West then wrote and costarred in I'm No Angel (1933), Belle of the Nineties (1934), and Klondike Annie (1936), which brought her popularity to its height. In the 1940s and '50s she sometimes appeared onstage surrounded by young musclemen, including on Broadway in Catherine Was Great(1944). Her films were revived in the 1960s, and she appeared in Myra Breckinridge(1970), an adaptation of a novel by Gore Vidal, and Sextette (1978), based on a play that she wrote.From https://www.britannica.com/biography/Mae-West. For more information about Mae West:“‘When I'm Bad, I'm Better': Mae West's Sensational Life, in Her Own Words”: https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2020/06/mae-west-autobiography-scandal“Mae West: Dirty Blonde”: https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/mae-west-dirty-blonde-documentary/14998/“Mae West Vamped and Winked. She Also Blazed a Trail We're Still Following”: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/06/30/movies/mae-west.html

Quotomania
Quotomania 278: Oscar Wilde

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Author, playwright and poet Oscar Wilde was a popular literary figure in late Victorian England. After graduating from Oxford University, he lectured as a poet, art critic and a leading proponent of the principles of aestheticism. In 1891, he published The Picture of Dorian Gray, his only novel which was panned as immoral by Victorian critics, but is now considered one of his most notable works. As a dramatist, many of Wilde's plays were well received including his satirical comedies Lady Windermere's Fan (1892), A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband (1895) and The Importance of Being Earnest (1895), his most famous play. Unconventional in his writing and life, Wilde's affair with a young man led to his arrest on charges of "gross indecency" in 1895. He was imprisoned for two years and died in poverty three years after his release at the age of 46.From https://www.biography.com/writer/oscar-wildeFor more information about Oscar Wilde:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Anand Giridharadas on Wilde, at 23:03: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-063-anand-giridharadasLady Windermere's Fan: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/lady-windermeres-fan-oscar-wilde/1100533269“Oscar Wilde”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/oscar-wilde“How Oscar Wilde Won Over the American Press”: https://lithub.com/how-oscar-wilde-won-over-the-american-press/

Quotomania
Quotomania 277: Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Jean-Jacques Rousseau, (born June 28, 1712, Geneva, Switz.—died July 2, 1778, Ermenonville, France), was a Swiss-French philosopher. At age 16 he fled Geneva to Savoy, where he became the steward and later the lover of the baronne de Warens. At age 30, having furthered his education and social position under her influence, he moved to Paris, where he joined Denis Diderot at the center of the philosophes; he wrote on music and economics for Diderot's Encyclopédie. His first major work, the Discourse on the Arts and Sciences (1750), argued that man is good by nature but has been corrupted by society and civilization; Rousseau's belief in the natural goodness of man set him apart from Roman Catholic writers who, like him, were hostile to the idea of progress. He also wrote music; his light opera The Cunning-Man (1752) was widely admired. In 1752 he became involved in an influential dispute with Jean-Philippe Rameau over the relative merits of French and Italian music; Rousseau championed the latter. In the Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality Among Men (1754), he argued against Thomas Hobbes that human life before the formation of societies was healthy, happy, and free and that vice arose as the result of social organization and especially the introduction of private property. Civil society, he held, comes into being only to ensure peace and to protect property, which not everyone has; it thus represents a fraudulent social contract that reinforces inequality. In the Social Contract (1762), which begins with the memorable line, “Man was born free, but he is everywhere in chains,” Rousseau argues that a civil society based on a genuine social contract rather than a fraudulent one would provide people with a better kind of freedom in exchange for their natural independence, namely, political liberty, which he understands as obedience to a self-imposed law created by the “general will.” In 1762 the publication of Émile, a treatise on education, produced outrage, and Rousseau was forced to flee to Switzerland. He began showing signs of mental instability c. 1767, and he died insane. His Confessions (1781–88), which he modeled on the work of the same title by St. Augustine, is among the most famous autobiographies.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Jean-Jacques-Rousseau. For more information about Jean-Jacques Rousseau:“Jean-Jacques Rousseau”: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/rousseau/“Jean-Jacques Rousseau”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81KfDXTTtXEThe Essential Writings of Rousseau: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/158207/the-essential-writings-of-rousseau-by-jean-jacques-rousseau-newly-translated-by-peter-constantine-edited-by-leo-damrosch/

Quotomania
Quotomania 276: Naomi Shihab Nye

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Naomi Shihab Nye is an award-winning writer and editor whose work has appeared widely. She edited the ALA Notable international poetry collection, This Same Sky, and The Tree Is Older Than You Are: Poems and Paintings from Mexico, as well as The Space Between Our Footsteps: Poems and Paintings from the Middle East. Her books of poems include Fuel, Red Suitcase, and Words Under the Words. A Guggenheim fellow, she is also the author of the young adult novel Habibi, which was named an ALA Notable Book, a Best Book for Young Adults, and winner of the Jane Addams Children's Book Award as well as the Book Publishers of Texas award from the Texas Institute of Letters. Naomi lives in San Antonio, Texas, with her husband, Michael, and their son, Madison.From https://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Naomi-Shihab-Nye/1339809. For more information about Naomi Shihab Nye:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Naomi Shihab Nye on The Quarantine Tapes: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-073-naomi-shihab-nyeEdward Hirsch about Nye, at 18:00: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-173-edward-hirsch“Naomi Shihab Nye”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/naomi-shihab-nye“Naomi Shihab Nye, On Being”: ​​https://onbeing.org/programs/naomi-shihab-nye-before-you-know-kindness-as-the-deepest-thing-inside/“A Poet's Humble Answers: Naomi Shihab Nye”: http://www.cerisepress.com/01/03/a-poets-humble-answers-naomi-shihab-nye/view-all

Quotomania
Quotomania 275: Homer

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Homer, (flourished 9th or 8th century BCE, Ionia?), was an ancient Greek poet and presumed author of the Iliad and the Odyssey. Though almost nothing is known of his life, tradition holds that Homer was blind. The ancient Greeks attributed to him the great epic poems the Iliad and the Odyssey. Modern scholars generally agree that he composed (but was not the original creator of) the Iliad, most likely relying on oral traditions, and at least inspired the composition of the Odyssey.The Iliad, set during the Trojan War, tells the story of the wrath of Achilles. The Odyssey tells the story of Odysseus as he travels home from the war. The two epics provided the basis of Greek education and culture in the Classical age, and they have remained among the most significant poems of the European tradition. The method of their composition has been long debated.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Homer-Greek-poet. For more information about Homer:Previously on The Quarantine Tapes:Daniel Mendelsohn about Homer, at 14:10: https://quarantine-tapes.simplecast.com/episodes/the-quarantine-tapes-096-daniel-mendelsohnThe Iliad, translated by Robert Fagles: https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/537250/the-iliad-by-homer-translated-by-robert-fagles-introduction-and-notes-by-bernard-knox/“Englishing the Iliad: Grading Four Rival Translations”: https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/englishing-the-iliad-grading-four-rival-translations“Robert Fagles, the Art of Translation No. 2”: https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/930/the-art-of-translation-no-2-robert-fagles

Quotomania
Quotomania 272: Ocean Vuong

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Ocean Vuong is the author of The New York Times bestselling poetry collection, Time is a Mother (Penguin Press 2022), and The New York Timesbestselling novel, On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous (Penguin Press 2019), which has been translated into 36 languages.  A recipient of a 2019 MacArthur "Genius" Grant, he is also the author of the critically acclaimed poetry collection, Night Sky with Exit Wounds, a New York Times Top 10 Book of 2016, winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Whiting Award, the Thom Gunn Award, and the Forward Prize for Best First Collection. A Ruth Lilly fellow from the Poetry Foundation, his honors include fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, The Elizabeth George Foundation, The Academy of American Poets, and the Pushcart Prize.Vuong's writings have been featured in The Atlantic, Granta, Harpers, The Nation, New Republic, The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Paris Review, The Village Voice, and American Poetry Review, which awarded him the Stanley Kunitz Prize for Younger Poets. Selected by Foreign Policy magazine as a 2016 100 Leading Global Thinker, Ocean was also named by BuzzFeed Books as one of “32 Essential Asian American Writers” and has been profiled on NPR's “All Things Considered,” PBS NewsHour, Teen Vogue, Interview, Poets & Writers, and The New Yorker. Born in Saigon, Vietnam and raised in Hartford, Connecticut in a working class family of nail salon and factory laborers, he was educated at nearby Manchester Community College before transferring to Pace University to study International Marketing. Without completing his first term, he dropped out of Business school and enrolled at Brooklyn College, where he graduated with a BA in Nineteenth Century American Literature. He subsequently received his MFA in Poetry from NYU. He currently lives in Northampton, Massachusetts where he serves as an Associate Professor in the MFA Program for Poets and Writers at UMass-Amherst.From https://www.oceanvuong.com/about. For more information about Ocean Vuong:Ocean Vuong on A Phone Call From Paul: https://a-phone-call-from-paul.simplecast.com/episodes/a-phone-call-from-paul-67-ocean-vuongNight Sky with Exit Wounds: https://www.coppercanyonpress.org/books/night-sky-with-exit-wounds-by-ocean-vuong/“Torso of Air”: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/06/26/magazine/ocean-vuong-torso-of-air.html“Ocean Vuong is Still Learning”: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/the-new-yorker-interview/ocean-vuong-is-still-learning

Big Table
Episode 37: Mark Rozzo on Dennis Hopper and Brooke Howard in 1960's L.A.

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 44:20


Mark Rozzo's astute and engaging new book Everyone Thought We Were Crazy: Dennis Hopper, Brooke Heyward, and 1906s Los Angeles, published by Ecco Press, documents the lives of Hopper and Hayward in the heyday as New Hollywood's It couple but also paints a panoramic landscape of the Los Angeles scene in the Sixties.Rozzo poignantly captures the vivacity of the heady days in the early 1960s, just as the underground culture of the Beat Generation was about to explode into the mainstream counterculture of the latter part of the decade—the sex, drugs and rock ‘n' roll mantra was born in the late 1960s.Sixties Los Angeles was a new center of gravity in culture; there was a new consciousness, a West Coast symmetry between art, underground cinema, music and civil rights that had never happened before, and has never happened since. Hopper and Hayward were not only up-and-coming actors in the early 1960s, they were also cross-cultural connectors who brought together the best of underground Los Angeles art, music and politics, under one roof—literally—1712 N. Crescent Heights in the Hollywood Hills. This modest Spanish Colonial was the meeting ground, as Rozzo illustrates, for a who's who of that time: Jane Fonda, Andy Warhol, Joan Didion, Jasper Johns, Tina Turner, Ed Ruscha, The Byrds and the Black Panthers.Their art collection, showcased at this house on Crescent Heights, as well as the house itself, is the backdrop of Everyone Thought We Were Crazy. Rozzo tells the story in a straight-forward, dual narrative, that helps fill in large parts of Brooke's story, which compared to Hopper's, hasn't been as well documented or explored in other books. Rozzo finds the right balance.As a decade-ending benchmark, Hopper's directorial debut Easy Rider became the emblematic proto-New Hollywood independent film, alongside Haskell Wexler's Medium Cool. These films help illustrate the promise and loss of that generation and that era. There isn't a happy ending in those films or in Hopper's marriage to Heyward, unfortunately—the couple divorced in 1969 just at Easy Rider was about to make cinematic history.After the divorce, Brooke eventually sold the house, broke up the art collection and moved back to New York, where she still resides. Hopper died in 2010.Rozzo's wide view of Los Angeles in the 1960s is essential reading for anyone interested in the unvarnished history of that period.Here's my conversation with Mark Rozzo discussing the life and times of Dennis Hopper and Brooke Hayward.Reading by Mark Rozzo.Music by Love.

Quotomania
Quotomania 271: Marina Tsevetaeva

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Russian poet Marina Tsvetaeva (also Marina Cvetaeva and Marina Tsvetayeva) was born in Moscow. During her lifetime she wrote poems, verse plays, and prose pieces; she is considered one of the most renowned poets of 20th-century Russia. Tsvetaeva's life coincided with turbulent years in Russian history. She married Sergei Efron in 1912; they had two daughters and later one son. Efron joined the White Army, and Tsvetaeva was separated from him during the Civil War. She had a brief love affair with Osip Mandelstam, and a longer relationship with Sofia Parnok. During the Moscow famine, Tsvetaeva was forced to place her daughters in a state orphanage, where the younger, Irina, died of hunger in 1919. In 1922 she emigrated with her family to Berlin, then to Prague, settling in Paris in 1925. In Paris, the family lived in poverty. Sergei Efron worked for the Soviet secret police, and Tsvetaeva was shunned by the Russian expatriate community of Paris. Through the years of privation and exile, poetry and contact with poets sustained Tsvetaeva. She corresponded with Rainer Maria Rilke and Boris Pasternak, and she dedicated work to Anna Akhmatova.In 1939 Tsvetaeva returned to the Soviet Union. Efron was executed, and her surviving daughter was sent to a labor camp. When the German army invaded the USSR, Tsvetaeva was evacuated to Yelabuga with her son. She hanged herself on August 31, 1941.Critics and translators of Tsvetaeva's work often comment on the passion in her poems, their swift shifts and unusual syntax, and the influence of folk songs. She is also known for her portrayal of a woman's experiences during the “terrible years” (as the period in Russian history was described by Aleksandr Blok). Collections of Tsvetaeva's poetry translated into English include Selected Poems of Marina Tsvetaeva, translated by Elaine Feinstein (1971, 1994). She is the subject of several biographies as well as the collected memoirs No Love Without Poetry (2009), by her daughter Ariadna Efron (1912–1975).From https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/marina-tsvetaeva. For more information about Marina Tsvetaeva:“No One Has Taken Anything Away”: https://ruverses.com/marina-tsvetaeva/nothing-s-been-taken-away/9732/Bride of Ice: New Selected Poems: https://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847770608“Tsvetaeva: The Tragic Life”: https://www.nybooks.com/articles/2003/02/13/tsvetaeva-the-tragic-life/

Quotomania
Quotomania 270: Groucho Marx

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Groucho was born Julius Henry Marx on Oct 2 1890 in New York. He was the third of the five surviving sons of Sam and Minnie Marx. He was the first of the brothers to start a stage career aged 15 in an act called The Leroy Trio. Other acts followed, but none of them was a great success. Twice the other members of the act disappeared overnight and left him penniless in places far away from home.When his Brothers came on stage they finally had success with the musical comedy called I'll Say She Is. It was at one of the performances of this show that Groucho got his painted moustache. He arrived late at the theater and used greasepaint to create a moustache. He found this so much easier than a glued-on moustache that he insisted on using this technique from then on. I'll Say She Is is was followed by two more Broadway hits - The Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers. The latter of which has the character of Captain Spaulding which remained (with the song Hooray for Captain Spaulding) a trademark for Groucho for the rest of his life.The Cocoanuts and Animal Crackers were also the first movies (except for one unreleased) made by the Brothers and were filmed in New York. The remaining movies were made in Hollywood. In the later years of the Brothers movie career Groucho started working on radio. He hosted several programmes and was a guest on many shows. His biggest success was the comedy quiz show You Bet Your Life which started in 1947. The show later moved to television and was on the air until 1961.Groucho also appeared in a few movies without his brothers. Always being a liberal, Groucho sometimes made critical remarks about politics and had friends who were regarded as communist by the US of the 1950s. This led to Groucho being investigated by the FBI.When Marx Brothers became popular again in the late sixties/early seventies Groucho made a comeback with a show in Carnegie Hall in 1972. At the film festival in Cannes in 1972 he was made Commandeur des Arts et Lettres and in 1974 he received a special Academy Award for the achievements of the Marx Brothers. Groucho died on August 19th 1977 at Cedars Sinai Medical Center. His ashes are at Eden Memorial Park, San Fernando, California.From https://www.marx-brothers.org/biography/groucho.htm. For more information about Groucho Marx:“Groucho Marx”: https://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/person/124006%7C63642/Groucho-Marx#overview“Groucho Marx Collection”: https://sova.si.edu/record/NMAH.AC.0269“From the Archives: Groucho Marx Dies”: https://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/archives/la-me-groucho-marx-19770820-snap-story.html

Quotomania
Quotomania 269: Isaac Newton

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Sir Isaac Newton, (born Jan. 4, 1643, Woolsthorpe, Lincolnshire, Eng.—died March 31, 1727, London), was an English physicist and mathematician. The son of a yeoman, he was raised by his grandmother. He was educated at Cambridge University (1661–65), where he discovered the work of René Descartes. His experiments passing sunlight through a prism led to the discovery of the heterogeneous, corpuscular nature of white light and laid the foundation of physical optics. He built the first reflecting telescope in 1668 and became a professor of mathematics at Cambridge in 1669. He worked out the fundamentals of calculus, though this work went unpublished for more than 30 years. His most famous publication, Principia Mathematica (1687), grew out of correspondence with Edmond Halley. Describing his works on the laws of motion (see Newton's laws of motion), orbital dynamics, tidal theory, and the theory of universal gravitation, it is regarded as the seminal work of modern science. He was elected president of the Royal Society of London in 1703 and became the first scientist ever to be knighted in 1705. During his career he engaged in heated arguments with several of his colleagues, including Robert Hooke (over authorship of the inverse square relation of gravitation) and G.W. Leibniz (over the authorship of calculus). The battle with Leibniz dominated the last 25 years of his life; it is now well established that Newton developed calculus first, but that Leibniz was the first to publish on the subject. Newton is regarded as one of the greatest scientists of all time.From https://www.britannica.com/summary/Isaac-Newton. For more information about Isaac Newton:“Isaac Newton”: https://education.nationalgeographic.org/resource/isaac-newton-who-he-was-why-apples-are-falling“The Truth About Isaac Newton's Productive Plague”: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-truth-about-isaac-newtons-productive-plague“Isaac Newton”: https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/newton/