Podcasts about Eno

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  • 434PODCASTS
  • 956EPISODES
  • 54mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 20, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Eno

Latest podcast episodes about Eno

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Eno's Optimism, Britt's Realism & Non-Playoff Teams of 2021 Destined to Reach the 2022 Postseason

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 63:53


Eno, Britt and DVR discuss the current state of the MLB lockout, Rachel Balkovec's move into the manager position for the Yankees' Low-A Tampa affiliate, changes at Camden Yards, and the non-playoff teams of 2021 that they see as playoff teams in 2022.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

IoT For All Podcast
What's the Enterprise Network Operator Strategy? | IoT For All Podcast E153 | Pod Group's Sam Colley

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 39:14


In this week's podcast with the Pod Group's Sam Colley, CEO, and Felix Ontañón, Director of Research and Innovation, we discuss IoT connectivity and the Enterprise Network Operator (ENO) strategy. They share their insights on the IoT landscape, barriers to adoption, and information about their recent acquisition by G+D.The ENO strategy allows hardware manufacturing distributors, the companies creating the IoT projects, with the ability to be their own operator along with the benefits that come from it. Allowing companies to have more ownership and control over their project coupled with greater privacy.Sam Colley has focused his career on working in the telecommunications sector and the M2M/IoT communications market. He joined Pod Group in 2011 and contributed to the geographic and financial expansion of the company. Since 2019 he has been the CEO and focused on developing new global markets and increasing Pod's footprints in existing ones.Felix Ontañón is part of the Research and Innovation department at the Pod Group, where he works heavily in IoT connectivity and creating innovative technologies to overcome connectivity challenges. He is particularly interested in LPWANs, SIM card applets, eSIM/eUICC, Edge Computing, and Artificial Intelligence for IoT and has recently led Pod Group's Open Source Community initiatives.

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Pivoting In the Wake of Injuries, Beating BABIP & Timing Risk

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 69:31


Eno and DVR discuss how leagues can consider making structural changes to account for the 2021 rise in time lost to injuries, using BABIP as a launching point to dig deeper on a player's batted-ball profile (and the viability of xBA as a BABIP alternative), and taking an appropriate amount of injury risk in lieu of high-risk, high-reward prospects in redraft leagues.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RotoGraphs Fantasy Baseball
The Sleeper and the Bust Episode: 1000 – 1000th Episode Extravaganza ft. Eno Sarris, Nick Pollack, and Jason Collette!

RotoGraphs Fantasy Baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 145:03


Paul and Justin are joined by Jason, Eno, and Nick for a fun-filled 1000th episode!! Pablo Lopez v. Yu Darvish, Who is Next Year's Cedric Mullins, a rousing game of Reliever or Congressman plus much, much more!

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Multi-Position Eligibility, Dollar Values & Precision, and Seeking Challenges in 2022

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 68:21


Eno and DVR discuss players with multi-position eligibility, and the necessity of finding at least a few players with that flexibility to fit on draft-and-hold rosters. Plus, they examine Brandon Lowe's 2021, and answer questions about dollar values, limitations of WAR in a small sample, and the types of leagues to consider for those seeking a greater fantasy baseball challenge in 2022.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Eno, Britt & DVR, inspired by Andy McCullough, share their New Year's Resolutions and set a few for teams with varying levels of expected success in 2022. Along the way, they attempt to make a few blockbuster trades as the A's prepare to shake things up after the lockout.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Performance Anxiety: LARAAJI

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 74:46


I'm so happy to be joined by ambient pioneer, LARAAJI. We take a trip through his vast musical history, beginning with his early musical influences to changing his career path from architecture or engineering to music, to his discovery of the zither in a pawn shop. Even then, his path to music was not a straight one. In fact, it began in comedy at the famed Apollo Theater in Harlem. Through performing in parks around NYC, he came into contact with Brian Eno. Actually, Eno approached LARAAJI about recording together.  He has a new collaboration with Christopher Bono called Nous. It's a very exciting variation of ambient music that stretches the boundaries of the genre. And it all grew from using free association and a musical key in the studio. Check out LARAAJI and NOUS on Our Silent Canvas Records. Follow LARAAJI on social media. I'm pretty sure he's the only one. Follow us @PerformanceAnx. Rate & review the podcast. And help support it through ko-fi.com/performanceanxiety or performanceanx.threadless.com. So sit back, relax, and enjoy some reflection and contemplation with LARAAJI on Performance Anxiety on the Pantheon Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
A Return to 'On the Clock' Status: Breakouts v. Rebounds, Joe Musgrove as an SP1 & Luis Robert Love

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 81:45


Eno and DVR begin the 'On the Clock' phase of the year as another batch of slow drafts gets underway. They discuss how Draft & Hold formats modify their roster builds -- including a willingness to pay premiums for closers -- along with their thoughts about several early-rounders. Plus, they weigh the possibility of a step forward from Jazz Chisholm against the possibility of a rebound from Cody Bellinger or Christian Yelich, Joe Musgrove's bid for SP1 status, Aaron Ashby's Stuff+ shortcomings, and more.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Performance Anxiety

I'm so happy to be joined by ambient pioneer, LARAAJI. We take a trip through his vast musical history, beginning with his early musical influences to changing his career path from architecture or engineering to music, to his discovery of the zither in a pawn shop. Even then, his path to music was not a straight one. In fact, it began in comedy at the famed Apollo Theater in Harlem. Through performing in parks around NYC, he came into contact with Brian Eno. Actually, Eno approached LARAAJI about recording together.  He has a new collaboration with Christopher Bono called Nous. It's a very exciting variation of ambient music that stretches the boundaries of the genre. And it all grew from using free association and a musical key in the studio. Check out LARAAJI and NOUS on Our Silent Canvas Records. Follow LARAAJI on social media. I'm pretty sure he's the only one. Follow us @PerformanceAnx. Rate & review the podcast. And help support it through ko-fi.com/performanceanxiety or performanceanx.threadless.com. So sit back, relax, and enjoy some reflection and contemplation with LARAAJI on Performance Anxiety on the Pantheon Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kulturnice
Jaka Mihelač, slovenski baritonist v Berlinu

Kulturnice

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 12:12


Prva predstava med pandemijo, ki je bila predvajana po vsem svetu prek interneta in pred prazno dvorano, je bila opera Carmen Georgesa Bizeta. Eno od glavnih vlog je v berlinski operi pel mladi slovenski baritonist Jaka Mihelač, ki si je Berlin zaradi glasbe izbral za svoj drugi dom. Kako poteka življenje in delo med pandemijo, kaj pričakuje od leta 2022.

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast
K ꓘ 41 - Part 2 of the #OttoMock Breakdown

Pitcher List Fantasy Baseball Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 65:12


Keep or Kut - Pete (@PeteBBaseball) and Chad (@ChadYoung) continue their analysis of the mock Ottoneu auction that wrapped up on December 10. They covered five teams in the last episode and wrap up with the other seven today. Going team by team, they break down their favorite values, thoughts on overpaid players, and much more. Let your prep for your Ottoneu auctions start here.  Finished mock results: https://www.couchmanagers.com/auctions/?auction_id=5 Join Pitcher List Plus and get an ad-free website and access to the Pitcher List Discord community, while supporting the podcast. Timestamps: 2:57 - Ottoneu creator Niv Shah's OF attracted some attention, with a $25 Eloy Jiménez and a $23 J.D. Martinez.He got some love ($11 Ian Anderson) and some questions ($19 Eduardo Rodriguez) for his rotation, as well. Plus some credit for wisely spending on the positions where the money mattered most. 17:30 - Jake Mailhot of FanGraphs spent $31 on Wander Franco and Chad and Pete were split on how they feel about it. Alejandro Kirk and Tim Anderson also get some discussion on a team that Chad and Pete agrees looks awfully strong. 25:14 - Built buy two long-time Ottoneu players, the Sabrcatz had a plan and executed against it. As a result, they left with a ton of interesting long-term values, with conversations about everyone from Mike Trout and Ronald Acuńa, Jr., to Jo Adell and Joe Ryan, plus a nice bullpen. 32:11 - Ottoneu Slack Admin Mike Maude got some real nice old guy value, but are we still in on Germán Márquez? And is Walker Buehler a legit ace? 40:16 - The man behind the Ottoneu Surplus Calculator, Justin Vibber, got good values at the high end of the spectrum, but can a team with Yordan Alvarez, Giancarlo Stanton, Jacob Degrom, and others overcome a risky rotation? 47:23 - Eno Sarris of The Athletic got an underpriced ace in Charlie Morton, plus some fun values in Trent Grisham, Ian Happ, Tanner Houck, and Raisel Iglesias. Plus find out which SP Eno targeted, and why Chad is intrigued by them, even if he thinks Eno may have overpaid. 54:01 - The finalists in the inaugural Ottoneu Prestige Leauge joined forces to draft the team called Clondoves, and they nabbed one of Pete's favorite sleeper SP in Patrick Sandoval. They also loaded up on buy-lows, putting together a roster that is built well for OPL and includes a number of players we'll be targeting late in auctions. 59:17 - Before wrapping up, we hit on some overall takeaways: first-year auctions vs. established leagues; the importance of auction flow and order; why we are waiting on 1B (but not 3B); and the right balance of spending vs. saving.   Get PL+ and join our Discord: https://pitcherlist.com/plus

Keep or Kut
K ꓘ 41 - Part 2 of the #OttoMock Breakdown

Keep or Kut

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 65:12


Keep or Kut - Pete (@PeteBBaseball) and Chad (@ChadYoung) continue their analysis of the mock Ottoneu auction that wrapped up on December 10. They covered five teams in the last episode and wrap up with the other seven today. Going team by team, they break down their favorite values, thoughts on overpaid players, and much more. Let your prep for your Ottoneu auctions start here.  Finished mock results: https://www.couchmanagers.com/auctions/?auction_id=5 Join Pitcher List Plus and get an ad-free website and access to the Pitcher List Discord community, while supporting the podcast. Timestamps: 2:57 - Ottoneu creator Niv Shah's OF attracted some attention, with a $25 Eloy Jiménez and a $23 J.D. Martinez.He got some love ($11 Ian Anderson) and some questions ($19 Eduardo Rodriguez) for his rotation, as well. Plus some credit for wisely spending on the positions where the money mattered most. 17:30 - Jake Mailhot of FanGraphs spent $31 on Wander Franco and Chad and Pete were split on how they feel about it. Alejandro Kirk and Tim Anderson also get some discussion on a team that Chad and Pete agrees looks awfully strong. 25:14 - Built buy two long-time Ottoneu players, the Sabrcatz had a plan and executed against it. As a result, they left with a ton of interesting long-term values, with conversations about everyone from Mike Trout and Ronald Acuńa, Jr., to Jo Adell and Joe Ryan, plus a nice bullpen. 32:11 - Ottoneu Slack Admin Mike Maude got some real nice old guy value, but are we still in on Germán Márquez? And is Walker Buehler a legit ace? 40:16 - The man behind the Ottoneu Surplus Calculator, Justin Vibber, got good values at the high end of the spectrum, but can a team with Yordan Alvarez, Giancarlo Stanton, Jacob Degrom, and others overcome a risky rotation? 47:23 - Eno Sarris of The Athletic got an underpriced ace in Charlie Morton, plus some fun values in Trent Grisham, Ian Happ, Tanner Houck, and Raisel Iglesias. Plus find out which SP Eno targeted, and why Chad is intrigued by them, even if he thinks Eno may have overpaid. 54:01 - The finalists in the inaugural Ottoneu Prestige Leauge joined forces to draft the team called Clondoves, and they nabbed one of Pete's favorite sleeper SP in Patrick Sandoval. They also loaded up on buy-lows, putting together a roster that is built well for OPL and includes a number of players we'll be targeting late in auctions. 59:17 - Before wrapping up, we hit on some overall takeaways: first-year auctions vs. established leagues; the importance of auction flow and order; why we are waiting on 1B (but not 3B); and the right balance of spending vs. saving.   Get PL+ and join our community: https://pitcherlist.com/plus

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
2021 Disappointments, 2022 Bouncebacks: Pitcher Edition

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 63:22


Eno and DVR discuss several pitchers who underperformed expectations in 2021, but are primed for a big rebound in 2022. Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Doctor Supercoach
Doctor SuperCoach x FantasyTake TV Collab - AFL SC Draft Game

Doctor Supercoach

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 62:09


A special episode with our first collaboration with Fantasy Take TV, JB and Pistol join Jords and Eno as we run through a SC Draft Game choosing players across each line. With great discussion and certainly a lot to reflect upon, we hope you enjoy this episode! Fantasy Take TV: https://twitter.com/FantasyTakeTV

Vroči mikrofon
Sledite obrazu: "Iščem sestro", "Iščem sina"

Vroči mikrofon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 18:01


Glede na poročilo Agencije ZN za bgunce (UNHCR) se je število ljudi, ki bežijo pred vojnami, nasiljem, preganjanjem in kršitvami človekovih pravic, kljub pandemiji lani povečalo na več kot 8,2 milijona. Kar 42 odstotkov razseljenih ljudi po svetu je mlajših od 18 let. Marsikdo na poti izgubi stike s svojci, veliko je pogrešanih. Pri iskanju pogrešanih in pri ponovnem povezovanju družin se trudijo tudi v svetovnem gibanju Rdečega križa. Eno izmed orodij, ki pomaga pri tem, je spletna stran Trace the FAce oziroma Sledite obrazu, fotogalerija ljudi, ki iščejo pogrešane sorodnike.

Ciao Bella!
Bottling Green in Montepulciano with Salcheto

Ciao Bella!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 42:46


A certified carbon footprint of a bottle of wine? Eno-sustainability champion Michele Manelli pioneers a more sustainable landscape of enoculture in Montepulciano   Ciao Bella INSTAGRAM: @ericafirpo TWITTER  @moscerina

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
2021 Disappointments, 2022 Bouncebacks: Hitter Edition

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 60:09


Eno and DVR discuss several hitters who underperformed expectations in 2021, but are primed for a big rebound in 2022.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Trace
S4 E2 - Outcast Songs on The Trace Radio

The Trace

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 98:04


On this episode of The Trace Kat Sommers and Andrew Hackett play “Outcast Songs”. These are songs by or about people that are different, people that don't have a place to be, people that don't quite fit in.   As usual Kat and Andrew get into existential themes through their song choices.   Keep an eye out for the upcoming serialized audiobook by Andrew which is called “The Sky, Finally”.  Part 1 comes out next week.   Now…onto the music!

The Hot Slice
79. Growth Mode

The Hot Slice

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 33:52


Eno's Pizza Tavern in Dallas, Texas, is currently in strategic growth mode. We “sit down” with Shane Spillers to talk concept, pizza style, planned expansion, staffing and bringing a commissary online in this week's The Hot Slice Podcast.

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
2021 Favorites + A Holiday Adjacent Movie Draft

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 61:30


Eno, Britt & DVR share their favorite baseball and non-baseball stories from 2021, as well as their top moments from the show this year, before proceeding to a five-round draft of movies that take place around the holidays. Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Old Men Yell At Cloud
094 - Another Green World, or: Foolish American Turtles

Old Men Yell At Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 69:22


Kick off the holidays on a high note with Mariah Carey. Get a free McDonald's favorite every day from December 13th-24th with $1 minimum purchase, only in the app. Frequently Asked Questions: 1. Is there free merch with the Mariah Menu? / Is there merch on the Mariah Menu?Yes! To celebrate our collaboration with Mariah Carey, two of our twelve daily deals will include access to free merchandise when the deals are redeemed using Mobile Order & Pay in the McDonald's app. These deals are the free bakery item on 12/15 and free Sausage McMuffin with Egg on 12/21; both deals require a $1 minimum purchase to redeem the offer. After redeeming the deals, customers will need to provide their name and shipping address to receive merchandise directly. The merchandise is only available while supplies last and will be shipped February 2022.2. What days are the merchandise deals available?The Free Bakery Item deal is available on Thursday 12/15 from midnight to 11:59:59 pm local time. The Free Sausage McMuffin with Egg deal is available on Wednesday 12/21 during breakfast hours only (breakfast hours vary by location). The deals are available during the times specified on these days, but the merchandise will only be available while supplies last.3. How do I redeem the Mariah Menu merchandise?To access merchandise, you must redeem the Mariah Menu deal of the day on December 15th or December 21st via Mobile Order & Pay in the McDonald's app, while supplies last. After redeeming the deal, if there are still merch items remaining, you will be shown a redemption screen. You must select “Get It Now” to redeem the merchandise deal immediately by providing your name and shipping information. Once you exit from the merch redemption flow, you will not be able to access it again.4. What are the free merchandise items?An embroidered black beanie is available on Wednesday 12/15 and a branded t-shirt in one size (adult large) is available on Tuesday 12/21—both while supplies last.5. If I redeem the merchandise offer, when will I receive my item?Merchandise will be shipped direct by February 2022 to customers who redeemed the merchandise offer for delivery.6. Can I redeem more than one merchandise item?You will only be able to redeem one merchandise item on each day merchandise is offered.7. Is there a limited quantity of merchandise items?Yes, merchandise is only available while supplies last.8. If I exit out of the merchandise redemption form, will I be able to get back to it?No—you must fill out the redemption form immediately once prompted to redeem the merch. If you close out of the window, you will not be able to access the merch redemption screen again.9. Do I need to provide my real address to receive my merchandise?Yes, you must provide your real shipping address (including apt/unit number, if applicable) to receive the merchandise. We cannot guarantee delivery to an undeliverable address.10. What happens if I enter the wrong contact information?You will have the chance to review your contact information to confirm the correct information before submitting.11. Can you ship to a PO Box?No, we cannot ship the merch to a PO Box address.12. Will I receive a confirmation email?No, you will not receive a confirmation email for your merch, but you will be shown a success/thank-you screen once you've submitted your shipping information.13. Will I receive a tracking number?No, you will not receive a tracking number or tracking information for your merch.14. Who should I contact if I have questions after I redeem?If you have further questions about Mariah Menu merchandise, please contact us with our General Inquiry Form.15. Why am I not seeing merch on the Mariah Menu deal of the day?If merch is out of stock on 12/15 or 12/21, there will be a “merch out-of-stock” flag on the deal of the day. You will still be able to redeem the deal of the day, for a free food item with minimum $1 purchase, but you will not be able to redeem the free merchandise item, which is available only while supplies last.Derek Paul of Lowell, MA band Crowfeeder joins us in this whimsical episode as we examine Brian Eno's critically acclaimed 3rd album "Another Green World".

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast
Eno Sarris Tries To Solve The MLB Lockout

Ben & Woods On Demand Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 12:49


Ben & Woods chat with Eno Sarris, MLB writer at The Athletic and one of our favorites! Listen here as Eno gives his thoughts on the MLB lockout, and how he thinks the two sides can come together to make an agreement before we start missing baseball games in 2022! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Swapping Pitchers for Hitters, Re-Thinking Saves + Holds, and KC Optimism

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 71:59


Eno & DVR discuss the balance of trading pitching for hitting in real baseball -- and in long-term league formats -- before taking a closer look at a few pitchers of interest from the mailbag, a softening stance on Saves + Holds as a category thanks to Ron Shandler's article in the Baseball Forecaster, whether max Exit Velocity can help us see players in decline, and a few reasons for optimism about the Royals in 2022.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Get 33% off a subscription to The Athletic: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
An Attempt to Find Solutions in the Negotiations for a New CBA

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 73:44


Eno, Britt & DVR make an attempt to "solve" some of the issues pending in the ongoing negotiations toward a new CBA. Will the players' 'War Chest' help speed up the process of reaching an agreement? How likely is a significant bump to league minimum salaries? Can the players end up with a faster path to reach free agency? If the luxury tax threshold is raised and penalties are reduced, will the teams willing to spend the most gain an advantage? Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
More Issues with the Baseball, Home-Run Rate Questions & An Eno Barrel-ISO Concoction

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 73:04


Eno & DVR discuss the latest issues with the supply of baseballs used during the 2021 season as first reported by Bradford William Davis, the potential implications of inconsistencies with the ball when reviewing home-run rates, plus Eno unveils as a ISO-Barrel Rate formula in attempt to find players who underperformed their barrel rates last season. Plus, did the Padres quietly sign a closer during last week's flurry of activity? Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Friendly Potential Radio
Ep 277 pt.2 w/ Gus

Friendly Potential Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 57:25


FP DJ Gus gets ready for afters. @hypeasgus Cluster - Sowiesoso [Sky Records] The Incredible String Band - Air [Elektra] Psychic TV - The Orchids [Some Bizarre] The Penguin Café Orchestra - Telephone And Rubber Band [Editions EG] Sam Amidon - How Come That Blood [Bedroom Community] Harmonia & Eno '76 - Vamos Companeros [Grönland Records] Smog - Our Anniversary [Drag City] White Magic - One Note [Drag City] The Sabres Of Paradise - Ballad of Nicky McGuire [Warp Records] Two Lone Swordsmen - Spraycan Attack [Emissions Audio Output] Michiel van den Bos - Foregone Destruction [Epic Games]

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
The Final Free-Agent Signings and Trades Before the Music Stopped

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2021 66:55


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss the last wave of signings and trades prior to the start of the lockout including Rich Hill to Boston, Marcus Stroman to the Cubs, Mark Melancon to Arizona, Corey Knebel to Philadelphia, and a Red Sox-Brewers swap that sent Jackie Bradley Jr. and two prospects to Boston for Hunter Renfroe. Plus, how much does playing 'close to home' factor into a free agent's decision-making process? Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
More Moves! Seager, Ray, Ozuna's Suspension, Báez, Iglesias and Trades

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 83:12


Eno & DVR examine another 48-hour flurry of activity including Corey Seager to the Rangers, Robbie Ray to the Mariners, MLB's retroactive 20-game suspension for Marcell Ozuna, Javier Báez to the Tigers, a catcher carousel, Raisel Iglesias' return to the Halos, and more.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
An Early Free Agent Frenzy: Scherzer, Semien, Marte, Gausman & Extensions!

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 108:07


Eno & DVR return from a two-week break to a massive haul of free-agent signings and extensions including Max Scherzer and Starling Marte to the Mets, Marcus Semien to the Rangers, Kevin Gausman to the Blue Jays, an 11-year extension for Wander Franco, and a seven-year deal for Byron Buxton to remain in Minnesota.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at $1/month for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels Podcast Apple: http://bit.ly/AppleRandB Spotify: http://bit.ly/SpotifyRandB Google: http://bit.ly/RatesGoogle Stitcher: http://bit.ly/STRandB TuneIn: http://bit.ly/RBTuneIn Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
Did Your Computer Have "Intel Inside"? It Won't For long!

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 85:08


Did Your Computer Have "Intel Inside"? It Won't For long! We're going to talk a little bit about shopping right now. Then we'll get into our chip crunch, and why Intel is being left on the side of the computer road. [Following is an automated transcript.] [00:00:16] There's lots of fun stuff to do. And it's kind of fun getting out of the house. Isn't it getting out, going out, going around? There's a, an outlet store close by where I live and it's kind of one of these outdoor. Outlet things. And it was fun. Just walking around, enjoying the little bit of fresh air, no matter what the weather has. [00:00:40] Uh, I even enjoy going up there when there's some snow on the ground. Because again, it's a little bit of a, uh, it's, it's fun. It's a little bit of a change, which is not. Part of what I love about living in the Northeast. You really get all four seasons and they can be really, really nice. Well, black Friday of course came and went. [00:01:01] It was not a bad black Friday, but one of the questions I been asked all week long, all month long, frankly, has to do. When should I buy, what should I buy? What are the deals? And it is weird this year. Let me tell you really weird. And the reason I say that is I didn't my show prep. And I spent some hours just looking on different websites and looking at opinion pieces, looking at news sources, just trying to find, okay, what's going on? [00:01:36] What's the real word out there. Our items, as rare as everybody seems to be saying they are, or is it easy enough to find. Well, that's what we're going to talk about right now. Really. We've had a very turbulent two years for retail, every branch of retail, whatever it is, it's been been terrible. So many people have lost their businesses. [00:02:03] So many small businesses, small retail restaurants, some restaurants that I, I enjoy and just haven't been to in years, really. Completely gone, which is such a crying shame. And a lot of people have put a lot of the blame for the general retail malaise on Amazon and Walmart. Because again, you know, I had a discussion just this last weekend with. [00:02:35] Oh, friend's father. And he was saying, well, you know, I've been a biologist in pharmacology for years. And, uh, you know, th this is just as just a science. It's all science talking about the lockdown. And so I pointed out how, well, let me see, let me see. I got family from Canada. They cannot drive across the border because of the lockdown, but in, in the states, they won't let us, us, we won't let them fly. [00:03:03] But they drive in, I should say, but they will let them fly in. How does that science, right. There's coronavirus not survive at 30,000 feet. Is that what it is? You know? No, come on. People it's politics and part of the politics was. Walmart got to stay open and all of these other small businesses couldn't so what are they supposed to do? [00:03:29] How are they supposed to compete? And yet, Hey, I understand you need clothes, right? And you need food. Most Walmarts have both. You might need medicine in order to even survive. So that kind of makes sense, but why. Walmart. Why did the government choose Walmart and target are going to survive all of you, little mom and pops stores, you know, that maybe have been multi-generational where it's your parents. [00:04:00] And maybe even your grandparents that started the store, started the restaurant. And now all of a sudden there's a lockout and you cannot be over. It just, it entirely political, entirely political. And I understand the science behind all of this. I have spent a lot of time studying it and you might remember if you've listened to me even. [00:04:26] Dean or 20 years ago, I'm trying to remember when it was, I started talking with scientists about RNI, RNA interference and the coolest stuff that was happening with African violets and getting the, the purple flowers to change to white and all of the stuff they were doing. It it's exciting. It's fun. But why. [00:04:49] Did we use politics here. And so many people lost their livelihood. So many people lost their businesses. It's, it's absolutely incredible. And just pain companies basically to stay closed. Uh, doesn't make sense either. Because now you're pumping more money into the economy and that's causing inflation because there are not more products or not more vendors. [00:05:15] There's not enough competition. So the prices go up. And when there's inflation, how about people who are retired, who have saved something. And now their money is worth what the inflation rates are. Again, it's a hidden tax, but it's really hard on retirees because their money that they've saved, you know, they're getting the pitons, you put it in a savings account and you're making a fraction of 1%. [00:05:43] And yet we're seeing inflation rates on things like fuel being almost a hundred percent. Think about what it was like in 2019, what the gas prices were. It is insane. So small businesses have to be supported. They are the backbone. They are the innovators. Walmart didn't start as a big company. They started very small. [00:06:10] He innovated his claim to fame. That old Sam Walton was let's go ahead and have the best prices and anywhere. Right. And so they got the best prices by beating up their suppliers, et cetera, but it all worked. And Walmart increased, raised its it's demonstrable again through real science, but they raise the standard of living in every community. [00:06:39] They opened a store. It's absolutely funneling. But Walmart stopped innovating a long time ago. Now again, the innovations come just like they do in the tech world. Typically not from the existing companies, right. Facebook isn't innovating, they bought WhatsApp, they bought so much of the technology they're using to drive their company. [00:07:02] Oculus. You look at it, right? That's their future. According to of course, uh, you know, Mr. Mark. What did it come from? What was the cost? Right. They by their competition. So I want to encourage everybody to really try and go out of your way, try and shop at these small places. There are. And so many of these malls nowadays kind of local stores where they've got together and they're running their co-op or where someone's managing a bind product from local craftsman, really that they, everything from these women that are knitting doilies all the way on out, through very cool black iron work things, things that you can find there. [00:07:54] That maybe you can find on Amazon, maybe they come from China. Maybe they're locally sourced. Not very likely, but it's been a very, very tough, tough time here for so many of these industries. One of the things that I did talk about this week, I, one of my radio appearances is. Tik TOK live shopping. If you haven't heard of tick tock, tick tock is this short form video site. [00:08:21] And it kind of started by people saying, okay, well with this song, uh, use that song to make a funny little 32nd. And 22nd and that's what people did. And it was really quite cool to see they there's some innovative people out there. Tick talk has a lot of, I share nowadays way more popular amongst the younger people than Facebook is Facebook has kind of become something for the older people. [00:08:49] But what tech talk is now doing is providing live shop. And this is an innovation that really started in China, which of course is where tick-tock is located. But in 2020, there was a survey done that found that two thirds of Chinese consumers said that they bought products via live stream in the past year. [00:09:13] So what's live stream. I want you to think about QVC online share or a television shop. Those channels, those infomercials that come on at night, but particularly the channels that are constantly selling stuff like micro did a little bit of that at one point in time, right? His interview was, he came in and the, he, the guy who was interviewing him, held up a pen. [00:09:37] Is that okay, you sell me this pencil. And so micro went on and on for 10 minutes or more just talking about the pencil and everything related to the pencil and what a great quality was. All he course, she didn't know anything about it. Right? And that's part of what bothers me about some of these things, right? [00:09:55] These people are just making stuff up, but talk live now is allowing you to go ahead and make funny little things. Gain an audience. Maybe they're not funny. Maybe they're just informative. Have them inserted into people's streams and then sell it right there. In fact, instant purchasing of a featured product during a live stream. [00:10:22] And then obviously audience participation, they got chat functions, reaction buttons. This is what's coming our way. And so all of you, small businesses out there, I really want to encourage you pay attention to social media. This is the sort of thing that you can do. You can target your local area, which is where most small businesses operate, right? [00:10:48] It's in, in your town. It's maybe a 10, 20 mile radius, depending on what, what you're doing, what you're selling. And you can micro target nowadays. That's the joy. That's the beauty of the online world. Micro-targeting Hey, and if you're interested, let me know. We can talk a lot more about this because I have studied this for years now. [00:11:12] Hey, stick around Craig peterson.com online. [00:11:20] So while you're shopping online, what are some of the things you should do or look out for? I've got a few ideas. I'm going to tell you what I do, and it has worked wonders for me. So here we go. [00:11:35] When you're shopping online, there are some obvious tips, just run through them very, very quickly because I don't, I think you guys being the best and the brightest really know these things. [00:11:50] So just very quickly, make sure your security. Today, make sure that everything is patched up the way that it should be, that you have some really great anti-malware hopefully advanced anti-malware, but apply any updates before you start doing shopping, because this is a bad time of year to lose all of your personal information and to have your money stolen. [00:12:18] Uh, number two. If you're seeing an email or you're seeing a deal that really looks too good to be true. Take, take caution here. Right? Do you see a place? Oh, I got five brand new Sony PlayStation fives for sale. You might not want. To buy those, right? The minister, Jeff Foxworthy. Here's your sign. So be careful about that. [00:12:46] Criminals are really taking advantage of consumers who, uh, you know, life's been tough, money's been tight. You're trying to find a deal. So be careful about that. Okay. Coupons or other way, the bad guys have been trying to get consumers. To compromise their own cyber security. Okay. Uh, 12% of emails out there are considered to be spam emails. [00:13:15] I think it's more like 80% or 90%, but then I've had the same email address for 30 years. Okay. Uh, so don't click on link. Be sure you shop on the real website and apply coupons there by manually typing out the code. So for instance, if, if let's say you use duck, duck, go for your search engine, which you should be using for most cases, most searches a duck duck go says, okay, let me see where coupons here you go. [00:13:46] Here's a site that has a lot of coupons be careful about those sites, because some of them are trying to lure you in. Are the websites you're going to the real ones, the legit one. Are you clicking a link in your email in order to get to that sale site? Double check, because what they're doing is using some of these URLs that aren't. [00:14:14] Right. And we see those all of the time. They'll have a misspelling of the business name or they'll, they'll do something else. So they might have Amazon Dodd bad guys.com. Oh, okay. Amazon. Okay. Is Amazon, uh, obviously they wouldn't say bad guys, but yeah. That's kind of what they're doing. So be careful. So once you're on a website, look for that little padlock that's to the side, click on it and double. [00:14:43] To make sure that it is legit because they might have us. What's called a secure, sir. And they might have a certificate that's valid for the site that you just went to, but it's not, there's a different kit for Amazon or Walmart or target or w you know, whatever Joe's clothing.com. It might be something entirely different. [00:15:07] So be careful, okay. Is what you're looking at on the ad. Because there are a lot of fake advertisements out there that looked like they got great deals. And even though black Friday has come and gone, they're going to continue to do this through the end of the year and be on. Okay. So rather than clicking on the ad, just type in the retailer. [00:15:35] Information, because some of these ads that are showing up are in fact, almost every last one of them is coming from what's called an ad network. So that ad network is where people go and buy ads and they say, Hey, I want to retarget people that were at this site or clicked on this link, et cetera, et cetera. [00:15:54] And now. If you are a bad guy, all you have to do is sneak into one of those big ad networks. And all of a sudden your bad guy ads are showing up everywhere. So you see a great ad for a Chromebook. For instance, we've talked about those before you can just go ahead. Okay. Chromebook. No problem. Wow. Yeah. [00:16:14] Yeah. Type it in. If the ads for a Chromebook from Walmart, just type in walmart.com. Okay. Avoid clicking on ads. Isn't it terrible how bad it's gotten, man. I liked the internet better back in the 1980s and nineties. Uh, how should you pay? We're going to talk about that in a minute. Public why fi is a potential problem. [00:16:40] The bad guys will often create fake hot spots and you are now using their hot spot. Now this isn't as much of a problem as a used to be because your visits to most websites nowadays are encrypted. Do you remember that lock? I mentioned in the URL. Well, that means it is using SSL or TLS, which is a secure communications pro protocol. [00:17:07] So if you're seeing that, you know that you basically have a VPN, you don't have to buy a VPM service. You don't have to use a VPN service. You have a VPN that's being provided by the website, your. And that's really what that lock means. So the public wifi is less of an issue for the monitoring, what you're doing, although yeah, they can still do some monitoring. [00:17:33] They might play with DNS and things, but they can also scan you, which is the biggest problem from my perspective about using public wifi and never. Share your personal data. If you can avoid it, one of the things we're going to be covering in the upcoming boot camps and workshops is using fake or alternate email addresses. [00:17:57] I do it all of the time. That's why I have 3000, 3000. Yes. You heard it right different log-ins right now in use active use on. Uh, in my password manager, at least over the last decade. So I've accumulated a lot of them. So I use a different email address pretty much all of the time. And I'll, I explain how to do that in the boot camps and workshops that are coming up. [00:18:25] So keep an eye on. On my weekly emails again, Craig peterson.com/subscribe. So you can find out about them, you know, these, the free ones. I really want to give you guys all of the basics, right? So that's what I'm going to be doing anyways. How should I pay? This is maybe the even bigger side of things. It is very, very rare that I actually put my credit card number in on a website at least. [00:18:54] Real credit card number. There's a number of options that are available to you now that weren't before, even if it's not a credit card, even if it's a debit card and generically, this is known as single use credit cards. So we've got a few things. I use typically capital one's email E N O. If you have a capital one card of any sort, this is a little browser plugin that you can put on. [00:19:25] Now, the downside of this is they will by default, try and look. Every web page you visit. So from their perspective, it's worth it because now they get that data from you. However, in all modern browsers, you can restrict when it runs. But what happens is I go to a website, it wants a credit card and I can pop up that little Eno browser plugin. [00:19:53] And now. Todd, uh, I can generate a virtual credit card number that's tied in behind the scenes to my real credit card number. I can even put an expiration date on that credit card number. So it can't be used after a certain. Some of these virtual credit card options, even allow you to say, Hey, it really is only single use. [00:20:18] It can only ever be used once. And that way the bad guys can't run up your credit card. Bill Citibank, American express, JP Morgan, and the more have these types of options and basically any visa or MasterCard. Look for virtual credit cards. From your bank or whoever's providing your credit card. Hey, stick around. [00:20:42] You're listening to Craig Peterson and I'll be right back. [00:20:46] We're going to talk a little bit now, since it's getting near the end of the year, about what kind of technology do we think is going to be big next year. And I've got to mention this project. My daughter has been working on it. Finally hit the ocean. [00:21:02] My daughter has been busy. You might know she's been in the maritime industry for quite a while now. [00:21:11] And a man, she went to, she graduated 2008. I think it was this, this daughter. And you probably already know I have five daughters, right? Uh, three sons too. So it was kind of a mix, but she has been working on a ship called the Yarra Burkland it's over in Norway. And what the ship is doing here is hauling fertilizer, anything. [00:21:38] Oh, wow. Isn't that exciting? Wow. Craig, I'm so excited for you. Well, it is the world's first autonomous electric ship period. Okay, cargo ship and what it is doing ultimately, is it to eliminating the need for about 40,000 truck round trips a year. See what's happening over there in Norway is there's a factory that's right. [00:22:07] Located right next to a mine. That's making all of this fertilizer and it needs to be hauled down through some fjords. To get to the main shipping Depot where it can be loaded onto the big ocean ship. So these trucks are going up and over the mountains alongside the fjords. And this is a ship that's going to take a trip that's about seven and a half nautical mile. [00:22:34] So give or take eight miles and on the water. And now Norway is doing this in its own waterways. So there's no problem with international rules and regulations about ships here. This is just local and it loads itself. It drives itself and it unloads itself. I think that's really, really cool. And what it does is it plugs itself. [00:23:02] When it is on either port w now we've seen this with some ships, right? You might've been on some of these ferries that are electric. They work pretty well for electric ferries. Cause they're usually short haul. They connect up to shore power and they do a rapid charge and they're ready for. The next leg of their ship while they are busy taking all of their load in right. [00:23:26] Makes sense. And you might've done it, but this is, this is different. And a lot of the incidents that happen in shipping are due to human error. Think about all of the problems we've had with Navy ships, even running into things, human error, and a lot of that's due to fatigue. On the ships. I don't know if you know it. [00:23:47] I have two kids that, well, three actually that have been in the maritime industry, uh, the, the big maritime industry and they take four hour shifts. So four on four off four on four off every day. So fatigue is a very big deal for a lot of the shipping industry. And for the first few years, they're planning on having the ship be. [00:24:15] They're going to be up, of course, on the bridge monitoring everything, because you've got a problem with artificial intelligence machine learning. If a big ship is coming along and there's a kayak in the way, it's actually the kayaks job to get out of the way. But if you run over a kayaker things, aren't going to go very well for you, frankly. [00:24:37] But how does a computer recognize a kayak? Maybe Marine life or even some sort of a swell that's out there. So they think they've got most of this solved. And this is the project that my daughter's been working on for a few years here. She's a Mariner. She has her captain's license unlimited. Tonnage unlimited vessels on unlimited waterways anywhere in the world is just incredible. [00:25:06] All of the stuff she's done. So the wheelhouse could disappear all together, but they've got to make sure that everything is working pretty darn well. Okay. Uh, large vessels. Do anything about the kayak? All they can do is warn, but they definitely can't maneuver. And that's why the deep draft vessels have priority over sailboats or pretty much anything else that's out there. [00:25:32] But, and what that brings up is the fact that we don't have the regulations yet for these autonomous ship. Well, we don't have the regulations yet for the autonomous cars, right? This is normal. The technology tends to proceed the regulations, and we have regulations in place right now for autonomous vehicles in certain areas. [00:25:57] But they're nowhere near mature. It's going to take a while before everything has all frigging. And now that is leading us into our friends at Ford. Ford's done a couple of interesting announcements over the last couple of weeks. So I have to bring the. And an effort really to deal with this ongoing chip shortage. [00:26:21] Ford has made a deal with global founders. Global foundries is a chip maker and they have a non-binding agreement. Now that makes it interesting. If it's non-binding. Why even bother, but the press release says opening the door for global foundries to deliver more chips to Ford in the short term. But what's happening right now because of the chip shortages. [00:26:50] Well, companies are designing their own. Purpose built chips rather than relying on the general purpose chips made by Intel or AMD Qualcomm, Samsung and video media tech, depending on what kind of chips we're talking about. This is fascinating because it is hurting Intel. No question about it. And AMD. So what does Intel done? [00:27:15] Intel is moving its stance to being more of a contracted chip manufacturer. So you can go to Intel and say, here's my chip design. Go ahead and make that for us. And off they'll go and they will manufacture it and they probably even help you with some of the design things. Fascinating. Now, the other thing that's been happening for a while is if you look at apple, for instance, they have been using their own chips in their I phones and eye pads. [00:27:52] Now they also are using their own chips in the laptops and various desktop computers. So apple is the highest profile example I can think of offhand. That have replaced Intel's chips. That's absolutely amazing. Google has also created its own chip for the latest pixel phone. So if you buy the latest flagship pixel, which I would not do, because this is the first time they're really using their own chip, but they've got their own chip now. [00:28:28] Amazon has been deploying its own chips in its internal servers to improve performance as well as to make it better for the Alexa voice assistant. You see how long tail that's a marketing term, but really how special purpose purpose designed purpose built chips are. So it's huge. Intel's changing course. [00:28:55] They've never been a great chip designer. If he asked me and a few know my history, you know, I've been down at the chip level. I was down there for many years in the kernel of operating systems and dealing directly with all. From chips, you know, when you're thinking about drivers and the low end and the operating system, that's what I did for a lot of years. [00:29:18] So I'm, I'm glad to see this happen. It's going to be better for you because the devices can be cheaper because they don't use a general purpose chip. The chip is built and designed. For what it's being used for. So good news there for four, because Ford is going to be kind of doing the same sort of thing. [00:29:39] I bet mark my words. Okay. Well, I didn't get to the predictions for this year, but I will, when we get back this upcoming year, stick around, of course you listening to Craig, Peter Sohn, you can get all kinds of information. And in fact, if you sign up for my email list, which is not a heavy marketing. [00:30:02] Believe me, you'll get a bunch of different special reports. So ones I think are going to help you out the most. Craig peterson.com. [00:30:13] Well, we just talked about the future when it comes to chips and our computers, we're going to continue that discuss discussion right now on artificial intelligence and machine learning. What else is going to be important next? [00:30:29] So, what is the future? [00:30:31] We're getting close to, you know, the end of the year and the beginning of the year. So what am I looking forward to? Well, you just got my basic predictions about what's going to happen with chip manufacturing. These various vendors of various devices are going to continue to move away from Intel AMD, et cetera, these general purpose chips and move more to special purpose chips. [00:31:02] Now there's a number of special purpose type designs that have been out there for a very long time. For instance, a six OCB in industry. No, those I programmed some way back when. I have gotten much more complicated, but for instance, when we're putting in systems for a business, we will typically use Cisco systems that have a basics so that everything is extremely fast. [00:31:29] You don't notice any delay and yet it can do very heavy duty filtering. Packet examination, stream examination, because it's being done in hardware. That's the advantage to it. So we're going to see more and more that since Apple's already moved to their own chips, Google has already moved to their own chips, Amazon, their own chips, et cetera. [00:31:53] And there'll always be a need for general purpose chips. In fact, you can say that the apple chips for instance, are fairly. The purpose they're being used in your iOS devices, your iPhone, your iPad, but they're also being used in desktop applications. But if you look more closely at what Apple's done, it has a couple of different types. [00:32:16] Of CPU's inside the chip. So it has the high-performance CPU's that are only engaged when it needs some serious computing going on. It has the low power, lower performance CPU's that are also built into that same chip that now handle kind of background tasks, things. Dated the don't need a whole lot of CPU or don't need to be really fast. [00:32:42] And then it also has graphics processing units that will handle things like screen updates, moving stuff around on the screens. There is a lot of technology in that chip in reality, it's it would use to take three. Completely different sets of chips to do what the one apple chip can do. So it is an example of a special purpose CPU. [00:33:11] We're going to be seeing more and more of those now as a consumer, you're not really going to notice other than, wow, this thing's fast or wow. This battery lasts forever. You're going to have some great, great functionality. And I think we are seeing, because they're spinning. $2 billion a week right now in the industry, you're going to be seeing more of these fabs come online, chip fabrication plants, and they take a long time to build and put up online, but they're going to be making more specialized chips, which I really. [00:33:46] Well, there's an article that came out based on a survey from the I Tripoli. And this is called the impact of technology in 2022. And beyond of these are some global technology leaders. Of course I Tripoli was all about electrical engineering back in the day today, it's more about general technology. But here's the results. [00:34:12] What is important for next year? Now, remember, I don't give investment advice. So don't look at this as things you should be putting your money into. This is just stuff that is good to know and probably should be considered, but this is not again, investment advice. So. Technologies will be the most important in 2022. [00:34:33] While according to this kind of little, little brain trust, if you will, amongst the respondents more than one in five, say that AI and machine learning are going to be very important. What's the difference between artificial intelligence and machine learning. Uh, the lines are blurred nowadays. They used to be a lot more clear machine learning used to be the, the machine, the computer learns it. [00:35:02] Let's say it's working on a factory floor and it has to do some welding on a joint. And the, it has sensors and it learns, oh, okay. Well, this part, when it comes into me may be here, but I might be there and I might be here. So I got to kind of move around a little bit. That's basic machine. Artificial intelligence, which I think is a super set of machine learning, but other people argue the other way, but you know, they don't know what they're talking about. [00:35:30] There is artificial intelligence is where it doesn't even have to be taught how to learn. It. Just figures things out. So it's. When it's built, talk to learn where that piece that it needs to weld is likely going to be and how to find it. It just knows. Okay, well, I'm supposed to weld. So how do I do that? [00:35:56] That's much more of an artificial intelligence. So that's number one, artificial intelligence next. Cloud computing 20%. Now my opinion on cloud computing is not very high, frankly, because cloud is just the name for somebody else's computer cloud computing does not mean it's safer. It does not mean that it requires less work on your part where I think cloud computing can help a business is where. [00:36:30] Push over flow to the cloud. The many businesses that have moved technology to the cloud have moved it back now because frankly, the cloud did not provide them with what they thought they'd get, which is cheaper, better computing. And a lot of the breaches that we're getting nowadays are in the cloud. [00:36:53] People's databases being exposed, applications, being exposed. It's great for hackers because they know. Okay, well, let me see. Amazon has the majority of all cloud computing in the world, so let's just scan Amazon computers and see what we can find. Right. And they're going to find that this bank has this opener, that company has that database available, et cetera, et cetera. [00:37:17] So be careful with that, but they think cloud's number two, five G. 17% that I am very excited about it. And here's why five G is kind of a generic term for the high speed, uh, room wireless data. So think cell phone basically, but why it really matters is it's designed to handle billions of devices. So that you can have a lot of people sharing data and getting to data, sharing a network connection in a densely populated area. [00:37:58] That's where it really, really shined. And then it also has a faster data rate than the older technology. One of the things you'll find as you compare, if you really dig into the technology compare, the various cell companies is that for instance, T mobile, which is who I use has a lower frequency spectrum. [00:38:24] Lower frequencies can not carry as much data for, but what they can do, I'm really oversimplifying. But what they can do is more readily peers, glass, and brick and walls. So T-Mobile's frequencies are lower than Verizon, for instance. So Verizon can get you faster data. But can't get it into as many places and not as well as T-Mobile just really putting this quite simply. [00:38:57] And in fact, just what was it? Two weeks ago, we had a court order stopping the deployment of these higher frequency, 5g networks. Because of complaints from some people, uh, particularly in the avionics, in the airline industry where they're saying, well, they could be squashing some of our critical systems because they're using some of the old satellite frequencies for 5g up in the upper bands. [00:39:25] Anyhow, one of the things that 5g. Which has already been used for is what I was involved with. You know, I was involved with emergency medicine for a long time and I was an EMT I P D uh, back in the day. So almost a paramedic. And think about what could happen now, you're in the back of an ambulance that you could be the hands for the doctor who can be seeing the patient as you're driving down the highway, bringing that person in, because historically I remember this one woman. [00:40:01] Placenta previa and had just soaked through some towels with blood. She was in really bad shape and we were squeezing IVs to get fluid into her. It was, it was incredible. It was something else. And we brought her right in on the gurney, in emergency room and right up to the operating room and put her on the table, right from her ambulance gurney while with five G. [00:40:27] They can be doing that now, not just in an ambulance, but in, in more rural areas, doctors can be operating remotely on someone. It's very cool. This whole tele medicine, including remote surgery. It's huge. So these technology leaders agreed with me on that 24% is the number one, most benefit four or five G telemedicine. [00:40:53] Number two, remote learning and education 20%. Personal and professional day-to-day communications. Think of all of the stuff we're doing now, how much better that's going to get entertainment, sports, live streaming, manufacturing, and assembly transportation, traffic control. Now we're down to 7% and by the way, that's where the cars are talking to each other. [00:41:16] If you have five G. You don't need a mesh because you can use 5g, carbon footprint reduction in energy efficiency. That's 5% and 2% farming and agriculture. Our farming equipment is already using GPS in order to plow fields, planned fields, harvest fields. It's amazing. So there you go. Those are the top pieces of technology that are predicted to influence us next year. [00:41:46] I think it's absolutely correct. And I've got to give you a bit of good news here again. 97% of these people polled agree that their teams are working more closely than ever before. Because of these working from home workplace technologies and apps for office check-in, et cetera. Good news. All around. [00:42:11] Hey, if you want more good news. If you want to know what's happening, even some bad news, I got the right place for you to go. I have five minute little trainings in my emails every week. I have bootcamps again, all of this is the freeze stuff. You imagine what the paid stuff is like, but I want you to understand this. [00:42:32] Okay. Craig, peter.com/subscribe. Do it right now. [00:42:39] I had a good friend this week that had his life's work stolen from him. Yeah. And you know what caused it? It was his passwords. Now, you know what you're supposed to be doing? I'm going to tell you exactly what to do right now. [00:42:55] Well, let's get right down to the whole problem with passwords. [00:43:00] I'm going to tell you a little bit about my friend this week. He has been building a business for. Maybe going on 10 years now, and this business relies on advertising. Most businesses do so in some way, we need to have new customers. There's always some attrition there's customers that go away. So how do we keep them? [00:43:25] Well, we do what we can. How do we get new customers? Well, for him, it was. Advertising, primarily on Facebook. He did some Google ads as well, but Facebook is really where he was focused. So how did he do all of that? Here's the bottom line. You have to, if you are going to be advertising on Facebook, you have to have an advertising account. [00:43:51] Same thing's true with Google. And then on that account, you tie in either your bank account or your credit card. I recommend a credit card so that those transactions can be backed up. And on top of all of that now, of course you have to use a pixel. So the way the tracking works is there are pixels on websites, you know, about those already. [00:44:17] And the bottom line with the pixels. Those are also. Cookie's about the pixels are used to set a cookie so that Facebook knows what sites you've gone to. So he uses those. I use those. In fact, if you go to my website, I have a Facebook pixel, the get set. And the reason for all of that is so that we know with. [00:44:39] I'd be interested in something on the site. So I know that there's a lot of people that are interested in this page or that page. And so I could, I have not ever, but I could now do some advertising and I could send ads to you so that if you were looking at something particular, you'd see ads that were related to that, which is what I've always said. [00:45:04] Is the right way to go. If I'm looking to buy a pickup truck, I love to see ads for different pickup trucks, but if I don't want a car or truck, I don't want to see the ads. Right. It isn't like TV where it seems sometimes every other ad is about. Car or a pickup truck. It drives me kinda crazy because it's a waste of their money in advertising to me because I don't want those things. [00:45:33] And it's also not only just annoying in money wasting. There are better ways to do targeting. And that's what the whole online thing is. Anyways, I told you about that because he had set up this pixel years ago. Basically the Facebook pixel gets to know you gets to know. All of the people who like you, that might've bought from you. [00:45:58] Cause you can have that pixel track people through your site, your purchase site, they know what you purchase on the shopping cart, et cetera. And you can identify these people over on Facebooks and them ads because they abandoned the cart or whatever it is you want to do there. There's just a whole ton of stuff that you can do for these people. [00:46:19] And it's so bad. It is so valuable. It takes years to build up that account years to put that pixel in place. And our friend here, he had done exactly that. Then he found that his account had been compromised. And that is a very bad thing in this case because the bad guy used his account to place ads. Now there's really two or three problems here. [00:46:52] We'll talk about one of them is. Why was the bad guy going after him? Well, he has been running ads on Facebook for a long time. So as far as Facebook is concerned, his account is credible. All of the ads he runs don't have to be reviewed by a human being. They can, can go up almost immediate. He doesn't have to wait days for some of these things to go up. [00:47:21] So our bad guy can get an account like his, that has years worth of advertising credibility, and now start advertising things that are not correct. So there again is part of the value of having one of these older accounts for advertising. And so the bad guy did that use his credibility. And then secondly, he used 25 grand worth of my friend's money to run ads. [00:47:51] Also of course, very bad, very, very bad. So I sat down with him. In fact, it was this last week and I was out on a trip with just kind of a vacation trip. It was absolutely wonderful. You know, I, I never just do vacation. Right. It's always business plus work whenever I do anything like this, but I was on. [00:48:11] Trip last week. And so my eldest son who works closely with me, and he's also part of the FBI InfraGuard program. I had him reach out to my friend and they, he helped them out and they talked back and forth. Here's the problem that he has. And I'm trying to figure out a really good way to solve this. And I haven't figured that out yet. [00:48:35] And you know, if you guys have an idea because you are the best and brightest, you really are. Go ahead and drop me an email me@craigpeterson.com if you know, a good way around this particular problem, which is he has. This Facebook could count as well as many other accounts, including his website, hosting account, his email account, et cetera. [00:48:57] And. Uh, he has people who manage his ads for him who manages website for him, who put up some of the promotions for him, you know, the advertising and everything else. So these are third-party. This is what we generically call a supply chain, risk people who are not him have access to his stuff, his private stuff. [00:49:24] And, well, how does he do it or how did he do it? Is he went ahead and gave them. Access by giving them accounts or passwords. How well were they guarding their passwords and their accounts? So the first thing I had my friend do was go to have I been poned.com. You'll find that online at have HIV. E I been. [00:49:50] Poem dispelled PW, N E d.com. So I took him to have I been poned and I had him put in his email address, the one he uses the most and it showed up in five different. Hacks data dumps. So these are five different sites where he had used that same email address in this case. And he found out that in those five cases, the bad guy's got his passwords and personal information. [00:50:21] All bad. Right. And he went ahead and cleaned it up. So I said, well, put in the password because have I been, poned also let you check your password, just see if it has been used by someone else and then stolen. So there are billions of passwords in this database. It's incredibly. Of all of these known passwords. [00:50:44] So he put in his password and no it had not been stolen, but the problem is how about the people that were managing his ads on Facebook and managing his Facebook ad. We're the usernames, which are typically the email addresses and the passwords kept securely. That's a supply chain thing I'm talking about, and that's where I I'd love to get him. [00:51:12] But from you guys, me@craigpeterson.com. If you think you have a good answer, What we've been doing. And our advice to him was use one password. That's the only one to use. I don't trust the last pass anymore. After their last big hack where they got hacked, uh, one password, the digit one password. And go ahead. [00:51:33] And set it up. And in a business scenario, you can have multiple vaults. So have a vault. That's just for people that are dealing with your Facebook ad account, maybe have another vault for people who are posting for you on Facebook. Or better yet when it comes to Facebook, go ahead and have an intermediary that is trusted, uh, kind of like the, if this, then that, or there's a few of them out there that can see that you put the post up on the website and automatically posted on Facebook. [00:52:09] So you don't have to get. All of these people, your passwords, but again, it's up to you. You got to kind of figure out if that makes sense to you that those are the types of things that I think you can do. And that is what we do as well. Now, one of the beauties of using one password like that, where you're not sharing all of your passwords to everything you're sharing, the minimum amount of login information that you possibly can share is that if they leave your employees, All you have to do is remove their access to the appropriate vault or volts, or maybe all of your volts. [00:52:49] And this is what I've done with people that worked for me in the U S and people would work for me overseas and there have been a lot of them and it has worked quite well for me. So with one pass, We can enforce password integrity. We can make sure the passwords on stolen. One password ties automatically into have I been postponed. [00:53:12] So, you know, if a password has been exposed, if it's been stolen online, it's a great way to go. Now I've got an offer for you guys who are listening. I have a special report that I've sold before on passwords, and it goes through talks about one password. He talks about last pass, which I'm no longer really recommending, but give some comparisons and how you can use these things. [00:53:35] Make sure you go and email me right now. Me, M e@craigpetersohn.com. That's Emmy at Craig Peter Sohn, S O. Dot com and just ask me for the password special report, and I'll be glad to get that on off to you. There is a lot of good detail in there and helps you, whether you're a home user or a business. [00:54:02] So the next step in your security is multi-factor authentication. Interesting study out saying that about 75% of people say that they've used it for work or for business, but the hard numbers, I don't think the. [00:54:18] One of the things that you have to do is use good passwords. And the best way to do that is to use a password manager. [00:54:27] I was talking about a friend of mine who had been hacked this last week and his account was hacked. His Facebook ad account was hacked. We asked him if we could reach out to. BI and he said, sure. So we checked with the FBI and they're looking to turn this into a case, a real case, because they've never seen this type of thing, the hijacking of an advertising account who hijacked it. [00:54:56] And why did they hide jacket? Was this in preparation maybe for. Playing around with manipulating our next election cycle coming up. There could be a lot of things that they're planning on doing and taking over my friend's account would be a great way to have done it. So maybe they're going to do other things here. [00:55:15] And our friends at the FBI are looking into it. How now do you also keep your data safe? Uh, easily simply. Well, when we're talking about these types of accounts, the thing to look at is known as two factor authentication or multifactor authentication. You see my friend, if he had been using multi-factor authentication. [00:55:42] I would not have been vulnerable. Even if the bad guys had his username, email address and his password, they still would not be able to log in without having that little six digit code. That's the best way to do multi-factor authentication. When we're talking about this code, whether it's four or 5, 6, 8 digits long, we should not be using our cell phones to receive those. [00:56:16] At least not as text messages, those have a problem because our phone numbers can be stolen from us and they are stolen from us. So if we're a real target, in other words, they're going after you. Joe Smith and they know you have some, $2 million in your account. So they're going after you while they can, in most cases take control of your phone. [00:56:45] Now you might not know it and it doesn't have to be hacked. All they have to do is have the phone company move your phone number to a new phone. Once. So that means one of the things you need to do is contact your telephone vendor, whoever it is, who's providing new that service. That's a company like Verizon sprint T-Mobile, uh, a T and T one of those companies that are giving you cell service, you have to contact them and set up a pass. [00:57:15] So that if they have a phone call coming in and that phone call can be faked. So it looks like it's coming from your phone, even if there was a phone call coming in, whether it's coming from your phone or not, they have to get that password or pass code that you gave them. And once they have that pass code now, Right. [00:57:37] Uh, and that's great, but if you don't have that in there targeting you specifically, then you're in trouble. So for many of us really, it, it may not make a huge difference. Uh, but I would do it anyways. I have done it with every one of my cell phone carriers now. A couple of decades set up a password. So the next step is this multifactor authentication. [00:58:03] If I'm not supposed to get it via text message to my phone, how do I get it? Well, there are a couple of apps out there. There's a free one called Google authentic. And Google authenticator runs on your phone. And once it's there on your phone and you are setting it up on a website, so Facebook, for instance, your bank, most websites out there, the bigger ones, all you have to do is say, I want to set up multi-factor authentication, and then it'll ask you a case. [00:58:34] So how do you want to do it? And you can say, I want an app and they will display. A Q R code. That's one of those square codes with a bunch of little lines inside of it. You're seeing QR codes before they become very common. And you take your phone with the Google authenticator app. Take a picture. Of that little QR code on the screen, and now it will start sinking up so that every 30 seconds Google authenticator on your phone will change that number. [00:59:08] So when you need to log back into that website, it's going to ask you for the code. You just pull up Google authenticator and there's the code. So that's the free way to do it. And not necessarily the easiest way to. Again, going back to one password. I use this thing exclusively. It is phenomenal for keeping my passwords, keeping them all straight and then encrypted vault, actually in multiple encrypted vault it's so that I can share some of them. [00:59:37] Some of them are just strictly private, but it also has that same authenticator functionality built right into it. Microsoft has its own authenticator, but you can tell Microsoft that you want to use the standard authenticator. Of course, Microsoft has to do everything differently. Right. But you can tell it. [01:00:00] And I do tell it, I want to use a regular authenticator app, not Microsoft authentication. By the way. That's why I advise you to do don't use the Microsoft authenticator, just use one authenticator for all of the site, and then Microsoft will give you that same QR code. And then you can take that picture and you're off and running. [01:00:20] Next time you log in, it asks you for the code and instead of texting it to you to your phone smarter, otherwise it will not. That require you to open up your authenticator. So for me, for instance, when I'm logging into a website, it comes up and asks for the username, asked for the password. Both of those are filled out automatically by one password for me. [01:00:44] And then it asks for that code, uh, indication code and. One password automatically puts it into my pace to buffer copy paste, buffer, and I just paste it in and they they've got the code. So I don't have to remember the codes. I don't remember passwords. I don't have to remember usernames or email addresses. [01:01:05] One password remembers them all for me. Plus it'll remember notes and other things. So you can tell, I really like one password. We use it with all of our clients. That's what we have for them. And it does meet even a lot of these DOD requirement on top of. Depending again, how much security you need. We will use duo D U O and it also has this authenticator functionality and we will also use UBI keys. [01:01:37] These are those hardware key. They do oh, can provide you with hardware tokens. Those are those little tokens that can go onto your key ring. That show a changing six digit number every 30 seconds. And that's the same number that would be there in your smartphone app. Your one password or Google authenticator smartphone. [01:01:59] Hopefully, I didn't confuse you too much. I think most of the reason we're not using the security we should is because we're not sure how to, and we don't know what we're going to be. And I can see that being a big problem. So if you have questions about any of this, if you would like a copy of my password security, special report, just send an email to me. [01:02:25] M e@craigpetersohn.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's S O n.com. I'll be glad to send it to you. Also, if you sign up for my newsletter there on my website@craigpeterson.com, you are going to get. I was hold little series of these special reports to help you out, get you going. And then every week I send out a little bit of training and all of my articles for the week. [01:02:56] It's usually six to 10 articles that I consider to be important so that, you know, what's going on in the cybersecurity world. So you can. With it for yourself, for your family, for your business. Craig peterson.com. Stick around everybody. We'll be right back again. Craig peterson.com. . [01:03:20] According to researchers. 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram made them feel worse. And you know what Facebook knew and knows Instagram is toxic for teen girls. [01:03:37] There's a great article that came out in the wall street journal. [01:03:40] And I'm going to read just a little bit here from some of the quotes first. When I went on Instagram, all I saw were images of chiseled bodies, perfect. Abs and women doing 100 burpees in 10 minutes, said, Ms. Uh, now 18, who lives in Western Virginia. Amazing. Isn't it. The one that I opened now with 32% of teen girls said that when they felt bad about their bodies, Instagram, I made them feel worse. [01:04:12] So that is some studies again, that looks like, um, yeah, these were researchers inside Instagram and they said this in a March, 2020 slide presentation that was posted to Facebook's internal message board that was reviewed by the wall street journal quote comparisons on Instagram can change how young women view and describe themselves. [01:04:38] Apparently for the past three years, Facebook has been conducting studies into how Instagram is affecting its millions of young users. Now, for those of you who don't know what Instagram is, it allows these users to create little stories, to have. Pictures videos of things that they're doing, and it it's a lifestyle type thing you might've heard of course, of how this, this, uh, I don't know what it is. [01:05:09] Kidnapping murder plot. These, this young couple and the body I think was found up in Wyoming. Uh, I'm trying to remember, but, uh, of her and it's yeah, there it is. It wasn't my OMI. And I'm looking up right now, Gabby potato. That's who it is. She was what they called a micro influence. And I know a lot of people who can loom, that's what they want to be. [01:05:37] There's a, a young lady that stayed with us for a few months. She had no other place to live. And so we invited her in here and, uh, we got some interesting stories to tell about that experience. And it's, you know, a little, a little sad, but anyhow, she got back up on her feet and then she decided she was going to become an influence. [01:06:01] And what an influencer is, is someone that has a lot of followers. And of course, a lot means different numbers. You get these massive influencers that have tens of millions of people that quote, follow unquote them. And of course, just think of the Kardashians they're famous for. Being famous, nothing else. [01:06:23] Right. Uh, they have subsequently done some pretty amazing things. At least a few of them have. And we've got one of those daughters who now was the first earliest billionaire, I think it was ever youngest. So they have accomplished some amazing things after the fact, but they got started. By just becoming famous by posting on these social media sites. [01:06:48] So you get a micro influencer, like Gabby Petito, who is out there posting things and pictures. And you look at all of these pictures and, oh my gosh, they're up at this national park. Oh, isn't she so cute. Oh, look at her boyfriend. They'll look so good together. And people. Fall for that image, right? It's just like Photoshopping these pictures of models, changing them. [01:07:16] There've been some real complaints about those over the years. So Instagram sets these kids up with these pictures of people that are just totally unrealistic. One of the slides from a 2019 presentation says, quote, we make body. Excuse me. We make body image issues worse for one in three teenage girls teams, blame Instagram for increases in the rate of anxiety. [01:07:49] And depression said another slide. This reaction was unprompted and consistent across. Groups among teens is this according to the wall street journal who reported suicidal thoughts, 13% of British users, and 6% of American users trace the desire to kill themselves to Instagram. Again, according to one of these presentations, isn't this just absolutely amazing. [01:08:18] And you might've heard it discussed a little bit. I saw some articles about it, obviously in the news wall street journal had it, but this is a $100 billion company, Instagram. That's what their annual revenues. More than 40% of Instagram users are 22 years old and younger. And about 22 million teens log into Instagram in the U S each day, compared with 5 million that log into Facebook, the younger users have been declining. [01:08:57] Facebook it's getting, uh, the population there is getting older and older on Facebook. In average teens in the us spend 50% more time on Instagram than they do on Facebook. Uh, and also tick-tock, by the way I took talk has now surpassed YouTube in some of these metrics, quote, Instagram is well-positioned to resonate. [01:09:20] And when with young people said a researcher's slide posted internally. Inside Facebook and post said there is a path to growth. If Instagram can continue their trajectory. Amazing. So Facebook's public phase has really tried to downplay all of these negative effects that the Instagram app has on teens, particularly girls, and hasn't made its research public or available to academics or lawmakers who have asked for it. [01:09:54] Quote, the research that we've seen is that using social apps to connect with other people. Positive mental health benefits said mark Zuckerberg. He's the CEO of course of Facebook. Now this was 2020. In March one at a congressional hearing, he was asked about children and mental health. So you see how he really lawyered the words that they can have, can have positive mental health benefits, but Facebook's own internal research seems to show that they know it has a profound negative effect on a large percentage of their users. [01:10:36] Instagram had Adam Moseri told reporters in may of this year, that research he had seen suggest the app's effect on team's wellbeing is likely quote quite small. So what the wall street journal seems to be pointing out here is that Facebook is not giving us the truth on any of this stuff. It's really sad. [01:10:58] We've got to be careful. No, apparently Mr. Moseri also said that he's been pushing very hard for Facebook to really take their responsibilities more broadly. Uh, he says they're proud of this research. I'm just kind of summarizing this before we run out of time here, but it shows the document. Uh, internal documents on Facebook show that they are having a major impact on teen, mental health, political discourse, and even human trafficking. [01:11:36] These, this internal research offers an unparalleled picture. Uh, Courtney told the wall street journal of how Facebook is acutely aware that the products and systems central to its business success routine. Fail great article. I've got it in this week's newsletter. You can just open it up and click through on the link to the wall street journal. [01:12:01] They have a pay wall and I kind of hate to use payroll articles, but this one, this one's well worth it. And they do give you some free articles every month. So if you're not on that newsletter, you can sign up right now. Craig peterson.com. You'll get the next one. If you miss a link today, if you want some, you know, the special report on passwords, et cetera, just email me directly. [01:12:29] Give me a few days to respond. Uh, but me M e@craigpeterson.com. That's me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:12:41] We've all worked from home from time to time. At least if we're somehow in the information it industry, I want to talk right now about why you need a personal laptop. Even if the business is providing you with a laptop. [01:12:57] Laptops are something that was designed to be personal, but many of us are using them as our main computer. [01:13:06] I know I often am using my laptop, a couple of my kids and my wife. It's really their main computer, even though they all have other computers that they could potentially be using, laptops are just handy and you have them with, you can take them with you. We've got workstation set up that are kind of. [01:13:27] Workstations, if you will, where there are three screens set up and they're all hooked up into one central screen controller that then has a USBC connection that goes right into the, your laptop. So you can be sitting there with four screens on your Mac laptop on your Mac pro if you needed four screens, it's really handy. [01:13:53] No question. Many of us have a laptop for home and a laptop for business. And many of us also look at it and say, oh wow, this is a great laptop I got from work. It's much better than my home laptop. And you start to use the business laptop for work. At home. Okay. That's what it's for. Right. But then we start to use that business laptop for personal stuff. [01:14:25] That's where the problems start. We've seen surveys out there that are shown. Then half of workers are using work issue devices for personal tasks that might be doing it at home. They might be doing it at the office. Things like personal messages, shopping, online, social media, reading the news. So the prospect of using your work laptop as your only laptop, not just for work, but also for maybe watching some movies, group chat and messaging, reading, fan fiction, paying bills, emailing to family or friend. [01:15:06] It just seems not. It's so tempting. It's just natural. I'm on it. I'm on it all day long. Why wouldn't I just use it? And this is particularly true for people who are working from home, but we have to be careful with that. It's really something that you shouldn't be doing for a couple of reasons. One that. [01:15:30] Top that's a business. Laptop is the property of the business. It's just like walking home with boxes, full of pencils and paper back in the old days, it is not yours to use for personal use. We also have to assume, assume since it is the company's laptop that hopefully it's been secure. Hopefully they haven't set up. [01:15:57] So it's going through a special VPN at the office and it's going through special filters, maybe snort filters or something else. That's doing some deeper inspection on what's coming through your laptop. Well, there are also likely on that laptop. Tools that are monitoring your device. Things like key loggers, biometric tracking, Jill location, software that tracks your web browser and social media behavior, screenshot, snapshot software, maybe even your cam. [01:16:34] Is being used to keep track of you. I know a number of the websites that I've used in the past to hire temporary workers. Those workers have to agree to have you monitor what they're doing. These hourly workers, subtle take screenshots of their screen, unbeknownst to them. Yeah. Pictures from the cameras at random intervals. [01:16:58] Again, unbeknownst to them, it'll track what they're doing. And so I can now go in and say, okay, well he billed me five hours for doing this. And I look at his screen and guess what? He wasn't doing that for all of those five hours that he just billed me. Well, the same thing could be true for your company, even if you're not paid by the hour. [01:17:23] Right now, we're looking at stats that show over half of the businesses that are providing laptops for the employees to use more than half of them are using monitoring software. And through this whole lockdown, the usage of these different types of monitoring systems has grown. Now there's some of the programs you're using. [01:17:50] You might be VPN in, you might be using slack or G suite enterprise, all good little pieces of software. They can monitor that obviously, but it goes all the way through to the business. And using your slack access as paid for, by the businesses also idiotic to do things like send messages to your buddies, set up drinks after work, complain to other people about someone else in the business, your boss, or otherwise your it, people at the business can see all of that. [01:18:31] They can see what you're doing with slack. Even if you have a separate personal account. It's still more likely that you'll end up mixing them up if you're logged into both on the same computer. So the bottom line is if you are on a work computer, whether it's a laptop or something else, you can reasonably assume that I T can see everything. [01:18:56] That's not. They own it. Okay. And they have to do some of this stuff to protect themselves. We put software on laptops for companies not to spy on employees. That's none of our business, but we put software on computers for employees. To make sure they stay safe. Think of what happens when your computer, your laptop, whatever it might be connects to the company's network. [01:19:25] Now that can be through a VPN. It can be because you take your laptop home or on the road when you're traveling and you bring it back into the office. If that computer is infected, somehow now you've brought that infection into the office. And that's how a lot of the malware works. It goes from computer to computer. [01

The Update with Adam Copeland
Eno Sarris breaks down the winners of the MLB Awards

The Update with Adam Copeland

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 17:42


Adam Copeland is joined by Athletic MLB Writer Eno Sarris to break down the winners of the MLB Awards and if he thinks anyone got snubbed. The guys talk about the rookie of the year formula on how they count if a player is a rookie or not and if they think Randy Arozarena should've been eligible. They debate the NL Cy Young award going to Corbin Burnes and if Wheeler should've been a better option. Eno brings up an interesting idea to try to speed up the game and make inning pitched a bigger thing. Shohei Ohtani won the AL MVP and the guys discuss if it's fair that Ohtani is able to get credit for both hitting and batting, which makes his WAR much higher than all the other players. You can check out all of Eno's great Baseball & Beer coverage by visiting: https://theathletic.com/author/eno-sarris/ And you can follow Eno on Twitter @enosarris Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Heaney to the Dodgers, Verlander's Workout, and Changes in Oakland, Cincinnati & Texas

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 53:11


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss the early happening at this week's GM Meetings, Justin Verlander's workout and comeback bid, Andrew Heaney to the Dodgers, the Mets' ongoing search for a new general manager, and big changes in store for the A's, Reds and Rangers this winter.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Qualifying Offers, New First-Rounders & Getting Right Back Into Drafts

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 64:36


Eno and DVR discuss the players on the receiving end of Qualifying Offers, as well as a few notable omissions including Clayton Kershaw, Carlos Rodón and Jon Gray, before examining the first round of their very early 2022 Draft Champions Leagues. Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Atlanta Brings Home the 2021 World Series!

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 44:33


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss Atlanta's dominant 7-0 win over Houston to capture the franchise's first World Series title since 1995 on the strength of a massive Jorge Soler homer and an excellent Game 6 start from Max Fried.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
World Series Game 6 Preview & Bob Melvin Heads to San Diego

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 48:23


Eno, Britt & DVR preview Game 6 of the World Series as the Astros try to keep their season alive, and discuss the latest changes in San Diego including the hiring of new manager Bob Melvin.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Atlanta Heads Back to Houston With a 3-2 World Series Lead

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 43:30


Eno and DVR discuss a busy three-game weekend in the World Series as the Astros did just enough to avoid elimination in Atlanta despite facing a 4-0 deficit after the first inning of Game 5. Should Ian Anderson have been left in the game longer in Game 3? How did Game 4 not play out more like Game 5? Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk
How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You

Craig Peterson's Tech Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 85:09


How Ransomware, Trojanware, and Adware Hurt You. And Why ExpressVPN Isn't Safe to Use. Ransomware, Trojanware Adware. What's the difference between these different types of malware.? And when it comes down to our computers, which should we worry about the most and which should we worry about the most? [Automated Transcript Follows] [00:00:17] There are a lot of different types of malware that are out there and they're circulating and scaring us. [00:00:23] And I think for good reason, in many cases, ransomware of course, is the big one and it is up, up, up. It has become just so common. Now that pretty much everybody is going to be facing a serious ransomware attack within the next 12 months. The numbers are staggering. And what are they doing while now they're getting you with the double whammy. [00:00:50] The first whammy is they encrypt your data. Your computers are encrypted, everything on them. So you can't use them anymore. Bottom line. Yeah, they'll boot they'll run enough in order to be able for you to pay that ransom. But any document that you might care about, any PDF, any word doc, and the spreadsheet is going to be encrypted. [00:01:14] And the idea behind that is. You have to pay in order to get that decryption key about 50% of the time. Yeah. About half of the time. Even if you pay the ransom, you'll get your data back the rest of the time. No, you you'll never see it again. So what do you do about that type of ransomware? Well, obviously most people just pay the rent. [00:01:39] But that's gone up as well. We've seen over a hundred percent increase in the amount of ransom people happy. So what's the best thing to do. What's the easiest thing to do in order to help you with this type of ransomware while it's obviously to have good backups. Now I'm going to be doing a bootcamp. [00:02:00] We're going to talk about this and a workshop. I really want to get going with these one week long workshops. So we'll do a, at least a couple of times a month in these boot camps that we'll do pretty much every week here, but they're coming up fairly soon. You'll only know about them. If you are on my email list, that is Craig peterson.com and the number one thing that you can do to. [00:02:27] You when you're hit with this type of rent somewhere, because if you're not taking all of the other precautions, you should be digging under really good that you're going to get hit the better than 50%. And once you do is have a good backup, and I want to warn everybody because I've seen this again and against people just keep making this mistake, probably because they don't get it. [00:02:51] They don't understand why and where and how, when it comes to ransom. The mistake is they do a backup to a local desk. Now, many times the backup is on a thumb drive or USB drive. So you just go to the big box store. You go to Amazon, you order an external drive. You're just amazed how cheap they are. [00:03:16] Nowadays. Once you've got that drive, you plug it in. You turn on some backup software. Maybe it's something you've used for some years, maybe. If you have a Mac, you're just using the built-in backup software. Even the windows operating system now comes with some built-in backup and you think you're off and running because every so often it back. [00:03:40] If we're using a Mac is smart enough to not only back up your whole machine, but as you're editing files, it's going to go ahead and make a backup of that file as you're editing it. So if there is a crash or something else, you're not going to lose much. I just love the way apple does that. Huge problem. [00:03:59] Because if the disc is attached to your machine, or let's say that disc is on a file server, cause you're smart, right? You set up some network attached storage of some sort and your machine has access to it. And so you're sending it off of your machine to a central. Well, you still got a problem because if your machine can read or more particularly right to a location on your network or locally, that ransomware is going to also encrypt everything, it can find there. [00:04:37] So, if you are sharing a network drive and you get ransomware, when you remember the odds are better than 50%, you're gonna get it. Then what happens? What would this type of ransomware it not only encrypts the files on your computer, but encrypts them on the backup as well. And it also encrypts them on any of the. [00:04:58] File servers or network attached storage the, to have on your network. So now everything's encrypted. You wonder why someone and people pay the ransom? Oh, that's a large part of the reason right there. And I keep saying this type of ransomware because there isn't another type of ransomware and they usually go hand in hand. [00:05:21] The bad guys were not making enough money off of holding your files. Rants. So the next thing the bad guys have done is they've gone to a different type of extortion. This one is, Hey, if you don't pay us, we are going to release your files to the world. Now they might do it on a dark website. They might do it on a publicly available site, which is what many of them are starting to do now. [00:05:51] And you're going to either be embarrassed or subject to a lot of fines or both, because now if your files have. Confidential information. Let's say it's your intellectual property. Now, anybody who bothers to search online can find your intellectual property out there. If you have anything that's personally identifiable information. [00:06:18] And it gets out. Now you are subject to major fines. In fact, in some states like California and Massachusetts, you are subject to fines. Even if the bad guys don't post it online. So that's the second type of ransomware and it's a bad type. And usually what'll happen is the bad guys, get their software on your machine and they can do it in a number of different ways. [00:06:45] One of the popular ways to do it now is to just break in because. Our businesses, we've, we've set up something called remote desktop, and we're using remote desktop for our users to get in. And maybe we're using some form of a VPN to do it with, or maybe we've made the mistake of using express VPN. And, uh, we have that now connected up to our homes and we think that that's keeping us safe. [00:07:13] And I got a few things to say about that as well. These VPN services. What happens now while Microsoft remote desktop has been under major attack and there are some major flaws. Some of these were patched more than a year ago now, but according to recent studies, 60%, almost two thirds of businesses have not applied the patches. [00:07:42] You know, th this is basic stuff. And I understand how hard it can be and it can be confusing and you can break your systems, but you have to weigh that against well, what's going to happen if our systems are broken into, because we didn't apply the patch. So that's the second type of ransomware and that's what most people are afraid of and for good reason. [00:08:07] And one of the things we do for businesses and we do ransomware audits, we have a look at your systems, your firewalls, et cetera, and make recommendations to. Man. I got to talk about this too, cause it really upset me this week. I signed up for a webinar just to see what was going on. There's a company out there that sells these marketing systems to managed services providers. [00:08:33] And I, I, I had to turn it off like instantly because it was just such. Garbage that they were telling managed services providers MSPs to do. I couldn't believe it. So this guy was talking about how, again, I turned it back on and I said, Hey, I've got to watch us anyways, because I need to know what's going on. [00:08:54] And this guy was telling these managed services providers, how they can double their clothes. I couldn't believe this guy. Cause he was saying that what they do is they offer to do a ransomware audit for businesses and they say, normally we charge $6,000 to do a ransomware audit, but I tell you what we'll do it for you for. [00:09:20] Now, this is a guy that he had an MSP managed services provider. Apparently he had started it and he was bringing in more than $1 million per month in revenue. Can you imagine that monthly recurring revenue over a million dollars? And so he's telling people businesses, Hey, I have a $6,000 audit that we'll do. [00:09:47] For free, Hey people, how long have we said, if you're not paying for something your, the product remember Facebook, right? Google, Instagram, all of those guys, Twitter, you don't pay for it, but your information is the product. So what's this guy doing well, guess what? His audit, it's going to show his audit. [00:10:10] It's going to show that you need him. And he's sucked in hundreds of businesses and he didn't even know what he was doing when it came to the audits or protecting them. It is insane. What's going on out there. I am ashamed of my industry, absolutely ashamed of it. You know, I've got my first attack, successful attack against my company back in 91 92. [00:10:42] And I learned this stuff because I had to, and I help you guys because I don't want you to get stuck. Like I was so important, important word of advice. If you want to nod it, go to someone that charges you for the audit. That's going to do a real one. It's going to give you real advice that you can really need and use rather than, Hey, you knew do use me. [00:11:11] Because my free audit tells you so, so many scams. [00:11:15] What is ad where in what is crypto, where these are two types of real, kind of bad things. Won't gray areas, things that are hurting us, our mobile devices, our businesses. And our homes. [00:11:32] Adware is also a type of malware that's been around a long time. But it does live in a gray area. [00:11:42] And that gray area is between basically marketing and, uh, well outright fraud. And I don't even want to call it just marketing because it's very aggressive market. What they will do with add where is they? They will have some JavaScript code or something else that's embedded on a webpage, and that's usually how you get it. [00:12:09] And then once it's in, in your browser, it sits there and it pops up things. So it'll pop up an ad for this, pop up an ad for that, even if it's. Uh, part of the site that you're on right now, and it can live for months or years on your computer. We've known for a long time about ad where on the windows environment and how it has just been just terribly annoying at the very least Microsoft and genetic Explorer. [00:12:40] One of the worst web browsers ever. Perpetrated on humankind was well-known for this. And of course, Microsoft got rid of internet Explorer, and then they came up with her own symposer browser, the edge browser that was also openly scorned. And so Microsoft got rid of their edge browser and switched over to basically Google Chrome chromium, and then changed his name to the edge browser. [00:13:11] And so you think you're running edge, but you're kind of not, you kind of are. So they did all of that in order to help with compatibility and also to help with some of these problems that people have had using that Microsoft browser online, very, very big problems. So what can you do about it and what does it do to you and where can be very. [00:13:37] You might've had it before words always popping up again and again and again on your browser, just so crazy knowing it it's insane, but it can also be used to spy on where you're going online and potentially to, to infect you with something even worse. Sometimes some of this ad where we'll purposely click on ads, that the people who gave you the ad were, are using as kind of like a clickbait type thing. [00:14:09] So you go to a website and it was. Automatically click certain ads and click on unbeknownst to you, right? It's as though you went there so that people have to pay for that ad. And sometimes aids are very, very complicated. Sometimes they'll use. In order to drive a competitor out of business or out of the market, because the ads are so expensive because so many people are supposedly clicking on the ads. [00:14:40] But in reality, you didn't click on the ad. You're not going to see that page that you supposedly clicked on, and it's going to cost that advertiser money, whole bunch of money. You might not care. Right. But it is. Ad ware over on the Mac, however, is the only real malware menace at all I had to where is something that choosed fairly frequently on the Mac? [00:15:09] It is pretty darn easy to get rid of. And as a general rule, it doesn't work very well on the Mac. Although I have seen some cases where it got very, very sticky. Where someone ended up installing it, it wasn't just running in the browser, but they installed it on their Mac, which is something you should never do. [00:15:29] But apple has some things in place to help stop any of this from happening. And it's gotten a lot better. I haven't seen this problem in a couple of years, but apple is using the signature based blocking technology called export. They also have at apple, this developer based notarization of apps. And so the run of the mill malware, which includes most of this Al where really can't find a foothold. [00:15:57] But I want to remind everybody that if they can get Al add where onto your computer, they might be able to get something worse. So you really got to keep an eye out for no two ways about it. There are some companies out there, for instance, there's this one. Parrot, which is a program linked to this Israeli marketing firm that gains persistence on your browser and potentially could gain root access to the Mac system. [00:16:30] So careful, careful on all fronts now. Anti-malware stuff that we use for our clients is called amp, which is an advanced malware protection system. That's been developed by our friends over at Cisco it's amp is very, very good. Unfortunately, you cannot get it unless you buy it from somebody like us and you have to buy so many seats for some of this stuff, it gets gets expensive quickly. [00:17:00] Um, if you can't do that much, a lot of people like Malwarebytes, there are some very good things about it, but be careful because in order for this to work, this is Railey parrot software to work. It has a fake install. So again, it's just be careful if you know how apple installed software, you know that unless you have instigated it, it's not going to be installed. [00:17:30] You're not just going to see an installer. And say, Hey, we're apple install us. Right? Apple just does it in the background when it comes to updates patches. But they're very sneaky here trying to install things like the Adobe floor. Player, which has been deprecated. Deprecated is completely now gone from Mac systems and from windows systems, you should not be using flash at all anymore. [00:18:02] It was very, very bad. So up becomes you, you go to wound stole the leaders flash player, or, and I'm sure they're going to change this or something else, right? It won't be flashed in a future. It'll be a Adobe. Would you also don't need on a Mac. So anyhow, that's what you got to be careful of ad were still a big problem in windows. [00:18:25] Not much as much as it used to be. Uh, thanks to the change to Google Chrome, which Microsoft has rebranded as of course its own edge browser. Much of a problem at all on Macs, but be very, very careful in either platform about installing software that you did not start installing. Now earlier this year, there's a security firm called red Canary that found something that's been named silver Sparrow. [00:18:58] That was on a. 30,000 Mac computers. And apparently the developers for this malware had already adapted it to apples and one chip architecture and have distributed this binary, this program as a universal binary. Now in the macro, the member doesn't just use Intel. It used to use power PCs and then it used Intel. [00:19:21] And now it's using its own architecture for the chips themselves. So a universal binary is something that will run on Mac Intel based and Mac architecture base. But, uh, the bottom line is that this proof of concept. Malware, if you will had no payload. So we know it's out there, we seen it now on almost 30,000 Mac computers, but at this point it's not really doing much, much at all. [00:19:53] So. These are malicious search engine results and they're directing victims to download these PKGs, which are Mac packaged format installers based on network connections from your browser shortly before download. So just be very careful about all of that. It can be something as annoying as malware or something as a malicious. [00:20:17] Well, potentially as ransomware. Particularly if you're running windows, Hey, if you want to find out more about this, if you want to get into some of my free courses here, we got free boot camps coming up. Make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. More than glad to send you my show notes, a little bit of training, and of course, let you attend these free bootcamps that are now to sell you stuff, but solve problems for you. [00:20:49] Hey, if you use VPNs to try and keep yourself safe, particularly if you use express VPN. Wow. What just came out is incredible. It is anything but safe and secure. [00:21:06] Express VPN was purchased by a company called Cape K A P E. Cape is a company that had changed its name because oh, things were bad. [00:21:19] Right. It was originally founded under the name of cross writer. And you might've seen notices from your anti-malware software over the years for everything from Malwarebytes on saying that, oh, it blew up. To this cross writer piece of malware, most of the time it's ad ware, but it is really interesting to see because this company was founded by a person who was part of the Israeli secret service. Right? So it wasn't of course not. It's not called the secret service over there in Israel. And it, frankly, it compares to our NSA, you know, no such agency. Yeah. It's part of unit 8,200 in the Israeli intelligence military. And it's been dubbed, of course, Israel's NSA. Teddy Saggy, which was one of these investors also was mentioned in the Panama papers. [00:22:24] Remember those? We talked about those back in 2016, those were leaked and that showed these law firm, this one particular law firm in panel. And that we're sheltering assets for people all over the world. And so now that express VPN is owned by this company that is, this company built entirely by intelligence agents for almost a billion. [00:22:55] Dollars in cash and stock purchases. That's a much, they sold express VPN for almost a billion dollars, which is kind of crazy when you think of it as a VPN service, but makes a lot of sense. If you're going to want to monitor what people are doing, where they're going, maybe even break into their systems or better choice than a VPN provider and the. [00:23:20] The company has been buying up VPN providers and is now the proud owner of express VPN. If you attended my VPN workshop that I had, oh, it's probably been a year and I'm going to start doing these again. I promise, I promise. I promise, but you know how much I just like VPNs. In fact, one of you guys, I'm sorry, I forgot your name. [00:23:46] Send me. A couple of weeks ago now about VPNs and saying, I know how much you disliked VPN look at this article. And it was talking about this whole thing with express VPN. So they just now all over the place, the discussions online about what. Been to hear who the founder was, the CEO, the CTO, this growing portfolio that they have in Sunbrella of ownerships, that now is centralized in a multiple VPNs. [00:24:15] Now, Cape technology only started acquiring VPN companies about four years ago. And they've been in business now for over a decade. And what were they doing before? They started buying VPN companies? While they own VPN companies. Oh, they were a major manufacturer and distributor of. Malware of varying types. [00:24:40] Now the first part of the show today, of course, I was explaining some of the differences, like ad words, et cetera, so that you could understand this story. Right? Ghulja that? So you can understand this. That's what these guys have been doing. It's absolutely crazy. So the F the co-founder of Cape technology and former CEO started his career in information technologies while serving in the Israeli defense forces. [00:25:08] As I mentioned, Israeli intelligence Corps under unit 8,200 it's that unit is responsible for. Dean what's called signal intelligence and data decryption. Now we have signal intelligence here as well, and that's basically intercepting signals, figuring out what's being said, what's going on? Where they are, the size of the forces, et cetera. [00:25:32] I have a friend of mine, a young lady who is in signal intelligence in, I think it's the Navy, but every part of our military has it is. However, our military doesn't directly control VPM services like express VPN that can be used in a very big spike capacity. That's what I'm really concerned about. Now. I also, I found an interesting article on zero hedge about this, uh, you know, this company express, VPN being acquired. [00:26:06] But they're also pointing out that companies that were founded by former operatives of unit 8,200. That again, the Israeli version of the NSA included. Ways Elbit systems, which is right in my hometown of Merrimack, New Hampshire and slews of other startups now ways. Right. I, I used ways I recommended people to use it and of course, Google bought it a few years back and that's when I stopped using it, but it was really nice. [00:26:39] It worked really well. And I had no idea the information was likely going to. The Israeli defense Corps. Oh my goodness. There's spy agencies, uh, and a bunch of other startups, by the way. It's estimated that there have been over 1000 stack tech startups that came out of the people working at unit 8,208. [00:27:07] Again, they're CIA NSA, uh, guys, their spine on everybody. You can, you believe that? And they've been bought by a mentioned Google, but other companies like Kodak, PayPal, Facebook, Microsoft have bought them. So in addition to the thousands of companies, according to zero. Uh, unit 8,200 has also fostered close working relationship with the U S government, which you would expect, right? [00:27:33] Edward Snowden. You remember him? He disclosed leaked documents. He obtained, which included an agreement between the NSA and the Israeli defense force. The agreement showed that the U S intelligence. Agency would share information. It collected under domestic surveillance operations with it. Israeli counterpart. [00:27:53] You remember we talked before about the five eyes, seven eyes searching eyes. It's up in the twenties. Now these countries that spy on each other citizens. For the other countries, right? Yeah. Your information might not be collected by the U S government, but the U S government gets it by buying it from private contractors, which it says it can do because we're only barred from collecting it ourselves. [00:28:17] We can use private contractors that collected on you. And also by going in partnership with foreign government. Because again, we can't collect that information, but we can certainly have the Israelis or, or the Brits or the Australians or Canada. They could collect it from. Can you believe this, how they're just stretching these rules to fit in what they want to fit. [00:28:39] Okay. Completely ignoring not only the constitution, but the laws of the United States. It's, it's just absolutely incredible. So critics of this unit, Eddy 200 attested that the Israeli intelligence outfit routinely uses the data received from the NSA by providing it to. Politicians Israeli politicians for the basics of blackmailing. [00:29:06] Yes. Blackmailing others. Yes. Indeed. Other whistle blowers have revealed any two hundreds operations have been able to disrupt Syrian air defense systems, hack Russia. Cap Kaspersky labs. You remember I told you guys don't use Kaspersky antivirus and has outfitted several Israeli embassies with Glendale, seen surveillance systems, cleanse Stein. [00:29:31] However you want to pronounce it. By the time Cape technologies acquired his first VPN company. Uh, the CE original CEO had left and he went on to found cup pie before leaving as it CEO in 2019, it goes on and on, uh, bottom line gas, SWAT express VPN, which is advertised by so many conservatives. Now looks like it is actually part of a spy operation. [00:30:01] So sign up now. Craig peterson.com. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. You're going to want to attend my free VPN webinar. Hey, I don't have anything to sell you when it comes to VPNs. I just want you to know the truth. [00:30:17] Labor shortages are making businesses turn direction. And now that we're laying off people or firing them because they didn't take the jab, what are businesses going to do? Well, I have news for you that reduced workforce, well, guess what?. [00:30:34] U.S. Businesses are really seriously moving to automation. [00:30:39] Now they've been doing this since the start of this whole lockdown. They were doing it even before then. I tell the story of when I was in France, a boom went four or five years ago now, and I stayed off the beaten path. I was not in the touristy areas. I speak French. So I went just where the. I decided to go, my wife and I, so we rented a car and we spent a month just kind of driving around where do we want to go next to, or do we want to go next? [00:31:08] It was a whole lot of fun. And while we were there on a Sunday, I came to realize that these small French towns have no restaurants open on Sunday, nothing at all, talking about a bit of a culture shock. That's not true. There was one restaurant opened in the town and that restaurant was, and McDonald's. [00:31:30] So when I go to McDonald's here a few years ago in France, central France. And when I walk in, there's nobody at the counter, but they're all. Oh, half a dozen kiosks out front. So you go and you order your hamburger, whatever might be, or your drinks, et cetera, right there in the kiosk, you pay for them riding the kiosk. [00:31:53] And there's some people working out back that are then making the hamburgers or the milkshakes or coffee, whatever you ordered and bringing it up to the front. And then they just put her right there for you to grab that simple. And this was of course, pre. Down days, I assume that it has gone even more automated. [00:32:14] Uh, they're in France, but hard to say. And I've seen the same thing here in the us. I was out in Vermont just about a month ago and I was riding with a buddy of mine, motorcycle riding, couple of buddies, actually. And we stopped in this small. Town. And we went to this little breasts, breakfast restaurant and the breakfast restaurant had maybe four or five tables inside. [00:32:42] And you just sat at the table. No waitress came up, but there's little sign with the QR code. So it said a scan, the QR code to get started. So you scanned it, it knew based on the QR code, which table you were at, and it showed you the menu that was in effect right then and there. So the lunch menu or the breakfast or the all day, you got to pick it and then you selected what you wanted. [00:33:08] It used whatever payment you wanted. I used apple pay. And in order to pay for my breakfast and my buddy ordered what he wanted. And then out came a waitress who delivered the food. Once it was already in the drinks, it was very automated. It allowed them to cut back on some people and others, this small restaurant, they probably had one last waitress, but when you kind of had in the shifts. [00:33:33] Days and vacation days is probably two waitresses. So they're saving some serious money because a system like this that you just scan a QR code and do the order and it prints up in the kitchen is cheap compared to hiring. Well, of course, it's hard to hire people, especially in the restaurant industry nowadays heck and in my business where we go in and we do analysis of computer networks and systems, it's almost impossible to find people that are really well qualified that understand the regulations that apply to these different businesses. [00:34:10] So it's like, forget about it. There's more than a million of these jobs open right now. And just in this cybersecurity. Well, September mark, the end of the real lockdown induced unemployment benefits workers. Didn't just flood the labor market as we kind of expected. And we have now few, we have more people now. [00:34:38] Who are out of the workforce. Who've decided not to look for a job than we did in 2008. So that's telling you something 2008 during the great recession. Interesting things are about to happen, but there's a great little article that I found in. Times this week, and it's talking about this quality local products company out of Chicago, the prince logos on merchandise, like t-shirts water bottles, you know, the little stress balls, all of that sort of stuff. [00:35:10] And he said prior to the pandemic, we had over 120 employees. That's the co-founder talk in there. And he said, Primary focus was on growth. We simply plugged any holes or any efficiencies that we could along the way with human capital, bringing people in. But once the lockdown happened, of course, all of a sudden now you don't have the access to employees you had before. [00:35:36] So they had a huge decrease also in business. So those two went hand in hand. They let a lot of people go and they use the opportunity to program many of the previous manual and human controlled activities into computers. So now 18 months later, yeah, two weeks to flatten the curve. Right? 18 months later, the company employees, 83 workers. [00:36:03] And as managing a workload, that's pretty much the same as pre lockdown. So they went from over 120 employees down to 83. So basically they cut 40 employees from the workforce. That's a whole lot of quarter of the workforce gone. They don't need them anymore. So that's going to help produce more profits for them. [00:36:27] A lot more profits. Cause usually automating. Yeah, it can be painful, but it usually has major paybacks and that's exactly what it had for them. And they're saying that they anticipate that they can reduce employees even more by the end of this year and get their head count below. 50 now 50 is a magic number. [00:36:48] So it was a hundred when it comes to employees. Well, one is like the biggest magic number because when, once you have one employee, you all of a sudden have to comply with all kinds of rules, regulations, state, local, federal. But if you hit 50 employees, you have the next step of major new regulations that are gonna affect your business. [00:37:09] And then when you hit a hundred employees, Even more, so many people try and keep their businesses below 50 employees because it's just not worth it to have all of those regulations, additional regulation, taxes, and everything else. Another company, this is a California based property management. The managing more than 90,000 commercial and residential properties. [00:37:33] And what they've done is they added a chat feature to the website, the company's called sea breeze. And he says, even though we have the live chat, you can still reach us outside of business hours. Well, You are using the chat or you can call us either way, but they're saying people like the simple form and someone gets back to them as soon as they can. [00:37:57] So they're avoiding now having staff available 24 7 to respond to chat messages and to respond to the voicemails and phone calls that come in. So it's pretty good all the way around, frankly, new shopping models are in place. I'm looking at a picture of a business and it has. Of course, a window up front and in the window they have jewelry. [00:38:21] This is a jewelry store and they've got QR codes in front of each of these pieces of jewelry right on the inside of the window. So if you're interested in finding out more about that piece of jewelry, Just scan the QR code. It'll take you to the right page on their website and we'll even let you buy the jewelry and they will mail it to you again. [00:38:46] How's that for? Great. If you have a business in a tourist jury area and you don't want to be open until 11:00 PM at night, your story can keep selling for you. Even when you're close. This is window shopping, taken to an extreme, very simple. To do as well. This company is called full me waiter. Obviously they've got a bit of a sea theme here. [00:39:10] So once someone orders the jewelry and the other merchandise sent right to them, or they can have it set for pickup in the store, when they next open it's phenomenal. They're calling. Alfresco shopping space, right from the sidewalk. So businesses again are returning to pre pandemic levels and he, this guy is available in the store by appointment only he's loving it. [00:39:37] And he says that customers have been so satisfied with this QR code window shopping contract. That he wrote a guidebook. You can get it@scantshopsolution.com or excuse me, scan, just shop solution.com. I misread that. So any retailers who want to use this method, if you don't know what QR codes are, or you don't know how to code it into a website, et cetera, she's got webinars she's taught on it and she's got the guide book. [00:40:05] I think this is great. Right? So she's now making some money on. Explain to other people, how she did this. It's phenomenal across industries. Epic times is saying the staffing shortages could be temporary, but as firms are further embracing, embracing automation and all of its benefits, some of these jobs that people just don't want anymore may actually be going away. [00:40:33] And I think this is ultimately a problem. We had, uh, you know, again, I'm older generation, right? Us baby boomers. We had opportunities when we were younger. I had newspaper routes. I had the biggest drought in the area. I can't remember. It was like 120 homes. It was huge. It took me hours to do, but I made money. [00:40:56] I learned how to interact with people. I knew, I learned how to do bill collection, how important it was not to let customers get too far behind on their bills. Although I have been slack on that one, I'm afraid, but it helped me out a lot. So, what are kids going to do that need to learn a work ethic that need to be able to have a job, make the mistakes, maybe get fired a once or twice or, or three times maybe learn how to interact with customers. [00:41:27] Everyone, I think can benefit from some retail experience. Get that when you're young and if these jobs don't exist, then. Or the younger generations here, are they just going to be trying to find jobs they can do with Instagram? Right? They're all I know. A few kids who have said, well, I'm a social media influencer and you look them up and okay. [00:41:50] So they got a thousand people following them. I have far more than that, but you know, it, that's not a job. It's not going to last. Your looks are only going to last so long. Right now you start having a family and you start working hard outdoors, et cetera. There's a lot of things that make that all go away. [00:42:09] So I think many businesses now we're going to continue to accelerate our plans program out and. A lot of weld pain positions, as well as these entry-level positions in the next five or 10 years. Really? I don't even know if it's going to be 10 years retool retrain our workforce, or everyone's going to be in for a world of hurt. [00:42:33] Hey, make sure you subscribe. So you're not in a world of hurt. Get my latest in news, especially tech news and cybersecurity. Craig peterson.com. [00:42:46] In this day and age, if you don't have a burner identity, you are really risking things from having your identities stolen through these business, email compromises. It's really crazy. That's what we're going to talk about. [00:43:03] An important part of keeping ourselves safe in this day and age really is con to confuse the hackers. The hackers are out there. They're trying to do some things. For instance, like business, email compromise. It is one of the biggest crimes out there today. You know, you hear about ransomware and. It hits the news legitimately. [00:43:26] It's very scary. It can really destroy your business and it can hurt you badly. If you're an individual you don't want ransomware. Well, how about those emails that come in? I just got an email in fact, from a listener this week and they got a phone call. His wife answered and it was Amazon on the phone and Amazon said, Hey, listen, your account's been hacked. [00:43:54] We need to clear it up so that your identity doesn't get stolen. And there's a fee for this. It's a $500 fee. And what you have to do is just go to amazon.com. Buy a gift card and we'll then take that gift card number from you. And we'll use that as the fee to help recover your stolen information. So she went ahead and did it. [00:44:20] She went ahead and did all of the things that the hackers wanted and now they had a gift card. Thank you very much. We'll follow up on this and. Now she told her husband, and of course this isn't a sex specific thing, right. It could have happened to either one. My dad fell for one of these scams as well. [00:44:44] So she told her husband or her husband looked at what had happened and said, oh my gosh, I don't think this is right. Let me tell you, first of all, Amazon, your bank, various credit card companies are not going to call you on the phone. They'll send you a message right. From their app, which is usually how I get notified about something. [00:45:10] Or they will send an email to the registered to email that. Uh, that you set up on that account. So that email address then is used by them to contact you right. Pretty simple. Or they might send you a text message. If you've registered a phone for notifications, that's how they contact you. It's like the IRS. [00:45:35] I was at a trade show and I was on the floor. We were exhausted. And I got no less than six phone calls from a lady claiming to be from the IRS and I needed to pay right away. And if I didn't pay right away, they were going to seize everything. And so all I had to do. Buy a gift card, a visa gift card, give her the number and she would use that to pay the taxes it and this lady had a, an American accent to one that you would recognize. [00:46:10] I'm sure. And it's not something that they do now. They do send emails, as I said. So the part of the problem with sending emails is, is it really them? Are they sending a legitimate email to a legitimate email address? Always a good question. Well, here's the answer. Yeah, they'll do that. But how do you know that it isn't a hacker sending you the email? [00:46:42] It can get pretty complicated. Looking into the email headers, trying to track. Where did this come from? Which email servers did it go through? Was it authenticated? Did we accept? Did the, uh, the provider use proper records in their DNS, the SPIF, et cetera, to make sure that it's legitimate. Right? How do you follow up on that? [00:47:07] That's what we do for our clients. And it gets pretty complicated looking at DKMS and everything else to verify that it was legitimate, making sure that the email came from a registered MX server from the, the real center. There is a way around this. And this has to do with the identities, having these fake burner identities. [00:47:33] I've been doing this for decades myself, but now it's easy enough for anybody to be able to do. There are some services out there. And one of the more recommended ones. And this is even the New York times, they have an article about this. They prefer something called simple log-in. You can find them online. [00:47:57] You can go to simple login dot I O. To get started now it's pretty darn cool. Cause they're using, what's called open source software it's software. Anybody can examine to figure out is this legitimate or not? And of course it is legitimate, but, uh, they it's, it's all out there for the whole world to see. [00:48:17] And that means it's less likely in some ways to be hacked. There are people who argue that having open source software means even more. In some ways you are, but most ways you're not, anyways, it doesn't matter. Simple login.io. Now, why would you consider doing this? Uh, something like simple login? Well, simple login is nice because it allows you to create dozens and dozens of different email address. [00:48:51] And the idea is with simple log-in it will forward the email to you at your real email address. So let's say you're doing some online shopping. You can go ahead and set up an email address for, you know, whatever it is, shopping company.com, uh, that you're going to use a shopping company.com. So you'd go there. [00:49:13] You put in two simple log-in, uh, I want to create a new identity and you tag what it's for, and then you then go to some, um, you know, shopping company.com and use the email address that was generated for you by simple login. Now you're a simple login again. Is it going to be tied into your real email account, wherever that might be if using proton mail, which is a very secure email system, or if using outlook or heaven forbid Gmail or one of these others, the email will be forwarded to you. [00:49:52] You will be able to see that indeed that email was sent to your. Shopping company.com email address or your bank of America, email address, et cetera, et cetera, that makes it much easier for you to be able to tell, was this a legitimate email? In other words, if your bank's really trying to get ahold of you, and they're going to send you an email, they're going to send you an email to an address that you use exclusive. [00:50:22] For bank of America. In reality, you only have the one email box that is over there on wherever proton, mail, outlook, Gmail, your business. You only have that one box you have to look at, but the email is sent to simple login. Does that make sense? You guys, so you can create a, these alias email boxes. It will go ahead and forward. [00:50:49] Any emails sent to them, to you, and you'll be able to tell if this was indeed from the company, because that's the only place that you use that email address. That makes it simple, but you don't have to maintain dozens or hundreds of email accounts. You only have the one email account. And by the way, you can respond to the email using that special aliased email address that you created for the shopping company or bank of America or TD or whomever. [00:51:22] It might be, you can send from that address as well. So check it out online, simple log-in dot IO. I really liked this idea. It has been used by a lot of people over, out there. Now here's one other thing that it does for you, and this is important as well. Not using the same email address. Everywhere means that when the hackers get your email address from shopping company.com or wherever, right. [00:51:56] pets.com, you name it. They can not take that and put it together with other information and use that for business, email compromise. Does that make sense? It's it makes it pretty simple, pretty straightforward. Don't get caught in the whole business email compromise thing. It can really, really hurt you. [00:52:19] And it has, it's one of the worst things out there right now, dollar for dollar it's right up there. It, by the way is one of the ways they get ransomware into your systems. So be very careful about that. Always use a different email address for every. Website you sign up for. Oh, and they do have paid plans like a $30 a year plan over at simple IO will get you unlimited aliases, unlimited mailboxes, even your own domain name. [00:52:50] So it makes it pretty simple, pretty handy. There's other things you might want to do for instance, use virtual credit cards. And we'll talk about those a little bit. As well, because I, I think this is very important. Hey, I want to remind everybody that I have started putting together some trainings. [00:53:12] You're going to get a little training at least once a week, and we're going to put all of that into. We have been calling our newsletter. I think we might change the name of it a little bit, but you'll be getting those every week. And the only way to get those is to be on that email list. Go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [00:53:35] Please do that right. I am not going to harass you. I'm not going to be one of those. And I've never been one of those internet. Marketers is sending you multiple dozens of emails a day, but I do want to keep you up to date. So stick around, we will be back here in just a couple of minutes. And of course you're listening to Craig Peterson. [00:53:59] And again, the website, Craig peterson.com stick around because we'll be right back. [00:54:05] One of the best ways to preserve your security on line is by using what we're calling burner identities, something that I've been doing for more than 30 years. We're going to talk more about how to do that right. [00:54:20] We've talked about email and how important that is. I want to talk now about fake identities. Now, a lot of people get worried about it. It sounds like it's something that might be kind of sketchy, but it is not to use fake identities in order to confuse the hackers in order to make it. So they really can't do the things that they. [00:54:46] To do they can't send you fishing ear emails, particularly spear phishing emails. That'll catch you off guard because you're using a fake. How do you do that? Well, I mentioned to you before that I have a thousands of fake identities that I created using census data. And I'm going to tell you how you can do it as well. [00:55:13] Right? There's a website out there called fake name a generator. You'll find it online@fakenamegenerator.com. I'm on that page right now. And I'm looking at a randomly generated identity. It has the option right on this page to specify the sex. And it says random by default, the name set, I chose American the country United States. [00:55:44] So it is applying both American and Hispanic names to this creative. And now remember it's doing the creation based on census data and some other public data, but it is not giving you one identity of any real. I think that's important to remember, and you're not going to use these identities for illegal purposes. [00:56:11] And that includes, obviously when you set up a bank account, you have to use your real name. However, you don't have to use your. If you will real email address, you can use things like simple login that will forward the email to you, but we'll let you know who was sent to. And if you only use that one email address for the bank, then you know that it came from the bank or the email address was stolen from the bank. [00:56:40] Right. All of that stuff. We've talked about that already. So in this case, The name has come up with for me is Maurice D St. George in Jacksonville, Florida even gives an address, uh, in this case it's 36 54 Willis avenue in Jacksonville, Florida. So if I go right now, Uh, two, I'm going to do use Google maps and I am going to put in that address. [00:57:11] Here we go. Jacksonville willows avenue, all the guests. What there is a Willis avenue in Jacksonville, and it's showing hoes from Google street view. Let me pull that up even bigger. And there it is. So ta-da, it looks like it gave me. Fairly real address. Now the address it gave me was 36 54, which does not exist. [00:57:40] There is a 365, but anyways, so it is a fake street address. So that's good to know some, if I were to use this, then I'm going to get my. Uh, my mail saying why about I pass? So, uh, Maurissa tells you what Maurice means, which is kind of neat. It'll give you a mother's maiden name. Gremillion is what a gave me here, a social security number. [00:58:06] So it creates one that passes what's called a check sum test. So that if you put it into a computer system, it's going to do a real quick check and say, yeah, it looks. To me. So it's was not just the right number of digits. It also passes the check, some tasks. Well-known how to do a check sum on their social security numbers. [00:58:27] So again, it's no big deal. And remember, you're not going to use this to defraud anyone. You're going to use this for websites that don't really need to know, kind of give me a break. Why do you need all this information? It gives me a phone number with the right area code. Uh, and so I'm going to go ahead and look up this phone number right now. [00:58:50] Remember, use duck, duck go. Some people will use Google search and it says the phone number gave me is a robo call. As I slide down, there's some complaints on that. Uh, so there you go. So they giving us a phone number that is not a real person's phone number, country code, of course one, cause I said United state birth date. [00:59:13] Oh, I was born October 7th, year, 2000. I'm 20 years old. And that means I'm a Libra. Hey, look at all this stuff. So it's giving me an email address, which is a real email address that you can click to activate or right there. Again, I mentioned the simple login.io earlier, but you can do a right here and it's got a username and created for me a password, which is actually a pretty deep. [00:59:41] The password. It's a random one, a website for me, my browser user agent, a MasterCard, a fake MasterCard number with an expiration and a CVC to code all of this stuff. My height is five six on kind of short for. Uh, my weight is 186 pounds own negative blood type ups tracking number Western union number MoneyGram number. [01:00:11] My favorite color is blue and I drive a 2004 Kia Sorento and it also has a unique ID. And, uh, you can use that wherever you want. So the reason I brought this up again, it's called fake name generator.com is when you are going to a website where there is no legal responsibility for you to tell them the true. [01:00:39] You can use this. And so I've, I've used it all over the place. For instance, get hub where you have, uh, it's a site that allows you to have software projects as you're developing software. So you can put stuff in, get hub. Well, they don't know to know, need to know who I really am. Now they have a credit card number for me. [01:01:01] Because I'm on a paid plan. I pay every month, but guess what? It isn't my real credit card number. It isn't the number that I got from fake name generator. My credit card company allows me to generate either a single use credit card numbers, or in this case, a credit card. Number four, get hub doc. So just as an example, that's how I use it. [01:01:24] So if get hub gets hacked, the hackers have an email address and a name that tipped me off right away, where this is coming from. And if the email didn't come from GitHub by no, they either sold my information to a marketing company, or this is a hacker. Trying to manipulate me through some form of his fishing scheme. [01:01:47] So I know you guys are the breasts and best and brightest. A lot of you understand what I'm talking about and I'm talking about how you can create a burner identity. And let me tell you, it is more important today to create a burner identity. Then it has ever been at any point in the past because frankly burner identities are one of the ways that you can really mess up some of the marketing firms out there that are trying to put the information together, these data aggregator companies, and also the hackers. [01:02:24] And it's really the hackers that were off up against here. And we're trying to prevent them from. Getting all of this information. So when we come back, I want to talk about the next step, which is which credit cards can you get? These single use card numbers from? Should you consider using PayPal when my Google voice be a really good alternative for you? [01:02:52] So we're going to get into all of that stuff. Stick around in the meantime, make sure you go to Craig peterson.com/subscribe. Get my newsletter. All of this. Is in there. It makes it simple. It's a simple thing to do. Craig peterson.com. And if you have any questions, just email me M e@craigpeterson.com. [01:03:20] Having your credit card stolen can be a real problem for any one of us. It gives the bad guys, a lot of options to spend a lot of money very quickly. We're going to talk right now about virtual credit cards. What are they, what does it mean? [01:03:37] Virtual credit cards come in two basic forms. [01:03:41] One is a single use credit card, which was quite popular back when these things first came out and another one is a virtual credit card that has either a specific life. In other words, it's only good for 30 days or that can be used until you cancel it. If you have a credit card, a visa, MasterCard, American express discover all of the major card issuers will give you the ability to reverse any charges that might come onto your cards. [01:04:19] If your card is stolen or missing. Now that makes it quite easy. Doesn't it? I want to point out that if you're using a debit card, as opposed to a credit card, there's not much challenging you can do with the credit card. You can say, I am not going to make my pain. And, uh, because of this, that, and the other thing, this was stolen, et cetera, they can file it as a disputed charge. [01:04:46] They can do an investigation find out. Yeah. I'm you probably were not at a bus terminal down in Mexico city, which happened to me. 'cause I was up here in New Hampshire, quite a ways down to Mexico city. And so they just reversed it out. That money never came out of my bank account because it was on a credit card. [01:05:08] If I were using a debit card. That money would have come right out of my account. Now, mind you, a bus ticket in Mexico city is not very expensive, but many people have had charges of many thousands of dollars. And if you need that money in your checking account, and you're using a debit card, you got a problem because your check for, well, if you ever have to pay rent again, red check is going. [01:05:38] Bound because they just empty it out to your bank account. So now you have to fight with the bank, get the money back. They will, they will eventually refund it, but it could make some of you. Transactions that you might've written a check or something, it'll make them bounce. And that could be a real problem. [01:05:57] These, it could make them bounce. So using a credit card is typically less of a hassle online. So why would you want to use a virtual card or also known as a master credit card? Masked and may S K E D? Well, the main reason behind this is to allow you. Control payment. I've used them. In fact, I use them exclusively on every website online. [01:06:29] And I'm going to tell you the names of some of them here in just a couple of minutes, but I use them all of the time. And part of the reason is let's say, I want to camp. Uh, service. Have you ever tried to cancel a service before and you have to call them many times, right. And so you're, you're arguing with somebody overseas somewhere who doesn't want you to close the account. [01:06:53] And of course the. Bump you up to the next level person who also doesn't want you to close the account. And so you have to fuss fuss, fuss, fuss. Have you ever had that experience and I'm sure you have. It just happens all the time. So with using the virtual credit card, Well, the advantage to me is, Hey, if you are going to try and fight with me, I don't care because I'm just going to cancel that credit card number. [01:07:24] So I don't have to cancel my credit card. I don't have to have the company reissue credit card for me. I don't have to do any of this sort of thing that makes my life pretty easy. Doesn't it? And so, because of that, I am now I think in a much better. Place, because it just, I don't have to fight with people anymore. [01:07:43] So that's one of the reasons I used it. The other big reason is if it gets stolen, they can cause less harm. Some of these credit card it's virtual credit cards are set up in such a way that you can limit the amount that's charged on them. Do you like that? So if you are using it on a site that maybe is charging you $50 a month, no problem. [01:08:09] $50 a month comes off of the credit card. And if someone tries to charge more bounces and then hopefully you find out, wait a minute, it just bounced on me right now. Then next step up is okay. It bounced and. Uh, I am just going to cancel the card and then you issue a new credit card number for that website. [01:08:32] So an example. In my case has get hub.com. We keep software up there and they charge me every month if get hub were to get hacked and that credit card number stolen I'm I really don't care because there's almost nothing that can happen. And if good hub doesn't properly cancel. My account, I can just cancel the credit card and, you know, let them come after me. [01:08:57] Right. This isn't going to happen. So then it's also called a master credit card number because it's a little safer than using your real credit card details. I also want to point out something about debit card. I went for years with no credit cards at all. Nowadays, many of my vendors will take a credit card for payment. [01:09:20] And in fact, give me a bit of a better deal. And then with the credit card, I can get 2% cash back, which I use to pay down the credit card. Right. It couldn't get any better than that, but when you're using a debit card, what I always. Is I had two accounts that I could transfer money between at the bank. [01:09:42] So I had one checking account. That was my main operating, if you will account. And then I had another checking account where I would be. Just moving money out of it. Or you could even do it with a savings account, but some banks, they only let you do so many transactions a month on a savings account. So the idea is I know that I have this much in credit card obligate while debit card obligations for this month, that money is going to be coming out. [01:10:11] So I make sure that. In the debit card account to cover the legitimate transactions I know are coming up and then I keep everything else in the other account. And then I manually transferred over every month. So that's how I dealt with the whole debit card thing. And it worked really well for me. Bottom line. [01:10:30] I think it's a really great. So there you go, who are the companies that you can use to do this? I've used some of these before all of them have worked really well. If you have a capital one credit card, they have something called Eno, E N O, and it's available to all capital one card. You know, even has an extension for your web browsers. [01:10:59] So if it notices you're on a webpage, it's asking for credit card number, it'll pop up and say, do you want me to create a credit card number or a virtual one for this websites you can make your payment. Does it get much easier than that? Citibank has something they call a virtual credit cards available to all Citibank card holders, master pass by MasterCard. [01:11:23] That's available to any MasterCard visa, American express discover Diner's club card holders, credit, debit, and prepaid cards by their way. So you might want to check that one out. Uh, yeah, so that's the only one I see on my list here. That will do it for debit cards, Masterpass by MasterCard American express checkouts, available to all American express card holders. [01:11:51] Chase pay available to all chase card holders, Wells Fargo, wallet, uh, visa checkouts, available to all visa, MasterCard, and American express and discover color card holders, credit and debit cards. Plus. Prepaid cards. Okay. So it does do the debit cards as well. Final that's all owned by Goldman Sachs and is not accepting any new applicants and entro pay. [01:12:19] Also not accepting new applicants. There's a couple online. You might also want to check out our Pyne. Premium Al buying. I'm buying a, B I N E blur premium. You might want to check that out as well. All right, everybody make sure you check me out. Craig peterson.com/subscribe. [01:12:43] We're going to wrap up how you should be using these burner identities of few more tips and tricks that are going to help keep you safe from the hackers that are out there. So here we go. [01:12:58] There are a lot of hackers out there. [01:13:01] The numbers are just astounding. The cost of these hackers coming in and stealing our information is just unbelievable. And it goes all the way from big corporations, from things like the colonial pipeline, the U S government all the way on down through you and me. I want to tell you a little story about a friend of mine. [01:13:28] He is about 75 years old and he supplements his income by driving for Uber eats and one other company. And so what he'll do is someone puts in an order for food somewhere. He'll go pick it up and then he'll drive it to where whoever wanted wanted, whoever ordered it. Now, there are. Pricing number of scams with this. [01:13:55] So he's very careful about some of that orders, a cookie, for instance, because it's usually a bit of a scam anyways, we won't get into those, but I'll tell you what happened to him. His information was stolen online as it was probably yours. Mine I know was as well. So it's all stolen. What do you do? While in his case, what ended up happening is they managed to get into his email account. [01:14:27] Once they're in his email account, they now had access to the emails he was getting from one of these companies. Now it wasn't the Uber eats guy. He was, there was another company. So let's just explain this a little bit. Uber eats sends him a request for him to go ahead and do a double. So, you know, go to the restaurant, pick it up and take it to this client's house. [01:14:54] And in order for him to register, he had to register an email address. Now, of course, he uses the same email address for everything, all of the. Now, personally, that drives me a little bit insane, but that's what he does. And he has just a few passwords. Now. He writes them down a little book and heaven forbid he ever lose the book so that he can remember them. [01:15:24] He just wants to keep his life simple. Right. He's 75. He's not technophobic, but you know, he's not up on all of this stuff. What he found was a paycheck didn't show. And it was an $800 paycheck. We're talking about real money that he should have had in his. It didn't show up. So he calls up the company and says what happened to my paycheck and their record show? [01:15:53] Yes, indeed. It had been paid. We paid you, we deposited right into your account. Just like you asked. Yeah. You know, ACH into the account. Great. Wonderful. What had happened is bad guys had gone, gained control of his email address and use that now. Because they figured, well, I see some emails in his account from this food delivery service, so, well, let's try and see if this email address that we're looking at right now. [01:16:26] All of his emails let's look and see. Okay. Yeah. Same. Email address and same password as a used ad at this email address. Yeah, it worked. Okay. Great. So now we have access to this guys food delivery account. So they changed. The bank account number now, easy enough to confirm, right. They change it and send you an email. [01:16:54] Hey, I want to make sure that it was you until the bad guys, the hackers click out, yada yada. Yeah, it was me and then delete the email. So he doesn't see it. And now his $800 paycheck. In fact, I think there were a couple of different checks is deposited directly into the bad guy's bank account and. The money of course is transferred out pretty quickly. [01:17:18] Now the, that guys, these hackers are using what are called mules. You might be familiar with that in the drug trade. They'll have a third party deliver the drugs just to mule. They don't know what all is going on. They probably know the delivering drugs in this case, most of the meals are useful idiots of which there are many in this country. [01:17:43] Unfortunate. Uh, political and otherwise. And these people are convinced that all they need to do is transfer the money into this account so that the hackers can then pull it out. And you know, now they're going to take care of their grandmother who is stuck in the hospital and they have no way to pay for it. [01:18:07] And they can't transfer the money out of the country during. That's one of the stories they use for people. And in many cases, these meals know what they're doing. The FBI earlier this year arrested a whole group of mules out in California that were purposefully transferring the money. They knew what they were doing. [01:18:28] So his money was now out of the country. No way to get it. And this food delivery company was not about to pay him. So it, isn't just the big guys it's you and me as well. So what I want to talk about right now is multi-factor authentication. Now. You guys are the best and brightest. I hope you understand this. [01:18:54] If you have questions, please reach out to me. I am more than

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
The Astros Tie Up the Series at 1-1, Expectations for Games 3-5

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 49:52


Eno and DVR discuss Houston's Game 2 World Series win over Atlanta on the strength of a nice outing from José Urquidy and a seven-run outburst from the Astros' lineup before setting expectations for the three-game weekend stretch as the series heads to Georgia.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Atlanta Takes a 1-0 Lead, Charlie Morton's Injury & Game 2 Preview

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 45:11


Eno and DVR discuss a Game 1 win for Atlanta that also included the loss of Charlie Morton for the rest of the playoffs, and take a look ahead to Wednesday's Game 2.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Get 33% off a subscription: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
World Series Game 1 Preview, Series & MVP Predictions

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 45:26


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss Game 1 of the World Series between the Astros and Braves, and share their expectations for the series as a whole.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
It's a Houston-Atlanta World Series?!

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 41:57


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss a Houston-Atlanta World Series on the heels of LCS clinching wins over the weekend, and say goodbye to the 2021 Dodgers and Red Sox.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Informed Life
Patrick Tanguay on Newsletter Curation

The Informed Life

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 29:16


Patrick Tanguay is a self-described "generalist, synthesist, and curator of eclectic ideas." His weekly newsletter, Sentiers, surfaces deep posts about highly relevant topics and provides insightful commentary and ideas. In this conversation, we discuss the tools and methods that enable his curation and sharing process. Show notes @inervenu on Twitter About Patrick The Alpine Review Sentiers RSS Instapaper INFORMA(C)TION newsletter MailChimp Pinboard Delicious WordPress Eleventy Readwise Obsidian Pocket What is a static site generator? (Cloudflare) DuckDuckGo rsync cron Bear Markdown The Informed Life episode 54: Kourosh Dini on DEVONthink DEVONthink Keep It EagleFiler Grant for the Web GitHub Some show notes may include Amazon affiliate links. I get a small commission for purchases made through these links. Read the transcript Jorge: Patrick. Welcome to the show. Patrick: Thanks! Glad to be here. Jorge: I'm very excited to have you on the show. I've been subscribed to your newsletter for a while and always find insightful links and information there. So I'm very excited to talk with you. For folks who might not know you, would you mind please, introducing yourself? About Patrick Patrick: Sure. Thats always a... it probably shouldn't be, but it's always a bit of a hard question to answer. I've started using "generalist" which I kind of resisted doing for awhile, but that's ... like my Twitter bio is "Generalist, Synthesist and Curator," and that's probably the best description. I've worked in a number of fields, and I realized a little while ago that the red thread connecting everything, was that I always ended up figuring stuff out and explaining it to others. Even when I was a front-end web developer, it was often the fact that I could explain to the client, and if I was working with others, explain across their disciplines. Like, of course the actual craft, if you will, of the front end was of course part of the contract, but kind of the selling point or that people would refer me to was the fact that I could explain it and kind of make sense of what we were going to build. And then that transferred into a print magazine, "The Alpine Review," and I liked doing that so much that even though we closed it down or put it in a deep freeze, I try to recreate that experience with my newsletter. Jorge: I love the three terms: generalist, synthesist and curator. It reminds me of a phrase that I believe was coined by Stewart Brand to describe Brian Eno. He said that Eno is a "drifting clarifier." Patrick: Whoa! That's nice. Jorge: And your trajectory here reminds me of that. Yeah, Sentiers is the newsletter I was referring to when we kicked off the conversation. Tell us a bit more about that. What's the newsletter about? Sentiers Patrick: There's kind of the... the official description and the real description. The real description would probably be, "anything that Patrick finds interesting." The kind of official description is, "exploring technology and society, signals of change, and prospective futures." Which... like, "technology and society." Technology permeates so much of the world in a growing number of areas that you end up being able to talk about anything if you look at technology very broadly. And "signals of change." There's so many things changing that that also brings you to many topics. And I try to — more and more — to make sense of it with an eye to where we're going or where each topic might be going. Each field. But Sentiers is French for "paths," and the path is taking more importance in the curation in the last year or so. Jorge: I don't know if this distinction is emphasized in the French: I see "path" as a distinction to something like a road, right? Like where a path is more emergent. Patrick: Absolutely. Jorge: Is that a part of this? Like when I say that you're detecting signals for change, that to me implies that you're not dictating the path, you're somehow seeing it emerge. Is that fair? Patrick: Yes, absolutely. And I use, for example, as many of the people I read and learn from, I use future in plural — "Futures" — because they're always guesses at where things might be going or sometimes guesses that you're wishing for that direction, sometimes because you're dreading a certain direction. But there's definitely always different potentials. And one thing that I should have paid more attention before, but I'm paying more attention to now, is also the diversity of voices. So, some futures that we look at are already someone's present. Like climate change. In the Western side, we're starting to feel it, but some other people have been feeling it for years. Some technologies... so there's also that, someone's utopia is always someone else's dystopia. So, to always try to listen to a greater diversity of voices — and necessarily, as you do so, you realize that there's multiple potential directions and futures and paths. Picking the signals Jorge: How do you pick up the signals that you write about? Like, what are you paying attention to that leads you to elucidate the path? Patrick: It's layers. Layers upon layers of people I've discovered through the years, or publications. It's usually more individuals than specific publications. I've used Twitter. I think I'm user 6,000- something of Twitter. So I've been there for a while and using RSS for even longer. So, it's, adding and replacing people as I go and feel, "okay, this person is... I realize now, was too naive about technology or too positive" or, on the contrary, "this person has evolved in their thinking and introduced me to this other person." And so I try to build this network, I guess, of people I'm listening to. And also using The Alpine Review before and Sentiers now to a lesser degree perhaps, but to introduce myself to those people and then to also pick up on their networks and be part of the discussions and get a better feeling for what's going on. And then, being... I was going to say "too curious" — but being very curious about a number of topics, and adding them to the number of things I follow. Jorge: That brings me to another question I had for you, which is this idea of spotting signals for change and another idea that I think is implicit in that, which is kind of spotting patterns, right? Like in order to detect change, we have to somehow be aware of the trajectory of something or the pattern of something, or having a sense for the context. You've hinted at the fact that you've been doing this for a while; like you said, you were an early Twitter user and you've been following things like RSS. And I would imagine that you have a way not just of detecting signals, but also of building a corpus of ideas somehow, that allows you to keep track of those patterns. That allow you to spot the signal from the noise. And first, I was wondering if that was the case and if so, if you could share with us what that looks like. Patrick: It's the case and it's been more purposeful in the last few years. It used to be, I guess, just piles of magazines when I was selling computers before starting the web. And then when I started doing web development, a series of bookmarks and bookmarks, and then quickly blogging, which then... it's only recently that I've been specifically taking notes to refer to later. Originally, the notes were more blogging publicly, and then as you write something, it sticks in your mind. And so for a while, the library was mostly in my mind and in the blog. And then as... I guess it's starting with The Alpine Review, as we needed to collaborate and to keep track of whom we wanted to include, it needed to be more documented. And then, yeah! Then Sentiers becomes a great... often even for some clients, I'll just first go through the archives of the newsletter and re-find everything I've found before and compile it in a different way or see new patterns. And now more recently with the new website, the goal is to integrate the website with my note taking and my reading in Instapaper often and kind of having the information flow more directly so that I can take more notes more easily. And I was going to say, "trust my brain a little less," but I guess it's more expand my — augment — my brain more purposefully. Personal knowledge management Jorge: I actually wanted to find out more about that because as someone who publishes a newsletter myself, I have found myself doing what you're talking about here, which is thinking, "oh, I remember writing about that in my newsletter. And where was that?" And I send out my newsletter through MailChimp, which creates a web version for each issue of the newsletter and that is published elsewhere, right? Like it's in a different place than my regular website, so I can't search for it using the same search engine and it's almost like suddenly I have this separate set of information that I need to refer to. And I have the sense that you've recently made changes specifically to the relationship between content on your newsletter and content on your website. Can you tell us more about that project specifically? Patrick: Sure. Well, one of my interests that isn't often in the newsletter, but that is an ongoing interest is with PKM or "personal knowledge management." And finding ways to find again. Because I think people trust search engines a lot, but it's hard to search Google for, "this guy I remember seeing on Twitter was talking about this thing." So, I try to make the haystack smaller, and the longest going tool I have is using Pinboard, the bookmarking service that Maciej Ceglowski started after Delicious started.... I'm going back — just a lot of people won't recognize those tools. But one of the interesting things of Pinboard is that if you're a paying member, it archives the pages. So, first of all, you don't lose something you've bookmarked that suddenly disappears. And also you can do a full text search of only what you've bookmarked. So, to me, that's a much smaller haystack to search and I'll often find things through there quicker than trying to find it again with a search engine. But that wasn't linked to my note taking. So, when I write the newsletter, I write it to the text file in Markdown, and then I convert it to HTML and put it in MailChimp. So, when I say that I searched the archives of the newsletter, it was always the text files that I have on my computer. So, often to look for something, I would look at the bookmarks and I would look at the newsletter. So, now I've tried to connect all of those things. The website used to be in WordPress, and now I've built it with Eleventy, which is a file based system. So it's not a database anymore, it's just, again, a bunch of text files. So without going into the details, or too much of the technical details, the interesting part is that the website now is a bunch of text files on my computer. And then when I want to publish a new version, it basically crunches that into an actual website and I just put it online. And it's... first of all, it's much, much quicker for readers. It's also much lighter. Because I'm trying be mindful of bandwidth and server usage because so many of those are using "dirty" electricity. So it's good if you can save on that side. But the first reason was that it's text files on my computer. now when I'm searching, everything is together. You tell me if I'm going too much in the weeds, but the other change is that now I'm using Readwise — readwise.io. And that allows you to connect the things you've highlighted in various places. And recently it started offering a sync with the text editor I'm using, which is Obsidian. So now... for years and years, I've been reading either in Pocket or Instapaper, two apps I think a lot of your listeners probably use. Now everything I highlight in there goes through with Readwise and straight into my notes, which don't necessarily make it on a website, but now it's... so there's more of a direct flow of everything I've read and the chunks I found interesting all end up in text files locally and can be oriented towards the website. Details about Patrick's setup Jorge: I'm hearing you say this and thinking, not only do I want to get into the weeds with you on this stuff, but, uh, I I'm afraid we're not going to have enough time to get as far into the weeds as I would like, because you've touched on several things that I've been exploring myself. I have been contemplating making this very same move that you're describing — going from WordPress to what is often called a static site generator. And for many of the same reasons you're pointing out here, I would love to have my site as text files — as Markdown specifically, which I use as well. And I recently posted about this on Twitter and a lot of folks came back to me recommending Eleventy, so it's one that is very much on my radar. I'm wondering about what you might lose by doing such a transition. And I can tell you two things that I'm aware of, that I would lose for my own instance. One is that WordPress provides a pretty good site search, which I don't believe static sites have. And the other is, WordPress provides the ability for me to preschedule posts. So, I can write something and say... say on a Monday morning and leave it so that it's published on a Tuesday afternoon, right? Are you dealing with those in any way? Is that an issue? Patrick: Yeah. Those are pretty much the two issues. You've hit the two issues directly. The search, of course people can be unhappy and not tell me, but I haven't had any people telling me that they miss the search engine. Although I did include one, but it's... it basically searches DuckDuckGo, by specifying my website. And so it gives a result only on the website. It's been working pretty good. There are a couple of solutions to do web searches on a static website. But it mostly ends up being work done on the client's side. So, in the reader's browser and so I haven't implemented that yet. The scheduling is more of an issue than I thought because like my newsletter goes out at 6:00 AM every Sunday. And I try to have it online exactly at the same time as the email goes out for people who want to read it online and share it. So that's... it connects to the biggest issue, which is... it's a lot more technical to run a site like that than it is to run WordPress. WordPress, you can just go on wordpress.com and create a blog and even have it on your own domain and you have nothing to do basically, other than use the interface, which is very broadly known already. A huge number of people have used it for themselves or at work or somewhere else. And so this is... it's harder. But I figured out the way. It's like, I'm actually... I'm getting back from vacation and there's one going out on Sunday, and it's going to be the first one using the new automation to put it online at 6:00 AM. It's basically, it's... it's going back to the command line. It's having rsync and a cronjob running on the server. That could probably be done some other ways, but I found that that's actually... because the way I've built the new version is that my newsletter is usually four or five featured articles that I have a summary and comment on. So each of those has been split, so each newsletter has become at least five chunks — five notes. And I might issue 184, so it can take a while to transfer the whole thing. So automating it that way is a timesaver. Jorge: That's very encouraging. And I'm kind of desperately trying to make more time to experiment more with these things because I do find very appealing the idea that at the other end of this, you end up with this more consolidated, personal knowledge management base that you use... you used that phrase, PKM, right? And, I find the idea of having it as a set of text files on my file system very compelling. You touched on Obsidian, which is another tool that I've been recently migrating to. I am using Readwise and I was not aware that they had enabled Obsidian sync, so I'm very excited. Now I'm like thinking... it's like the moment that we hang up here, I'm going to go experiment with that. Patrick: I think it's been active for like five days. So it's a really, really new feature. Obsidian Jorge: That's amazing. I was using it with Roam, to sync my highlights from Kindle and Instapaper and all these other things, sync them over to Roam. But, it's very exciting to hear that they've enabled Obsidian sync. How are you using Obsidian? I'm curious. How does it play into this workflow? Patrick: I'm hoping to transition completely to it. Right now, I 've used Bear for a few years, which is also in Markdown, but it's very visually polished, so it's fun to use and it syncs between phone and iPad and laptop. And it's Markdown that can be exported in Markdown, but when it's stored, it's not Markdown. It's in a proprietary database. So that was one of the things that kind of bugged me. Although I would have kept using Bear if not for Obsidian and the fact that it's pure text and you can actually open any folder with Markdown files. Open it in Obsidian and it becomes a bunch of notes and you can do back linking between the notes so that... because we often use links, but only in one direction. So, when you get to the destination, the destination doesn't display in any way where you came from, unless you're staying on the same website, then there's an indication. But if you're going from site to site, you don't know. And you don't know who else might have linked to that same page. And so with backlinks or bidirectional links would be another term, then you know at least within the corpus of your notes, which links to which -which has been in Wikis for forever, and which we even had on blogs 15 years ago with trackbacks which is coming back now with digital gardens which is kind of a personal Wiki. And Obsidian supports that. And I found a way to have them work in Obsidian and when their live on my website in the same way. And so, I'm still using Bear because it's kind of my reflex to go to those files and client notes and articles in the works are all in there, but I'm trying to switch more and more of them to Obsidian which is so far a great surprise because it's very modular. There's a hundreds of plugins, and so far I haven't seen it slow down. I've been wary of activating too many but so far it's super fast. So, I'm very encouraged, up to this point, and the advantage is of course, is that I have nothing to do if at some point they start... or they stop developing it. The app is local, the files are local... everything keeps working. Jorge: This idea of digital gardening is something that I am very interested in and we had earlier this year another guest on their show, Kourosh Dini, talking about the use of a tool called DEVONthink, which is designed for this type of personal knowledge management. And I mention it because DEVONthink too allows you to monitor folders on your computer and it indexes them and builds... it uses an artificial intelligence engine, and I don't know the details of how this works, but it uses AI to spot relationships between pieces of content in your computer. And I have been using Obsidian. My Obsidian folder with Markdown files, I'm indexing it with DevonThink. So building this bridge between the stuff that I have in Markdown there with things like PDFs and bookmarks and all this other stuff, and it just feels like... for me, it feels like my little personal knowledge management system, which has been scattered for a long time, is finally starting to come together with these more open tools. It's really exciting. Patrick: Yeah. It's... I was going to say the less exciting thing is the fact that we have to go back to old formats to get back that open function. Like Markdown files have been around forever and they're text files, which has literally been forever for computers and PDF is also a very old standard. But it's great to have that. I wasn't aware of that function by DEVONthink so I'm going to have to try it. I've actually... I've been doing some cleaning of stuff on my computer and I've been putting PDFs in Keep It and I've actually grabbed again, some old email archives that I'd archived to make the mail app snappier again. And I've put them in EagleFiler, which are both kind of... they both do the same thing you were explaining about DEVONthink, which is they do some search optimization and tagging and stuff, but the files remained in the finder and just on the Mac file system. So, but maybe I'm... after doing the cleanup, I'm just going to have to switch over to DEVONthink or add DEVONthink, because basically since it's indexing existing folders, that's the duty of it, you could have 10 applications doing different work on the same files. Jorge: Yeah, that's what I'm finding as well. I've stopped obsessing with the idea of trying to bring everything together into a single homogeneous system and more trying to find tools that are open about the data that they use so that you can get different perspectives on your information. And I can relate to this challenge you were talking about — the challenge of migrating stuff that you've had in more proprietary formats for awhile. We're coming close to the end of our time together — unfortunately, because there are so many more weedy areas of this that I would like to explore or with you. But I'm wondering what the future holds for what you're doing with Sentiers and how you see your system evolving. Evolving the system Patrick: Well, one of the main reason I was able to spend time doing that was that I used a grant by Grant for the Web, which is a project by the Interledger Foundation. We do web monetization. And a lot of the words they use sound like blockchain, but it's not actually. It can be related to the blockchain, but it's not. And they're basically developing a standard that they want to be accepted by the W3C, to be able to stream money to the website where you're spending time. And so the way I presented the project is that I'm already somewhat monetizing. I don't like that word that much, but that's... with memberships, paid memberships, but the archives and that's the case for most anyone doing those kinds of like... another word I dislike but the "creator economy." Often, their archives just fall by the wayside. So, that was a way of keeping the archives evolving and accessible and useful for readers and having the web monetization work underneath and possibly be a new revenue stream. And the other reason is that by making it text files, they can be on GitHub. And that's kind of... a lot of people have spoken about it with digital gardens, but not many have actually opened it. And I haven't found a way yet to do it — a way I'd be satisfied with. But potentially having people participate in the notes and appearing on the website would be something interesting that could be done with GitHub. And so the goal is to... it's kind of a forcing function for myself to note things beyond just highlighting in articles which then become notes that don't necessarily make it in the magazine because they're not necessarily interesting to read in themselves, but they can be super useful as you're browsing through different notes and adding context to something and adding to the topic. So, growing the notes, making it potentially a revenue source. The nice thing about this system is that if people are spending a lot of time, it means it's useful for them. So then it's a great way to transform it into a source of revenue because you're not forcing anything. They're just using it then. And then potentially bring in people on... I don't know if it would be specific contributors? If it would be a way of, for example, you and I joining some of our notes, or something else that's not... that's kind of on the roadmap, but not planned yet as to how it would happen. But that's another of the ways I hope to use it. Closing Jorge: That all sounds so fascinating. I would love to check in with you sometime in the future when this stuff has developed more just to see how that is going. But for now, where can folks find out more about you and follow your work? Patrick: The simplest is the newsletter, which is santiers.media. So sentiers.media. Or @inevernu on Twitter. And on the Sentiers website you can subscribe, and you can also look at what we've been talking about. So, how the notes connect together and so far, it's a lot, the existing archive. It hasn't been digital garden-ized as much as I would've liked, but I'm adding to it constantly. So yeah, those are the two... and I write the articles about monthly. So there's the newsletter, but there's also some articles to read. Jorge: Fantastic. I will post links to all of those things in the show notes. I want to thank you for being here and thank you for your work because like I said, I learn a lot from the work that you're doing. So thank you for sharing it with us, Patrick. Patrick: Thanks! Thanks for saying that and thanks alot for inviting me! It's been fun. It's always fun to discuss what you've been working on. It's sometimes bring us a different perspective as you're answering. So, it's always useful. Jorge: I hope that we can do it again sometime. Patrick: Sure.

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Chris Taylor's Three-Homer Game Extends NLCS & Boston's Path to Winning Twice in Houston

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 42:33


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss Chris Taylor's three-homer Game 5 as the NLCS heads back to Atlanta, and the Red Sox's paths to two road wins in Houston to rally back in the ALCS.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 33% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
The Astros Go Up 3-2, Atlanta Pushes L.A. to the Brink of Elimination

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 47:00


Eno & DVR discuss the Astros' 3-2 ALCS lead on the strength of Framber Valdez's Game 5 performance in Boston, and Atlanta's bid to close out the NLCS in just five games after taking a commanding 3-1 lead over the Dodgers on Wednesday.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 50% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Dodgers, Astros Wins Tighten Up LCS Series

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 39:12


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss the Dodgers' Game 3 awakening, uncertainty about Atlanta's bullpen game plans for Game 4, a late surge by the Astros in Boston, and what teams might be learning from this Postseason. Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 50% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
The Red Sox Take a 2-1 Lead Over the Astros & The Dodgers Return Home Down 2-0

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 35:55


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss the Red Sox's Game 3 outpouring of offense, their opportunity to open up a two-game lead in the ALCS on Tuesday night, and the Dodgers' bid to claw back from a 2-0 deficit in the NLCS against Atlanta.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at 50% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
A Wild Weekend in the LCS Matchups

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 31:17


Eno, Britt & DVR discuss a busy weekend in the LCS round including Atlanta's 2-0 lead over the Dodgers, a Red Sox-Astros series knotted up at one game apiece, and the mounting pitching injuries for Houston.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow Britt on Twitter: @Britt_Ghiroli Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 50% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Prospect One
Episode 269 - The AFL Experience with Eno Sarris, Chris Blessing, Eric Cross and Chris Clegg

Prospect One

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 78:45


Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
The Giants-Dodgers Game 5 NLDS Matchup, Houston's ALDS Dominance & Atlanta's Path to the World Series

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 48:58


Eno and DVR discuss the Game 5 matchup between the Dodgers and Giants, Houston's dominance (and the White Sox short list of flaws despite their elimination), and Atlanta's chances to advance through the NLCS against the winner of Dodgers-Giants.  Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Watch the show *Live* on weekdays at 11:30a ET/8:30a PT on YouTube and subscribe to the Rates & Barrels YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RatesBarrels Subscribe to The Athletic at 50% off for the first year: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Lead
'They're Doing Something Different': Why The Brewers' Pitchers Are So Good

The Lead

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 18:30


The Milwaukee Brewers are absolutely running away with the NL Central this season, and that's thanks largely to their incredible pitching staff. So what exactly is going on in Milwaukee? The Athletic's Eno Sarris recently crunched the numbers and spoke with MLB insiders, and he joins us today to talk about what sets the Brewers' pitchers apart, and how a forward-thinking front office has led to explosive results on the mound. Then, we turn from brewers to breweries and look at why the national craft beer boom has not translated to better beer selections at many ballparks. Eno's story about the Brewers:https://theathletic.com/2816670/2021/09/10/sarris-theres-some-nasty-stuff-and-stuff-brewing-in-milwaukee/Eno's story about the brews:https://theathletic.com/2800477/2021/09/14/as-craft-beer-booms-around-the-country-why-isnt-it-thriving-at-the-ballpark/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.