Acton Line

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Dedicated to the promotion of a free and virtuous society, Acton Line brings together writers, economists, religious leaders, and more to bridge the gap between good intentions and sound economics. 

Acton Institute


    • Feb 1, 2023 LATEST EPISODE
    • weekly NEW EPISODES
    • 36m AVG DURATION
    • 375 EPISODES

    4.8 from 165 ratings Listeners of Acton Line that love the show mention: caroline, content, great, acton.



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    Latest episodes from Acton Line

    The Errors of the 1619 Project (Rebroadcast)

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 47:27


    Since debuting in the New York Times Magazine on August 14, 2019, the 1619 Project has ignited a debate about American history, the founding of the country, and the legacy emanating from the nation's history with chattel slavery.The project's creator and editor, Nikole Hannah-Jones, has described the project as seeking to place “the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.” Components of a related school curriculum have been adopted in major cities like Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Buffalo, New York.For her work on the project, Hannah-Jones was awarded the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary. A book collecting all the essays debuted at number one on the New York Times non-fiction bestseller list in November 2021. Now, the 1619 Project has been reimagined as a television docuseries from Lionsgate and Hulu.But the project has also come in for heavy criticism from historians and economists of all political and philosophical persuasions for inaccuracies in “matters of verifiable fact” in history and economics. In response to these critics, Hannah-Jones has declared the project not a work history, but instead a work of journalism.One of the project's most frequent critics is Phil Magness, Senior Research Fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research.In this episode, which is a rebroadcast of an interview from August 2020, I talk with Phil Magness about the objectives of the 1619 Project, the economic history of slavery, the project's historical errors, and why many Americans seem to have such a difficult time accepting the complicated totality of our own history.Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Company Culture and the Human Person: A Compelling Vision

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 19:07


    Colin Duff, a co-founder and head of operations at Styx Golf, delivers a speech on how to align company culture with the human experience to create a compelling vision for employees. He stresses the significance of identifying a gap in the market and developing a unique value proposition, as Styx Golf did by providing high-quality minimalist designed golf gear at a reasonable cost. Additionally, he highlights the importance of being attentive to customer feedback and making updates to the product, as the company did with their new version launch in April 2021. He also stresses the need for a defined and compelling company culture that prioritizes employee well-being and supports the company's growth goals. He emphasizes the importance of transparency, authenticity and shared responsibility to foster an environment where employees can flourish.Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing) Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Martin Luther King Jr. and Russell Kirk: A Consensus of First Principles

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 39:29


    In their own time, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Russell Kirk occupied different ends of the political spectrum. Their philosophies inspired the two most powerful movements of the age: the Nonviolent Movement (which led the larger Civil Rights Movement) and the modern Conservative Movement. Without King and Kirk modern American Social Justice liberalism and modern American conservatism as we know them would not exist. And yet, for all of their differences, our modern politics suffer because contemporary liberalism and conservatism lack the grounding in virtues, communitarian values and faith in an ordered universe that both Kingian Nonviolence and Kirkian Conservatism held fast to. Is it possible that by reacquainting ourselves with these lost traditions we could summon the better angels of left and right and restore a politics of virtue for the modern age?In this episode, Eric Kohn, Acton's Director of Marketing & Communications, talks with John Wood, Jr., National Ambassador for Braver Angels about the overlap in first principles between Dr. King and Russell Kirk and reducing partisan polarization in our divisive times.Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing)Braver Angels Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Social Teaching of Pope Benedict XVI

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 45:41


    Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI—scholar, teacher, theologian, prefect of the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith, and finally supreme pontiff of the Roman Catholic Church until his resignation in 2013—died on December 31, 2022, at the age 95. Whether the subject was Islam, ecumenism, the rise and decline of the West, or simply "Who is Jesus Christ?,” Benedict opened up discussions once considered taboo and caused even hardened secularists to rethink some of their positions. For today's episode of Acton Line, in remembrance of Pope Benedict XVI's life and legacy, we're airing a lecture from Sam Gregg, currently senior research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research, illustrating how much the pope changed the focus of Christian engagement by addressing political, social, and economic issues. Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing)Pope Benedict XVI: 1927-2022 | Joshua Gregor, Acton InstituteFaith and Reason in the Life and Work of Benedict XVI | Kevin Duffy, Acton Institute Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Taxes, Spending, and Powerball Winnings

    Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 40:00


    On November 7, 2022, the jackpot for the Powerball lottery reached an astonishing $2.05 billion. Even after the federal and state governments take their piece of that, the winner will still be the recipient of a life-changing amount of money, more than enough to last an entire lifetime. But if the winner of that $2.05 billion Powerball jackpot was the United States federal government, they'd burn through that enormous sum of money in just over a week. How did the federal budget get this large? What does that budget say about our political system and the desires and priorities of the public and politicians? In this episode, Eric Kohn sits down with Dr. David Hebert, chair of the economics department and associate professor of economics at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids, to discuss his recent article for the American Institute for Economic Research using the Powerball to explain the size and scope of the federal budget. David Hebert graduated with a bachelor's degree in economics from Hillsdale College in 2009, and then attended George Mason University, where he earned a master's in 2011 and a doctorate in 2014. During graduate school, he was an F.A. Hayek fellow with the Mercatus Center and a fellow with the Department of Health Administration and Policy. He also worked with the Joint Economic Committee in the U.S. Congress. Since graduating, he has worked as an assistant professor at Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan, and Troy University in Troy, Alabama. He was also a fellow with the U.S. Senate Budget Committee, where he authored a comprehensive report on federal budget process reform. Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing)Taxes, Spending, and Powerball Winnings by David Hebert | AEIR Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Who Was Lord Acton?

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 54:00


    The Acton Institute is named in honor of John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton (1834–1902), 1st Baron Acton of Aldenham, a historian of freedom. Known as “the magistrate of history,” Lord Acton was one of the great personalities of the 19th century. Widely considered one of the most learned Englishmen of his time, Lord Acton made the history of liberty his life's work. The most notable conclusion of Acton's work is that political liberty is the essential condition and guardian of religious liberty. He thereby points to the union of faith and liberty, which has been the Acton Institute's inspiration. In describing the Institute's purpose, Acton's president emeritus, Rev. Robert Sirico, has said: “Acton realized that economic freedom is essential to creating an environment in which religious freedom can flourish. But he also knew that the market can function only when people behave morally. So faith and freedom must go hand in hand. As he put it, ‘Liberty is the condition which makes it easy for conscience to govern.'” So who was Lord Acton? In this episode, Eric Kohn, Acton's director of marketing & communications, sits down with Dan Hugger, Acton's librarian, a research associate, and editor of the book Lord Acton: Historical and Moral Essays, to discuss Lord Acton: his work, his beliefs, his life, and his legacy.Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing) Lord Acton: Historical and Moral Essays | Dan Hugger Lord Acton: A Study in Conscience and Politics | Gertrude Himmelfarb Lord Acton: Historian and Moralist | Samuel Gregg Selected Writings of Lord Acton | J. Rufus Fears The Pope and the Professor: Pius IX, Ignaz von Dollinger, and the Quandary of the Modern Age | Thomas Albert Howard Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Beatles and Economics (Rebroadcast)

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 50:19


    The Beatles will go down in history as one of the most prolific music acts of all time. Their music is still played in our homes and around the world and has influenced pop culture on a global scale.In this episode, Eric Kohn, Acton's Director of Communications, sits down with Samuel Staley to discuss his new book The Beatles and Economics: Entrepreneurship, Innovation, and the Making of a Cultural Revolution. Subscribe to our podcastsRegister Now for Business Matters 2023Apply Now for Acton University 2023 (Early Bird Pricing)Book | Beatles & Economics Pope John Paul, George, and Ringo on the harms of high taxes Music contained in this episode:Getting Better | The Beatles | 1967I Want to Hold Your Hand | The Beatles | 1963Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band | The Beatles | 1967Here Comes the Sun | The Beatles | 1969Everything in its Right Place | Radiohead | 2000Come Together | The Beatles | 1969Norwegian Wood (This Bird Has Flown) | The Beatles | 1965Tomorrow Never Knows | The Beatles | 1966Strawberry Fields Forever | The Beatles | 1966Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds | The Beatles | 1967Revolution | The Beatles | 1968 Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Godly Path to Adam Smith's Liberal Plan

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 40:25


    Daniel Klein is professor of economics and JIN Chair at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, where he co-leads a program in Adam Smith. There's been renewed interest in the role Christianity has played in liberalism since Larry Siedentop's 2014 book, Inventing the Individual: The Origins of Western Liberalism. Today, Dan Churchwell, Acton's Director of Programs and Education, sits down with Klein to discuss Adam Smith and his enlightenment vision. Building on Siedentop, Klein says universal benevolent monotheism, and Christianity in particular, has led to the articulation of a specific social grammar and corresponding rights—in short Adam Smith's “liberal plan.” Subscribe to our podcastsDr. Klein's faculty pageFull discussion of Larry Siedentop's book:Full set of notes on SiedentopKlein published interview on Siedentop:Klein replies to Deirdre McCloskey on Siedentop: Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Jimmy Lai's Extraordinary Struggle for Freedom

    Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 55:44


    For this episode, we're presenting the final evening plenary from Acton University 2022. This plenary was a panel discussion on Hong Kong medial mogul and pro-democracy advocate Jimmy Lai, the subject of Acton's most recent documentary feature film, The Hong Konger: Jimmy Lai's Extraordinary Struggle for Freedom.When Hong Kong's basic freedoms come under attack, Jimmy Lai finds himself in the crosshairs of the state and must choose between defending Hong Kong's long-standing liberties or his own freedom. This conversation with the filmmakers and interview subjects of The Hong Konger discusses the rise of China, the plight of Hong Kong, the fight for freedom that continues there to this day, and the man at the center of it all: Jimmy Lai.The featured panelists are:Victoria Tin-bor Hui, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Notre DameMary Kissel, Former Senior Adviser, U.S. Secretary of State Mike PompeoSimon Lee, Former Op/Ed Columnist, Apple DailyRev. Robert A. Sirico, President Emeritus, Acton Institute, and Executive Producer, THE HONG KONGEREric Kohn, moderator and Director of Marketing & Communications, Acton Institute, and Associate Producer, THE HONG KONGERJimmy Lai is currently sitting in a jail cell in Hong Kong awaiting trial on national security law charges. Recently, Lai was granted permission to be represented by a UK barrister in the trial, human rights attorney Tim Owen. That decision to allow Owen to represent Lai is being appealed to Beijing for “clarification.” The trail, which was supposed to start on December 1st has been delayed until December 13, and will almost certainly be delayed even further into the future.Subscribe to our podcastsThe Hong Konger: Jimmy Lai's Extraordinary Struggle for Freedom. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Wounds of Beauty

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 60:33


    In this episode, Sarah Negri, research project coordinator at the Acton Institute, sits down with Margarita Mooney Clayton, professor of practical theology at Princeton Theological Seminary and founder and executive director of Scala Foundation, to talk about Mooney Clayton's most recent book The Wounds of Beauty: Seven Dialogues on Art and Education (Cluny Media, 2022). They discuss beauty as a way of encountering and participating in the splendor of transcendental being through embodied sensory experiences, point out the dangers of viewing art merely as self-expression or “art with an agenda”, and draw out beauty's connection to human freedom, creativity, and flourishing. Subscribe to our podcasts About Margarita Mooney Clayton The Wounds of Beauty: Seven Dialogues on Art and Education (Margarita Mooney Clayton) Beauty: A Very Short Introduction (Roger Scruton)The Face of God (Roger Scruton)The Soul of the World (Roger Scruton)“The Feeling of Things, the Contemplation of Beauty” (Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger)Scala Foundation Event: An Interactive Conversation with Aidan HartScala Foundation 2023 Conference Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Who Is To Blame For Poverty?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 64:17


    For this episode, we're bringing you a session from our recent Poverty Cure Summit, a debate between between Bryan Caplan and Chris Arnade.The Poverty Cure Summit provides an opportunity for participants to listen to scholars, human service providers, and community leaders address the most critical issues we face today that can either exacerbate or alleviate poverty. Speakers joined panel discussions to discuss the legal, economic, social, and technological issues pertaining to both domestic (U.S.) and global poverty. Rooted in foundational principles of anthropology, politics, natural law, and economics, participants gained a deeper understanding of the root causes of poverty and identify practical means to reduce it and promote human flourishing.Subscribe to our podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Mary Kissel at Acton Institute's 2022 Annual Dinner

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 26:14


    In this episode, we're bringing you the keynote address from Mary Kissel at this year's Acton Institute Annual Dinner.Mary Kissel is executive vice president and senior policy adviser at Stephens Inc., a Little Rock, Arkansas–based, privately held financial services firm, where she advises management and clients on foreign policy and geopolitical risk. Prior to joining Stephens, she served as senior adviser to U.S. Secretary of State Michael R. Pompeo from October 2018 to January 2021. In that role, she provided advice to advance the national interests of the United States, conducted special projects for the secretary, and traveled to more than 60 countries.Kissel also appears in Acton's latest documentary film, The Hong Konger: Jimmy Lai's Extraordinary Struggle for Freedom.Subscribe to our podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Gift of Disillusionment

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 21:32


    How can leaders respond to discouragement in their work? Noah Gould sits down with Peter Greer, President & CEO of HOPE International, to discuss his latest book, The Gift of Disillusionment. In this conversation, they explore the responses of cynicism and idealism, and how leaders can move forward through extreme trials and disappointments.Subscribe to our podcastsThe Gift of Disillusionment | Amazon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Men Without Work

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 59:34


    In 2016, Nick Eberstadt's book “Men Without Work: America's Invisible Crisis” brought to light the grim reality that millions of working-age men were retreating voluntarily from the labor force. Although this trend was widely overlooked for decades, Eberstadt's searing analysis finally made it impossible to ignore.Today, six years and one catastrophic pandemic later, the male exodus from work has not only intensified but has spilled over into new demographics, including women and workers over the age of 55. By most reports, America now has something on the order of 11 million open jobs yet millions of men and women sitting jobless on the sidelines.Now, in the newly re-released “Men Without Work: Post-Pandemic Edition,” Eberstadt marshals recently released data to explain how this sad state of affairs came to be, what it means for American society, and what it portends for the country's economic future.Subscribe to our podcastsMen Without Work: Post-Pandemic Edition | Amazon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    No Free Lunch

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 37:50


    Common economic perceptions pervade our discourse on policy. Dr. Caleb Fuller's latest book, No Free Lunch: Six Economic Lies You've Been Taught and Probably Believe, sets out to dispel these myths. Acton's President Emeritus, Fr. Robert Sirico said of the book, “Anyone who wants a well-rounded education will not want to be without the knowledge this book contains.” This week on Acton Line, Noah Gould, Alumni & Student Programs Manager at the Acton Institute, sits down with Dr. Fuller to discuss the book and some of the most pervasive examples of economic myths.Subscribe to our podcastsNo Free Lunch | Amazon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Next American Economy

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 49:38


    One of America's greatest success stories is its economy. For over a century, it has been the envy of the world. The opportunity it generates has inspired millions of people to want to become American.Today, however, America's economy is at a crossroads. Many have lost confidence in the country's commitment to economic liberty. Across the political spectrum, many want the government to play an even greater role in the economy via protectionism, industrial policy, stakeholder capitalism, or even quasi-socialist policies. Then there is a resurgent China bent on eclipsing the United States' place in the world. At stake is not only the future of the world's biggest economy, but also the economic liberty that remains central to America's identity.But managed decline and creeping statism do not have to be America's only choices, let alone its destiny. In his latest book, “The Next American Economy: Nation, State, and Markets in an Uncertain World,” Dr. Samuel Gregg insists that there is an alternative—and that is to become a vibrant Commercial Republic grounded in entrepreneurship, competition, and trade openness, as envisioned by the founding generation. In this episode, Dylan Pahman, executive editor of the Journal of Markets & Morality and a research fellow at the Acton Institute, sits down with Dr. Gregg, Distinguished Fellow in Political Economy and Senior Research Faculty at the American Institute for Economic Research and an affiliate scholar at the Acton Institute, to discuss the book and the economic, political, and moral complications of our increasingly globalized world.Subscribe to our podcastsThe Next American Economy | AmazonThe Next American Economy Is Cause for Hope“Globalization,” in Stanford Encyclopedia of PhilosophyAdam Smith on the Benefits of International TradeDylan Pahman, “Fiat Currency, the Euro, and Greek Default”Samuel Gregg, “Rethinking Free Markets in an Age of Anxiety” Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Conservatism and Its Current Discontents

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 40:45


    American conservatism appears to be coming apart at the seams. What, if anything, can bring the various factions together to fight the much greater threat of an illiberal, intolerant left? Perhaps plain common sense. In this episode of Acton Line, George H. Nash sits down with Noah Gould to discuss his article "Conservatism and Its Current Discontents: A Survey and a Modest Proposal" which appeared in the Winter/Spring 2022 issue of Religion & Liberty.George H. Nash is a Senior Fellow of the Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal. He is author of The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945 and several scholarly volumes about the life of Herbert Hoover. He writes and speaks frequently about the history and current direction of American conservatism. He lives in western Massachusetts.Subscribe to our podcastsConservatism and Its Current Discontents: A Survey and a Modest Proposal | Religion & Liberty Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Blockchain Technology with Alexander Romanowski

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 36:48


    Alexander Hernandez Romanowski is a crypto research analyst at Tribal. Formerly a blockchain research analyst at the Mcnair Center for entrepreneurship at the Baker Institute for Public Policy, Romanowski focuses on how blockchain technology can improve access to capital for small businesses and entrepreneurs. Stephen Barrows, Acton's Chief Operating Officer, sits down with Romanowski to examine a research report entitled “Accelerating Small Business with Blockchain Technology.” Romanowski explains how blockchain technology is evolving, how its adoption is increasing, and what the implications are for decentralized finance and small businesses.Subscribe to our podcasts(99+) Alexander Hernández Romanowski | LinkedInAccelerating Small Business with Blockchain Technology | Houston, Texas USA (bakerinstitute.org)McNair Center for Entrepreneurship and Economic Growth | Baker InstituteTribal Credit | A Corporate Card Built For Growing Businesses Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 66:40


    5G. Microchips in vaccines. Crisis actors. Chemtrails. It seems that tales of conspiracy theories are in the news, and on social medial, constantly. But conspiracy theories have been with us for a long time.Black helicopters. 9/11 trutherism. The JFK assassination. And, anti-semitism is arguably the oldest conspiracy theory there is.Are conspiracy theories more prevalent now than they have been before? And what attracts people to believing in them? In this episode, Eric Kohn, Acton's Director of Marketing & Communications, talk with Dr. Aaron Pomerantz, assistant professor of psychology at University of St. Thomas Houston, about his research into the psychology of conspiracy theories.Subscribe to our podcasts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Free Trade and Globalization

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 42:24


    Philip Booth is professor of finance, public policy, and ethics and director of Catholic Mission at St. Mary's University explores all aspects of free trade and globalization.What is globalization? Is it a new phenomena? How did globalization fuel progress in the 19th century and how was it disrupted? How has globalization effected the developing world? How are effects different in the developed world?What challenges does globalization present to both the developed and developing world?Does protectionism offer an effective answer to the challenges of globalization in the developed world? The developing world?Why have political movements on both the left and the right seemed to grow more hostile to globalization over recent years?Does free trade and globalization erode local cultures?What concerns have religious leaders raised concerning globalization?Subscribe to our podcastsAbout Philip BoothCatholic Social ThoughtAmerica's Trade and Regulatory Policies Have Contributed to the Baby Formula Shortage | ReasonGlobalization, Poverty and International DevelopmentCatholic Social Teaching and the Market Economy Revised Second EditionA leading economist analyses what the Pope's new encyclical really says about markets Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Judaism and the Market Economy

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 42:37


    Rabbi Mitchell Rocklin serves as the president of the Jewish Coalition for Religious Liberty and is also a resident research fellow at the Tikvah Fund has a wide ranging conversation on Judaism and Markets.How does religion in general speak to the market economy? Does Judaism's covenantal self-understanding foster a unique perspective? Where do the perspectives of Christianity and Islam overlap with Judaism and how do they differ? What is the historical contribution of the Jewish community to economic dynamism? How does this relate to anti-Jewish attitudes and prejudice?What are contemporary attitudes toward the market in the United States and the larger Jewish world?Subscribe to our podcastsJewish Coalition for Religious LibertyAre American Jews Shifting Their Political Affiliation?Race and Covenant Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    The Rise of the New Puritans

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 50:26


    In The Rise of the New Puritans, Commentary Magazine associate editor Noah Rothman explains how, in pursuit of a better world, a relatively new and fervent strain of progressivism, in a “burst of moral enthusiasm” is ruining the very things which make life worth living by attempting to craft a society full of verbal trip wires and digital witch hunts. Football? Too violent. Fusion food? Appropriation. The nuclear family? Oppressive.As the social scientist Yuval Levin wrote in a review of the book, what's interesting about this New Puritanism is that “it is not rooted in a Christian ethic, at least not explicitly, and therefore that its worldly severity is not moderated by humility before the divine.”In response to this phenomenon, Rothman encourages us to spurn a movement whose primary goal has become limiting happiness. The book uncovers the historical roots of this war on fun and reminds us of the freedom and personal fulfillment at the heart of the American experiment.Subscribe to our podcastsRise of the New Puritans | Amazon Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    How History Frees and Forms Christians

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 41:16


    David George Moore, founder and president of Two Cities Ministries, discusses his recent book Stuck in the Present: How History Frees and Forms Christians. Dylan Pahman, Acton research fellow and executive editor of the Journal of Markets & Morality, joins Moore to explore his vision of how a deeper appreciation of history can ground Christians in an age in which one too often faces a landslide of information with insufficient tools to sift through the mess of our present world. Subscribe to our podcastsStuck in the PresentLord Acton: Historical and Moral EssaysNietzsche's Thoughts Out of Season, Part IIOrthodox Christian Social Thought and HistoryRaising Some Concerns over the “Inductive Method” of Bible Study Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Economic Inequality and Envy

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 44:08


    P. J. Hill, professor of economics emeritus at Wheaton College (Illinois) and a senior fellow at the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, Montana, delves into the topic of “Economic Inequality and Envy” based on a lecture he gave at Acton University 2022. Sarah Negri, research project coordinator at Acton, sits down with Hill to talk about the different kinds of economic inequality, the difference between inequality and poverty, and the economic and moral problems with envy being the modern standard mindset towards those who create mass wealth. They discuss the relationship between inequality and injustice with regard to human dignity, including what moral obligations might go hand in hand with being wealthy, as well as whether economic measures which have the goal of lessening inequality, such as resource transfers, are effective. Subscribe to our podcasts About P. J. Hill Growth and Welfare in the American PastThe Birth of a Transfer Society The Not So Wild, Wild West: Property Rights on the FrontierA Theory of Justice (John Rawls)John Rawls's “veil of ignorance” thought experimentThe preferential option for the poorSubscribe to our podcasts Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Does the university have a future?

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 45:20


    The Rev. John Arthur Nunes, Ph.D., is a Lutheran pastor and senior fellow at the Center for Religion, Culture, and Democracy, discusses the current challenges in higher education. How can students be challenged to enter into the world of new ideas in an era when many students and administrators seem more concerned with affirming student identities and experience? What are the current challenges to academic freedom in the face of increasing pressure to censor ideas? How can campus leaders promote an environment of free inquiry? What bureaucratic obstacles exist to building student resilience? In addition, Rev. Nunes considers the promise of creative disruption in the educational status quo by new institutions of higher learning, particularly within the humanities. How does a robust education in the humanities prepare students not only for a future world of work but all of life.The conversation concludes with an illuminating discussion of the religious dimensions of current conflicts in higher education and how trust can be restored in damaged institutions.Harvard lecturer takes heat for defending existence of biological sex Biology Lecturer's Comments on Biological Sex Draw BacklashUniversity of AustinPano Kanelos on the University of Austin | Acton LineAcademic Leaders Task Force on Campus Free ExpressionMeant for More: In, With. and Under the Ordinary | John NunesWittenberg Meets the World: Reimagining the Reformation at the Margins | Alberto L. GarciaThe Road to Character | David BrooksA World after Liberalism: Philosophers of the Radical Right | Matthew Rose Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

    7 Deadly Economic Sins

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 47:44


    You've heard of the Seven Deadly Sins: pride, greed, lust, envy, gluttony, wrath, and sloth. Each is a natural and recurring human weakness that impedes happiness. In addition to these vices, however, there are deadly economic “sins.” They, too, wreak havoc in both our personal lives and in society. They can seem intuitively compelling, yet lead to waste and lost prosperity. Dylan Pahman, Acton's research fellow and executive editor of the Journal of Markets and Morality, sat down with James R. Otteson, author of "Seven Deadly Economic Sins," to discuss his lecture on this very topic during Acton University 2022. Subscribe to our podcasts ‘Seven Deadly Economic Sins' About James R. Otteson David Hume | Essential Scholars See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Emerging Leaders at the Acton Institute

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 50:03


    The Acton Institute's Emerging Leaders Program is a leadership development initiative that brings together a cohort of students from across the nation and globe for a transformative experience. During the summer, Emerging Leaders gain professional experience, grow their network, and delve deeper into the ideas of a free and virtuous society. In this episode, we sit down with three of our Emerging Leaders: Walker Haskins, Lauren McCoy, and David Mendoza. They discuss Acton's Emerging Leaders Program, the landscape of the broader liberty movement, and how Acton fits into their future scholarly pursuits. Also discussed is Walter's and David's research on Wawrzyniec Goślicki, a 16th-century influential but now largely forgotten Polish bishop whose book, The Accomplished Senator, argued for the importance of legislative bodies in mediating between a monarch's absolutist tendencies and noblemen's attempts to acquire more power. Subscribe to our podcasts Emerging Leaders Program | Acton Institute Our Mission & Core Principles | Acton Institute Why Read the Classics in Economics? | Econlib How to Get Action | Foundation for Economic Education Wawrzyniec Goślicki | Wikipedia ‘De optimo senatore' | Wikipedia See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Taking rites seriously with Francis Beckwith

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 58:12


    Francis Beckwith, professor of philosophy and church-state studies at Baylor University, discusses the lecture he gave at Acton University 2022 entitled, “Taking Rites Seriously: Law, Politics, and the Reasonableness of Faith.” Sarah Negri, Acton's research project coordinator, sits down with Beckwith to discuss how religious rites such as marriage have a special significance not typically recognized in civil law, and how religion is unfairly set up as in conflict with reason, when in fact rites and religious observances can be profoundly reasonable. In addition, they talk about the difference between conscience and religious freedom, and how using these two similar but distinct concepts as a basis for legal decisions may have different social ramifications. Subscribe to our podcasts About Francis J. Beckwith Taking Rites Seriously: Law, Politics, and the Reasonableness of Faith The Heart Has Its Reasons | Church Life Journal Is it Time to Rethink the School Prayer Cases? | Anchoring Truths Taking Rites Seriously: Law, Politics, and the Reasonableness of Faith | Kresta in the Afternoon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Check your financial privilege

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 44:28


    Alex Gladstein, chief strategy officer at the Human Rights Foundation, discusses his new book, “Check Your Financial Privilege,” and how cryptocurrency can aid in pulling people out of poverty. Dan Hugger, Acton's librarian and research associate, sits down with Gladstein to discuss what's happening, for example, in Nigeria, where human rights activists depend on Bitcoin for donations. In Cuba, those who saved in Bitcoin managed to stay afloat after a dual-currency system devalued the peso. In El Salvador, where remittance fees and exchange rates can eat away a simple money transfer to family members in need, Bitcoin offers hope with lower fees and faster transactions. Subscribe to our podcasts ‘Check Your Financial Privilege' About Alex Gladstein The Quest for Digital Cash | Bitcoin Magazine Bitcoin's Price Surge Amid Doubts: What Would Aquinas Say? | Forbes Crypto and Blockchain: A flash in the pan or something more? | Acton Institute Should you bet on Bitcoin? | Acton Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Mike Cosper on ‘The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 41:57


    “The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill” is one of the most popular Christian podcasts of the past year. It chronicles how Mars Hill Church in Seattle went from one of the most influential multisite evangelical churches in the U.S. to an abuse- and scandal-ridden nightmare, finally having to shut its doors for good in 2014 following the resignation of its charismatic founder, Mark Driscoll. Eric Kohn, Acton's director of marketing and communications, sits down with Mike Cosper, producer, writer, and host of the podcast, to discuss the lessons from the stories Cosper tells in “The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill,” as well as the problems associated with celebrity pastors and church institutions. Subscribe to our podcasts ‘The Rise and Fall of Mars Hill' Podcasts | Christianity Today About Mike Cosper Is Christianity doing more harm than good to American men? | Acton Institute PowerBlog Saving men requires the leadership of laymen | Acton Institute PowerBlog Faithfulness Is the Future of the Church | Acton Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Fatherhood, fraternities, and moral formation

    Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 62:35


    Anthony Bradley, professor of religious studies at The King's College, NYC, and Acton research fellow, sits down with Dan Churchwell, Acton's director of program outreach, to discuss the importance of fatherhood as well as Dr. Bradley's new research on the good that fraternities do in the way of moral formation of young men. Subscribe to our podcasts About Anthony B. Bradley, PhD Black Marriage Matters | Acton Institute Saving men requires the leadership of laymen | Acton Institute Is Christianity doing more harm than good to American men? | Acton Institute Mobilizing Fathers to Close Prisons - Dr. Anthony Bradley | BreakPoint See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Literature and the scandal of holiness

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 42:44


    Award-winning author Jessica Hooten Wilson has written an exciting new book—“The Scandal of Holiness: Renewing Your Imagination in the Company of Literary Saints”—on how we're called to live beyond a merely mundane existence of settling for small goals. In fact, we're called to live a life of holiness. Wilson instructs us on how hearing the call to holiness requires cultivating a new imagination—one rooted in the art and discipline of reading. Reading with eyes attuned to the saints who populate great works of literature enables us to see how God opens up ways of holy living. Sarah Negri, Acton's research project coordinator, sits down with Wilson to discuss how literature has the power to show us what a truly holy life looks like. Subscribe to our podcasts The Scandal of Holiness: Renewing Your Imagination in the Company of Literary Saints About Jessica Hooten Wilson Jessica Hooten Wilson on Solzhenitsyn Against Propaganda | Acton Institute YouTube Channel See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Betsy DeVos on fixing education

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 48:25


    Betsy DeVos joins Eric Kohn, Acton's director of marketing and communications, in the studio to discuss her new book, “Hostages No More.“ In her book, DeVos writes about her experiences working in the Trump administration and how the “woke” curriculum is negatively impacting our children's learning. She also lays out a detailed approach to fixing America's badly broken education system and securing a prosperous future for our kids. Subscribe to our podcasts Hostages No More by Betsy DeVos | Center Street About Betsy DeVos Redemption, not retreat: Betsy DeVos' vision for redeeming U.S. education | Acton Institute PowerBlog Betsy DeVos and Sal Khan on education and entrepreneurial disruption | Acton Line Podcast What's driving the decline of religion in America? Secular education | Acton Institute PowerBlog The Myth of a Value-Free Education | Acton Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How savings banks and credit unions help prevent poverty

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 49:06


    In this episode, Dan Churchwell, Acton's director of program outreach, sits down with Dr. Richard Turnbull, the director of the Center for Enterprise, Markets and Ethics, to discuss how banks and credit unions develop a culture of savings, independence, and poverty prevention. Do trends in the direction of large, national, even global banking institutions best serve these ideals? And what are the implications of the loss of diversity in institutional and local provisions for personal saving? What does all this tell us about the nature of civil society? Subscribe to our podcasts About Dr. Richard Turnbull Centre for Enterprise, Markets and Ethics 4 arguments for the free market | Acton Institute Brexit: One last roll of the dice? | Acton Institute How to rebuild the economy after COVID-19 | Acton Institute Boris Johnson: The great survivor? | Acton Institute PowerBlog John Calvin and God's civil government | Acton Institute PowerBlog See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Reason, nature, and the human good

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 56:40


    Daniel Wagner, Ph.D., associate professor and chair of philosophy at Aquinas College, sits down with Dan Hugger, Acton's librarian and research associate, to explore the Aristotelian-Thomistic account of the human good, natural law, and living well. Why should we seek to know ourselves? How is the human good related to excellence and virtue? How do we reconcile this account of the good with the divergent moral views we see in the world? Subscribe to our podcasts About Daniel Wagner The Elements of Philosophy: A Compendium for Philosophers and Theologians | William Wallace, OP Aristotle | Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy Aquinas 101 | The Thomistic Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    'Conservatism: A Rediscovery'

    Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 58:08


    In this episode, Sam Gregg sits down with award-winning political theorist Yoram Hazony to discuss Hazony's new book, “Conservatism: A Rediscovery.” Hazony argues that the idea that American conservatism is identical to “classical” liberalism, which has been widely held since the 1960s, is seriously mistaken. According to Hazony, the best hope for Western democracy is a return to the empiricist, religious, and nationalist traditions of America and Britain. These conservative traditions brought greatness to the English-speaking nations and became the model for national freedom for the entire world. Subscribe to our podcasts Conservatism: A Rediscovery About Yoram Hazony Edmund Burke Society & The Russell Kirk Center What I Saw at the National Conservatism Conference, by Dan Hugger | Acton Institute The Post-Liberal Right: The Good, the Bad, and the Perplexing, by Sam Gregg | Public Discourse Patrick Deneen and the Problem with Liberalism, by Sam Gregg | Public Discourse Nationalism and the Future of Western Freedom, by Yoram Hazony | Mosaic Magazine What Is Conservatism? by Yoram Hazony | American Affairs Journal The Challenge of Marxism, by Yoram Hazony | Quillette See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The next generation of church leaders

    Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 51:39


    In this episode of Acton Line, Dylan Pahman, research fellow and executive editor of the Journal of Markets & Morality here at Acton, sits down with Jeff Fisher, professor of theology and director of spiritual formation, and Branson Parler, professor of theology and director of theological education, both of the Foundry, to discuss their entrepreneurial alternative to traditional Christian higher education for ministry leaders. Topics range from the specifics of how the Foundry works to broader questions of the economic and identity crises of colleges and universities across the country. What is the role of the Church in training the next generation of pastors and teachers? Is the Foundry's model the new way forward or a further symptom of the breakdown and silo-ization of the university? Subscribe to our podcasts The Foundry: Strengthening and Supporting Church Leaders About Branson Parler and Jeff Fisher New seminary head aims to revive church life and an entrepreneurial spirit in Venezuela | Acton Institute Lincoln Christian University Revamping Its Model, May Sell Campus | Christian Standard Abilene Christian University eliminated a $4.5 million budget deficit and reimagined itself | Mindstream Hundreds of Positions Eliminated at Evangelical Colleges and Universities | Christianity Today The Great Upheaval | Arthur Levine & Scott Van Pelt Deschooling Society | Ivan Illich After Whiteness | Willie James Jennings See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    ‘A Catholic Pilgrimage through American History'

    Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 36:47


    Kevin Schmiesing, director of research at the Freedom & Virtue Institute, takes you on a journey through American history to more than two dozen sites and events that symbolize and embody America's rich Catholic past in his new book, “A Catholic Pilgrimage through American History: People and Places that Shaped the Church in the United States.” Subscribe to our podcastsApply now for Acton University 2022 "A Catholic Pilgrimage through American History: People and Places that Shaped the Church in the United States"Freedom & Virtue Institute About Kevin Schmiesing See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    “The Economics of the Parables”

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:42


    In this episode, Rev. Robert A. Sirico, Acton's president emeritus, and Dan Hugger, Acton's librarian and research associate, dismiss the many misinterpretations of Jesus' parables to reveal their timeless wisdom as explored in Rev. Sirico's new book, “The Economics of the Parables.” Subscribe to our podcasts Apply now for Acton University 2022 "The Economics of the Parables" — Regnery Publishing The Rev. Sirico Leadership Fund — Acton Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    "The Essential Works of Thomas More”

    Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 49:42


    In this episode, Gerard Wegemer, professor of English at the University of Dallas, sits down with Sam Gregg, Acton's director of research, to discuss Wegemer's new book, “The Essential Works of Thomas More.” For the first time, Thomas More's most influential English and Latin works have been gathered into a single volume, creating a unique resource for anyone interested in More's teaching on theology, statesmanship, and renaissance humanism. Subscribe to our podcasts Apply now for Acton University 2022 "The Essential Works of Thomas More" About Gerard Wegemer, Ph.D. St. Thomas More: Saint, Scholar, Statesman, Martyr — EWTN See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    “Trust in a Polarized Age”

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 64:47


    Kevin Vallier, political philosopher and associate professor of philosophy at Bowling Green State University, joins Dylan Pahman, Acton's executive editor of the “Journal of Markets and Morality,” to discuss Vallier's new book, “Trust in a Polarized Age.” America seems to be falling into further hopelessness, divisiveness, and cultural decay. Yet Vallier sees things differently. He offers effective ways we can defend liberty, protect democracy, strengthen liberal economic institutions, and respect basic human rights. Subscribe to our podcasts "Trust in a Polarized Age" About Kevin Vallier "Are We a Nation?" with Samuel Goldman How to talk about rights in our polarized age – Acton Line Podcast Adam MacLeod on morality in public discourse – Acton Vault Podcast Divided we fall: America after the 2020 election – Acton Lecture Series We are a fractured nation, but there is still hope – PowerBlog See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The hundred-year war for American conservatism

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 63:04


    Matthew Continetti's new book, The Right, gives readers a clear historical perspective of the conservative movement—from the Progressive era to the present. He tells the story of how conservatism began as networks of intellectuals, developing and institutionalizing a vision that grew over time. This book is essential for anyone looking to understand what it truly means to be an American conservative. In this episode of Acton Line, Eric Kohn, Acton's director of marketing and communications, sits down with Continetti to discuss The Right and especially where the conservative movement is headed. Subscribe to our podcasts About Matthew Continetti The Right by Matthew Continetti An Awkward Alliance: Neo-Integralism and National Conservatism | Acton Institute Rise of the national conservatives with Matthew Continetti | Acton Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Being American in an age of division

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 51:54


    In this episode of Acton Line, Eric Kohn, our director of marketing and communications, sits down with Samuel Goldman, associate professor of political science at George Washington University, to discuss the history of our American national identity as explored in his new book, “After Nationalism: Being American in an Age of Division.” Goldman lays out the history of American national identity and offers new inspiration for how we can live together despite our current polarization and division. Subscribe to our podcasts After Nationalism: Being American in an Age of DivisionGod's Country: Christian Zionism in AmericaLoeb Institute for Religious Freedom About Samuel Goldman Politics & Values Program at George Washington University See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    College sports economics

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 42:59


    Eric Kohn, Acton's director of marketing and communications, sits down with Matt Brown, sports journalist and author of the “Extra Points” daily newsletter. They discuss the economic system behind college athletics and athletes' compensation in general. Subscribe to our podcasts Extra Points with Matt Brown Extra Points Podcast What If?: A closer look at college football's great questions | By Matt Brown See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Paul Henry and his influence on Christianity and politics

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 30:04


    In this episode, Dan Hugger, research associate and librarian here at Acton, sits down with Dr. Micah Watson, associate professor and executive director of the Paul Henry Institute at Calvin University, to discuss Congressman Paul Henry and his leadership in shaping the way Christian politicians live out their faith within their public service. The Paul Henry Institute seeks “to understand the role of faith in public life across time, from the earliest efforts of ancient peoples to organize their laws and institutions to present-day tensions between religion and the modern state.” Subscribe to our podcasts About Dr. Micah Watson Henry Institute for the study of Christianity and politics 5 Things that Christianity brings to our understanding of politics | Acton Institute Controversial Christianity: Understanding faith and politics | Acton Institute Our Mission & Core Principles | Acton Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Ian Rowe on “Agency”: Empowering all children to achieve success

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 50:11


    This is a special edition of Acton Line, featuring Ian Rowe, senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, speaking on his new book, “Agency.“ On Wednesday, March 16, Rowe visited the Acton Institute for a discussion in front of a live audience with Eric Kohn, Acton's director of marketing and communications. Rowe spoke on how we can inspire young people as they make the passage into adulthood. All children should be taught that a path to a successful life exists and that they have the power to follow it. Subscribe to our podcasts "Agency" by Ian Rowe | Book About Ian Rowe American Enterprise Institute See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    On a mission to help the poor and homeless

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 61:40


    In this episode, Dan Churchwell, director of program outreach here at Acton, sits down with James Whitford, executive director of Watered Gardens Ministries, to discuss the challenges of poverty we face here in our communities. Whitford supports the economic principle of subsidiarity. Subsidiarity is a social practice where neighbors help neighbors so the state doesn't have to intervene. This discourages reliance on the welfare state and avoids government bureaucracy. Subscribe to our podcasts Watered Gardens Ministries The Principle of Subsidiarity Build Together: Why lived experience is essential for crafting poverty solutions God doesn't need your good works (but your neighbor does) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    “The Essential Natural Law” with Samuel Gregg

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 48:25


    In this episode, Dan Hugger sits down with Acton's director of research, Samuel Gregg, to discuss his new book, “The Essential Natural Law.” They explore the fundamental principles of natural law and their place in Western thought and tradition. How does natural law deepen our understanding of economics, justice, human rights, private property, and the rule of law? Is our path to increased human flourishing contingent on the principles of natural law being applied? Subscribe to our podcasts About Sam Gregg Fraser Institute “The Essential Natural Law” See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    The Overton Window with Joseph Lehman

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 48:35


    In this episode, Eric Kohn, Acton's director of communications, sits down with Joseph Lehman, president of the Mackinac Center, to discuss the “Overton Window” and the influence it continues to play in politics. How can we use it to understand changing ideas in our culture and the marketplace? Subscribe to our podcasts Joseph G. Lehman, President of the Mackinac Center Mackinac Center for Public Policy The Overton Window | Mackinac Center The Overton Window: The Most Misunderstood Concept in Politics | The Daily Wire See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    How Christian fiction shaped a culture and a faith

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 23, 2022 50:22


    In this episode, Dan Hugger sits with Daniel Silliman, journalist and news editor for Christianity Today, to discuss his new book, "Reading Evangelicals: How Christian Fiction Shaped a Culture and a Faith." Silliman argues that the formation of evangelical identity does not stem from institutions or political stances but from Christian fiction and Christian publishing in general. In light of this, he explores the questions, what is evangelicalism, and what is evangelical subculture? Subscribe to our podcasts Business Matters 2022 — 50% off registration with promo code PODCASTBM22 About Daniel Silliman What's True About Christian Fiction | Christianity Today Reading Evangelicals: How Christian Fiction Shaped a Culture and a Faith | Daniel Silliman See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Why virtue matters in the trades

    Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2022 35:35


    In this episode, Sarah Negri, research project coordinator at the Acton Institute, sits down with David Michael Phelps, dean and director of program development at Harmel Academy of the Trades, to discuss the dignity of human work and how it is tied to our freedom to create value in the world and its connection to virtue. Why is formation in virtue important for skilled laborers? Who was Léon Harmel, and what was his impact on Catholic social teaching? Subscribe to our podcasts Business Matters 2022 — 50% off registration with promo code PODCASTBM22 Laborem Exercens, encyclical by John Paul II Rerum Novarum, encyclical by Leo XIII The Love of Learning and the Desire for God: A Study of Monastic Culture by Fr. Jean Leclercq, O.S.B. The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World by Iain McGilchrist Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work by Matthew Crawford The World Beyond Your Head: On Becoming an Individual in an Age of Distraction by Matthew Crawford Harmel Academy of the Trades Léon Harmel: Pioneer of the Just Wage See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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