Podcasts about Nobel Prize

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Set of five annual international awards, primarily established in 1895 by Alfred Nobel

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Nobel Prize

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Best podcasts about Nobel Prize

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Latest podcast episodes about Nobel Prize

World Business Report
Disney overtakes Netflix in streaming war

World Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 28:01


Disney, the American media giant, has beaten expectations in its latest results. Its on-demand platform now has more than 152 million subscribers, but it comes at a time of declining revenues for streaming services. Meanwhile, there's been lower-than-predicted inflation in the US. To crunch the numbers, we're joined by Susan Schmidt, Head of US Equity at Exchange Capital Resources in Chicago; and Randall Kroszner, a former Governor of the Federal Reserve Board. It's almost a year since the Taliban seized control of Afghanistan. Now a group of leading economists is calling on the US President, Joe Biden, to unfreeze the country's cash assets. We speak to Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz about how that could help citizens. In his first week in office, Colombia's new president, Gustavo Petro, has announced sweeping tax reforms aimed at rebalancing the country. Sergio Guzman from think tank Colombia Risk Analysis explains how it could make or break his leadership. We're also joined by Stefano Aurecchio from the Neopolitan Pizza Association, as delivery chain Domino's pulls out of Italy.

The Yoga Inspired Life
All Things SLEEP with Neuroscientist Dr. Sofia Axlerod

The Yoga Inspired Life

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 59:35


Today we are chatting all things sleep with special guest Sofia Axelrod, PhD. Sofia is a neuroscientist, sleep consultant, author of “How Babies Sleep” and founder of Kulala. Dr. Axelrod is a sleep researcher in the laboratory of Michael W. Young, the winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology of  Medicine. When she became pregnant with her first child, Dr. Axelrod, a lifelong insomniac, feared she would never sleep again. After the birth of her first baby, she naturally applied her expert knowledge to baby's sleep. It worked so well that she started working with other families, hosting baby sleep workshops, and developing science-based baby sleep products through her company, Kulala™. Through her work, Dr. Axelrod is providing new parents with the thing they needed the most: a good night's sleep. By helping the public using sleep secrets plucked from the frontlines of scientific research, Dr. Axelrod's ultimate goal is to fundamentally improve sleep in our notoriously sleep-deprived society, in particular for parents of young children. DISCOUNT CODE FOR https://kulalaland.com/:  Use code SHAYLA for 20% off the Kulala Sleep Lamp, system, or gift cards!Connect with Dr. Sofia Axlerod ✨ Book: How Babies SleepInstagram: @kulalalandWebsite: https://kulalaland.com/Connect with Shayla✨Instagram: @shaylaquinnYouTube: www.youtube.com/shaylaquinnWebsite: www.shaylaquinn.comTikTok: @shayla.quinnLearn more about TYIL Program ✨

Accent of Women
Remembering Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Accent of Women

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022


77 years ago, on the 6th and 9th of August, the USA military dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The two bombings killed around 175,000 people with another 90,000 dying by the end of the year due to radiation injuries.Some 5 years after these bombings, a global anti-nuclear armaments campaign emerged and in 2007, the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) was founded. In 2017, they won the Nobel Prize for peace, for their work towards global nuclear disarmament. One of the people that accepted the award was a woman named Setsuko Thurlow – a survivor of the bombing in Hiroshima. In 2019 she gave a speech at Harvard Law School.

Moonshots - Adventures in Innovation
Dalai Lama: The Art of Happiness: A Handbook for Living

Moonshots - Adventures in Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 58:27


Every time you see him, he's laughing. And he makes everyone else around him feel like smiling. He's the Dalai Lama, the spiritual and temporal leader of Tibet, a Nobel Prize winner, and a hugely sought-after speaker and statesman. If you ask him if he's happy, even after so much loss, the Dalai Lama will give you an unconditional yes. What's more, he'll tell you that happiness is the purpose of life and that the very motion of our life is toward happiness. How to get there has always been the question. The Art of Happiness is the book that started the genre of happiness books, and it remains the cornerstone of the field of positive psychology.★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

The Jimmy Dore Show
CNN Denies We're In A Recession To Boost Biden

The Jimmy Dore Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 57:25 Very Popular


New York Times opinion writer Paul Krugman won a Nobel Prize for Economics, but lately it seems like he's gunning for a new prize – that of Biggest Apologist for the Biden administration. And in that role most recently Krugman has been downplaying the prospect that the United States economy is in recession, even though by all traditional definitions of the term we most certainly are. CNN's Brian Stelter helps further the cause by giggling along as Krugman twists the language and the truth to suit the needs of his masters in the Democratic Party. Jimmy and his panel of The Dive's Jackson Hinkle and America's comedian Kurt Metzger discuss the contortions Krugman engages in to try to persuade us that the economy is doing super duper. Plus segments on Nancy Pelosi's word salad speech in Taiwan, the collapse of CNN's ratings and profits, and Colorado Senator Michael Bennet's "oops" moment revealing he may engage in insider trading. Also featuring Stef Zamorano and Black Agenda Report's Danny Haiphong!

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2821: Lobotomy

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 3:50


Episode: 2821 Science gone wrong: the lobotomy.  Today, science gone wrong.

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - GRANT CAMERON - UFOlogy - Inspirations and Downloads

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 56:01


UFOlogy - Inspirations and Downloads - Grant Cameron became involved in Ufology as the Vietnam War ended in May 1975 with personal sightings of an object which locally became known as Charlie Red Star. The sightings occurred in Carman, Manitoba about 25 miles north of the Canada-US border. The story has been optioned for a movie that will be released in 2016. These sightings led to a decade of early research done by the Canadian government into the flying saucer phenomena. Cameron is the authority on Wilbert B. Smith who headed up the Canadian government program. This led almost two decades of research into the role of the President of the United States in the UFO mystery. In the past few years Cameron has turned his research interests to the role of consciousness in the UFO phenomena, the possible involvement of extraterrestrials in modern music, and in the phenomena of inspirations and downloads in science, inventions, Nobel Prizes, music, art, books, near death experience, meditation, and with individuals known as savants and prodigies. Cameron co-authored books on the government UFO cover-up called “UFOs, MJ-12, and the Government” along with “UFO's, Area 51, and Government Informants.” He has just released the book, “The Alien Bedtime Story Book” and is about to release “Inspirations and Downloads: Where Good Ideas Come From.”. www.presidentialufo.com

The tastytrade network
The Skinny On Options Math - August 3, 2022 - Stationarity, Cointegration, and Options

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 21:13


Clive W.J. Granger won the 2003 Nobel Prize in Economics for his work developing the concept of cointegration. This revolutionized pairs trades by providing a better basis for setting up pairs than correlation based methods. Today, Jacob joins Tom and Tony to explain what cointegration is and see how mechanical option traders already had everything the pairs traders gained.

The tastytrade network
The Skinny On Options Math - August 3, 2022 - Stationarity, Cointegration, and Options

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 20:22


Clive W.J. Granger won the 2003 Nobel Prize in Economics for his work developing the concept of cointegration. This revolutionized pairs trades by providing a better basis for setting up pairs than correlation based methods. Today, Jacob joins Tom and Tony to explain what cointegration is and see how mechanical option traders already had everything the pairs traders gained.

According2Sam Podcast
According2Sam #126

According2Sam Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 63:56


Last year seventeen recipients of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences signed an open letter to President Joe Biden in support of his Build Back Better (BBB) package. At the time of this letter Democrats were proposing a bill that was $3.5 trillion in government spending. This was after they had passed a $1.9 trillion stimulus package earlier in the year. The open letter from these economic experts said there was a robust recovery taking place in the American economy, and that the BBB package would provide much needed support for the recovering economy. These experts expressed some concerns over inflation, but projected only a small, short term, rise in inflation that would quickly come back down. Democrats used this letter and the credibility of these experts to promote their spending package, but as inflation started to climb and persist even without their new spending they had to admit that the experts had got it wrong. What are they saying now about the '17 Nobel Laureates', and how is one Democratic Senator using their miscalculation to promote his new spending bill? Join the conversation and get answers to these questions and more on According2Sam episode #126.

F-World: The Fragility Podcast
#8 - Alexandre Marc: Why We Fight and The Pathways to Peace

F-World: The Fragility Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 84:58


Alexandre Marc is a political scientist and economist with over 30 years of experience working in areas of conflict and fragility across four continents. Alexandre was the Chief Specialist for Fragility, Conflict and Violence at the World Bank, and is the lead author of the United Nations-World Bank flagship report Pathways for Peace: Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict (2018). He also co-led the preparation of the World Bank's Strategy for Fragility, Conflict, and Violence 2020-2025.This is the first episode in a series with Alexandre covering the Pathways for Peace report, the stories that underpin its core ideas, and his recent work on the geopolitics of fragility. We start by talking about Alexandre's upbringing and how traveling with his parents – an adventure worthy of an Indiana Jones movie - led him to discover the wonders of different cultures. Experiences such as staying in an archeological mission in Egypt, crossing Afghanistan and Iran by car, and a road trip from Paris to Jordan sparked Alexandre's interest in how different cultures coexist and led him to try to understand conflict. We then talk about to the relationship between the price of bananas and witchcraft in Cameroon – and we sure had questions about it! Alexandre then shares with us how caring about people, culture, and history helps you better understand the origins and dynamics of conflict, the need to differentiate between conflict and violent conflict, and how the rise in what he calls “conflicts of fragility” led to the Pathways for Peace report. The conversation also explores how actors, institutions, and structural factors can push a country towards peace or conflict, why peace is desirable, the dangers of horizontal inequality, and the importance of dignity. And there's so much more! Listen to the episode to hear Alexandre share many more insights into fragility, conflict, and peace. *****Alexandre MarcWebsite: https://www.alexandremarc.orgTwitter: https://twitter.com/AlexanMarc1International Institute for Strategic Studies : https://www.iiss.org/people/conflict-security-and-development/alexandre-marcInstitute for Integrated Transitions: https://ifit-transitions.org/experts/alexandre-marc/*****Mihaela Carstei, Paul M. Bisca, and Johan Bjurman Bergman co-host F-World: The Fragility Podcast. Twitter: https://twitter.com/fworldpodcastInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/fworldpodcast/Website: https://f-world.orgMusic: "Tornado" by Wintergatan . Many thanks to Wintergartan for allowing us to use their wonderful music! This track can be downloaded for free at www.wintergatan.net. Editing by Alex Mitran - find Alex on Facebook (facebook.com/alexmmitran), Twitter (twitter.com/alexmmitran), or Linkedin (linkedin.com/in/alexmmitran)*****EPISODE RESOURCES: United Nations; World Bank. 2018. Pathways for Peace: Inclusive Approaches to Preventing Violent Conflict.Washington, DC: World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/28337 World Bank. 2011. World Development Report 2011: Conflict, Security, and Development. World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/4389Great Britain. Foreign Office. Historical Section. Cameroon. London, H. M. Stationery off, 1920. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/a22000968/Douglass C. North – Facts. NobelPrize.org. Nobel Prize Outreach AB 2022. Tue. 2 Aug 2022. https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/economic-sciences/1993/north/facts/Stewart, Frances. 2011. Horizontal Inequalities as a Cause of Conflict: A Review of CRISE Findings.Washington, DC: World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/9126 Marc, Alexandre; Willman, Alys; Aslam, Ghazia; Rebosio, Michelle; Balasuriya, Kanishka. 2013. Societal Dynamics and Fragility: Engaging Societies in Responding to Fragile Situations. New frontiers of social policy. Washington, DC: World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/12222Alexandre Marc, Bruce Jones. 2021. The New Geopolitics of Fragility: Russia, China, and the Mounting Challenge for Peacebuilding. The Brookings Institution. Washington, DC. https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/FP_20211015_new_geopolitics_fragility_marc_jones_v2.pdfTIMESTAMPS:00:00:00 Introduction00:01:21 Indiana Jones-like childhood and the discovery of different cultures00:04:35 Banana trade and witchcraft00:06:58 How to see the world in a different way00:09:08 Caring about people, culture, and history helps you better understand conflict00:12:25 What is conflict?00:15:42 Does conflict differ across different cultures? 00:18:48 The rise of "conflicts of fragility"00:23:57 The role of institutions in fragility and conflict00:29:00 What is fragility? Depends on who is asking.00:33:53 The interplay of actors, institutions, and structural factors00:41:19 Leadership must come from inside00:46:15 Actors have a choice - focus on structural factors that enhance dignity00:47:55 Development aid shouldn't be ideological00:54:20 Why is peace desirable?01:01:07 What people fight about, a.k.a. the arenas of contestation.01:09:49 How do the actors, structural factors, and institutions interact in the arenas?01:15:05 Horizontal inequality – when economic issues connect to identity issues01:22:46 On the inequality of dignity & future episodes in the Pathways for Peace series01:24:26 Wrap-up

JeffMara Paranormal Podcast
Atheist Researcher's Spiritual Transformation, Synchronicities & More!

JeffMara Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 69:24


Podcast guest 534 is Mark Gober and during this podcast we talked about consciousness, NDEs aliens, psychics and more. Mark is the author of "An End to Upside Down Thinking" (2018), which was awarded the IPPY award for best science book of 2019. He is also the author of "An End to Upside Down Living" (2020), "An End to Upside Down Liberty" (2021), and "An End to Upside Down Contact" (2022); and he is the host of the podcast "Where Is My Mind?" (2019). Additionally, he serves on the board of Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell's Institute of Noetic Sciences and the School of Wholeness and Enlightenment. Previously, Gober was a partner at Sherpa Technology Group in Silicon Valley and worked as an investment banking analyst with UBS in New York. He has been named one of IAM's Strategy 300: The World's Leading Intellectual Property Strategists. Gober graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University, where he wrote an award-winning thesis on Daniel Kahneman's Nobel Prize–winning “Prospect Theory” and was elected a captain of Princeton's Division I tennis team. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-s-reynolds/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jeffrey-s-reynolds/support

FemTech Focus
Natural Cycles, FDA-approved birth control app based on body temperature - Ep 174

FemTech Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 36:46


Natural Cycles° is a leading women's health company that developed the world's first birth control app, which has been used by millions of women around the world. As a Class II medical device, the NC° app is cleared by the FDA in the United States and certified to be used as a contraceptive in Europe, Australia, and Singapore. It has also received regulatory clearances to integrate with third party wearables. For a monthly or annual subscription fee, users have access to and can switch between NC° Birth Control, NC° Plan Pregnancy, and NC° Follow Pregnancy modes within the app. NC° Birth Control's clinical effectiveness and real life effectiveness is proven to be 93% effective with typical use and 98% effective with perfect use. Founded in 2013 by Physicists Dr. Elina Berglund and Dr. Raoul Scherwitzl, Natural Cycles° is committed to pioneering women's health with research and passion. The company's on-staff research team has contributed to 14 peer-reviewed research papers.Dr. Elina Berglund Scherwitzl is the CEO and co-founder of Natural Cycles - the world's first app to be certified as a contraception both in Europe and by the FDA. She was part of the team that discovered the Higgs boson at the CERN laboratory, which led to the Nobel Prize in physics in 2013. Following this success, Elina applied her skills from particle physics to create a unique algorithm that could accurately pinpoint when a woman was fertile based on her body temperature.https://www.naturalcycles.com/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/naturalcyclesFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/NaturalCyclesNCTikTok: @naturalcycles FemTech Focus is a 501c3 non-profit organization founded to bring awareness externally and internally for the FemTech industry and to empower the key stakeholders including entrepreneurs, investors, physicians, governments, and biopharma with resources and research to elevate women's health and wellness globally. Subscribe and Donate: www.femtechfocus.orgThe FemTech Focus Podcast with Dr. Brittany Barreto is a meaningfully provocative conversational series that brings women's health experts - including doctors, scientists, inventors, and founders - on air to talk about the innovative technology, services, and products that are improving women, female, and girl's health and wellness, collectively known as FemTech. The podcast gives the host, Dr. Brittany Barreto, and guests an engaging, friendly environment to learn about the past, present, and future of women's health and wellness. Linkedin: @FemTech Focus @Brittany BarretoTwitter: @Femtech_Focus @DrBrittBInstagram: @FemTechFocus @DrBrittanyBarretoFacebook: @FemTech Focus @Dr. Brittany Barreto

Dumbasses Talking Politics
Episode 577 - Monkey Pox!

Dumbasses Talking Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 54:56


No one seems to take monkey pox seriously even though it has been declared an emergency in two big cities. A Nobel Prize winning economist doesn't seem to know much about economics. And everything is racist.   Follow me on Twitter @RunninFewl Follow me on Rumble @DumbAssesTalkingPolitics Download or listen to my podcast on Apple Podcasts, Podbean, Podcast Addict, Stitcher and Rumble. Show notes and blog can be found on: http://www.dumbassestalkingpolitics.com   Please Subscribe, Like and Comment!

BeSimply Radio
BeSimply...Cristi Christensen {Chakra Ritual}

BeSimply Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 52:00


Join Cristi Christensen and Suzanne Toro as they explore her wisdom. We dive into her book Chakra Ritual, the Chakra System, Healing, Ritual, Sisterhood, Inner Transformation, Generational Healing and the Divine. About Cristi  IG @cristi_christensen Cristi has been the face for yoga & lifestyles brands such as Exhale Spa, Loewes Hotel Hollywood, Satya Yoga Wear, and Ananda Soul Creations, and has graced the covers of Yoga Journal, Om Yoga, Self, and LA Yoga. When she isn't teaching, globe-trotting, and empowering others, you'll likely find Cristi dancing and doing back flips on Venice Beach! Practice with Christi Chakra Rituals CHAKRA RITUALS ~ AWAKEN TO LIFE RETREAT Aug 15, 2022 – Aug 19, 2022 w/ special musical guests DJ Marques Wyatt and Dvine ONE Wild Women Wednesday's Building Peace History Mentioned in this Broadcast..Betty Williams received her Nobel Prize one year later, in 1977. Prize motivation: “for the courageous efforts in founding a movement to put an end to the violent conflict in Northern Ireland”  I had the pleasure of meeting Betty. A women after my heart. Her sister in heart and peace. Mairead Corrigan Brought to you by OmToro Media and Productions + Suzanne

BeSimply
BeSimply...Cristi Christensen {Chakra Ritual}

BeSimply

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 51:06


Join Cristi Christensen and Suzanne Toro as they explore her wisdom. We dive into her book Chakra Ritual, the Chakra System, Healing, Ritual, Sisterhood, Inner Transformation, Generational Healing and the Divine.About Cristi  IG @cristi_christensenCristi has been the face for yoga & lifestyles brands such as Exhale Spa, Loewes Hotel Hollywood, Satya Yoga Wear, and Ananda Soul Creations, and has graced the covers of Yoga Journal, Om Yoga, Self, and LA Yoga. When she isn't teaching, globe-trotting, and empowering others, you'll likely find Cristi dancing and doing back flips on Venice Beach!Practice with Christi Chakra Rituals CHAKRA RITUALS ~ AWAKEN TO LIFE RETREAT Aug 15, 2022 – Aug 19, 2022w/ special musical guests DJ Marques Wyatt and Dvine ONEWild Women Wednesday's 7 Weeks of Chakra Rituals Building Peace History Mentioned in this Broadcast..Betty Williams received her Nobel Prize one year later, in 1977. Prize motivation: “for the courageous efforts in founding a movement to put an end to the violent conflict in Northern Ireland”  I had the pleasure of meeting Betty. A women after my heart. Her sister in heart and peace. Mairead CorriganBrought to you by OmToro Media and Productions + Suzanne

The Daily Article
The mistaken obituaries of Tony Dow and Alfred Nobel: How the reality of death liberates us to live fully today

The Daily Article

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 8:06


Tony Dow, a teenage star in the popular 1950s and 60s comedy series Leave It to Beaver, died Wednesday at his California home at the age of seventy-seven—but his death was erroneously reported the day before. Alfred Nobel rewrote his will after an erroneous reporting of his death, which effectively resulted in the creation of the Nobel Prize. In The Daily Article for July 29, 2022, Dr. Jim Denison discusses how Christians always have the opportunity to rewrite our obituaries when we embrace the reality of our mortality and God's call to dependence on him. For more on death in biblical perspective, please read my latest article, “What happens when you die?”

Labor Radio-Podcast Weekly
Organizing in Medieval Times

Labor Radio-Podcast Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 34:28


On the Work Stoppage podcast: Hyundai is violating child labor laws with migrant children in an Alabama metal stamping plant. The latest southern labor news from The Valley Labor Report. On the Belabored podcast, why performers at the Medieval Times in Lindhurst, New Jersey have voted to unionize. Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz, in Australia recently to talk with unions, workers and the newly elected Labor government, sat down with the On The Job podcast in Melbourne. Labor journalist Hamilton Nolan talks to the Labor Radio Podcast Network about why “labor media is a vital part of a thriving labor movement.” This is your Network, and we're building it like a union organizing campaign, one show and one listener at a time; please help us build sonic solidarity by sharing this show; just click on the share button below. Thanks so much! Highlights from labor radio and podcast shows around the country, part of the national Labor Radio Podcast Network of shows focusing on working people's issues and concerns. #LaborRadioPod @AFLCIO @WorkStoppagePod @LaborReporters @DissentMag @SaintFrankly @sallyrugg Edited by Mel Smith; produced by Chris Garlock; social media guru Mr. Harold Phillips.

Getting Simple
#67: Frank Harmon — Writing, Drawing, and Sense of Place

Getting Simple

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 46:24


Frank Harmon on the purpose of writing and sketching, what makes great writers, artists, and architects, and the importance of giving people a sense of place. Frank Harmon, FAIA, is a nationally renowned award-winning architect, a professor of architecture at NC State University's College of Design. and a popular mentor to four decades of student architects. A graduate of the Architectural Association in London and a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, he has also taught at the Architectural Association and has served as a visiting critic at Harvard, the University of Virginia, and Auburn University's renowned Rural Studio. Among dozens of design awards throughout his career, Frank received AIA NC's highest honor, the F. Carter Williams Gold Medal, in 2013. Frank is also a published writer and illustrator, using hand-drawn sketches and 200-word essays that consider the relationship between nature and built structures in his online journal Nativeplaces.org. In 2018, ORO Editions published a collection of sketch/essay duos from the journal and Frank's thoughts on the value of drawing in a hardback book entitled Native Places: Drawing as a Way to See. He is currently working on a new book that celebrates the people, places, and stories behind eight of his signature projects. Frank lives in Raleigh in the award-winning modernist house and lush gardens near NCSU that he designed with his late wife, landscape architect Judy Harmon. Favorite quotes “My goal in life is to make short sentences.” “We lost contact with our senses by making everything depend on the visual.” “When we draw, we touch.” “Once we've bought into the digital internet world, we're never going to get rid of it.” “When we make a place [we should make it] situated in its place so that we've got something physical and concrete that grounds us in an otherwise unlimited digital world.” “Genius is the ability to recall your childhood at any time.” —Baudelaire Books Native Places: Drawing as a Way to See by Frank Harmon The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses by Juhani Pallasmaa Links Frank's Instagram Native Places blog by Frank Harmon Frank's Drawing as a Way to See talk at Clark Nexsen (2019) Frank's Heritage talk at Creative Mornings Raleigh (2014) Less is Love by Frank Harmon People mentioned Ernest Hemingway Joan Didion C. S. Forester Tadao Ando Kevin Carl - Child psychologist, friend Pablo Picasso Henry David Thoureau - “ Every child discovers the world anew.” Peter Zumthor Jordan Gray (podcast) Charles Baudelaire - “[G]enius is nothing more nor less than childhood recovered at will.” William Shakespeare Alice Munro - Canadian short story writer, Nobel Prize in Literature in 2013 Marlon Blackwell William Faulkner - American writer Glenn Murcutt Tom Kundig Ted Flato Rick Joy - Studio Rick Joy Brigitte Shim - Shim-Sutcliffe Architects Brian MacKay-Lyons Patricia and John Patkau - Patkau Architects Larry Scarpa Frank Gehry James Monroe Henry Woodhead Mies van der Rohe Tadao Ando Le Corbusier Chapters 00:00 · Introduction 01:14 · Writing 05:00 · Becoming an architect 06:21 · Frank's book 07:19 · Living in London 09:03 · Studying abroad in the US 13:37 · Childhood place 20:38 · Born with screens 23:39 · Design 27:42 · Place 33:41 · Good architecture 37:10 · Bad architecture 38:48 · Frank Gehry's middle finger 39:31 · Native Places: Drawing as a Way to See 43:47 · The best way to write 44:23 · The purpose of sketching 45:45 · Thanks 46:09 · Outro Submit a question about this or previous episodes. I'd love to hear from you. Join the Discord community. Meet other curious minds. If you enjoy the show, would you please consider leaving a short review on Apple Podcasts/iTunes? It takes less than 60 seconds and really helps. Show notes, transcripts, and past episodes at gettingsimple.com/podcast. Theme song Sleep by Steve Combs under CC BY 4.0. Follow Nono Twitter.com/nonoesp Instagram.com/nonoesp Facebook.com/nonomartinezalonso YouTube.com/nonomartinezalonso

Into the Impossible
Ben Shapiro REACTS to New NASA Facts!

Into the Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 9:04 Very Popular


In July NASA released the first images and data from the James Webb Space Telescope. Here's my discussion with @Ben Shapiro on this treasure trove of data including: Carina Nebula. The Carina Nebula is one of the largest and brightest nebulae in the sky, located approximately 7,600 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina. Nebulae are stellar nurseries where stars form. The Carina Nebula is home to many massive stars, several times larger than the Sun. WASP-96 b (spectrum). WASP-96 b is a giant planet outside our solar system, composed mainly of gas. The planet, located nearly 1,150 light-years from Earth, orbits its star every 3.4 days. It has about half the mass of Jupiter, and its discovery was announced in 2014. Southern Ring Nebula. The Southern Ring, or “Eight-Burst” nebula, is a planetary nebula – an expanding cloud of gas, surrounding a dying star. It is nearly half a light-year in diameter and is located approximately 2,000 light years away from Earth. Stephan's Quintet: About 290 million light-years away, Stephan's Quintet is located in the constellation Pegasus. It is notable for being the first compact galaxy group ever discovered in 1877. Four of the five galaxies within the quintet are locked in a cosmic dance of repeated close encounters. Don't miss my exclusive LIVE Q & A with JWST Project Scientist, and Nobel Prize winner, John Mather! https://youtu.be/vC77uaWYd44 Please join my mailing list to get the latest news in the Universe and win cool prizes like meteorites, books, and more! briankeating.com/list

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie
Episode 2286: Janet Bray Attwood ~ 2x New York Times Bestselling Author. The Passion Test

Building Abundant Success!!© with Sabrina-Marie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 30:30


Two-Time NY Times Bestselling Author From her own remarkable experiences, Janet created the profoundly impactful Passion Test process. This simple, yet effective process has transformed thousands of lives all over the world and is the basis of the NY Times bestseller she co-authored with Chris Attwood, The Passion Test: The Effortless Path to Discovering Your Life Purpose &Shine Your Light: Powerful Practices for an Extraordinary Life by Janet Bray Attwood and Marci Shimoff .Janet is a living example of what it means to live a passionate, fully engaged life. A celebrated transformational leader, Janet has shared the stage with people like His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Sir Richard Branson, Nobel Prize winner, F.W. deKlerk, Stephen Covey, Jack Canfield, and many others. She is also known as one of the top marketers in America. In 2000, Mark Victor Hansen and Robert G. Allen paid for 40 of the top marketing experts in the country to come to Newport Beach, CA to consult with them on marketing their book, The One Minute Millionaire. Janet was one of the very first they invited. As a result of that meeting, Robert G. Allen and Mark Victor Hansen asked Janet to partner with them in their Enlightened Millionaire Program. Her personal stories of following her passions, of the transformations which people like Chicken Soup for the Soul author Jack Canfield have experienced with The Passion Test, and the practical, simple exercises she takes people through to discover their own passions are a few of the reasons she gets standing ovations wherever she presents. Janet has given hundreds of presentations and taken thousands of people through The Passion Test process, in the U.S., Canada, India, Nepal, and Europe. Janet is also the founder of The Passion Test for Business, The Passion Test for Coaches, The Passion Test for Kids and Teens, The Passion Test for Kids in lockdown, and The Reclaim Your Power program for the homeless. Janet is a golden connector. She has always had the gift of connecting with people, no matter what their status or position. From the influential and powerful, to the rich and famous, to lepers and AIDS patients, to the Saints of India, Nepal, the Philippines and elsewhere—to anyone who is seeking to live their destiny, Janet bonds with every single person, and the stories she shares are inspiring, mind-boggling, uplifting and very real. A co-founder of top online transformational magazine, Healthy Wealthy nWise, Janet has interviewed some of the most successful people in the world about the role of passion in living a fulfilling life. Her guests have included Stephen Covey, Denis Waitley, Robert Kiyosaki, Neale Donald Walsch, Paula Abdul, Director David Lynch, Richard Paul Evans, Barbara DeAngelis, marketing guru Jay Abraham, singer Willie Nelson, Byron Katie, Wayne Dyer, Nobel Prize winner Muhammad Yunus, Tony Robbins, Rhonda Byrne and many others. These live teleconference interviews have attracted listeners from all parts of the globe. Edited versions of these interviews are made available to over 150,000 subscribers. Her Passion Test process has impacted people worldwide, and The Passion Test phenomenon has resulted in requests from schools to build a passion curriculum, from teachers, trainers and speakers to use the process, and from organizations like NASA to incorporate it in their staff development programs. It was as a result of taking The Passion Test with Janet that Jack Canfield recognized his passion to be part of a spiritual leaders' network and out of that came the Transformational Leadership Council. Janet and Chris are both founding members of that organization whose 100+ members serve over 10 million people in the self-development world. Janet Attwood makes magic happen. Her presentations hold audiences spellbound. Her programs attract people from all over the globe. Through her magnetic charisma she is touching the lives of millions of people around the world. janetattwood.com'© 2022 All Rights Reserved© 2022 BuildingAbundantSuccess!!Join Me on ~ iHeart Radio @ https://tinyurl.com/iHeartBASSpot Me on Spotify: https://tinyurl.com/yxuy23baAmazon Music ~ https://tinyurl.com/AmzBAS https://tinyurl.com/BASAud

The Roundtable
Yaddo - Interview with Elaina Richardson, Joseph Keckler, and James Hannaham

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 27:06


Founded by Saratoga residents Spencer and Katrina Trask in 1900, Yaddo was the first artist residency in the United States of America. It went on to welcome some of the most famous figures in the world from Sylvia Plath and Truman Capote to Walter Mosley, Laurie Anderson and David Sedaris. 7000 artists, which include winners of the Academy Award, the Pulitzer Prize, the Nobel Prize, and the National Book Award, and many, many more. We have been very fortunate to be invited into the mysterious inner sanctum of Yaddo to discuss the recent changes after a multi-million dollar stabilization and restoration of the public face. We welcome Yaddo President Elena Richardson; artist, singer, songwriter, author and performing artist Joseph keckler, and writer, performer, and visual artist James Hannaham. Both Keckler and Hannaham are on Yaddo's board and have been artists in residence.

The Climate Pod
Paul Krugman on Inflation, Climate Spending, and the Future of the Economy

The Climate Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 45:52


Dr. Paul Krugman, Nobel Prize in Economics recipient and Distinguished Professor of Economics at City University of New York, joins the show to talk about what's driving the world's rising inflation rates, how investments in climate solutions would impact inflation and the economy, and the prospects of Congress passing a climate spending bill. Dr. Krugman also provides his thoughts on the Federal Reserve increasing interest rates, whether or not the US is in a recession, and what all of this means for climate investments. Plus, co-hosts Ty and Brock Benefiel discuss the importance of environmental and climate advocates building political power and the urgency to elect policymakers who will support climate solutions. Further Reading: Paul Krugman "I Was Wrong About Inflation" Paul Krugman "Climate Politics Are Worse Than You Think" Nathaniel Stinnett "Climate Movement Must Stop Hoping for Political Heroes"   Subscribe to our Substack newsletter "The Climate Weekly": https://theclimateweekly.substack.com/ As always, follow us @climatepod on Twitter and email us at theclimatepod@gmail.com. Our music is "Gotta Get Up" by The Passion Hifi, check out his music at thepassionhifi.com. Rate, review and subscribe to this podcast on iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, and more! Subscribe to our new YouTube channel! Join our Facebook group. Check out our updated website!  

Law School
Conflict of laws and private international law (2022): Hague Conference on Private International Law

Law School

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 8:09


The Hague Conference on Private International Law (HCCH) is an intergovernmental organization in the area of private international law (also known as conflict of laws), that administers several international conventions, protocols and soft law instruments. The Hague Conference was first convened by Tobias Asser in 1893 in The Hague. In 1911, Asser received the Nobel Prize for Peace for his work in the field of private international law, and in particular for his achievements with respect to the HCCH. After World War II, the Hague Conference was established as an international organization. History. A permanent diplomatic conference. On the initiative of Tobias Asser, the First Diplomatic Session of the HCCH was convened in 1893. Its aim was, and remains, to "work for the progressive unification of the rules of private international law", including by creating, and assisting in the implementation of, multilateral conventions that promote the harmonization of the rules and principles of private international law (or conflict of laws). The First to Fourth Diplomatic Session of the HCCH took place in 1893, 1894, 1900 and 1904 respectively. They resulted in a number of multilateral treaties, the Hague Conventions, that unified the rules of private international law in the areas of Marriage (1902), Divorce (1902), Guardianship (1902), Civil procedure (1905), Effects of Marriage (1905), and Deprivation of Civil Rights (1905). After World War I, the Fifth and Sixth Diplomatic Sessions took place in 1925 and 1928 respectively. The result of those Diplomatic Sessions was the Protocol to recognize the competence of the Permanent Court of International Justice to interpret the Hague Conventions on Private International Law. Intergovernmental organization. After World War II, steps were taken to establish the HCCH as an intergovernmental organization, governed by its member states and administered by a secretariat, the Permanent Bureau. The treaty establishing the HCCH, the "Statute of the Hague Conference on Private International Law", was adopted during the Seventh Diplomatic Session of the HCCH in 1951, and entered into force on 15 July 1955. The acronym "HCCH" is derived from using the respective capitals of the phrases "Hague Conference" and "Conférence de La Haye". It represents the bilingual nature of the HCCH, which has both English and French as its working languages. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/law-school/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/law-school/support

Stereo Chemistry
Bonus: For John Goodenough's 100th birthday, we revisit a fan-favorite interview with the renowned scientist

Stereo Chemistry

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 38:01 Very Popular


Famed lithium-ion-battery pioneer and Nobel Prize–winner John Goodenough has achieved yet another milestone—a century on Earth. Goodenough celebrates his 100th birthday on July 25, 2022. In honor of the occasion, Stereo Chemistry host Kerri Jansen and C&EN reporter Mitch Jacoby revisit their 2019 interview with the renowned scientist, recorded at his office at the University of Texas at Austin just prior to his Nobel win. In the expansive and candid conversation, Goodenough tells Stereo Chemistry about childhood adventures, infernal exams with Enrico Fermi, and his path to the innovation that enabled an electronics revolution. A transcript of this episode is available at bit.ly/3otFrh3. Music credit: “Happy Birthday To You (Orchestral)” by beanstalkaudio/Pond5.com Image credit: Mitch Jacoby/Robert Bryson/C&EN/Milano M/Shutterstock

Aging in Portland | Radio Show and Podcast
7/25/22: Chris Burres from MyVitalC | Can You Live Longer, Taking One Nobel Prize-Winning Molecule, ESS60? | Aging Today with Mark Turnbull

Aging in Portland | Radio Show and Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 87:09


This week on the Aging Today podcast, I interviewed Chris Burres, Chief Scientist from MyVitalC. He discusses the benefits of taking one Nobel Prize-winning molecule, ESS60, in Organic Olive Oil. Does living a longer, healthier life sound appealing? Chris Burres, Carbon Nanomaterial scientist and Co-Founder of My Vital C, joins us on Aging Today to discuss the extraordinary benefits of ESS60 in Organic Olive Oil. It is Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant, and Antibacterial properties. The results are proving life-changing for many. Tune in to hear Chris tell this remarkable story of C 60/ESS 60. After hearing the story, and if you want to personally try it, log in to Myvitalc.com/agingtoday for your 25% discount.

Radiolab
You v. You

Radiolab

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 26:00 Very Popular


This episode, originally aired more than a decade ago, attempts to answer one question: how do you win against your worst impulses? Zelda Gamson tried for decades to stop smoking, but the part of her that wanted to quit couldn't beat the part of her that refused to let go. Adam Davidson, a co-founder of the NPR podcast Planet Money, talked to one of the greatest negotiators of all time, Nobel Prize-winning Economist Thomas Schelling, whose tactical skills saw him through high-stakes conflicts during the Cold War but fell apart when he tried them on himself in his battle to quit smoking. And a baby Pat Walters complicates things — in a good way — with the story of two brothers, Dennis and Kai Woo, who forged a deal with each other that wound up determining both of their futures. Our newsletter comes out every Wednesday. It includes short essays, recommendations, and details about other ways to interact with the show. Sign up (https://radiolab.org/newsletter)! Radiolab is supported by listeners like you. Support Radiolab by becoming a member of The Lab (https://members.radiolab.org/) today. Follow our show on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook @radiolab, and share your thoughts with us by emailing radiolab@wnyc.org.  

Science Friday
Kahneman on ‘Noise,' CHIPS Act, Great Salt Lake Dryness, Hybrid Toads. July 22, 2022, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 47:20 Very Popular


When Times Get Tough, These Toads Make Hybrid Babies Scientists have long thought that when two animals from two different species mate, it's a colossal error and the end of the road for the mismatched couple. It's called interspecies breeding, and many hybrid offspring often end up sterile, such as zonkeys —a cross between a zebra and donkey. Or they can develop serious health problems, like ligers and tigons. One biologist even went as far to call interspecies breeding “the grossest blunder in sexual preference.” But is breeding across species lines always a dead end? One critter —the plains spadefoot toad—shows us that maybe it isn't. In fact, it can give them a leg up in survival. Katherine Wu, staff writer for The Atlantic, talks with Ira about the complicated sex lives of the female plains spadefoot toads, the trade-offs females make when choosing a mate, and why hybridizing critters may not be such a biological abomination after all.     Major Semiconductor Support Bill Passes First Hurdle Earlier this week, the Senate voted in favor of the Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Act. If passed, the bill would provide more than $50 billion to companies that will build semiconductor factories here in the United States. Semiconductors are versatile materials—such as silicon—often used in electronics and in microchips. But the bulk of semiconductors, known as “chips,” are produced in other countries, mostly Taiwan. If the CHIPS Act is passed, the government will fund tech companies to build factories at home instead. Although the bill still has to go through the House and be signed by President Biden, this Senate vote is still a monumental moment in the tech world. Jesús del Alamo, a professor of electrical engineering at MIT, joins Ira to talk about why this bill is such a big deal, and what's at stake.   Drought Could Raise Toxic Dust Around Utah's Great Salt Lake Utah's Great Salt Lake holds a unique ecological niche as the western hemisphere's largest saltwater lake. The body of water is three to five times saltier than the ocean, with salinity ranging between 12 and 28 percent. According to the Great Salt Lake Institute, millions of birds from more than 250 species rely on the lake yearly, alongside a diverse variety of plants and animals. Like many bodies of water in the U.S., climate change is affecting the status quo in the Great Salt Lake. The water is drying up at an alarming rate, reaching its lowest level in recorded history this month. Now, researchers warn that toxic dust could increase as water levels continue to drop. Joining Ira to discuss the Great Salt Lake's ecosystem and future is Bonnie Baxter, director of the Great Salt Lake Institute and biology professor at Westminster College in Salt Lake City, Utah.   A Flaw in Human Judgment: How Making Decisions Isn't As Objective As You Think If two people are presented with the same set of facts, they will often draw different conclusions. For example, judges often dole out different sentences for the same case, which can lead to an unjust system. This unwanted variability in judgments in which we expect uniformity is what psychologist Daniel Kahneman calls “noise.” The importance of thoughtful decision-making has come in stark relief during the pandemic and in the events leading up to the January 6th insurrection. Ira talks with Nobel Prize-winning psychologist Daniel Kahneman about the role of ‘noise' in human judgment, his long career studying cognitive biases, and how systematic decision-making can result in fewer errors. Kahneman is the co-author of “Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgment,” along with Oliver Sibony and Cass R. Sunstein, now available in paperback.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.  

The MindBodyBrain Project
How to improve your gut health with Dr Josephine Muir

The MindBodyBrain Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 49:48


Josephine is the co-founder of Noisy Guts, a company formed in collaboration with Nobel Prize winner, professor barry Marshall, who showed that stomach ulcers were created by a bacteria called H Pilori.  Noisy Guts is driven to create a non-invasive and accurate diagnostic test for one of the world's most common gut disorders - Irritable Bowel Syndrome. In this episode we discuss common gut disorders and how to improve your gut health.Check out Noisy Guts for their blogs, recipes, testing recommendations and gut-healthy superflora shakes.

Probably Science
Episode 465 - Brian Keating

Probably Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 55:44


UC San Diego astrophysicist, podcaster and YouTuber Brian Keating (@DrBrianKeating) joins Matt, Jesse and Andy to talk about the inflation model versus the cyclic model of the universe, multiverses, how an astrophysicist conducts an experiment, working on BICEP at the South Pole, Brian's books Losing the Nobel Prize and Into the Impossible and joining Brian's mailing list for your chance to win an actual meteorite from SPACE. 

The Past Lives Podcast
Paranormal Stories Ep23

The Past Lives Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 22:02 Very Popular


Episode 23 of Paranormal Stories. This week the books are 'Changed in a Flash: One Woman's Near-Death Experience and Why a Scholar Thinks It Empowers Us All' by Elizabeth Krohn and Jeffrey Kripal and 'An End to Upside Down Contact: UFOs, Aliens, and Spirits—and Why Their Ongoing Interaction with Human Civilization Matters' By Mark Gober.Mark GoberAre we alone? The answer, according to Mark Gober's An End to Upside Down Contact, is a resounding NO. Humans exist among a variety of advanced species, sometimes identified as aliens, spirits, beings of light, and beyond. In fact, our civilization seems to be regularly influenced by such nonhuman intelligences, even if we're not always aware of it. Near-death experiences and other phenomena of consciousness reveal that some species exist in other dimensions that our eyes cannot ordinarily see. Similarly, UFOs and alien abductions—which were examined by the former head of psychiatry at Harvard—provide additional evidence that we are not alone. As strange as it might sound, none of this is new: contact with nonhuman intelligence is likely a part of humanity's ancient history. This isn't just some “fringe” phenomenon, either. We seem to exist within a multispecies, multidimensional battle between Good and Evil, and our future as a civilization is at stake. Buckle up for a wild—and paradigm-shifting—ride.BioMark Gober is the author of "An End to Upside Down Thinking" (2018), which was awarded the IPPY award for best science book of 2019. He is also the author of "An End to Upside Down Living" (2020), "An End to Upside Down Liberty" (2021), and "An End to Upside Down Contact" (2022); and he is the host of the podcast "Where Is My Mind?" (2019). Additionally, he serves on the board of Apollo 14 astronaut Edgar Mitchell's Institute of Noetic Sciences and the School of Wholeness and Enlightenment.Previously, Gober was a partner at Sherpa Technology Group in Silicon Valley and worked as an investment banking analyst with UBS in New York. He has been named one of IAM's Strategy 300: The World's Leading Intellectual Property Strategists.Gober graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University, where he wrote an award-winning thesis on Daniel Kahneman's Nobel Prize–winning “Prospect Theory” and was elected a captain of Princeton's Division I tennis team.https://www.amazon.com/End-Upside-Down-Contact-Spirits-ebook/dp/B0B43TH5JZ/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1657892123&sr=8-1https://markgober.com/Elizabeth KrohnA fascinating first-hand account of an awakening into a psychic consciousness, paired with a revolutionary analysis by a respected professor of religion. When Elizabeth Greenfield Krohn got out of her car with her two young sons in the parking lot of her synagogue on a late afternoon in September 1988, she couldn't have anticipated she would within seconds be struck by lightning and have a near-death experience. She felt herself transported to a garden and engaging in a revelatory conversation with a spiritual being. When she recovered, her most fundamental understandings of what the world is and how it works had been completely transformed. She was “changed in a flash,” suddenly able to interact with those who had died and have prescient dreams predicting news events. She came to believe that some early traumatic and abusive experiences had played a part in preparing her for this experience. Told in matter-of-fact language, the first half of this book is the story of Krohn's journey, and the second is an interpretation and analysis by respected professor of religion Jeffrey J. Kripal. He places Krohn's experience in the context of religious traditions and proposes the groundbreaking idea that we are shaping our own experiences in the future by how we engage with near-death experiences in the present. Changed in a Flash is not about proving a story, but about carving out space for serious discussion of this phenomenon.https://www.amazon.com/Changed-Flash-Near-Death-Experience-Empowers-ebook/dp/B079D8T8BY/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1657890862&sr=1-1https://www.pastliveshypnosis.co.uk/https://www.patreon.com/alienufopodcasthttps://www.patreon.com/pastlivespodcast

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
The James Webb Space Telescope is out of this world (rerun)

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 34:44 Very Popular


Hey everyone, we're taking a short break today, but we'll be back tomorrow with an all-new Make Me Smart. In the meantime, here's a deep dive episode you may have missed, all about the James Webb Space Telescope. NASA released its first images earlier this month. For the first deep dive of 2022, we’re going to space! OK, not really. But we’re talking about the most powerful space telescope ever. The James Webb Space Telescope cost $10 billion, a lot of tech went into developing it and we can’t stop obsessing over it. Neither can our guest. “I cannot contain my excitement. It’s been a wild roller coaster getting to this point. And to have this telescope now launched in space, it’s just so thrilling for astronomers everywhere,” said Caitlin Casey, professor of astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin, who will be leading the biggest project on the JWST. The telescope is expected to help researchers discover some of the most distant galaxies and study the atmosphere of planets outside our solar system to see if they’re habitable. On the show today: what the JWST tells us about the future of public and private investment in space exploration. Casey will also highlight the technological developments created by the JWST and its predecessor, Hubble, and how they’ve impacted industries from medical equipment to GPS technology. In the News Fix, some companies have stopped predicting when they’ll be back in the office. Plus, an in-depth investigation into the House and Senate members who enslaved Black people. Later, we’ll discuss why some people want to tone down our use of the term “deep dive” and an answer to the Make Me Smart Question from the 2011 Nobel Prize winner in physics. Here’s everything we talked about today: “James Webb Space Telescope Launches on Journey to See the Dawn of Starlight” from The New York Times Photo: the Hubble Deep Field  “Global Space Economy Rose to $447B in 2020, Continuing Five-Year Growth” from the Space Foundation “NASA splits human spaceflight unit in two, reflecting new orbital economy” from Reuters “Surging Covid-19 Puts an End to Projected Return-to-Office Dates” from The Wall Street Journal “Rivian shares decline on 2021 production and executive departure” from CNBC Who owned slaves in Congress? A list of 1,700 enslavers from The Washington Post

The Dispatch Podcast
James Webb Takes Us Back in Time

The Dispatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 38:44 Very Popular


Images from the James Webb Space Telescope have taken the internet by storm, and Declan is here with two guests who worked on it for a fascinating conversation about its long journey into reality. Dr. John Mather, a Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and the senior project scientist for the JWST, and Dr. Scott Acton, a physicist at Ball Aerospace and JWST's Wavefront Sensing and Controls scientist, relay their exploits in achieving the most incredible and ambitious space images ever taken of thousands of galaxies, black holes, and dust clouds. And we have to ask: Are we alone in the universe, really? Show Notes:-First Images from the James Webb Space Telescope-Dr. John Mather-TMD: This Is Something That's Going to ‘Change Our Understanding of the Universe'

Body of Wonder
Episode #31 The Role of Nitric Oxide in the Body with Dr. Louis Ignarro

Body of Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 33:59


Your body naturally produces nitric oxide, a small gaseous molecule; while it exists for mere seconds, it is vitally important for your health. The main function of nitric oxide is vasodilation. Nitric oxide also improves brain cognition, stabilizes blood pressure, and supports exercise performance. Today we welcome, Dr. Louis Ignarro, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his discovery that nitric oxide acts as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. His research led him to the development of one of the most popular pharmaceuticals in the world, sildenafil, known widely by its brand name, Viagra. Yet, Dr. Ignarro has devoted his life to unlocking nitric oxide’s larger potential in advancing heart health. In this episode Dr. Ignarro shares the history of the scientific discovery of nitric oxide and its use in medical settings around the world. Dr. Weil asks what’s responsible for the rise in nitric oxide deficiencies. Dr. Maizes asks about natural mechanisms to increases nitric oxide levels, such as breathwork. Join us on a journey through the science of nitric oxide, the small molecule with a large impact.

Marketplace All-in-One
The James Webb Space Telescope is out of this world (rerun)

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 34:44


Hey everyone, we're taking a short break today, but we'll be back tomorrow with an all-new Make Me Smart. In the meantime, here's a deep dive episode you may have missed, all about the James Webb Space Telescope. NASA released its first images earlier this month. For the first deep dive of 2022, we’re going to space! OK, not really. But we’re talking about the most powerful space telescope ever. The James Webb Space Telescope cost $10 billion, a lot of tech went into developing it and we can’t stop obsessing over it. Neither can our guest. “I cannot contain my excitement. It’s been a wild roller coaster getting to this point. And to have this telescope now launched in space, it’s just so thrilling for astronomers everywhere,” said Caitlin Casey, professor of astronomy at the University of Texas at Austin, who will be leading the biggest project on the JWST. The telescope is expected to help researchers discover some of the most distant galaxies and study the atmosphere of planets outside our solar system to see if they’re habitable. On the show today: what the JWST tells us about the future of public and private investment in space exploration. Casey will also highlight the technological developments created by the JWST and its predecessor, Hubble, and how they’ve impacted industries from medical equipment to GPS technology. In the News Fix, some companies have stopped predicting when they’ll be back in the office. Plus, an in-depth investigation into the House and Senate members who enslaved Black people. Later, we’ll discuss why some people want to tone down our use of the term “deep dive” and an answer to the Make Me Smart Question from the 2011 Nobel Prize winner in physics. Here’s everything we talked about today: “James Webb Space Telescope Launches on Journey to See the Dawn of Starlight” from The New York Times Photo: the Hubble Deep Field  “Global Space Economy Rose to $447B in 2020, Continuing Five-Year Growth” from the Space Foundation “NASA splits human spaceflight unit in two, reflecting new orbital economy” from Reuters “Surging Covid-19 Puts an End to Projected Return-to-Office Dates” from The Wall Street Journal “Rivian shares decline on 2021 production and executive departure” from CNBC Who owned slaves in Congress? A list of 1,700 enslavers from The Washington Post

Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People
Pamela Hawley: How to Foster Volunteerism and Social Activism

Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 54:59 Very Popular


Pamela Hawley is a pioneer in modern ways to optimize philanthropy. She's the winner of the Jefferson Award, which is the Nobel Prize in community service, and she was the finalist for Ernst & Young's Entrepreneur of the Year Award She is the founder and CEO of UniversalGiving, an award-winning nonprofit that helps people give and volunteer worldwide. She is also the co-founder of VolunteerMatch. This organization has matched more than four million volunteers with nonprofits. During her time there, she generated more than one million dollars in revenue. Pamela has a political science degree from Duke University and a master's in international communications from the Annenburg school of communications. Great episode with Pamela on Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People Podcast!

Quotomania
Quotomania 292: Eugenio Montale

Quotomania

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 1:30


Subscribe to Quotomania on Simplecast or search for Quotomania on your favorite podcast app!Eugenio Montale was born into a family of businessmen in Genoa, Italy, on October 12, 1896. During World War I, he served as an infantry officer on the Austrian front. Orginially Montale had trained to be an opera singer, but when his voice teacher died in 1923, he gave up singing and concentrated his efforts on writing.After his first book, Ossi di seppia (Cuttlefish Bones), appeared in 1925, Montale was received by critics as a profoundly original and experimental poet. His style mixed archaic words with scientific terms and idioms from the vernacular. He was dismissed from his directorship of the Gabinetto Vieusseux research library in 1938 for refusing to join the Fascist party. He withdrew from public life and began translating English writers such as Shakespeare, T. S. Eliot, Herman Melville, and Eugene O'Neill. In 1939, Le occasioni (The Occasions) appeared, his most innovative book, followed by La bufera e altro (The Storm and Other Things, 1956). It was this trio of books established him as a founder of the hermetic school of Italian poetry.In 1948 he moved from Florence to Milan, where he became chief literary critic for Italy's primary newspaper, Corriere della Sera. In addition to writing poems, Montale was also a prolific essayist, writer of stories and travel sketches, distinguished music critic, translator, and amateur painter. He corresponded with Ezra Pound (despite Pound's Fascist sympathies), Italo Svevo, and Salvatore Quasimodo. In 1961, Montale was awarded an honorary degree at the University of Rome and shortly afterwards, at the universities of Milan, Cambridge, and Basel. In recognition of his work, as well as his courageous opposition to fascism, he was made a lifetime member of the Italian Senate in 1967.After a long break from writing poetry, Montale published four collections during the last ten years of his life: Satura (Miscellany, 1971), Diario del '71 e del '72 (Diary of 1971 and 1972, 1973), Quaderno di quattro anni (Notebook of Four Years, 1977), and Altri versi e poesi disperse (Other and Uncollected Poems, 1981). In 1975 he received the Nobel Prize in Literature "for his distinctive poetry which, with great artistic sensitivity, has interpreted human values under the sign of an outlook on life with no illusions." Montale died in Milan in 1981 at the age of 85.From https://poets.org/poet/eugenio-montale. For more information about Eugenio Montale:From “Cuttlefish Bones/Movements” collection, The Collected Poems, 1920-1954: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9780374533281“Eugenio Montale”: https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/eugenio-montale“Eugenio Montale”: https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/literature/1975/montale/biographical/

Killer Innovations: Successful Innovators Talking About Creativity, Design and Innovation | Hosted by Phil McKinney

During the Cold War, Nobel Prize winner Richard Feynman investigated the possibility of science on a microscopic scale. He wanted to create machines that could assemble molecules atom by atom. While this sounds like science fiction, the “nanoscale” exists. Nanobots exist. Nanotechnology is growing rapidly, and I believe its impact will be significant. The Nanoscale In 2016, IBM researchers announced […]

Off the Record with Paul Hodes
Senior Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope, Dr. John Mather

Off the Record with Paul Hodes

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 40:49


If you're like us and most of the Internet, you spent last week goggling at the very first, and absolutely stunning, images from the James Webb Space Telescope. These images lead us right into the most profound questions about the cosmos, and our own existence...and they help to put some of our fights, disagreements, and problems here on this pale blue dot (the kinds of things we normally cover on this show) into some proper perspective. To give us that perspective, our guest is Dr. John Mather, Senior Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope. In 2006, he won the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) which helped cement the big-bang theory of the universe. According to the Nobel Prize committee, "the COBE project can also be regarded as the starting point for cosmology as a precision science." In 2007, Mather was listed among Time magazine's 100 Most Influential People in The World. ***Note: we had low audio quality on Matt's portion of audio, because when a Nobel Prize winner agrees to come on the show to talk about one of the most exciting stories in the world, you make it work even if one of your hosts is traveling and using sub-standard equipment. We apologize for the slightly hollow sound.***

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Nobel winner's harassment, Fiji journalist's utu

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 7:33


Media commentator Andrew Holden joins Kathryn to look at the harassment experienced by Nobel Prize winner Maria Ressa in the Philippines, while her fellow winner Dmitry Muratov also had his independent newspaper shut down. A Fijian journalist expelled from a press conference during a visit of the Chinese foreign minister spotted two Chinese embassy officials pretending to be reporters at the Pacific Islands Forum, and ABC in Australia is to get a five-year funding model that the new Government says will make it 'safe' from political interference and manipulation. Andrew Holden is a journalist for more than 30 years including five as Editor of The Press (in Christchurch) and four as Editor-in-Chief of The Age in Melbourne.

Bob Murphy Show
Ep. 245 Cutting Larry Summers Some Slack on His Labor Market Remarks

Bob Murphy Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 35:37


Bob provides a qualified defense of Larry Summers' recent claim that high unemployment will be necessary to contain price inflation. Mentioned in the Episode and Other Links of Interest: The https://youtu.be/z-uKEMiOWcw (Summers interview) featured in the audio clip. The https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-06-20/summers-says-us-needs-5-jobless-rate-for-five-years-to-ease-cpi (Bloomberg article) quoting Summers on how unemployment is necessary to fight inflation. Robert Lucas' https://www.nobelprize.org/uploads/2018/06/lucas-lecture.pdf (Nobel Prize lecture) that explains the Phillips Curve. The Jan 2022 https://bcf.princeton.edu/events/inflation-debate-between-paul-r-krugman-lawrence-h-summers-part-ii/ (debate between Krugman and Summers) on inflation. http://bobmurphyshow.com/contribute (Help support) the Bob Murphy Show. The audio production for this episode was provided by http://podsworth.com/ (Podsworth Media). 

Night Science
Shafi Goldwasser and the good joke

Night Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 24:24


Shafi Goldwasser received the Turing Award – the “Nobel Prize of Computing” – in 2012. She needs no introduction to anyone working in computer science or cryptology, a field she essentially founded as a theoretical discipline. Shafi is a professor at both MIT and the Weizmann Institute in Israel, as well as being the director of the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing at Berkeley. In this episode, Shafi tells us how her favourite scientific ideas are akin to a good joke: they catch you off guard with something unexpected. We discuss how even the most abstract work almost always starts from a concrete example, and how feeling comfortable expressing your ideas is the basis of good collaborations.For more information on Night Science, visit https://www.biomedcentral.com/collections/night-science .

Into the Impossible
James Webb Space Telescope First Results Q & A with Project Scientist John Mather, Nobel Prizewinner

Into the Impossible

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 35:43 Very Popular


@NASAWebb Senior Project Scientist, and @NobelPrize winner, John Mather answers questions about the JWST from listeners of Into The Impossible.

Think Like A Nobel Prize Winner
James Webb Space Telescope First Results Q & A with Project Scientist John Mather, Nobel Prizewinner

Think Like A Nobel Prize Winner

Play Episode