Podcasts about west african

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Westernmost region of the African continent

  • 1,009PODCASTS
  • 1,572EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Nov 26, 2021LATEST
west african

POPULARITY

20112012201320142015201620172018201920202021


Best podcasts about west african

Show all podcasts related to west african

Latest podcast episodes about west african

Talk Art
Charmaine Watkiss

Talk Art

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 69:56


Russell and Robert meet British artist Charmaine Watkiss to explore the themes and inspirations behind her first solo exhibition at Tiwani Contemporary in London. The Seed Keepers (2021) is a new series of drawings that fuse Watkiss' interests in botany, herbalism, ecology, history, and Afrofuturism. Researching the medicinal and psychical capabilities of plants, Watkiss has personified a matrilineal pantheon of plant warriors safeguarding and facilitating cross-generational knowledge and empowerment. The show consists of a body of entirely new works on paper and explores the use of full colour - a first for Watkiss. The drawings of women in luminal spaces along with her ‘plant warriors' have a mystical quality which exist outside our linear time and space. The natural world is at the forefront of most of our imaginations right now; and this show explores narratives around ancient plant knowledge and its relationship to women of African descent. Charmaine Watkiss' practice addresses themes including diaspora, ritual, tradition, ancestry, and cosmology. In the past, she has explored the usage of blue stemming from her research into the long history of indigo including its production on the plantations of colonial America and Caribbean and sacred use in ancient African cultures, particularly with reference to the funerary rites, spiritual beliefs, and cosmologies of West African and ancient Egyptian cultures. She draws connections between ancient tradition, knowledge, and our lives - asking what role ritual and its practice plays in contemporary experience. Charmaine Watkiss lives and works in London. She holds a MA in Drawing, from UAL Wimbledon College of Art (2018). Recent exhibitions include RA Summer Exhibition, Royal Academy of Arts, London (2021); To the Edge of Time, KU Leuven Libraries, Belgium (2021); Breakfast Under The Tree, Carl Freedman Gallery, Margate (2021); Me, Myself and I, Collyer Bristow Gallery (2020); Trinity Buoy Wharf Drawing Prize (2019), Wimbledon College of Art MA Degree Show (2018); Against Static (Curated by Tania Kovats), Wimbledon Space (2018).Follow @MsWatkiss on Instagram and her website https://charmainewatkiss.com/ Visit the gallery on Instagram too at @TiwaniContemporary. Charmaine's new exhibition 'The Seed Keepers' runs til 5th December 2021. View images at Tiwani Contemporary's official website: https://www.tiwani.co.uk/exhibitions/64-charmaine-watkiss-the-seed-keepers/overview/For images of all artworks discussed in this episode visit @TalkArt. Talk Art theme music by Jack Northover @JackNorthoverMusic courtesy of HowlTown.com We've just joined Twitter too @TalkArt. If you've enjoyed this episode PLEASE leave us your feedback and maybe 5 stars if we're worthy in the Apple Podcast store. For all requests, please email talkart@independenttalent.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Just the Zoo of Us
120: Acorn Woodpecker & West African Lungfish

Just the Zoo of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 54:21


Join the Weatherfords for a weekly animal review! In this week's episode, Christian brings the acorn woodpecker to trial for its rampant vandalism & Ellen goes for a ride in a time machine with the West African lungfish. Along the way, we discuss the physics of using your face as a jackhammer, snot cocoons, and Sonic hedgehog. Cover photos: Luis Echeverri Urrea via Getty images (woodpeckers), voltan1 via Getty images (lungfish)

The Underworld Podcast
West Africa's Cocaine Empire: Guinea Bissau's True Narco State Status

The Underworld Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:18


Does any country deserve the title of narco-state more than tiny Guinea-Bissau? The West African nation has become the beating heart of the global cocaine trade, with political leaders serving as little more than pawns in a trade that transformed its cashew coast into a gangster's paradise. And it doesn't even have any proper prisons! We explore street fights, assassinations, DEA plots, Colombian conspiracies - and a round-bellied former military chief that totally _isn't_ a druglord, pinky promise. A truly incredible melting pot of crime on the streets of whose tumbledown capital city cocaine bricks, not banknotes, have become the principle currency.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Nov. 20, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the continuing mobilization in Ethiopia against the United States supported efforts to remove the government of Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed; Sudanese are remaining in the streets demanding the removal of the military junta which staged a coup last month; South African activists are calling for the nation's beauty queen to boycott the Miss Universe pageant being held in occupied Palestine; and in the West African state of Burkina Faso there was a demonstration which blocked a French military convoy operating inside the country. In the second hour we look back at the assassination of Malcolm X (Hajj Malik El-Shabazz) on Feb. 21, 1965 in light of the recent exoneration of two men falsely accused in his killing. Finally, we review some of the most pressing and burning issues of the day in Africa and around the globe.

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive
ELWA Monrovia, Liberia, January 24, 1979 0625 UTC 11930 Khz

The Shortwave Radio Audio Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021


Living on the West Coast of North America meant not hearing Africa much - a few times a year - particularly near the equinoxes, we would get some astounding openings on 60 and 49 meters in the early afternoon prior to 2300 UTC when a lot of African regional stations were signing off for the night. It was awesome. It would still be light outside and we were hearing low powered 60 meter West African signals in French, Portuguese and others native African tongues. It was a treat. Here is a not often heard station on the 25 meter band on my DX150B. To the best of my knowledge, there are not a lot of recordings of ELWA from that period in radio history.

Trylove
Episode 145: COBRA VERDE (1987)

Trylove

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 82:39


Klaus Kinski again appears as That Freaky Guy Who Insists On Going To The Jungle, this time portraying Francisco Manoel da Silva (better known by his outlaw codename, “Cobra Verde”), who's chased there by his plantation owner boss who has no interest in being his father-in-law after Francisco impregnates the baron's three teenage daughters. Oops! Cobra Verde's attempts to kickstart the cold engine of the slave trade on the West African coast, and everything that derail them, make up the rest of an inscrutable plot. In this episode, we discuss our confusion over how the titular character is built, where the movie's satirical lens is pointed, its fairly misguided attempts at ‘authentic' portrayal of African cultures, and how the surly, perfectly pitched magic of AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD (1972) and NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE (1979) don't seem to have rubbed off on this one. Also check out: - “Picturesque savagery: Primitivism and authenticity in Cobra Verde” by Sam Storey https://www.academia.edu/30156985/Picturesque_savagery_Primitivism_and_authenticity_in_Cobra_Verde Follow us on Twitter at https://twitter.com/trylovepodcast and email us at trylovepodcast@gmail.com to get in touch! Buy tickets and support the Trylon at https://www.trylon.org/. Theme: "Raindrops" by Huma-Huma/"No Smoking" PSA by John Waters. Choir performance from COBRA VERDE. 0:00 - Episode 145: COBRA VERDE (1987) 2:37 - The Patented Aaron Grossman Summary 4:43 - Jason's thoughts 7:57 - Cody's thoughts 12:04 - Harry's thoughts 16:42 - Aaron's thoughts 22:41 - Where the film's sardonic lens is pointed 28:44 - The line between ‘adding authenticity' and ‘exoticizing' 36:06 - Who is Cobra Verde?: A discussion 47:06 - Da animals D: 48:40 - A CLOCKWORK ORANGE (1971) and the systems that grind us all 53:51 - Cody's Noteys: Snakelove (snake-themed trivia)

Black Desserts
Diasporic Desserts

Black Desserts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:48


Sweets look different across the African diaspora, where baking is less about decadent desserts to end a meal and more about special occasions, a taste of other parts of the world, and the botanical bounty of indigenous fruits. I wanted to start this season with a grounding conversation at the West African center of the Black culinary diaspora. On this episode, I drafted my friend, the ever-brilliant Nigerian food explorer, culinary anthropologist, and food historian Ozoz Sokoh (@kitchenbutterfly) of Kitchen Butterfly and founder of Feast Afrique to help us reimagine Black desserts.

Table Manners with Jessie Ware
S12 Ep 6: Reggie Yates

Table Manners with Jessie Ware

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 53:36


The man that does everything!! This week we welcome the wonderful Reggie Yates to Table Manners. Reggie talks to us about his West African heritage; his mum's Ghanian cooking - we all want a bit of her special peanut soup - his love of apple crumble & growing up in north London. We chat about his wondrous career; from hosting radio shows in his bedroom aged 10, to becoming a TV and Radio favourite & now writing and directing his first feature film ‘Pirates' (out now and well worth a watch!). Reggie we absolutely love you ! Enjoy! X See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 193:00


Listen to the Sun. Nov. 14, 2021 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the condemnation by the Ethiopian government of the United States sanctions imposed on the State of Eritrea; the African Union has called for the Sudanese military junta to negotiate a settlement to the continuing unrest in the country; a Nigerian general has been killed in an attack by insurgents operating in the north of the West African state; and the son of the slain former leader of Libya Col. Muammar Gaddafi has announced he is running in the national elections for president next month. In the second hour we examine the 1619 Project written by Nikole-Hannah Jones which is now being republished as a book. Finally, we review some of the important issues and developments in Africa and internationally.

Lantern Rescue Podcast
Modern Day Molech

Lantern Rescue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 27:25


Mark and Ren share two recent trafficking survivor stories and discuss the instability and dangers complicating their work in Haiti, as well as their work in combating child kidnappings in two West African countries, who are observing a month of child sacrifice.

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
A Cup of Tea with the Taliban Neighbours

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 26:56


The news from Afghanistan is ever more dire. Twenty three million people are at risk of starvation, according to the World Food Programme, a fate which gets ever nearer as winter approaches. For international donors and aid agencies, this presents an acute dilemma: whether or not to work with the Afghan authorities to try to solve this crisis. To do so might require handing over food and other supplies to the Taliban government, a regime which no country even recognises. That is because nobody is quite sure just what kind of rulers the Taliban will be. Since they took over in August, there have been reports of brutality, which in some cases meant the cold-blooded murder of people who were seen as Taliban opponents. Yet there have not been the kind of mass atrocities which many feared. Visiting Kabul, Andrew North has found a variety of attitudes among the Taliban members he's come across, and they include his next door neighbours. They held a mass funeral in Sierra Leone, after a hundred and fifteen people were killed in a fuel tanker explosion. It happened in the West African country's capital, Freetown, some of the victims dying because they had rushed towards the site of the accident, hoping to gather up some of the petrol which had spilled out. This latest disaster comes just months after a fire destroyed thousands of homes in one of the city's slums. And many of this week's victims were buried in the same cemetery as those who died in a mudslide; that disaster killed around a thousand people. But then Sierra Leone is a country which in recent times has also experienced an Ebola outbreak, and before that, civil war. Walking round Freetown this week, Lucinda Rouse found people shocked and upset, but also sometimes resigned to the misfortune so frequently visited upon them. We were hoping to bring you a report from Nicaragua, where they have been holding an election. However, our Correspondent, Will Grant was not allowed into the country, turned back at the border. But that in itself tells you plenty about the way politics works in Nicaragua these days he says. It is a country where journalists and other commentators are routinely locked up for what they write, and where people protesting against the government have been shot in the streets. Still, Will Grant did at least try to get in, knowing the chances were slim. People often have a love-hate relationship with tourists. They may well bring plenty of money into an economy, and jobs for those who need them. And yet the disruption caused by a mass of visitors is not always welcome. Of course, many tourist spots have had a terrible time under Covid, with lockdown preventing anyone from coming to visit. Some resorts have been positively praying for a return to the days when they could play host to hordes of holiday-makers. Others though have been surprised to find a surge in new arrivals, like residents on the Greek island of Tinos, where Antonia Quirke was among those paying a visit.

By Any Means Necessary
Sanctions Levied On West African Nations

By Any Means Necessary

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 17:26


In this segment of By Any Means Necessary, Sean and Jacquie are joined by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire to discuss the imposition of sanctions on Mali and Guinea by the Economic Community of West African States, the relationship of ECOWAS to the United States, the developing situation in Guinea, and the patterns taking place across the African continent.

All Songs Considered
New Mix: Jónsi, Julie Doiron, Rokia Koné, David Keenan, more

All Songs Considered

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 33:54


All Songs Considered host Bob Boilen shares his favorite new tracks of the week, including the stunning voice of West African singer Rokia Koné, new solo work from Sigur Rós frontman Jónsi and more.Featured Tracks:1. Julie Doiron: "You Gave Me The Key," from I Thought Of You2. Cola: "Blank Curtain" (Single)3. David Keenan: "What Then Cried Jo Soap," from WHAT THEN?4. Rokia Koné & Jacknife Lee: "N'yanyan," from BAMANAN5. Jónsi: "Pyralone," from Obsidian6. Sóley: "Desert," from Mother Melancholia

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Nov. 6, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The episode features a PANW report with dispatches on the current threat to national sovereignty in Ethiopia amid the escalating conflict initiated by western-backed rebel groupings; Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa has attended the COP26 climate conference held in Glasgow, Scotland; reports says that 98 people have been killed in an oil tanker exploision in the West African state of Sierra Leone; and the Sudanese mass organizations have rejected a settlement offered by the military leaders that seized power on Oct. 25. In the second hour we look at the contributions of Ghana musician Nana Kwame Ampadu who recently joined the ancestors. In addition, we examine in detail the conflict in the Horn of Africa state of Ethiopia. Finally, we look into other issues impacting Africa and international community. 

What's Up with Docs Podcast
Episode 32 - Mirjam Wiekenkamp - "Abusey Junction"

What's Up with Docs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 71:17


n this episode, I speak with the publicist and one of the founders of NOISE Film PR, Mirjam Wiekenkamp. During our conversation, we get into her publicist origin story, some of the differences between PR firms in the US and Europe, the unique ways a publicist can position documentary films in the European documentary festival landscape, and how publicist and impact producers can often build upon and support one another's work on behalf of a filmmaker. Mirjam and NOISE Film PR are representing several films at DOKLeipzig and IDFA that are part of the Steps' Generation Africa program. To celebrate these young filmmakers from the Continent, this week's song is Kokoroko's “Abusey Junction.” KOKOROKO (meaning 'be strong' in Urhobo), are a collective of young musicians brought together by a love for Afrobeat led by trumpeter Sheila Maurice-Grey. They specialize in a soul-shaking, horn fuelled sound with West African roots and inner London hues. “Abusey Junction” is a ballad written by guitarist Oscar Jerome. It was written on the roof of a compound in Gambia where the band spent time last year immersing themselves in the soundscapes of the region.

Better Than Human
Allosaurus: The Bone Wars Almost Ruin Our Discovery

Better Than Human

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 59:15


This week is all about the Allosaurus, a large carnosaurian theropod dinosaur that lived 155 to 145 million years ago during the Jurassic period. Think what the Velociraptors in Jurassic Park look like, but bigger, and spoiler: probably no pack hunting. In the Good The Bad the NewsIn the Bad, Syphilis in on the rise in the U.S., a sign that our public health services are failing. (A few years ago we almost eliminated syphilis in America…)In the Good, Amber talks about the ‘penis plant' that just bloomed in the Netherlands that smells like rotting flesh. Yum. And Jen talks about loggerhead sea turtle nests in the West African nation of Cape Verde making a rebound. Allosaurus means "different lizard" referring  to its unique (at the time of its discovery) hollow vertebrae. Allosaurus had sharp saw-like teeth, which it used to slash the flesh of its prey, tearing at it without splintering bones. We know a lot about Allosaurus because of the many fossils we found of the species, from eggs to fully grown. Allosaurus was one of the earliest dinosaur discoveries, and they are the most commonly found dinosaur in the United States. The Bone Wars of the late 1800's, however, botched their discovery, and it was years before the dinosaur was even officially even called Allosaurus. Listen now to learn about Allosaurus, a commonly found dinosaur throughout the U.S.'s Midwest.For more information on us, visit our website at betterthanhumanpodcast.comFollow us on Twitter @betterthanhuma1on Facebook @betterthanhumanpodcaston Instagram @betterthanhumanpodcasthttps://www.tiktok.com/@betterthanhumanpodcastor Email us at betterthanhumanpodcast@gmail.comWe look forward to hearing from you, and we look forward to you joining our cult of weirdness!#betterthanhuman #cultofweirdnes

New Books in American Studies
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books Network
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Environmental Studies
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in History
Gregg Mitman, "Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia" (New Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 44:00


In the early 1920s, Americans owned 80 percent of the world's automobiles and consumed 75 percent of the world's rubber. But only one percent of the world's rubber grew under the U.S. flag, creating a bottleneck that hampered the nation's explosive economic expansion. To solve its conundrum, the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company turned to a tiny West African nation, Liberia, founded in 1847 as a free Black republic. Empire of Rubber: Firestone's Scramble for Land and Power in Liberia (New Press, 2021) tells a sweeping story of capitalism, racial exploitation, and environmental devastation, as Firestone transformed Liberia into America's rubber empire. Historian and filmmaker Gregg Mitman scoured remote archives to unearth a history of promises unfulfilled for the vast numbers of Liberians who toiled on rubber plantations built on taken land. Mitman reveals a history of racial segregation and medical experimentation that reflected Jim Crow America—on African soil. As Firestone reaped fortunes, wealth and power concentrated in the hands of a few elites, fostering widespread inequalities that fed unrest, rebellions and, eventually, civil war. A riveting narrative of ecology and disease, of commerce and science, and of racial politics and political maneuvering, Empire of Rubber uncovers the hidden story of a corporate empire whose tentacles reach into the present. Gregg Mitman is the Vilas Research and William Coleman Professor of History, Medical History, and Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. An award-winning author and filmmaker, his recent films and books include The Land Beneath Our Feet and Breathing Space: How Allergies Shape Our Lives and Landscapes. He lives near Madison, Wisconsin. Website. Brian Hamilton is Chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Deerfield Academy. Twitter. Website Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Chefs Without Restaurants
Ghanaian Cooking and Decolonizing the Food Industry with Chef Zoe Adjonyoh

Chefs Without Restaurants

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 67:01


On this episode, we're joined by Zoe Adjonyoh. She's a chef, writer, entrepreneur, and the founder of Zoe's Ghana Kitchen, a West African food brand that she started in 2010. Zoe's been pioneering modern West African food in the forms of supper clubs in London, Berlin & New York. She had her own restaurant in Brixton, and has done numerous pop-ups  and events. In 2017 she released her cookbook, Zoe's Ghana Kitchen, which was just republished and re-released in October. If you go to her website, you can get more info on the book, find recipes, purchase items from her spice line, and learn about her online classes.On the show, we talk about how her background, having an Irish mother, and a father from Ghana, influenced her cooking. Our conversation revolves primarily around decolonizing the food industry, and who should be profiting from African foodways. We talk about gatekeeping, and the importance of sharing opportunities, and the stage, with others, even when it means passing on an incredible opportunity for ourselves. We discuss her podcast Cooking Up Consciousness, and the upcoming anthology she's editing, Serving Up: Essays on food, identity, and culture. And I asked her if she identified as a cook or a chef, and what it means to be a chef these days. SponsorsIf you're interested in grits, corn meal, and corn flour that are both delicious and nutritious, check out Professor Torbert's Orange Corn.   All of their products are non-GMO, gluten free and vegan. Their orange corn is helping fight micronutrient deficiencies in more than 10 African countries. So, when you choose Professor Torbert's you aren't just saying yes to better flavor. You're also helping deliver better nutrition on a global scale. When ordering on their website, use discount code CHEFS10 to save 10%.Looking to hire employees for your restaurant? This week's sponsor is Savory Jobs, a job site only for restaurants. For just $50, get unlimited job postings for an entire year. Use discount code SAVORY10 to save 10%.===========Zoe Adjonyoh=========== Zoe Adjonyoh InstagramZoe Adjonyoh TwitterZoe's Ghana KitchenThe Cooking UpConsciousness Podcast Buy the book Zoe's Ghana Kitchen, and support the book Serving Up==========================CHEFS WITHOUT RESTAURANTS==========================SUPPORT US ON PATREONGet the Chefs Without Restaurants NewsletterVisit Our Amazon Store (we get paid when you buy stuff)Chefs Without Restaurants Facebook pageChefs Without Restaurants private Facebook groupChefs Without Restaurants InstagramFounder Chris Spear's personal chef business Perfect Little BitesIf you want to support the show, our Venmo name is ChefWoRestos and can be found at https://venmo.com/ChefWoRestos. If you enjoy the show it would be much appreciated. 

Soundcheck
Angélique Kidjo: Building Connections and Living Her Passion

Soundcheck

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 32:35


Multiple Grammy-winner and longtime UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador Angélique Kidjo pulls together multiple generations, collaborating with global pop stars Burna Boy and Yemi Alade among others, in addition to focusing on our connection to the natural world for her latest album, Mother Nature. Through a signature combination of West African music, jazz, and funk, and using her incredible voice as instrument, Kidjo asks us to honor Mother Nature, and hopes that one lesson that people might learn from the pandemic is how to better care for one another. As she and host John Schaefer chat, Kidjo gives props to her collaborators, many of them from younger generations, and also speaks to being the vocalist in Philip Glass' Symphony No. 12, (Lodger) based on David Bowie's album. Even with no audience, Angélique Kidjo's larger-than-life stage presence captivates as she talks about having the luxury of living out her passion. She performs live with her band, from The Greene Space in advance of a Mother Nature concert event at Carnegie Hall on Friday, Nov. 5. - Caryn Havlik Watch "Africa -One of a Kind”: Watch "Take It Or Leave It": Watch "Mother Nature":

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Oct. 30, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the demonstrations in Mali demanding the withdrawal of French troops from the West African state; the Republic of Sudan has been seriously impacted by a military coup and mass protests calling for the restoration of civilian rule; the Ethiopian government says that the United Nations personnel assigned to the Horn of Africa nation are continuing to interfere in its internal affairs; and Tanzania has accepted a grant to address the need to preserve its biodiversity. In the second hour we look deeper into the Sudanese crisis where the popular organizations are demanding the resignation of the military junta. We also explore the return of stolen African art to the continent from European museums. Finally, we examine some of the most burning and pressing issues of the day in Africa and globally.

Content Magazine
#69 - Conrad Egyir

Content Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 35:26


#69 - Conrad Egyir Conrad is a Ghanaian artist based in Detroit, working in figurative narratives of the African Diaspora. His work blends religious and West African folk iconography within domestic scenes, portraying a deep understanding of the history of portraiture. He utilizes shaped canvases and relief elements to reference stamps and postcards as metaphors for migration; journals, books, binder tabs, and chapters as metaphors for time and the archiving of ideas. In our conversation, Conrad discusses his process, the inspiration to this current series as well as his guiding life philosophy. His exhibition will be on view in the ICA San Jose's Main Gallery in conjunction with Conrad Egyir: A Chapter of Love, a Facade Project at the ICA San José through February 20, 2022. Conrad Egyir: A Chapter of Love and Conrad Egyir: Chapters of Light are generously supported by program partner Facebook Open Arts, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Pamela and David Hornik, Tad Freese and Brook Hartzell, and Applied Materials. Follow Conrad at @conrad_egyir and conradegyir.com On view at Institute of Contemporary Art San Jose (https://www.icasanjose.org) This episode's music is "408" by Jack Pavlina. read more about Jack in issue 14.1 Winter 2022, released Date Dec. 9, 2021 Follow Jack at @jackpavlinamusic Spotify: https://bit.ly/jackpavlina --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/content-magazine/support

PE Talks Africa
AVCA COP26 Series #2: Funding the energy transition in Nigeria and West Africa

PE Talks Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 52:07


In the run-up to COP26, we discussed Àrgentil's sustainable and impact investments across clean energy and the broader productive economy via SMEs with Gbenga Hassan, Managing Partner. He also provided insight into Àrgentil's strategy of investing in early-stage energy opportunities, approach to value creation with its investee companies and contribution to the UN SDGs. Àrgentil is a member of AVCA and is currently expanding its investment focus via the US$95mn Àrgentil SME Investment Fund (ASIF) to cover key West African countries.

Circle Round
Catching Fire feat. Lilli Cooper & Chuck Cooper

Circle Round

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 16:35


Broadway stars and father-daughter duo Chuck Cooper ("The Life," "Trouble In Mind") and Lilli Cooper ("Tootsie," "SpongeBob SquarePants") headline this West African adventure tale about using your inner spark to change the world.

Your Brain on Facts
This Is (still) Halloween

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 35:49


♪♫This is Halloween!  This is Halloween!♫♪  Supporters on our Patreon and fans in our FB group chose the topics for today's episode (plus now there's a sub-reddit):  01:35 sorting Dracula fact from fiction 07:49 how horror stars got their stars 20:01 when did clowns become scary 23:29 the history behind zombies 28:38 movie monster fast facts!  Mentioned in the show: Overly Sarcastic's Frankenstein run-down Cutting Class podcast on Christopher Lee Oh No! Lit Class on The Phantom   Who needs a costume when you could wear this?!   Read the full script. Reach out and touch Moxie on FB, Twit, the 'Gram or email. Music by Kevin MacLeod  Sponsor: City of Ghosts Brandi B. asked that we sort fact from fiction on Vlad Dracula.  Personally, I can remember a time when I didn't know that Vlad the Impaler was thought to be the inspiration from Bram Stoker's genre-launching vampire Dracula.  Hop in your magic school bus, police box, or phone booth with aerial antenna, and let's go back to 15th's century Wallachia, a region of modern day Romania that was then the southern neighbor of the province of Transylvania.  Our Vlad was Vlad III.  Vlad II, his father, was given the nickname Dracul by his fellow Crusade knights in the Order of the Dragon, who were tasked with defeating the Ottoman Empire.  Wallachia was sandwiched between the Ottomans and Christian Europe and so became the site of constant bloody conflict.  Without looking it up, I'm going to guess that they failed, since the Ottoman Empire stood until 1923.  Dracul translated to “dragon” in old Romanian, but the modern meaning is more like devil.  Add an A to the end to denote son-of and you've got yourself a Vlad Dracula.   At age 11, Vlad and his 7-year-old brother Radu went with their father on a diplomatic mission into the Ottoman Empire.  How's it go?  No too good.  The three were taken hostage.  Their captors told Vlad II that he could be released – on condition that the two sons remain.  Since it was his only option, their father agreed.  The boys would be held prisoner for 5 years.  One account holds that they were tutoried in the art of war, science and philosophy.  Other accounts says they were also subjected to torture and abuse.  When Vlad II returned home, he was overthrown in a coup and he and his eldest son were horribly murdered.   Shortly thereafter, Vlad III was released, with a taste for violence and a vendetta against the Ottomans.  To regain his family's power and make a name for himself, he threw a banquet for hundreds of members of his rival families.  On the menu was wine, meat, sweetbreads, and gruesome, vicious murder.  The guests were stabbed not quite to death, then impaled on large spikes.  This would become his signature move, leading to his moniker Vlad the Impaler, but wasn't the only arrow in his quiver.  Facing an army three times the size of his, he ordered his men to infiltrate their territory, poison wells and burn crops.  He also paid diseased men to go in and infect the enemy.  Defeated combatants were often treated to disemboweling, flaying alive, boiling, and of course impalement.  Basically, you turn your enemy into a kabob and let them die slowly and, just as important, conspicuously.  Vlad's reputation spread, leading to stories we have trouble sorting from legend, like that he once took dinner in a veritable forest of spikes.  We do know that in June of 1462, he ordered 20,000 defeated Ottomans to be impaled.  It's a scale that's hard to even imagine.   When the Ottoman Sultan Mehmed II came upon the carnage, he and his men fled in fear back to Constantinople.  You'd think Vlad was on the road to victory, but shortly after, he was forced into exile and imprisoned in Hungary. [[how?]]  He took a stab, no pun intended, on regaining Wallachia 15 years later, but he and his troops were ambushed and killed.  According to a contemporary source, the Ottomans cut his corpse into pieces and marched it back to Sultan Medmed II, who ordered them displayed over the city's gates.  History does not record where the pieces ended up.   Vlad the Impaler was an undeniably brutal ruler, but he's still considered one of the most important rulers in Wallachian history for protecting it against the Ottomans and a national hero of Romania.  He was even praised by Pope Pius II for his military feats and for defending Christendom.  So how did get get from Vlad Dracula, the Impaler, a warrior king with a taste for torture, to, 400 years later, Dracula the undead creature of the night who must feed on the blood of living, can morph into bats or mist, and must sleep in his native earth?  Historians have speculated that Irish author Bram Stoker met with historian Hermann Bamburger, who told him about Vlad III, which ignited some spark of inspiration, but there's not actually any evidence to back this up.  Stoker was actually the first writer that we know of to have a vampire drink blood.  Vampires are actually a common folklore baddie around the world, from the obayifo in Africa which can take over people's bodies and emit phosphorus light from their armpits and anus to the manananggal of the Philippines who can detach her torso from her legs so she can fly around with her organs trailing behind her and use her snakelike tongue to steal babies from the womb.  In Western culture, though, Vlad the Impaler became the basis for everything from Bela Lugosi's Dracula to Count Chocula.  That means he's also the source of the Twilight saga, truly one of history's greatest monsters.   Ronnie asked for “how some legends got their stars.”  I wasn't sure what that meant, so I asked for clarification.  No, I didn't, I launched off immediately and at a full gallop with the first interpretation that came to mind, as I do in all aspects of my life.  So let's talk horror actors and the Hollywood walk of fame.   Even if he weren't a recognizable face, Vincent Price is probably the most recognizable voice in horror history.  For folks my age, you probably heard him for the first time on Michael Jackson's Thriller.  Folks in their 30's might have heard him first as Prof. Ratigan in The Great Mouse Detective.  Price wasn't always a horror icon.  He'd done theater, radio, including Orson Wells Mercury Theater of the Air, and other genres of films, but 1953's House of Wax, which was also the first 3D movie to crack the top 10 box office gross for its year, solidified his place in horror history.  It's almost odd that Price went into acting at all.  His father was the president of the National Candy Company and his grandfather had set the family up with independent means thanks to his brand of cream of tartar.  Price and his wife Mary wrote a number of cookbooks, one of which my mother had when I was young.  You cannot fathom my confused disappointment that it was just a regular cookbook full of regular, boring, non-scary recipes.  And now, for no other reason than it makes me smile, is another amazing voice, Stephen Fry, talking about Price on QI.:  Romanian-born Bela Lugosi was a classical actor in Hungary before making the move to movies.  In fact, he was already playing Dracula on stage when the movie was being assembled.  Lugosi wanted the role so badly he agreed to do it for $500 per week, about $9K today, only one quarter that of actor David Manners who played Jonathan Harker.  It was a good investment, I'd say, since everyone knows Lugosi and this was the first time I'd ever seen David Manners' name.  Though Lugosi turned down the role of the monster in Frankenstein, he was quickly locked into horror.  He appeared in minor roles in a few good movies, like “Ninotchka” with Greta Garbo, but mostly bounced like a plinko chip from mediocre to bad movies, with ever decreasing budgets.  His drug addiction probably had a cyclical relationship with his work prospects.  He died two days into filming the absolutely dreadful “Plan 9 From Outer Space” and was replaced by a much younger and taller actor and his ex-wife's chiropractor because he fit the costume.   Peter Lorre is a name you might not recognize, but you would absolutely recognize his overall aesthetic.  It's still being referenced and parodied to this day.  See the bad guy?  Is he short, with round eyes, and a distinctive way of speaking?  What you got there is Peter Lorre.  Hungarian-born Lorre struck out at 17 to become a star.  For 10 years he played bit parts in amateur productions, but in 1931 he got his big break in the German film “M,” and Hollywood took notice.  His first English-speaking role was in the Hitchcock thriller “The Man Who Knew Too Much.”  The character spoke English, but Lorre didn't.  Just like Bela Legosi during his first turn as Dracula, Lorre had to memorize his lines phonetically.  Imagine how difficult it must be to put the right pacing and inflection into a sentence when you don't know which word means what.  He continued portraying psychopaths until John Huston cast him in a quasi-comic role in “The Maltese Falcon” with Humphrey Bogart and Sidney Greenstreet, which led to lighter roles like the one he played in Arsenic and Old Lace.  If you never seen it, make it you next choice.  It's a comedy, but you can definitely watch it with your horror movies, since it's about a pair of serial killers hiding bodies in their cellar.   Arsenic and Old Lace also features a bad guy getting plastic surgery to avoid the police, which accidentally leaves him looking like Boris Karloff and he's really touchy about it.  I don't know why.  Even though he played many monsters and villains in his career, Karloff was said to actually be a kind, soft-spoken man who was happiest with a good book or in his garden.  We hear him narrate How the Grinch Stole Christmas every year.  He doesn't sing the song, though.  That's Thurl Ravenscroft, who was also the original voice of Tony the Tiger.  The title role in Frankenstein took Karloff from bit player to household name.  Karloff said of the monster, “He was inarticulate, helpless and tragic.  I owe everything to him. He's my best friend.”  By the way, if you're one of those people who delights in going “Um, actually, Frankenstein was the name of the doctor,” can you not?  We all know that.  And since it's the last name of the man who gave him life, aka his father, it's a perfectly passable patronym to use.  Oh and by the way Mr or Ms Superior Nerd, Frankenstein wasn't a doctor, he was a college dropout.  I refer you to my much-beloved Red at Overly Sarcastic Productions on YouTube for a thorough explanation of the actual story.  Penny Dreadful did get pretty close in their interpretation.   Here's a name more people should know, John Carradine.  Wait, you say, the guy from Kill Bill?  No, that's his son David.  Oh, you mean the FBI guy the sister was dating on Dexter.  No, that's his other son Keith.  Revenge of the Nerds?  No, that's Robert.  The patriarch John Carradine was in over 500 movies, big names like Grapes of Wrath and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, but he also did a lot of horror, though it could be a mixed bag — everything from Dracula in House of Dracula down to Billy the Kid vs Dracula.  Not always for the love of it, either.  Sometimes a gig's just a gig.  He told one of his sons, “Just make sure that if you've got to do a role you don't like, it makes you a lot of money.”  Good advice for many areas of life.  If you've got Prime Video or Shudder, look for The Monster Club.  It's an darling, schlocky little anthology movie, which they just don't seem to make anymore, starring Carradine and Vincent Price.     Jaime Lee Curtis could have been on this list since she was in 5 of the Halloween films, but I just don't think people think “horror” when they hear her name.   There were a few names surprisingly not set in the stones.  While ‘man of a thousand faces' Lon Chaney, who played the original Phantom of the Opera and Hunchback of Notre Dame, has a star, his son, Lon Chaney Jr, who played the Wolfman, the Mummy and numerous other roles in dozens of horror movies, does.  Somehow, Christopher Lee doesn't either.  In addition to the 282 roles on his imdb page, he deserves a star just for playing Dracula 10 times and still having a career after that.  Also, he was metal as fuck, recording metal albums into his 80's and there was the time he corrected director Peter Jackson on what it's like when you stab someone, because he *knew.  My buddies over at Cutting Class diverged from their usual format to tell us all about his amazing life.   Over in the Brainiac Breakroom, (plug sub reddit, thank Zach), Alyssa asked for the history behind clowns being evil.  One day, a man dressed up as a clown and it was terrifying.  Thank you for coming to my TED talk.   No?  Okay.  Fine!  It's not like I have to research them and keep seeing pictures of clowns.  Clowns weren't really regarded as frightening, or at least a fear of clowns wasn't widely known, from the creation of what we'd recognize as a clown by Joseph Grimaldi in the 1820's until fairly recently.  David Carlyon, author, playwright and a former clown with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus in the 1970s, argues that coulrophobia, the fear of clowns, was born from the counter-culture 1960s and picked up steam in the 1980s.  “There is no ancient fear of clowns,” he said. “It wasn't like there was this panic rippling through Madison Square Garden as I walked up through the seats. Not at all.”  For centuries, clowns were a funny thing for kids — there was Bozo, Ronald McDonald, Red Skelton's Clem Kaddidlehopper and Emmet Kelly's sad clown– then bam!  Stephen King's hit novel “It,” the doll in “Poltergeist,” and every incarnation of The Joker.  It could be seen as a pendulum swing.  Clowns had been so far to the good side that it must have been inevitable they would swing *way the hell over to evil.   Not so fast, argues Benjamin Radford, author of the book “Bad Clowns,” who argues that evil clowns have always been among us.  “It's a mistake to ask when clowns turned bad because historically they were never really good.  Sometimes they're making you laugh. Other times, they're laughing at your expense.”  Radford traces bad clowns all the way to ancient Greece and connects them to court jesters and the Harlequin figure.  He points particularly to Punch of the Punch & Judy puppet shows that date back to the 1500s.  Punch was not only not sweet and loveable, he was violent, abusive, and even homicidal.   Maybe when isn't as important as why.  Why are some of us afraid of clowns?  Personally, I think it's their complete disregard for personal space.  Kindly keep your grease-painted face at least arm's length away.  The grease paint may be part of it.  It exaggerates the features.  The face is basically human in composition, but it's not.  It dangles us over the edge of the uncanny valley, where something makes us uncomfortable because it is *almost human.  The makeup obscures the wearer's identity, so we don't really know who we're dealing with.  Clowns also act in aberrant ways, contrary to societal norms and expectations, and that might subconsciously get our back up.  As for coulrophilia, sexual attraction to clowns…. I got nothing.  You do you.   Charlie asked for the real history behind popular horror icons, like werewolves, vampires, and zombies.  Even though the zombie craze held on longer than the 2017 obsession with bacon, most people don't know about them pre-George Romero's Night of the Living Dead.   The word “zombie” first appeared in English around 1810 in the book “History of Brazil,” this was “Zombi,” a West African deity.  The word later came to suggest a husk of a body without vital life energy, human in form but lacking the self-awareness, intelligence, and a soul.  The Atlantic slave trade caused the idea to move across the ocean, where West African religions began to mix with force Christianity.  Pop culture continually intermixes many African Diasporic traditions and portrays them exclusively as Voodoo. However, most of what is portrayed in books, movies, and television is actually hoodoo. Voodoo is a religion that has two markedly different branches: Haitian Vodou and Louisiana Vodoun. Hoodoo is neither a religion, nor a denomination of a religion—it is a form of folk magic that originated in West Africa and is mainly practiced today in the Southern United States.   Haitian zombies were said to be people brought back from the dead (and sometimes controlled) through magical means by voodoo priests called bokors or houngan. Sometimes the zombification was done as punishment (striking fear in those who believed that they could be abused even after death), but often the zombies were said to have been used as slave labor on farms and sugarcane plantations. In 1980, one mentally ill man even claimed to have been held captive as a zombie worker for two decades, though he could not lead investigators to where he had worked, and his story was never verified.   To many people, both in Haiti and elsewhere, zombies are very real and as such very frightening.  Think about it.  These people were enslaved, someone else claimed dominion over their body, but they still had their mind and their spirit.  What could be more frightening to an enslaved person than an existence where even that is taken from you?   In the 1980s when a scientist named Wade Davis claimed to have found a powder that could create zombies, thus providing a scientific basis for zombie stories, a powerful neurotoxin called tetrodotoxin, which can be found in several animals including pufferfish.  He claimed to have infiltrated secret societies of bokors and obtained several samples of the zombie-making powder, which were later chemically analyzed.  Davis wrote a book on the topic, “The Serpent and the Rainbow,” which was later made into a really underappreciated movie.  Davis was held up as the man who had scientifically proven the existence of zombies, but skeptic pointed out that the samples of the zombie powder were inconsistent and that the amounts of neurotoxin they contained were not high enough to create zombies.  It's not the kind of thing you can play fast & loose with.  Tetrodotoxin has a very narrow band between paralytic and fatal.  Others pointed out nobody had ever found any of the alleged Haitian plantations filled with zombie laborers.  While Davis acknowledged problems with his theories, and had to lay to rest some sensational claims being attributed to him, he insisted that the Haitian belief in zombies *could be based on the rare happenstance of someone being poisoned by tetrodotoxin and later coming to in their coffin.   Bonus fact: Ever wonder where we get brain-eating zombies from?  Correlation doesn't equal causation, but the first zombie to eat brains was the zombie known as Tarman in 1984's Return of the Living Dead.  This wasn't a George Romero movie, though.  It's based on a novel called  Return of the Living Dead by John Russo, one of the writers of Night of the Living Dead.  After Russo and Romero parted company, Russo retained the rights to any titles featuring the phrase “Living Dead.”    Cindra asked for movie monster facts.  The moon is getting full, so let's hit these facts muy rapido.   1922's Nosferatu was an illegal and unauthorized adaption of Bram Stoker's Dracula.  Stoker's heirs sued over the film and a court ruling ordered that all copies be destroyed.  However, Nosferatu subsequently surfaced in other countries and came to be regarded as an influential masterpiece of cinema.   Not a single photograph of Lon Chaney as the Phantom in The Phantom of the Opera (1925) was published in a newspaper or magazine, or seen anywhere before the film opened in theaters.  It was a complete surprise to the audience and to Chaney's costar Mary Philbin, whos shriek of fear and disgust was genuine.   In the original Dracula, Lugosi never once blinks his eyes on camera, to give his character an otherworldy vibe.  Francis Ford Coppolla did something similar by having Dracula's shadow move slightly independently, like the rules of our world don't apply to him.   Even though he starred in the film, Boris Karloff was considered such a no-name nobody that Universal didn't invite him to the premiere of 1931's Frankenstein.   Karloff's classic Mummy the next year did not speak because the actor had so many layers of cotton glued to his face that he couldn't move his mouth.   The Creature from the Black Lagoon's look was based on old seventeenth-century woodcuts of two bizarre creatures called the Sea Monk and the Sea Bishop.   To make a man invisible for 1933's The Invisible Man, director James Whale had Claude Rains dressed completely in black velvet and filmed him in front of a black velvet background.   The movie poster for The Mummy (1932) holds the record for the most money paid for a movie poster at an auction: nearly half a million dollars.   Boris Karloff's costume and makeup for 1935's Bride of Frankenstein were so heavy and hot that he lost 20 pounds during filming, mostly through sweat.  His shoes weighed 13 lb/6 kg/1 stone apiece.   The large grosses for the film House on Haunted Hill (1960) were noticed by Sir Alfred Hitchcock was inspired to make a horror movie after the seeing the box office gross for William Castle's House on Haunted Hill.   Filming the shower scene for Psycho was pretty mundane, but actress Janet Leigh was so terrified by seeing the finished product –thanks to the editing by Alma Reveill-Hitchcock and Bernard Herrmann score– that she did not shower, only bathed, from the premier in 1960 to her death in 2004.  You can read more about Alma Revill in the YBOF book.   According to our friends Megan and RJ at Oh No! Lit Class podcast, the first use of Toccata Fuge in G Minor in a film was the 1962 Phantom of the Opera.  It's hard to imagine classic horror without it.   In Night of the Living Dead, the body parts the zombies ate were ham covered in chocolate sauce.  George Romero joked that they shouldn't bother putting the zombie makeup on the actors because the choco-pork made them look pale and sick with nausea anyway.   A lot of people know that Michael Myers' mask in the original Halloween was actually a William Shatner mask painted white.  They bought it because it was on clearance and the film had a small budget.  Most people don't know that Shatner later repaid the favor by dressing up as Michael Myers for Halloween.   Freddy Kruger's look was based on a scary drunk man Wes Craven saw outside his home as a child.  His glove made of leather and steak knives was actually inspired by Craven's cat.  Looks down at scratches on both arms.  Yeah, that checks out.  The idea of being killed in your sleep comes from real deaths of people who survived the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, only to die mysteriously later.   1987's The Monster Squad. With a werewolf, a mummy, Dracula, and Frankenstein's monster in the mix, the group looked suspiciously like the line-up of the 1930s and '40s Universal horror movies. To avoid confusion (i.e. lawsuits), filmmaker Fred Dekker made some subtle changes to his monsters, like removing Dracula's widow's peak, and moving Frankenstein's neck bolts up to his forehead. See? Totally different!   Yes, those were real bees in Candyman, even the ones in Candyman's mouth.  Tony Todd had a clause in his contract that he would get $1k for every bee sting he got during filming.  Even though juvenile bees with underdeveloped stingers were used, he still got $23k worth of stings.   You might think 1991's Silence of the Lambs was the first horror movie to win an Oscar, but Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde beat them to it by 60 years with Fredric March's Oscar for Best Actor.

movies horror thriller hitchcock night german music stephen king price brazil halloween greece philippines hop michael jackson english ringling bros history dragon hollywood psycho supernatural house opera pop phantom joker vampires jekyll frankenstein twilight air dracula irish mummy madison square garden haiti tiger best actor rj russo universal filming fbi africa serpent forum punch rainbow reach 3d william shatner transylvania carradine plan haitian zombi bonus nerds clowns penny dreadful lorre vincent price shortly peter jackson outer space revenge house on haunted hill living dead silence lambs atlantic wax voodoo christianity wes craven craven creatures cryptids hyde wrath black lagoon totally hungary tony todd candyman michael myers humphrey bogart notre dame historians prof romania folks hunchback wolfman bram stoker west africa dracul stoker poltergeist hungarian constantinople janet leigh romero karloff cambodia grapes west african wallachia ottoman empire kill bill george romero bela lugosi grinch stole christmas old lace jonathan harker vlad impaler facing harlequin shudder arsenic christendom nosferatu lugosi crusade invisible man boris karloff christopher lee monster squad moxie romanian chaney qi john russo personally radford peter lorre khmer rouge defeated radu great mouse detective lon chaney jr ratigan prime video g minor sidney greenstreet maltese falcon bozo red skelton bernard herrmann john huston greta garbo lon chaney hoodoo ronald mcdonald 9k freddy kruger james whale claude rains william castle christian europe fred dekker cutting class kindly southern united states david manners in western in night wade davis john carradine vlad iii tarman fredric march count chocula ottomans correlation barnum bailey circus jaime lee curtis vlad dracula thurl ravenscroft ninotchka wallachian benjamin radford haitian vodou pope pius ii african diasporic bad clowns
Desperately Seeking Paul : Paul Weller Fan Podcast
EP64 - Seckou Keita - Musician - Kora Master - Griot - Pioneer - ”A melody strong, an angel‘s voice and I find myself in awe of its truth...”

Desperately Seeking Paul : Paul Weller Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 26:00


My guest in this episode is the world-class musician, griot (praise singer), composer, djembe master, virtuoso and pioneer -  Seckou Keita - he's a rarity, seated in tradition whilst constantly pushing the boundaries of his art. A true master of the kora - a 22 stringed West African harp - Seckou, from Southern Senegal, was a childhood prodigy, born of a line of griots and kings. Seckou has graced the international stage since 1996, earning worldwide acclaim for his kora playing and appearing with a host of fellow artists including Paul Weller, Salif Keita, Damon Alban, Youssou N'Dour, Miriam Makeba and Neil Finn. It was whilst performing as part of the Africa Express Presents The Orchestra of Syrian Musicians in 2016, that he met Paul for the first time - playing a sensational version of Wild Wood as part of the concerts. In 2019, he won 'Musician of the Year' at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards - whilst also picking up the award for 'Best Duo/Band' with Catrin Finch. November 2020 saw the release of the On Sunset Remixes EP - with Seckou's beautiful remix of Rockets featuring as one of the 5 tracks. Seckou Keita has arguably become the most influential and inspiring Kora player of his generation, an exceptional and charismatic musician - find out more about his amazing music & collaborations at seckoukeita.com LINKS Seckou Keita with Paul Weller on Wild Wood - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bb9VKNe7o_U&ab_channel=AfricaExpress Seckou Keita / Paul Weller - Rockets Remix - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-yS41iAH2xg&ab_channel=paulwellertv Find out more about Catrin Finch & Seckou Keita here and dive in to his new album Suba recorded during lockdown with Omar Sosa, one of Cuba's most prolific jazz pianists and the astounding percussionist Gustavo Ovalles. You can also see Africa in the Lounge featuring Seckou Keita here Thanks for listening - make sure that you subscribe / follow and leave a review - and if you want to support the podcast financially, you can buy me a virtual coffee via the link below (£3) Buy me a coffee on ko-fi https://ko-fi.com/paulwellerfanpodcast

Cleared Hot
Episode 204 - Marcus and Amber Capone

Cleared Hot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 175:04


When he was medically retired after 13 years. and multiple combat deployments as a U.S. Navy SEAL, Marcus Capone and his wife, Amber, thought that life would return to normal. Instead, their struggle had just begun. Marcus was experiencing an escalating myriad of challenges, including depression, isolation, cognitive impairment, excessive alcohol use, headaches, insomnia, and impulsivity. Marcus was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but, instinctively, Amber felt there was more to be discovered. After learning about the effects of blast waves, concussive, and subconcussive brain injuries, everything started to become clear. Marcus' military career as an explosives expert, combined with his prior years of contact sports, had left him with the invisible wounds of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a condition that has significant overlap with PTSD, and is often not properly diagnosed. When all hope seemed lost, Amber learned about ibogaine, a plant-based psychedelic used traditionally in West African ceremonial settings that has been studied as a potential treatment for opioid addiction and other mental health conditions. Marcus traveled to a reputable independent clinic outside of the U.S. to receive treatment with Ibogaine, as well as 5-MeO-DMT, another naturally occurring psychedelic compound. Immediately after the sessions, Marcus felt a massive weight had been lifted, his cognitive functioning returned, he had no desire for alcohol, and he stopped taking all prescription medications. Since 2019, the non-profit Veterans Exploring Treatment Solutions (VETS) has provided grants for hundreds of U.S. Special Forces veterans to receive psychedelic-assisted therapy treatment outside the U.S., as well as preparation and integration coaching. VETS believes that psychedelic therapy can lay the foundation for further healing. This “foundational healing” enables continued progress across a range of therapeutic modalities, and is supported by a robust coaching program, providing a holistic treatment solution for veterans. https://betterhelp.com/clearedhot https://athleticgreens.com/clearedhot https://paintyourlife.com https://letsdisco.com  

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Special Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 194:00


Listen to the Sun. Oct. 24, 2021 special edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the need for the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) Regional Economic Commissions to make the project a reality; Ethiopia is accusing the western media of spreading misinformation on the situation inside the country; a delegation from United Nations is visiting the West African state of Mali to assess the security situation; and the military junta in Guinea has appointed three new members to its cabinet. In the second hour we listen to a briefing by the World Health Organization (WHO) Director General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus on the status of the COVID-19 pandemic internationally. Finally, we review some of the important issues impacting Africa and the world.

Rights Talk
E25: Mental Health, War, Forced Migrants, and FGM/C with CCNY Prof. Adeyinka Akinsulure-Smith

Rights Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 33:24


This episode focuses on the mental health challenges faced by some of the most vulnerable populations: survivors of war, sexual violence, and torture as well as forced migrants, particularly children and women. Dr. Adeyinka Akinsulure-Smith, licensed psychologist and Professor of Psychology at CCNY and the CUNY Graduate Center, discusses her research, advocacy, and clinical work with survivors of human rights abuses. She considers the particular challenges faced by the West African community in New York City, including racism and xenophobia, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and female genital mutilation/cutting practices. She also explains her research on compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress among therapists and refugee resettlement workers.

Best Served
BSP351: New African Cuisine In The Diaspora w/ Zoe Adjonyoh of Zoe's Ghana Kitchen - Tell Your Best Story Ep#10

Best Served

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 27:57


In this episode of Tell Your Best Story, Jensen speaks to Zoe Adjonyoh of Zoe's Ghana Kitchen about how she started cooking Ghanaian food for herself as a latchkey kid, how oral tradition is used in passing down West African recipes, and about creating the canon of West African food one cookbook at a time. Zoe's Ghana Kitchen Zoe's Ghana Kitchen - An Introduction to New African Cuisine – From Ghana With Love

The Biblical Mind
How the Marginalized Church Reads the Bible, Part 1: Vince Bantu

The Biblical Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 45:10


New CHT fellow Dr. Vince Bantu of Fuller Theological Seminary is back on the podcast, this time to discuss the how historically marginalized and oppressed parts of the church can understand Scripture better than the dominant church—from the early church to the African church to the Black church in the U.S. today. Dr. Bantu and Dru explore the interpretive advantages that the lack of political and social power can confer on readers of the Bible—a book written largely by people who had suffered oppression and exile. Show notes: 0:00 The dominant church vs. the marginalized church 6:10 Imperial Christendom and the temptation of political power 13:08 Dualisms of the white church that the Black church doesn't have 20:03 The Black church's grasp on biblical righteousness and justice 29:27 God's providence and the West African slave trade 36:35 The white church's incomplete gospel Show notes by Celina Durgin Credits for the music used in TBM podcast.

Hunt, Gather, Talk with Hank Shaw
West African Fish and Seafood

Hunt, Gather, Talk with Hank Shaw

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 69:25


West African food is something more Americans should get to know, although, if you know where to look, you can see West Africa all over America's Southern cuisine. I talk with cookbook author Zoe Adjonyoh about the food of Ghana, and its rich fish and seafood traditions. 

The China in Africa Podcast
Folashadé Soulé on West Africa's Priorities at FOCAC 8

The China in Africa Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 64:08


The triennial Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) summit is just weeks away now and speculation is now starting to build as to what will be on the agenda. As of now, very little is known as to what's going to happen, not even the specific dates when the event will take place in Dakar, Senegal.Nonetheless, expectations are high that the forum will produce tangible outcomes for Africa on issues related to debt relief, infrastructure financing, and public health among others.Folashadé Soulé, a senior research associate at Oxford University, spoke with diplomats, policymakers and civil society stakeholders in several West African countries to find out what they're hoping to achieve at FOCAC. Folashadé joins Eric & Cobus to discuss what they said and to her predictions of what she thinks will be on the agenda.SHOW NOTES:SAIIA: Mapping the Future of Africa–China Relations: Insights from West Africa: https://bit.ly/3Bj6VL2 LSE IDEAS: FOCAC at 21: Future Trajectories of China-Africa Relations: https://bit.ly/3m04jg2AFRICA CENTER FOR STRATEGIC STUDIES: The Forum on China-Africa Cooperation at 21: Where to Next?: https://bit.ly/2Zh8YSc JOIN THE DISCUSSION:CAP on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ChinaAfricaProjectTwitter: @eolander | @stadenesque | @folasouleJOIN US ON PATREON!Become a CAP Patreon member and get all sorts of cool stuff including our Week in Review report, invitation to join monthly Zoom calls with Eric & Cobus, and even an awesome new CAP Podcast mug!www.patreon.com/chinaafricaprojectSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Haptic & Hue
African Wax Cloth

Haptic & Hue

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 38:51


African Wax Cloth is having its moment in the sun and it seems to be everywhere, from the catwalks of Paris and New York to the humblest country fabric shop. To the world's eyes, it is joyful and original, a celebration of West African identity and culture. But what is this fabric, where does it really come from and what does it mean to the different societies and communities that have had a hand in shaping it?   The is episode explores the curious origins of African Wax Cloth, and the twists and turns in an extraordinary story that is behind the creation of the fabric that is one of West Africans most iconic fabrics. But the origins of this cloth lie thousands of miles away from the place that now calls it home. Find out more in this episode.   You can see pictures of the textiles we talk about in this episode, a full script and a list of further resources on the Haptic and Hue Website at https://hapticandhue.com/tales-of-textiles-series-3/

Broken Record with Malcolm Gladwell, Rick Rubin, and Bruce Headlam

On her intimate new album Wary + Strange, Amythyst Kiah sings her heart out about losing her mom to suicide, and what it's like being the only black person in the room at country gigs. She created the album with Phoebe Bridger's producer, Tony Berg, and the result is a project expertly fuses Kiah's love for ‘90s alt-rock with her old-time, country sensibility. Amythyst Kiah performs two of her new songs on today's episode and talks to Bruce Headlam about what it was like for a black teengager to come out as gay in a white Christian southern town. She also explains how learning of the West African roots of Bluegrass helped reaffirm her place in Americana music. Just a warning, this episode contains talk of suicide. Subscribe to Broken Record's YouTube channel to hear all of our interviews:  https://www.youtube.com/brokenrecordpodcast and follow us on Twitter @BrokenRecord You can also check out past episodes here: https://brokenrecordpodcast.com Check out our favorite Amythyst Kiah songs HERE. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
How the West's obsession with fast fashion compounds an environmental nightmare in Ghana

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


As the West continues to mass produce cheap clothes, a lot of it ends up barely worn, donated or in a landfill. In Ghana, the deluge of worn-out fashions has overwhelmed the West African country's infrastructure and poses huge environmental threats to its coastlines.

PRI: Arts and Entertainment
How the West's obsession with fast fashion compounds an environmental nightmare in Ghana

PRI: Arts and Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021


As the West continues to mass produce cheap clothes, a lot of it ends up barely worn, donated or in a landfill. In Ghana, the deluge of worn-out fashions has overwhelmed the West African country's infrastructure and poses huge environmental threats to its coastlines.

Mystic Moments
Ep. 29: 10/13/21

Mystic Moments

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 81:18


Bringing a little bit of wisdom and mysticism to your life! This episode covers the weeks of October 13 to November 7. On this special episode, Gary speaks with guest Abiola Abrams about her upbringing as a transformational speaker and coach and learns more about the creation of her powerful Oracle deck, the African Goddess Rising Oracle. They touch upon the upcoming Full Moon in Aries, the ghetto Mercury Retrograde in Libra that's getting ready to end as our last Retrograde of the year, and how we can let go of the blockages standing our way from achieving our success. The Panel GG - @gangstaGURRY | @gangstagurry (IG) Abiola - FB: @abiolaTV | Twitter: @abiolaTV | Instagram: @abiolaTV ABIOLA ABRAMS is an award-winning author, intuitive coach, oracle deck creator—including the African Goddess Rising Oracle deck—transformational speaker, and international retreat leader. Abiola is the first-generation American daughter of multi-generational healers, seers, and farmers in Guyana, South America, who are descended from several West African nations. The founder of the Womanifesting self-love empowerment platform, podcast, and Goddess Temple Circle, Abiola studied sociology at Sarah Lawrence College. Learn more about Abiola on her website: Womanifesting.com Support Visit https://www.gangstagurry.me/ for information and to book services! You can also visit and support his Patreon. Contact Twitter: @MysticPod Instagram: @mysticpod Facebook: Mystic Moments Podcast Email: MysticMomentsPod@gmail.com Website: FlawlessNoisesMedia.com Patreon: Patreon.com/FlawlessNoises Voicemail: +1-425-243-3110 Mystic Moments is a Flawless Noises Media Network presentation. #FNMediaProd --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mysticmomentspod/message

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 193:00


Listen to the Sat. Oct. 16, 2021 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the demonstrations in Sudan demanding the resignation of the interim Transitional Sovereign Council (TSC); the Central African Republic (CAR) government has offered a ceasefire to the rebel groups fighting over the last several years inside the country; in Burkina Faso the Pan-African Film Festival opened this weekend; and former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo has announced the creation of a new political party in this West African state. In the second hour we commemorate the 55th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense. Finally, we examine some of the most pressing and burning issues of the day in Africa and throughout the world.

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Drug dealing, murder and gentrification: the persisting contrasts of Marseille

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 28:46


Stories from France, Burkina Faso, Tajikistan, Austria and Turkey. It's fifty years since the release of “The French Connection,” a fast-moving cops and gangsters thriller, which focused attention on Marseille, and the drug dealers based there. Half a century on, much has changed in this southern French city; some areas have been gentrified, while the port has had a substantial makeover. And yet, the presence of the drug trade remains, and now the French President has stepped in. With a wave of drug related killings in Marseille this year, Emmanuel Macron is paying a high profile visit, promising to help tackle these problems. Chris Bockman explains that many there feel they've heard it all before: He was known as “Africa's Che,” and like Che Guevara, Thomas Sankara died young at the hands of gunmen who apparently took exception to his leftist policies. Yet Sankara was no jungle guerrilla – he was the President of Burkina Faso. And he was killed during a coup in the West African nation. Thirty-four years later, fourteen men have gone on trial, accused of complicity in that assassination. It's hard to overstate what Sankara meant for Burkina Faso, and indeed for supporters across Africa and the wider world. He was credited with vast improvements in literacy, giving land to the poor, and above all, with instilling a pride among his people – he rejected continuing French influence in the region. Yet critics insist that Sankara was an autocrat, one who had his opponents tortured, and sometimes killed. Henry Wilkins has been trying to separate the man from the myth: The fate of Afghanistan continues to be a source of concern round the world. The country is facing financial disaster, with shortages of basic goods like food, and it's also suffered repeated attacks by the militant group which calls itself Islamic State Khorasan. Last week, forty-six people died in a bombing which Islamic State claimed as one of theirs. This week, the United Nations held a special meeting, to try to work out how to give aid to Afghanistan, without it getting into the hands of the Taliban, now in charge of the country. All this instability is of particular concern to the countries bordering Afghanistan, like Russia, Pakistan, and also – to the north, Tajikistan. Tajikistan has had its own battles with Islamic militants. More than that, about a quarter of Afghans are of Tajik ethnicity, so problems in one country have a habit of spilling across the border. It's a border well known to Abdujalil Abdurasulov, who has spent time reporting on both sides of it. He's been thinking about what the Taliban takeover in Afghanistan might mean for its neighbour. There was a time when Austria was seen as a hive of political intrigue. Back when the Hapsburgs ruled an empire, the plotting and manoeuvring at their palace in Vienna could affect half of Europe. Then, after the Second World War, Austria's neutral status between the west and the Soviet bloc made it a base for many a spy and secret agent. Things had appeared to calm down – the country became known for its skiing and strudel more than any Machiavellian goings on. But now, it seems, the intrigue is back. This week, Austria's youthful Chancellor, Sebastian Kurz had to step down, following accusations that he had bribed a tabloid newspaper to get favourable coverage. This came only a few years after Mr Kurz's one-time coalition partner was caught in a sting, apparently prepared to offer government contracts to a woman he thought represented Russian oligarchs. Feeling confused? Bethany Bell has been untangling this web of allegations: Wherever there's mass tourism, you will find the escort industry flourishing, selling very personal services, and Turkey is no different. The‘gigolos' as they're known there offer these services to men and women. And just like other people dependent on tourism, they've been badly hit by the coronavirus lockdown, which saw the number of foreign visitors to Turkey plummet – as Sally Howard explains Producer: Paul Moss

Africa Today
Ecowas parliament discuss banning presidential term extensions

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:20


The West African regional parliament at its meeting in Ghana, expresses concern about the recent military coups and the growing trend of extension of presidential term limits. Plus, the military authorities in Guinea dismiss and move senior officers from the old regime. And Somali pop star Aar Maanta tells us how he's using music and the performing arts to help children stay connected to the language and culture of their parents' homeland.

National Day Calendar
October 12, 2021 – National Gumbo Day | National Farmer's Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 3:15


Welcome to October 12, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a Southern melting pot and those who work the land.  When we think of gumbo, the hearty stew of seasoned vegetables and seafood or meat, we immediately think of Southern cooking. For this we can thank it's older West African roots that blended with Native American and European traditions to create a culinary classic. Traditional recipes call for okra, a vegetable that thickens things nicely, but you may have also heard of gumbo filé. This Choctaw spice made from dried sassafras root, also thickens the stew and was most likely used when okra was out of season. And if all else fails you can tighten things up with a good old fashioned roux. Or leave the cooking to an expert! On National Gumbo Day, celebrate this “melting stew” that warms us during chilly seasons.  Farmer's Day has been celebrated since the mid 1800s and it's easy to see why. These folks contribute to much more than just the food on our table. From early on, people who worked the land set the bar for hard work and their products have affected many industries from manufacturing to transportation. For proof, you can look at a whole host of products from leather goods to textiles and even the ethanol in our gas tanks. These days it's more important than ever to support your local farmers. Even city slickers can do their part by purchasing from markets and visiting restaurants that take pride in their farm to table menus. On National Farmer's Day, celebrate the way of life that sustains us all.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux
4921 BEING GOOD SUUUCKS! Freedomain Call In

Freedomain Radio with Stefan Molyneux

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 137:44


www.freedomain.comHi Stefan,This is the most difficult message I have ever had to write, but after being a listener of yours for 4 years now I finally have to accept that there is both continuity and a cause to the endless failures that seem to shape my life thus far. I have an ACE score of 7, although I do believe that special consideration should be given to the context of the abuse, in my case this would surely increase my score.Violence, incest, abandonment, neglect, torture and betrayal are all major themes in my family history. Each time I listen to a freedomain call-in show a light is shone on to either a suppressed or repressed memory of mine, and it becomes increasingly clear that I am actively, perhaps subconsciously refusing to succeed in life. Most importantly, I am beginning to understand why no one has ever intervened to stop my self destruction, and even more terrifying is that their existence depends on my destruction.I am a British born West African male in my early 30s. I am tall, handsome, intelligent, charismatic, athletic and curious, but despite these gifts I have nothing of value to show for my time on this earth. I have bounced around from one addiction to another, from recreational drug use to sugar binges. I suffer from insomnia, chronic overthinking and crippling self doubt. I have never loved or been loved, but most disturbing to me is that I have never been loving to myself. I have dropped out of university twice, college three times, and procrastination has been my only consistent friend. After many years of inaction I am now afraid to dream, because each failure I add to my internal resume gradually erodes my sense of self worth and efficacy.As a child I would curse God for creating me and forcing me into existence, I thought it was a sick joke that he would make me live a life of suffering. I often wished I could snap my fingers and end my own life. I had no real friends, we were discouraged from socialising outside of the immediate family, it was school, home and church.My earliest memories were of being beaten by mother with the heel of her winter boot, being abruptly sent to live with an old woman relative in west Africa, and not seeing either my mother or father for months after that, all without any explanation at all! I have never had an intimate conversation with my mother, I have no memory of ever being hugged by her, I often wonder if she could mention 2 things that I enjoy doing. I have a memory of being woken up in the middle of the night by my mother and told to scrub my body in the shower with a soap from west Africa that had been prayed on and that would remove any evil curses. I could go on and on Stefan.The true darkness of my family and childhood is buried deep, and even to think about it is to risk too much. The perpetrators and victims have families of their own now and this is why I haven't contacted you before today. I feel as though I am trapped in a cult of secrecy and shame. I truly believe that the victims in my family are quietly and politely dying inside as we look at each other for permission to cry out! But of course , there will never be permission. I am frozen in time, frozen by shame, frozen by fear, Frozen. Help Please Stefan.I am currently studying for a master's degree so I can be available at anytime of day and on any day of the week.My questions is, why haven't I been able to start a life of my own? And what must I do to escape the gravity of the past?Thank you Stefan.

National Day Calendar
October 12, 2021 – National Gumbo Day | National Farmer’s Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 2:30


This Stew Makes Us Think Of Southern Cooking But It's Actually Much Older Than That! Welcome to October 12, 2021 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate a Southern melting pot and those who work the land.  When we think of gumbo, the hearty stew of seasoned vegetables and seafood or meat, we immediately think of Southern cooking.  For this we can thank it's older West African roots that blended with Native American and European traditions to create a culinary classic.  Traditional recipes call for okra, a vegetable that thickens things nicely, but you may have also heard of gumbo filé. This Choctaw spice made from dried sassafras root, also thickens the stew and was most likely used when okra was out of season.  And if all else fails you can tighten things up with a good old fashioned roux.  Or leave the cooking to an expert!  On National Gumbo Day, celebrate this “melting stew” that warms us during chilly seasons.  Farmer's Day has been celebrated since the mid 1800s and it's easy to see why.  These folks contribute to much more than just the food on our table.  From early on, people who worked the land set the bar for hard work and their products have affected many industries from manufacturing to transportation.  For proof, you can look at a whole host of products from leather goods to textiles and even the ethanol in our gas tanks.  These days it's more important than ever to support your local farmers.  Even city slickers can do their part by purchasing from markets and visiting restaurants that take pride in their farm to table menus.  On National Farmer's Day, celebrate the way of life that sustains us all.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson.  Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day.

TED Talks Daily (HD video)
The Black history of twerking -- and how it taught me self-love | Lizzo

TED Talks Daily (HD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 13:50


Twerking is mainstream now ... but do you know where it came from? Superstar Lizzo traces booty shaking to a traditional West African dance and tells how Black women across generations kept the rhythm alive, from blues and jazz singers to modern rap and hip-hop performers. With her characteristic energy, she shares how twerking empowered her to love her own body -- and explains why understanding its origins helps protect Black culture from erasure and misappropriation. (And, yes, she twerks on stage.)

TED Talks Daily
The Black history of twerking -- and how it taught me self-love | Lizzo

TED Talks Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 13:50


Twerking is mainstream now ... but do you know where it came from? Superstar Lizzo traces booty shaking to a traditional West African dance and tells how Black women across generations kept the rhythm alive, from blues and jazz singers to modern rap and hip-hop performers. With her characteristic energy, she shares how twerking empowered her to love her own body -- and explains why understanding its origins helps protect Black culture from erasure and misappropriation. (And, yes, she twerks on stage.)

TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The Black history of twerking -- and how it taught me self-love | Lizzo

TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 13:50


Twerking is mainstream now ... but do you know where it came from? Superstar Lizzo traces booty shaking to a traditional West African dance and tells how Black women across generations kept the rhythm alive, from blues and jazz singers to modern rap and hip-hop performers. With her characteristic energy, she shares how twerking empowered her to love her own body -- and explains why understanding its origins helps protect Black culture from erasure and misappropriation. (And, yes, she twerks on stage.)

The World and Everything In It
Legal Docket: Nestlé v Doe - S2.E7

The World and Everything In It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 41:38


Former child slaves on West African cocoa farms sue U.S. chocolate companies. The case examines whether the Alien Tort Statute covers those claims.