Podcasts about west african

Westernmost region of the African continent

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Gravy
In Houston, Three Tastes of West Africa

Gravy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 28:23


In the episode “In Houston, Three Tastes of West Africa,” Gravy producer Kayla Stewart takes listeners to her hometown of Houston, Texas, which boasts one of the most vibrant international food scenes in the country. It's a city where Black Americans have built their own communities and pathways to success, and where diversity is prized. It's also where West African immigrants—from Ghana, Senegal, Nigeria, and beyond—have created their own stories, including through food.  To find out why Houston is the center of this West African renaissance, Stewart starts at Safari restaurant, which Margaret and Hector Ukegbu opened in the 1990s. Safari helped appease the homesickness many Nigerians felt when they first arrived in the United States in the late 20th century. To understand why the restaurant is so significant, we've got to understand Houston's Black community and the landscape of Nigeria during the second part of the 20th century. During the 1960s and 1970s, decades critical to the Black Power Movement across the country, Black universities sought ways to connect with African countries, and vice versa. When the U.S. passed the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, it became easier for Africans to migrate to the U.S. Houston universities welcomed a huge number of students from several African countries, particularly from Nigeria.  This was a period of political instability in Nigeria. The Nigerian Civil War was technically only three years, culminating in 1970 but the war created emotional, economic, and political ramifications. Many Nigerians sought new opportunities in the United States, as did immigrants from nearby countries like Ghana, Senegal, and Liberia. Houston, thanks to its numerous universities, ample job opportunities and hot, familiar climate, was appealing. And once they were here, they looked for the foods they loved from home. Margaret Ukegbu started cooking and selling Nigerian food out of her home, such as rice dishes and plantains. Eventually, she and Hector opened Safari, which serves traditional Nigerian dishes like pepper soup with goat meat and egusi soup. For 25 years, they've served families and leaders from across the West African diaspora.  Over time, Houston has become an incubator of sorts for West African chefs and restaurateurs to get creative and explore the possibilities of West African dining. In this episode, Stewart interviews Kavachi Ukegbu, the daughter of Margaret and Hector, who currently runs Safari with her mother. She also speaks with Ope Amosu, the chef and entrepreneur behind ChòpnBlọk, a West African fast-casual restaurant in Houston, who's on a mission to share the cuisine with American diners and change the narrative around the continent's bounty. Finally, Stewart hears from Cherif Mbodji, the Senegalese-American general manager of the elegant restaurant Bludorn, about bringing Senegalese food and flavors to fine dining.

Film at Lincoln Center Podcast
#437 - Jerzy Skolimowski & Ewa Piaskowska on EO and Nikyatu Jusu & Nikkia Moulterie on Nanny

Film at Lincoln Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2022 58:04


This week on the Film at Lincoln Center podcast, we're featuring two conversations: the first with director Jerzy Skolimowski and co-writer Ewa Piaskowska on the NYFF60 selection, EO, and the second with director Nikyatu Jusu and producer Nikkia Moulterie on the ND/NF51 selection Nanny. At age 84, legendary director Jerzy Skolimowski has directed one of his spryest, most visually inventive films, following the travels of a peripatetic donkey named EO. After being removed from the only life he's ever known in a traveling circus, EO begins a journey across the Polish and Italian countryside, experiencing cruelty and kindness, captivity and freedom. Skolimowski imagines the animal's mesmerizing journey as an ever-shifting interior landscape, marked by absurdity and warmth in equal measure, putting the viewer in the unique perspective of the protagonist. Skolimowski has constructed his own bold vision about the follies of human nature, seen from the ultimate outsider's perspective. EO, a New York Times Critic's Pick, is now playing in our theaters. Get tickets at filmlinc.org/eo Next, we're revisiting a conversation from the 51st New Directors/New Films with Nanny director Nikyatu Jusu and producer Nikkia Moulterie. A riveting Anna Diop commands nearly every frame of director Nikyatu Jusu's feature debut, a breakout at this year's Sundance, where it won the Dramatic Grand Jury Prize. In this psychologically complex fable of displacement tinged with supernatural horror, Diop plays Aisha, a woman who recently emigrated from Senegal and is hired to care for the adorable daughter of an affluent couple (Michelle Monaghan and Morgan Spector) living in New York's Tribeca neighborhood. Increasingly unsettled by the family's volatile home life, though desperate to make enough money to bring over her young son from Senegal, Aisha begins to unravel, finding her life in America to be more nightmare than dream. Mixing domestic melodrama with American genre elements and West African folklore, Nanny is a spellbinding experience that defies expectation. Nanny, a New York Times Critic's Pick, is now playing in our theaters for one week only, with a special holiday promotion: buy one ticket, get one free for all screenings through November 27. Get tickets at filmlinc.org/nanny

History of Africa
Sokoto Revolution ep. 4: A West African Caliphate

History of Africa

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 58:51


By the 1810s, the militant stage of the Sokoto Revolution was coming to an end. The Commander of the Believers, Usman Dan Fodio, had vanquished his enemies. What had started as a small social movement led by a charismatic iterant teacher had conquered the largest contiguous territory in the entirety of Africa. And, according to Fodio, this new state would be no ordinary empire, but a righteous state that carried on the legacy of the Prophet Muhammad himself. His imamate would be a government worthy to call itself Muhammad's successor: the Sokoto Caliphate.However, this would prove to be no easy task. Join us for our final part of our examination of the Sokoto Revolution, in which we take a critical and close look at the consequences of Fodio's  world altering movement, as well as the monumental progress and suffering that define its legacy.Support the show

Soul of a Leader
Faith Over Fear

Soul of a Leader

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2022 44:25


Adrienne Johnson is the founder of Wo Ye Bra, (which translates to “menstrual cycle” in the Ghanaian Twi language) a West African empowerment program that develops female entrepreneurs. In today's podcast, Adrienne returns with a special guest, Ellen Adu Baah. Ellen is the Vice President of Operations for the Wo Ye Bra Program. This program specializes in educating, empowering, and encouraging women in Ghana to stay in school and become successful businesswomen. Adrienne believes that God has called her to get out of the boat and have faith like Peter. Together, these two women are changing Africa one village at a time.

Song Exploder
Omah Lay - Never Forget

Song Exploder

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 15:09


Omah Lay is a Nigerian singer, songwriter, and producer. He's one of the young stars of Afrobeats, the West African genre that's become a global phenomenon. His new album Boy Alone features a collaboration with Justin Bieber. But for this episode, Omah talked to me about the song “Never Forget.” Boy Alone was Omah's late father's nickname, and the song “Never Forget” was inspired by him. For more, visit songexploder.net/omah-lay.

60 Minutes
11/13/2022: The Surfside Mystery, Paper Brigade, Sona and the Kora

60 Minutes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 42:39


On this edition of “60 Minutes,” investigators still do not know what triggered the collapse of a 12-story beachfront condominium in Surfside, Fla., last summer, killing 98 people. Sharyn Alfonsi reports on the federal and local investigations and how the catastrophe is expected to impact the affordability of condo living for hundreds of thousands of Floridians. Jon Wertheim reports from Lithuania on a group of resistance fighters who risked their lives to save a trove of Jewish artifacts during and after the Holocaust. Lesley Stahl profiles Sona Jobarteh, the first female virtuoso player of a centuries-old West African instrument called the kora.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Designing Hollywood Podcast
The Woman King Costume Designer Gersha Phillips

Designing Hollywood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 70:37


The Woman King Costume Designer Gersha Phillips Design The tactile & gorgeous costume's!  Oscar winner Viola Davis leads a strong cast into battle in an epic from Gina Prince-Bythewood, inspired by real women warriors. Davis is absolutely mesmerizing as the Agojie's strategist warrior. Costume designer Gersha Phillips outfitted a literal army for “The Woman King.” The film, which premiered at the Toronto Film Festival ahead of its theatrical release, stars Viola Davis, Thuso Mbedu and Lashana Lynch. Bolstered by strong critical reviews, the film is already part of the awards conversation heading into fall. Set in the 1820s, the historical film tells the story of the Agojie, a group of female warriors who protected the West African kingdom of Dahomey. Phillips was familiar with the concept, having assisted Ruth Carter with research on “Black Panther,” which featured a group of fictional female warriors called the Dora Milaje. “The pitch [for ‘The Woman King'] came as ‘this is the story about the real Dora Milaje,'” Phillips says. Outfitting an army meant creating visual cues to differentiate levels of status and affluence. Signals of wealth in the kingdom included numerous layers of fabrics and jewelry piled onto the body. Sponsored by @peris.costumes  Brought to you by Designing Hollywood Productions and The John Campea Show!  Host Robert Meyer Burnett Executive Producer Martika Ibarra  #thewomanking #violadavis #filmmaking #costumedesign #costumedesigner #film #podcast #podcastshow #designinghollywood #marilynvance #martikaibarra #producer #startrek #periscostumes Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 168:00


Listen to the Sat. Nov. 12, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the United Nations Climate Conference, COP27, being held in the North African state of Egypt; France has announced the liquidation of Operation Barkhane although Paris will maintain a military presence in several West African states; Uganda is still battling an outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD); and investigations continue into the circumstances surrounding the airplane crash where 19 people lost their lives. In the second hour we look in detail at the COP27 Summit where Barbados Prime Minister Mia Mottley delivered an address. We also examine the attempts by the United States to influence African media outlets. Some of the African art works stolen during colonialism are being returned to the continent. Finally, we review the prophetic speech by Malcolm X, Ballots or Bullets, given in Detroit in April 1964 in light of the recent midterm elections amid a highly fractured political system.  

The olive magazine podcast
MARIA BRADFORD on 10 things you need to know about Sierra Leone food and cooking

The olive magazine podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2022 26:09


This week chef and food writer Maria Bradford takes us through 10 things you need to know about Sierra Leone food and cooking as she shares stories and recipes from her West African homeland. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Blowin’ Smoke Podcast
110: DJ Kenzo Pt.2 | West African DJ Drops Debut Album + Life On Stage, Kenergy & More | Ep.110

Blowin’ Smoke Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 85:22


Join in on this weeks conversation as the guys sit down for their Pt.2 with the one and only DJ Kenzo. Starting with his past experiences and how it has molded him today, being on stage in the infamous Stockton Arena, and dropping his debut album; Kenergy. #DJ #Producer #Artist #Africa  https://youtu.be/nlPBludR_Hc Instagram:  @blowinsmokepod @dopeaholic   @truephjt  @emilbustos

World Changing Ideas
How Is A Solar Farm In The Sky Going To Power Earth?

World Changing Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 40:11


From Queens, New York over to West Africa down to Southwest Florida and up to Europe, we're jumping from soil to sky in our exploration of how solar energy could power our world. Contributing WCI reporter Blake Odom investigates how you can set up solar power for your home. He looks into the installation costs, the time needed, and the potential savings. Energicity is hooking up West African countries like Sierra Leone and Liberia with solar power minigrids. Babcock Ranch is one of the few places in Florida that did not lose power when Hurricane Ian hit in September. And that's because it runs on solar power. It's a living laboratory for how we could power our towns with solar energy. Dr. Michael Harbottle is developing a way for soil to store solar energy. Bacteria in the soil will help this process by performing electrosynthesis. Wild! Especially considering how current solar batteries require lithium, which is a finite resource. The Solaris initiative is working on creating a space-based solar power to decrease energy decarbonization on Earth. Over the next decades, it could build a 2 km-long satellite over Europe that harnesses solar power directly from the sun and beams it back down to Earth! Check out our Instagram and TikTok at Fast Company for more creative world changing ideas!

Corner Table Talk
S2:E28 Jackie Summers I It's His Spirit

Corner Table Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 43:41


"If you go back 500 years, West Africans knew hibiscus to be a powerful medicinal plant, full of antimicrobials, full of antioxidants, natural source of vitamin C. It's a natural aphrodisiac. They would make a tea from this flower, and this was part of their ceremony and their traditions. Then around 500 years ago, the transatlantic slave trade starts, and bodies and spices are stolen from the continent of Africa. This flower, the hibiscus flower, takes physical roots in the Caribbean islands, but the people who knew what to do with it were transported along with it in the bottom of ships."  Jackie Summers A couple of years ago, I read an article about Jackie Summers being the first African American in the United States be granted a license in 2011 to make liquor, post-prohibition. Prohibition ended in 1933, almost 80 years ago. That is a story in and of itself, possibly for another day. After a cancer scare that turned out to be a benign tumor in his spine, Brooklyn-based Jackie quit his job as an advertising executive and with no formal training or background in the beverage industry, began to make Sorel Liqueur.Jackie's story is inspirational, full of stops and starts, including 623 attempts to fine tune the recipe, a period of homelessness, a hurricane that destroyed his first distillery, reneged deals from investors that led to a several year shutdown for Sorel,  getting knocked down and having the determination to get back up, guided by the spirit of his ancestors, and a strong desire to bring Sorel, a widely known but never before, distilled and distributed beverage with its roots in Africa to people all over the world.In 2021, Jackie took a major step towards realizing that goal when he teamed up with powerhouse Fawn Weaver, owner of Uncle Nearest Premium Whiskey and the Tennessee-based Nearest Green Distillery.In less than a year back on the market, Sorel Liqueur is receiving glowing accolades and major beverage industry awards. Jackie himself was named among "Drink Innovators of the Year" (Food & Wine Magazine), several times "100 Most Influential Bar Industry Figures" (Drinks International Magazine), and included on the Imbibe 75 list. His writing has been published in various outlets, James Beard-nominated and winner of "Best Food Essay" (Association of Food Journalists).Join me, your host, Brad Johnson, and Jackie for this inspirational conversation. on Corner Table Talk. * * * Instagram: Corner Table Talk  and Post and Beam Hospitality LinkedIn: Brad Johnson E.Mail:  brad@postandbeamhospitality.com For more information on host Brad Johnson or to join our mailing list, please visit: https://postandbeamhospitality.com/ Theme Music: Bryce Vine Corner Table™ is a trademark of Post & Beam Hospitality LLCSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Real Black Atheist & Pseudo Killas Library
Islam in West Africa was it Good for the West African People

Real Black Atheist & Pseudo Killas Library

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 135:14


https://abdjuwear.com/

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day for November 2, 2022 is: fustigate • FUSS-tuh-gayt • verb Fustigate means “to criticize severely.” Its older, less common meaning is “to beat with or as if with a short heavy club.” // The singer's awards show performance was fustigated by several prominent media outlets. // Although they're sitting atop the standings now, the team went through a rough patch of getting absolutely fustigated by their division rivals. See the entry > Examples: “This article explores major ways in which comedy exemplifies the power of popular culture to defy political censorship, advance freedom of expression, and contribute to the democratization of political culture in contemporary Africa. ... The article does so from the combined perspectives of political history and social philosophy. The latter perspective refers to the comedians' conjuring up of Islamic and West African religious creeds to fustigate particular social flaws and moral deviancies that affect their society.” — Mohamed Saliou Camara, Nokoko (Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada), 1 Jan. 2022 Did you know? A modern fustigation won't leave a bump on your head, but severe criticism can be a blow to your self-esteem. When fustigate first left its mark on the English language in the mid-17th century, it did so with the meaning “to cudgel or beat with a short heavy club”—a sense that reflects the word's Latin source, the noun fustis, meaning “club” or “staff.” (Beat, “to strike repeatedly,” is also a distant relative of fustis.) The “criticize” sense of fustigate may be more common these days, but the violent use is occasionally a hit with sportswriters who employ it metaphorically to suggest how badly a team has been drubbed by their opponent.

Free Library Podcast
Kardea Brown | The Way Home: A Celebration of Sea Islands Food and Family with over 100 Recipes

Free Library Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 50:00


In conversation with Valerie Erwin Charleston, South Carolina–based Kardea Brown hosts the Food Network's Delicious Miss Brown and OWN's The Great Soul Food Cookoff. She also is the creator of the pop-up New Gullah Supper Club, where her cuisine pays homage to her grandmother's cooking and her Gullah/Geechee heritage, which describes a distinct African American group that has preserved much of its West African culture in the coastal areas of South Carolina and Georgia. She has also appeared on Beat Bobby Flay, Chopped Junior, and Family Food Showdown, among other culinary programs. In her first ever cookbook, Brown shares her multi-generational recipes for Low Country favorites, accentuated with helpful tips, family anecdotes, and beautiful photos. The longtime owner of the Low Country-inspired restaurant Geechee Girl, longtime Philly chef Valerie Erwin was also the general manager of the innovative EAT Café. These ventures have been featured in The Philadelphia Inquirer and Philadelphia Magazine, and on The Food Network and NPR. She currently managers Farm to Families, a produce access program for children; serves on the board of C-CAP, a culinary scholarship program for high school students; and is a member of the board of the anti-homelessness organization Philadelphia Interfaith Hospitality Network. (recorded 11/1/2022)

Myths and Legends
294-West African Folklore: Spirited Away

Myths and Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 43:26


The story of Moremi Ajasoro from modern-day Nigeria has love, loss, and, of course, evil forest monsters. The creature is the Van Meter Visitor, a dinosaur that was apparently stinking up the Old West. -- The newspaper article for the creature and the disclaimer: https://myths.link/294 Lost in Panama: https://myths.link/panama -- Sponsors: Simplisafe: Get 40% off your order when you visit https://simplisafe.com/legends today! Bombas: Get 20% off your first purchase when you go to https://bombas.com/legends with promo code LEGENDS Shopify: Sign up for a free trial at https://shopify.com/legends The Official The Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power Podcast: Download the Amazon Music app and check it out!Support the show: https://www.mythpodcast.com/membershipSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Savage Wonder
David Tucker

Savage Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 93:31


A Seattle-based playwright, photographer and novelist, https://www.davidtuckerphotography.com/ (David A. Tucker II) has had several of his plays produced and/or developed at theaters across the nation, including Seattle Repertory Theatre, Abingdon Theater Co., ACT, Tacoma Actors Guild, and Foothill Theater Co. His theatrical works include The Nude, Persistence of Vision, Another Day in Baghdad (about his military experiences in Iraq), Under the Skin and North Wind Blowin', a play with music.  David received 2016 GAP funding for Smoke, a project where he interviews, photographs and videotapes members of Ebola burial teams as well as medical personnel who combatted the disease, an Ebola survivor, and staff on the Dead Body Management Teams in Liberia. His intent is to capture this challenging time in West African history by creating a theatrical work that weaves not only dialogue based upon these interviews, but also black and white photographs and video footage of the Liberian people and the locations in which these events took place. David has also been creating fine art and documentary photographs since 1980. His photographic series, The Human Landscape, explores the human figure in studio and natural environments. In 1995 he began DANCEWORKS, collaborating with ballet and modern dancers to capture the transitory beauty of dancers in motion. He continues to explore and add new images to each photographic series. The images in DEPLOYED: Haiti, Kosovo, Iraq were taken from 1994 - 2004 while a member of the U.S. Army. Tucker has exhibited and sold his photographs at a number of galleries and museums throughout the nation, including the Springfield Art Museum, Blue Sky Gallery, Photographic Center NW, M.I.A. Gallery, New York Center for Photography, Lightbox Photography Gallery, the DeMatteis Gallery, Silver Image Gallery, PhotoZone Gallery, Lumina Gallery and Photography West Gallery. His works may be found in several private collections. As both a fine art and journalism photographer, his images have been published in numerous publications including Black & White Magazine, The San Diego Union-Tribune, The Los Angeles Times, The Orange County Register, The Seattle Times, American Theatre Magazine, Dramatics Magazine, InTheatre Magazine, and the book, "Theater in America."

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 197:00


Listen to the Sat. Oct. 29, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. This episode features our regular PANW report with dispatches on the suspension of the Russian-Ukraine grain deal in response to reported drone attacks by Kiev and London against Crimea; there are nearly 100,000 Haitians who have been displaced due to social instability on this Caribbean island-nation; South African intelligence agencies have warned the public not to circulate unsubstantiated rumors on a potential terrorist attack; and the West African state of Ghana has been elected to the presidency of the United Nations Security Council. In the second hour we look at the current situation in Guinea where the military coup leaders have agreed to hold elections within two years. Mozambique provides its analysis on the significance of the recently-held 20th Congress of the Chinese Communist Party. We look in detail at the recent collapse of the grain deal between Russia and Ukraine. Finally, we review recent developments in the efforts to win an appeal for former Black Panther Party member Mumia Abu-Jamal in Philadelphia.

The Sonic Cloth
TSC26: West African Gems (Soundway, Analog Africa, Sahel Sounds, Awesome Tapes From Africa)

The Sonic Cloth

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 75:57


Part I of a survey of (mostly) funky African music via today's crop of excellent global reissue labels. These dedicated labels are introducing and reintroducing strains of outstanding West African music, new and old, to ears that have largely ignored the region's under-recognized contributions to the breadth of music. We run through Hilife, Afrobeat, Gumbe, Afro-Rock, Malian Peulh, Edo Funk, Country-Folk, Agadez Rock, and then some. Next up is Part II where we'll explore the musical gems of East Africa. AKULA! Available on all podcast apps. Subscribe and never miss a new rabbit hole.  Follow @thesoniccloth on Instagram to grab the tracklist.

The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
Maritime Africa: African Canoemen

The Mariner's Mirror Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 26:13


This begins a handful of episodes that will explore the maritime history of Africa. We begin with the fascinating story of African canoemen. African indigenous seafaring canoemen operated as middlemen between European traders and the coastal estuaries, rivers and land of West Africa. The topography of the coast often necessitated their involvement in trade because it was variably rocky, broken by sandbars and shallow waters, or treacherous in other ways to large sailing ships. Canoemen allowed access to trade by using surfboats that could surmount the waves on the coast in ways European boats could not. They often were hired as navigators and pilots on European ships or worked as menial labourers or ordinary seamen on European ships. Canoemen also frequently came alongside European ships to board them and trade goods or enslaved people. As a result, when Europeans began to build trading entrepots, such as Elmina Castle in Ghana, Monrovia in Liberia, or Cap Verde in Senegal, they hired canoemen to contract out trade. To find out more about this little-known aspect of African maritime history Dr Sam Willis spoke with Megan Cructcher, a PhD Student in the Nautical Archaeology Program at Texas A&M University who is looking into the roles, identities, and material culture of these canoemen in West African maritime history, especially during the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Gone Medieval
Who were the Africans in Medieval Britain?

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 30:47 Very Popular


Earlier this month, it was reported that DNA analysis of the skeleton of a 10-year-old girl buried in Kent in the 7th century showed she was of West African descent. Thirty-three per cent of her DNA suggests that the girl's grandfather or great-grandfather was probably from the Esan or Yoruba people.As Black History Month draws to a close, Dr. Cat Jarman explores what is known about the presence of Africans in Britain during the Medieval period with the distinguished historian of African affairs, Professor Hakim Adi.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. It was edited by Anisha Deva and produced by Rob Weinberg.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Monday newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Andrew Talks to Chefs
Episode 204: Chef Tolu "Eros" Erogbogbo (ILÉ popup, Hollywood, CA)

Andrew Talks to Chefs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 80:10 Very Popular


While at the LA Chef Conference last week, Andrew met the charming and passionate Chef Tolu "Eros" Erogbogbo, who's heading up the most talked-about popup in the LA area this year. Andrew and Chef Eros found some time to meet up before Andrew blew town to record this interview at the site of Eros'  West African popup, ILÉ, which has taken Los Angeles by storm since it launched in April.And in this week's Tech and Restaurants segment, brought to you by BentoBox and Clover, Daniel Holzman of Danny Boy's Famous Original pizza in Downtown Los Angeles, joins us to discuss the evolution and practical benefits of online ordering. Please visit the website for BentoBox and Clover to learn how they provide restaurants with the technology they need for even more success, and book a demo today.Andrew Talks to Chefs is a fully independent podcast and no longer affiliated with our former host network; please visit and bookmark our official website for all show updates, blog posts, personal and virtual appearances, and related information.

The CyberWire
Mobilizing DDoS-as-a-service. Interpol takes down Black Axe gang members. Trends in phishing. Spyder Loader active in Hong Kong. Europol announces arrests in keyless car hacking case.

The CyberWire

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 34:12 Very Popular


Mobilizing DDoS-as-a-service. Interpol takes down the Black Axe gang members. A look at phishing trends. Spyder Loader is active in Hong Kong. Joe Carrigan looks at Google's launch of passwordless authentication. Our guest is Dr. Eman El-Sheikh from University of West Florida's Center for Cybersecurity on NSA-funded National Cybersecurity Workforce Development Programs. And Europol announces arrests in a case of keyless car hacking. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news briefing: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/11/200 Selected reading. Project DDOSIA Russia's answer to disBalancer (Radwaare) Russian DDOSIA Project Pays Volunteers to Participate in DDOS Attacks on Western Companies (Gridinsoft Blogs) International crackdown on West-African financial crime rings (Interpol) Giant online scamming syndicate 'Black Axe' destroyed in Interpol-led operation (teiss) INTERPOL-led Operation Takes Down 'Black Axe' Cyber Crime Organization (The Hacker News) Operation Jackal: Interpol arrests Black Axe fraud suspects (Register) When the Black Axe falls: cybercrime suspects detained in global bust (Cybernews) International Police Action Blunts Black Axe Criminal Group - HS Today (Hstoday) Q3 2022 Cofense Phishing Intelligence Trends Review (Cofense) Spyder Loader: Malware Seen in Recent Campaign Targeting Organizations in Hong Kong (Symantec) Operation CuckooBees: Cybereason Uncovers Massive Chinese Intellectual Property Theft Operation (Cybereason) 31 arrested for stealing cars by hacking keyless tech | Europol (Europol) European gang that sold car hacking tools to thieves arrested (The Record by Recorded Future)

Speaking Tongues
115. Speaking Kabuverdianu

Speaking Tongues

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 76:46


Hello Language Lovers! Thank you for joining me for this episode of Speaking Tongues- the podcast in conversation with multilinguals. This week, let me tell you… I'm honored to have this discussion about Kabuverdianu with Jon of Learn Kabuverdianu and Cabo Verdean Linguist Adeleide Monteiro. In this week's episode, we are learning how Cabo Verde and Kabuverdianu grew together. We learn the exact city where the language originated and why we use the term “kabuverdianu” when talking about criolu. Jon & Adelaide talk to us about the structure of the language including why it's important to include the subject and how this structure differs from Portuguese. Adelaide tells us about West African languages that have influenced the structure and how linguists today are using technology to gather information on Kabuverdianu in real time. Adelaide tells us about Portuguese creoles from other countries that can be understood by Cabo Verdeans and Jon tells us about food and music to experience in Cabo Verde- which I myself cannot wait to partake in in person. Stay tuned through the episode to find out which word that yours truly already knew in Kabuverdianu and why I know this word (spoiler alert: there is singing involved!) Gigantic over land and sea thanks to Jon & Adelaide for this conversation and for sharing the beauty and majesty of Cabo Verde - its language, culture, traditions and people with all of us. If you enjoy episodes of Speaking Tongues, don't forget to subscribe, rate and review the Speaking Tongues Podcast on Apple Podcasts and like and subscribe on YouTube so that other language lovers like ourselves can find the show! If you've been a long time listener of the show or a recent listener, you can now pledge ongoing support for the show on Buy Me a Coffee dot com or on Patreon dot com. And as you know, I wrote a book! My food ‘zine of international language and cuisine, Taste Buds Vol 1. is available now for purchase! Check social media for the sneak peek inside of the book and make sure you purchase for yourself and your friends! Links to all platforms are below! To Find Learn Kabuverdianu & Adelaide Monteiro Website https://learnkabuverdianu.com/ Instagram https://www.instagram.com/learnkabuverdianu/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LearnKabuverdianu/?view_public_for=169947066967818&_rdc=1&_rdr YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LearnKabuverdianu/featured Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6tGZuWfQfe4JUO0wU3bbWv?si=07d214b214384b49&nd=1 Adelaide Monteiro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vc4sPrBlSAE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K2iIca-td_s&t=2s Speaking Tongues Podcast: IG: @speakingtonguespod Twitter: @stpodcasthost Facebook: @speakingtonguespod Subscribe on YouTube Did you enjoy this episode? Support Speaking Tongues on Buy me a Coffee Pledge on-going monthly support. Join my Patreon Buy my book here --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/speaking-tongues/message

Lowcountry Gullah
Gullah Religion and the Black Church

Lowcountry Gullah

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 36:25


The Black Church has always been the foundation of the Black/African American community. But what most people don't know is that many of the practices that continue to be experienced today, are directly tied to West African traditions ,p slavery and the Gullah Geechee culture. From the rite of passage called seeking, to jumping the broom and how ushers behave during the service, it's all connected. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pan-African Journal
Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast

Pan-African Journal

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2022 194:00


Listen to the Sat. Oct. 15, 2022 edition of the Pan-African Journal: Worldwide Radio Broadcast hosted by Abayomi Azikiwe, editor of the Pan-African News Wire. The program features our PANW report with dispatches on the recent developments in the West African state of Burkina Faso where Capt. Ibrahim Traore has been inaugurated as head-of-state; the government of Uganda has declared a partial lockdown amid the spread of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in sections of the East African country; the Chinese Communist Party has begun its 20th Congress in Beijing; and some elements in Russia are saying that NATO cannot prevail in Ukraine. In the second hour we look in detail at the recently formed coalition government in Lesotho where the Revolution for Prosperity Party (RFP) won the majority of votes. We then look at the current status of Africa-United States relations. Finally, we hear a briefing from the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

The Documentary Podcast
Bye-bye Baguette?

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 27:47


The bakers and farmers trying to wean Senegal off imported wheat. Trotting along on a horse and cart, over the bumpy red dirt roads, through the lush green fields of Senegal's countryside, Oule carries sacks of cargo back to her village. She is the bread lady of Ndor Ndor and she's selling French baguettes. As a former French colony, the baguette is such a staple of the Senegalese diet, that 8 million loaves are transported out to remote villages, roadside kiosks and high end city bakeries every morning. But wheat doesn't grow in the West African country, so they are at the mercy of the global markets. Usually they import the majority of their wheat from Russia and Ukraine, but since the war, there have been immense pressures on availability and prices have been soaring. So much so, the government has stepped in to subsidise wheat to keep the cost of a baguette down. But the war has forced bakers to question whether there could be another way of feeding Senegal's huge appetite for bread. Tim Whewell meets the bakers experimenting with local grains, like sorghum, millet and fonio, that can grow in Senegal's climate. But can they convince their customers to change their tastes and say bye-bye baguette? Produced by Phoebe Keane Field producer: Ndeye Borso Tall Additional Research: Azil Momar Lo and Nicolas Negoce Production coordinator: Iona Hammond Editor: Penny Murphy

Bright Side
A Girl Adopted by the Queen Had to Return to Africa

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 12:34


Remember Queen Victoria, the British monarch who once ruled the biggest empire in the world? The time of her reign was the Victorian Era, people donned Victorian fashion, and buildings were constructed with distinctive Victorian architecture. But there's one thing not many people know about the Queen: she once adopted an African girl, thus saving her life!  In 1850, a British emissary arrived in Dahomey. Buying and selling captives were still common in this West African kingdom. In fact, its ruler, King Ghezo, was known to capture people from rival tribes. That's why Captain Frederick E. Forbes of the Royal Navy was sent there to carry out this noble mission. During his stay, the African king introduced him to one of his most valuable prisoners. And it was... a 7-year-old girl named Aina.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Daily News Brief by TRT World
October 12, 2022

Daily News Brief by TRT World

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 2:20


*) G7 leaders vow to hold Putin accountable for Ukraine missile strikes World powers have said that they would hold Russian leader Vladimir Putin responsible for recent widespread aerial strikes on Ukrainian cities including Kiev. The G7 condemned the attacks in the strongest possible terms, saing indiscriminate attacks on innocent civilian populations constitute a war crime. The G7 leaders also criticised Russia's "irresponsible nuclear rhetoric". *) Turkish president heads to Kazakhstan for talks, regional summit Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has departed for the Kazakh capital Astana to meet with his counterpart Kassym-Jomart Tokayev and to participate in a regional summit. Erdogan and Tokayev will hold one-on-one talks and attend inter-delegation meetings to discuss bilateral relations and international issues after an official welcoming ceremony. Erdogan is expected to meet participating leaders, including Russian President Vladimir Putin, on the sideline of the summit *) Biden warns of 'consequences' for Saudi Arabia over OPEC+ oil cuts US President Joe Biden has promised what he called “consequences” for Saudi Arabia after a Riyadh-led coalition of oil-producing nations sided with Russia to cut output in a bid to boost prices. The 13-nation OPEC cartel and its 10 allies angered the White House last week with its decision to cut production by two million barrels a day, raising fears that oil prices could soar. Saudi Arabia's foreign minister said on Tuesday that the OPEC+ decision was purely economic and was taken unanimously. *) Gambia police probe links child deaths to India-made syrups Gambian police say the deaths of 69 children from acute kidney injury are linked to four cough syrups made in India and imported into the West African country. World Health Organization investigators had already found "unacceptable" levels of diethylene glycol and ethylene glycol, which can be toxic, in four products made by New Delhi-based Maiden Pharmaceuticals Limited. India on Wednesday halted production of these syrups at the factory. *) Disney pushes back several Marvel movie release dates Walt Disney has announced that it will be pushing back the release dates for numerous upcoming Marvel films including, "Blade," "Fantastic Four" and "Avengers: Secret Wars." Following "Blade" director Bassam Tariq's departure from the project in September, Marvel has decided to temporarily shut down production of the film to search for a new director. Delay of Blade's premiere has impacted the rest of the studios' production scheduling.

The Take
Why Burkina Faso just had its second coup in 8 months

The Take

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 19:21


On September 30, Captain Ibrahim Traore led a coup to become Burkina Faso's new leader, ousting Paul Henri-Damiba, who had only come to power in January through his own coup. So, what are the conditions that allowed for the West African nation to face two coups in just eight months? In this episode:  Nicolas Haque, (@nicolashaque), Al Jazeera's West Africa correspondent Episode credits: This episode was produced by Ashish Malhotra with Amy Walters, Negin Owliaei, Ruby Zaman, Chloe K. Li, Alexandra Locke, and Halla Mohieddeen. Alex Roldan is our sound designer. Tim St. Clair mixed this episode. Aya Elmileik and Adam Abou-Gad are our engagement producers. Ney Alvarez is Al Jazeera's head of audio. Connect with us: @AJEPodcasts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook

National Day Calendar
October 12, 2022 - National Farmer's Day | National Gumbo Day

National Day Calendar

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 3:30


Welcome to October 12, 2022 on the National Day Calendar. Today we celebrate those who work the land and a Southern melting pot. Farmer's Day has been celebrated since the mid 1800s and it's easy to see why. These folks contribute to much more than just the food on our table. Their hard work affects everything from manufacturing to transportation, producing a whole host of products from leather goods to textiles and even the ethanol in our gas tanks. These days it's more important than ever to support your local farmers. Even city slickers can do their part by purchasing from farmer's markets and visiting restaurants that take pride in their farm to table menus. On National Farmer's Day, celebrate the way of life that sustains us all.  When we think of gumbo, the hearty stew of seasoned vegetables and seafood or meat, we immediately think of Southern cooking. For this we can thank its older West African roots that blended with Native American and European traditions to create a culinary classic. Traditional recipes call for okra, a vegetable that thickens things nicely, but you may have also heard of gumbo filé. This Choctaw spice made from dried sassafras root, also thickens the stew and was most likely used when okra was out of season. And if all else fails you can leave the cooking to an expert! On National Gumbo Day, celebrate this stew that is a true melting pot of flavors.  I'm Anna Devere and I'm Marlo Anderson. Thanks for joining us as we Celebrate Every Day Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders
'The Woman King' and when movies aren't history lessons

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 29:08


When our host Brittany Luse first heard of The Woman King – a film about an all-women warrior unit defending the West African kingdom of Dahomey during the years of the Atlantic slave trade – the idea made her nervous. Hollywood's record with Black historical dramas is pretty checkered. But then she saw it.In this episode, Brittany breaks down the film's significance and the task of approaching historical representations in fiction. She sat down with actor Sheila Atim – who plays the warrior Amenza – to talk about the physical trainings, the joys of making a movie with actors from across the diaspora and how Atim has played characters on different sides of the Atlantic slave trade. Then Brittany is joined by Maya Cade, creator and curator of Black Film Archive, and culture critic Shamira Ibrahim. They discuss how to square historical accuracy with a satisfying Hollywood narrative.

Crossing Continents
Bye-bye Baguette?

Crossing Continents

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 28:43


The bakers and farmers trying to wean Senegal off imported wheat. Trotting along on a horse and cart, over the bumpy red dirt roads, through the lush green fields of Senegal's countryside, Oule carries sacks of cargo back to her village. She is the bread lady of Ndor Ndor and she's selling French baguettes. As a former French colony, the baguette is such a staple of the Senegalese diet, that 8 million loaves are transported out to remote villages, roadside kiosks and high end city bakeries every morning. But wheat doesn't grow in the West African country, so they are at the mercy of the global markets. Usually they import the majority of their wheat from Russia and Ukraine, but since the war, there have been immense pressures on availability and prices have been soaring. So much so, the government has stepped in to subsidise wheat to keep the cost of a baguette down. But the war has forced bakers to question whether there could be another way of feeding Senegal's huge appetite for bread. Tim Whewell meets the bakers experimenting with local grains, like sorghum, millet and fonio, that can grow in Senegal's climate. But can they convince their customers to change their tastes and say bye-bye baguette? Produced by Phoebe Keane

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast
Famine looms in Somalia

From Our Own Correspondent Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2022 28:53


A fight for survival is underway in Somalia as the country faces its worst drought in 40 years. Andrew Harding travelled to the southwestern city of Baidoa - one of the worst-affected areas in the country, where people are now flooding to in hope of finding humanitarian assistance. The story of two teenage sisters who were raped and hanged in their village in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh has shaken communities there. The case has also been complicated by spurious suggestions by local politicians that there was a religious motivation behind the killings. Geeta Pandy met the family of the victims. Henry Wilkins is in Burkina Faso, where two coups have now taken place this year. The West African country lacks strong democratic institutions and the military have long been dominant. It's also found itself increasingly embroiled in a new cold war rivalry between France and Russia. Set in the hills north of Spoleto in the southern Appenines is the small Italian town of Montefalco. The local grape, the Sagrantino, is known to be one of the tougher varieties to make into wine. Ellie House met one vineyard owner in the region and learnt how the production process is still one based on trial – and a few errors. Saudi Arabia's been burnishing its credentials as host for the world's biggest sporting events this year, with speculation its even lining itself up for an Olympic bid. Steve Bunce considers whether the presence of the world's best athletes can really distract critical eyes, as the kingdom's rulers might hope. Presenter: Kate Adie Producers: Serena Tarling and Ellie House Production coordinator: Iona Hammond Editor: Richard Fenton-Smith

Mondo Jazz
Jamaaladeen Tacuma, Eve Risser, Shoko Igarashi, Antonio Sanchez & More New Releases [Mondo Jazz 216-2]

Mondo Jazz

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 64:00


Inspired by Leo Sidran's latest single, "There Was a Fire", this week we look into various threads of memory--making (or memory--keeping) that can be found in projects that bring together various cultulal traditions (West-African or Cuban, Mitteleuropean or Japanese), bring new light to old repertoires, pay tribute to earlier composers or music-genres. The playlist features Eve Risser; chuffDRONE; Jamaaladeen Tacuma [pictured]; King Klavé; Shoko Igarashi; Antonio Sanchez, Dave Matthews, Pat Metheny; Leo Sidran; Dave Douglas; David Chevallier, Laurent Blondiau, Sébastien Boisseau, and Christophe Lavergne. Detailed playlist at https://spinitron.com/RFB/pl/16474585/Mondo-Jazz (from "Gamse" onwards). Happy listening! Photo credit: Žiga Koritnik

McKeany-Flavell Hot Commodity Podcast Series
Cocoa & the farmgate price

McKeany-Flavell Hot Commodity Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 13:05


Farmgate price and its increase explained Benefits and incentives to the farmers Know the exchange rate for West African currencies? Jeff does! Production and deliveries expectations for the upcoming year Weather and rain factors looking forward Expectations for chocolate demand Host: Michael Caughlan, President & CEO Expert: Jeffrey Rasinski, Consultant  

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp
Black Neighborhoods | Day 3 | Have You Heard of AfricaTown?

GirlTrek's Black History Bootcamp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 45:44


Day 3: Africatown The Address: 1959 Bay Bridge Rd, Mobile, Alabama The Story: This story has it all. Dahomey warriors, a landmark legal case, the last known survivor of the Atlantic slave trade, a brief appearance by Zora Neale Hurston, a re-discovered shipwreck, and a resilient community that, despite struggling with environmental racism for most of its existence, continues to persevere. Located three miles south of downtown Mobile on the banks of the Mobile River lies historic Africatown, a community formed by a group of 32 West Africans who arrived in the U.S in 1860. Today, their descendants continue the fight to keep their legacy and culture alive. Africatown is more than a story about the past, on today's walk we will learn about the modern-day Africatown movement and the neighborhoods around the country that are using the Africatown model to build vibrant communities for the future.

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts
A History of Franco-Muslim Education in Morocco and in Northwest Africa

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 16:01


Episode 147: A History of Franco-Muslim Education in Morocco and in Northwest Afric Between the 1850s and 1950s, colonial schools called médersas combined elements of French and Islamic educational traditions. First created in Algeria in 1850, the schools spread to the West African colonies of Senegal, French Soudan (today Mali), and Mauritania. The place of Morocco in this history is the subject of this discussion. In the 1910s, early in the protectorate period, the French established two “collèges musulmans,” the Collège Moulay Idriss in Fes and the Collège Moulay Youssef in Rabat. These were similar to the médersas in their curriculum and institutional framework; several of their directors had experience running médersas in Algeria and Senegal. In a field that remains deeply structured by national borders and by the notion of a “Saharan Divide” between North and West Africa, this research reveals close connections between societies usually considered in isolation. Dr. Samuel Anderson is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor of History at Pomona College in Claremont, California. He received a PhD in African History from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2018. His research focuses on education, race, and religion in northwest African Muslim societies under colonial rule. His current project examines the médersas, so-called “Franco-Muslim” schools, that combined Islamic and European curricula in a French effort to colonize Islamic schooling and the Muslim elite in the Maghrib and West Africa. He has conducted research on this topic in Algeria, Mauritania, Senegal, France, and now Morocco, with the support of the American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS), the Council of American Overseas Research Centers (CAORC), and other organizations. Portions of this project have been published in the journals Islamic Africa and History in Africa. This episode was recorded on July 22st, 2022 at the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM).  Posted by Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

Daily News Brief by TRT World

*) Putin says situation to 'stabilise', Ukraine presses counterattack Russian President Vladimir Putin has said he expects the situation to "stabilise" in Ukrainian regions annexed by the Kremlin, after Moscow suffered military setbacks. He has also ordered his government to seize control over Europe's largest nuclear power plant in the Russia-controlled region of Zaporizhzhia. Kiev has claimed victories over Russian troops in the eastern region of Luhansk, while the Kremlin has vowed to recapture territory lost in a lightning Ukrainian counteroffensive. *) North Korea fires two ballistic missiles, blames US drills 'escalation' North Korea has again fired two ballistic missiles, claiming its recent blitz of tests were necessary countermeasures against joint drills by the United States and South Korea. North Korea has accused the US of "escalating military tensions on the Korean peninsula" and threatening regional stability. South Korea, Japan and the US have ramped up joint military drills in recent weeks, including large-scale naval manoeuvres and anti-submarine exercises. *) WHO probes India syrups after dozens of children die in Gambia The World Health Organisation has issued an alert over four cough and cold syrups made by Maiden Pharmaceuticals in India. The UN health agency has said the four syrups in question "have been potentially linked with acute kidney injuries and 66 deaths among children" in The Gambia. It has also cautioned that contaminated medications may have been distributed outside of the West African country, warning that global exposure was "possible". *) Three 'click chemistry' pioneers win Nobel Prize The Nobel Chemistry Prize has been awarded to a trio of chemists from the US and Denmark who laid the foundation for a more functional form of chemistry. Americans Carolyn Bertozzi and Barry Sharpless, together with Denmark's Morten Meldal, have been honoured "for the development of click chemistry...," the jury has said. Click chemistry "is an elegant and efficient chemical reaction that is now in widespread use," the jury said. Among many other uses, it is utilised in the development of pharmaceuticals. *) Grandmaster Hans Niemann defends reputation after cheating claims American international grandmaster Hans Niemann has said he "won't back down," after chess platform chess.com reported he has "probably cheated more than 100 times" in online games. After a victory in the US Chess Championship on Wednesday, Niemann said the game he had just won "spoke for itself and showed the chess player that I am". Norwegian world champion Magnus Carlsen last week accused 19-year-old Niemann of cheating in a major controversy.

Seeds And Their People
EP. 15: Seeds of the African Diaspora with Amirah Mitchell & Sistah Seeds

Seeds And Their People

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 80:05


In this fifteenth episode, Amirah Mitchell of Sistah Seeds gives us a tour of the African Diasporic seed crops on her farm in Emmaus, PA. She also describes her work to preserve seeds and stories of African-American, West African, and Afro-Caribbean foodways, how she got to this point, and where she is headed. Amirah worked for four years as an apprentice and coworker at Truelove Seeds, and we are so grateful for our continued collaboration as she embarks on the next phase of her work as a farm owner, seed keeper, educator, and inspiration to so many. AMIRAH MITCHELL, SISTAH SEEDS: Web: sistahseeds.com Instagram: @sistahseeds Amirah in the press: Inquirer, 12/21 Grid Philly, 1/22 Edible Philadelphia, 3/22 Amirah Mitchell at Temple University Amirah's Seed Keeping Fellowship at Greensgrow SEED STORIES TOLD IN THIS EPISODE: Moses Smith Yellow Cabbage Collards Sea Island Brown Cotton Blue Shackamaxon Bean (Lenape) Ezelle Family Fish Eye Pea Fish Pepper Benne (Sesame) Green Striped Cushaw Squash Sea Island Red Okra White African Sorghum Celosia Sokoyokoto Lagos Spinach (Leaf Celosia from EFN) Efo Shoko (Lagos Spinach/Leaf Celosia from Truelove)  Feathery Plume Celosia (Ornamental)  Egusi Melon "Odell's" Large White Watermelon Chocolate Scotch Bonnet Pepper Aunt Lou's Underground Railroad Tomato MORE INFO FROM THIS EPISODE: Heirloom Collard Project Heirloom Collard Project on NPR (featuring Amirah and Mama Ira Wallace!) Truelove Seeds Indigenous Seeds Rematriation (scroll to bottom) Kris Hubbard, Appalachian Seed Keeper Fish Pepper episode, Seeds and Their People Cushaw Squash in Michael Twitty's Afroculinaria blog The Whole Okra: A Seed to Stem Celebration, by Chris Smith Herbal Affirmations, 'San' Kofi Sankofa, GoFundMe Lost Crops of Africa, Egusi Watermelon Men of Philadelphia, Inquirer article on the Carter family Ben Burkett, Federation of Southern Cooperatives ABOUT: Seeds And Their People is a radio show where we feature seed stories told by the people who truly love them. Hosted by Owen Taylor of Truelove Seeds and Chris Bolden-Newsome of Sankofa Community Farm at Bartram's Garden. trueloveseeds.com/blogs/satpradio   FIND OWEN HERE: Truelove Seeds Tumblr  |  Instagram  |  Twitter   FIND CHRIS HERE: Sankofa Community Farm at Bartram's Garden   THANKS TO: Amirah Mitchell Cecilia Sweet-Coll

The Debate
Coup after coup: After Mali, pro-Russia sentiment stoked in Burkina Faso

The Debate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 45:03


The whole region knows the drill by now. Dateline Ouagadougou. If you are watching images of pro-junta demonstrators protesting the visit of West African mediators looking for rule-of-law guarantees from their new interlocutors after a coup, there's no need to reach for the remote control as this is not a re-run. The capital of Burkina Faso just experienced its second coup in eight months, once again following a rout by an emboldened jihadist insurgency.

Africa Today
Suicide bombs hit town in central Somalia

Africa Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 25:38


Several people have been killed in bombs attacks in Somalia hours after the authorities announced they had killed a top Al Qaeda commander. We will hear from a government minister who says the commander's death is a big blow for the militant group. A delegation from the West African regional body Ecowas arrives in Burkina Faso after a second military coup in eight months, what can they really achieve? And the former president of Botswana, Ian Khama, tells us why he feels it is in the interest of African leaders to take a clear and unambiguous position on the war in Ukraine.

MTR Podcasts
Q&A with Visual Artist Melanie Royster

MTR Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 35:25


Melanie Royster is a Multifaceted Visual Artist. Art has always been a passion of hers. Growing up shy and quiet, she has always used art to express herself and tell stories. Melanie really dives into her work and is not afraid to be vulnerable. When you look at her work you can also tell that she is not afraid to experiment with different media or to try different techniques, which really defines her as an artist.Melanie studied Interior Design at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Arts and is currently working towards growing in her art career. She believes that studying Interior Design has helped her learn to connect with people. When designing for clients she focuses a lot on healing effects of the client's space, knowing that the design will affect their energy and productivity. She now uses that same practice when it comes to her art, especially when working with other brands.​She wants to make people feel and reflect. Melanie's design style is influenced by Caribbean and West African cultures, stemming in part from her Jamaican background. A lot of her concepts are centered on the power and worth of women, especially women of color. She also finds Nature to be very grounding in her work and incorporates it in almost every piece. Texture and vibrant colors are also used to highlight important messages and stories, adding movement to her pieces.With regard to her art career, Melanie is striving to grow and create as much as possible, based on concepts that are really important to her. She does not want to focus on trends and on what's “popular”. Authenticity is her goal. Melanie offers many different creative services when it comes to her artwork and hopes to use her talents to impact positively those who come across her work.The Truth In This ArtThe Truth In This Art is a podcast interview series supporting vibrancy and development of Baltimore & beyond's arts and culture. To find more amazing stories from the artist and entrepreneurial scenes in & around Baltimore, check out my episode directory. Stay in TouchNewsletter sign-upSupport my podcastShareable link to episode ★ Support this podcast ★

Newshour
Coup leader parades through capital of Burkina Faso

Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2022 46:23


The leader of Friday's coup in the West African nation of Burkina Faso, Captain Ibrahim Traore, joined a parade after the former military leader, Lt. Colonel Paul Henri Damiba, agreed to step down. We hear the latest from the capital Ougadougou and look at the background to the recent political upheaval with expert Andrew Lebovich of the Clingendeal Institute in the Netherlands. Also in the programme: a former Iranian political prisoner runs the London marathon; and the UK prime minister, Liz Truss, attends the Conservative Party conference after a turbulent first few weeks in office. (Photo: A man and a solider shake hands during a rally in support of the coup in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Credit: EPA-EFE/REX/Shutterstock)

Quiz Quiz Bang Bang Trivia
Ep 174: General Trivia

Quiz Quiz Bang Bang Trivia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 22:41 Very Popular


  On Today's Quiz Podcast Episode Time for 20 new questions on this trivia podcast! After which goddess was the capital of Greece named? What type of animal come in Rothschild's, Masai, and West African varieties? Mont Blanc is the highest point in which country? The Norse goddess Freyja travelled in a chariot pulled by what? The technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid lime plaster is known as what? In 2006, Which Pittsburgh Steeler became the youngest starting quarterback to win a Super Bowl? James Caan plays the biological father character of Will Farrell's character in which 2003 comedy? The first comedy album to make number one on the Billboard charts was released by which comedian? If you liked this episode, check out our last trivia episode! Music Hot Swing, Fast Talkin, Bass Walker, Dances and Dames by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Don't forget to follow us on social media for more trivia: Patreon - patreon.com/quizbang - Please consider supporting us on Patreon. Check out our fun extras for patrons and help us keep this podcast going. We appreciate any level of support! Website - quizbangpod.com Check out our website, it will have all the links for social media that you need and while you're there, why not go to the contact us page and submit a question! Facebook - @quizbangpodcast - we post episode links and silly lego pictures to go with our trivia questions. Enjoy the silly picture and give your best guess, we will respond to your answer the next day to give everyone a chance to guess. Instagram - Quiz Quiz Bang Bang (quizquizbangbang), we post silly lego pictures to go with our trivia questions. Enjoy the silly picture and give your best guess, we will respond to your answer the next day to give everyone a chance to guess. Twitter - @quizbangpod We want to start a fun community for our fellow trivia lovers. If you hear/think of a fun or challenging trivia question, post it to our twitter feed and we will repost it so everyone can take a stab it. Come for the trivia - stay for the trivia. Ko-Fi - ko-fi.com/quizbangpod - Keep that sweet caffeine running through our body with a Ko-Fi, power us through a late night of fact checking and editing!

Sounds Heal Podcast
Sounds Heal Podcast with John Yost and Natalie Brown

Sounds Heal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 50:21


John Yost has studied with master drummers in Africa, Japan, and the US and has a degree in percussion and a certificate in a Leadership and Organization Change, both from Northeastern University in Illinois. With his company Rhythm Revolution, he has been leading rhythm-based events for more than 30 years. He is certified as a drum circle facilitator by the Drum Circle Facilitator's Guild and Village Music Circle, for which he is a global trainer. Yost serves as co-chair of the Interactive Drumming Committee for the Percussive Arts Society and is an adjunct professor at Vandercook College of Music. He has facilitated interactive music-making activities and drum circles for conferences, corporations, schools, community groups, and at major events worldwide. Along with leading a free monthly community drum circle, he heads and performs in both Sound Magic (gong and bowl immersions) and Kaiju Daiko (Japanese-style drumming) and teaches both Daiko and West African drumming. On top of all that, he has created a best-selling instructional video series, “John Yost teaches” and is a parks and recreation professional certified by the National Recreation and Parks Association! http://www.drummingcircle.com/ Natalie Brown: http://www.soundshealstudio.com http://www.facebook.com/soundshealstudio.com http://www.instagram.com/nataliebrownsoundsheal Music by Natalie Brown, Hope & Heart http://www.youtu.be/hZPx6zJX6yA This episode is sponsored by The Om Shoppe.The OM Shoppe & Spa offers a vast array of Sound Healing and Vibrational Medicine tools for serious professionals and for those ready to make sound and vibration part of their ongoing lifestyle. More and more we are coming to understand that our individual wellness is a direct reflection of our personal vibration. How we care for ourselves, our physical bodies, our minds and our spirits. The OM Shoppe is ready to help you today in a variety of ways. They offer the countries largest showroom of Quartz Crystal Singing bowls, sound healing instruments and vibrational medicine tools. If you are ready to uplevel your sound healing practice The OM Shoppe is a great place to get guidance and direction. They are available to consult with you directly by phone or you can shop online. They really enjoy getting to know their clients and customers one on one to better help recommend the right sound healing tools in the right tones for you. Call them today or visit them at www.theomshoppe.com. If you are ever near Sarasota, Florida, do consider stopping in and visiting with them or enjoy a luxury spa treatment such as sound healing, energy work, massage, vibroacoustics or hypnotherapy. They truly offer a full holistic experience for practitioners and those seeking healing through natural means.

Item 13: An African Food Podcast
Edwina Morgan is Re-imagining West African Food with Waakye Leaf

Item 13: An African Food Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 52:53


This week's guest is Edwina Morgan of Waakye Leaf.The idea for Waakye Leaf was born out of a genuine love for building cultural bridges by sharing traditional African culinary knowledge with the world in the most creative and innovative ways in order to provoke, delight and rouse interest.Established in 2008 by Edwina Morgan, Waakye Leaf is now considered one of London's leading boutique afro-fusion caterers. They are passionate about creating enjoyable and memorable experiences through food, while setting new standards for quality and excellence. From mouth-watering canapés, delicious bowl food, themed supper clubs to luxury banquets, they offer a truly bespoke service and take pride in working with each of their clients to realize the client's vision.Find Waakye Leaf online: https://www.waakyeleaf.co.uk/ and on Instagram @waakyeleafFollow Item 13 on social media: Instagram, Facebook and Twitter @item13podcastDon't forget to subscribe & leave us a review!Item 13: An African Food Podcast is Powered by Simplecast.

Circle Round
Chameleon's Contest feat. Jonica Booth & Jay Pharoa

Circle Round

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 20:40


Jonica Booth (Rap Stuff) and Jay Pharoah (Out of Office, Saturday Night Live) co-star in this West African tale about a clothing-obsessed goddess and a crafty, colorful chameleon.

Pop Culture Happy Hour
The Woman King And What's Making Us Happy

Pop Culture Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 19:56 Very Popular


The new movie The Woman King tells the story of the Agojie, a real-life group of women warriors who protected a West African kingdom in the 1820s. Directed by Gina Prince-Bythewood, the film stars Viola Davis, Thuso Mbedu, Lashana Lynch, and John Boyega – and it mixes bloody battle scenes with discussions of leadership and chosen family.

How I Built This with Guy Raz
HIBT Lab! Yolélé: Pierre Thiam

How I Built This with Guy Raz

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 42:04 Very Popular


Pierre Thiam was robbed within days of arriving in New York City. It was 1989, and he had just traveled to the U.S. from Senegal to study chemistry and physics. This chance incident, however, set Pierre's life on an entirely different course. Today, he's a renowned chef, restaurant owner, cookbook author, and co-founder of Yolélé – a company working to introduce the world to an ancient West African grain called fonio.This week on How I Built This Lab, Pierre talks with Guy about his company's work to circulate this nutrient-dense and drought-resistant food source. Pierre also shares how he overcame cultural norms to embrace his cooking career, and his take on the connection between colonization and the vulnerability of our global food systems. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.