Podcasts about American studies

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  • Oct 13, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about American studies

Show all podcasts related to american studies

Latest podcast episodes about American studies

Common Good Podcast
Common Good Faith - A Conversation with Danté Stewart

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 44:38


Author and speaker Danté Stewart sits down with our Common Good Faith hosts to talk about his new book, "Shoutin' in the Fire: An American Epistle" which reimagines the spiritual virtues of rage, resilience, and remembrance.   www.dantecstewart.com   Dominique DuBois Gilliard is the Director of Racial Righteousness and Reconciliation for the Evangelical Covenant Church. He is the author of Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice that Restores, which won a 2018 Book of the Year Award for InterVarsity Press and was named Outreach Magazine's 2019 Social Issues Resource of the Year. Gilliard also serves as an adjunct professor at North Park Theological Seminary and serves on the board of directors for the Christian Community Development Association. In 2015, the Huffington Post named him one of the “Black Christian Leaders Changing the World.” Gilliard's forthcoming book, Subversive Witness: Scripture's Call to Leverage Privilegewill be released on August 24, 2021. @DDGilliard     //      facebook.com/dominique.dg.7   Rev. Dr. Laura Truax is senior pastor of LaSalle Street Church in Chicago and serves on the Seminary Advisory Board at the University of Dubuque. Dr. Truax holds a master of divinity degree from Loyola University and a Doctor of Ministry degree from the joint program of North Park Seminary and Fuller Theological Seminary. She is the author of Undone: When coming apart puts you back together (2013) and Love Let Go: Radical Generosity for the real world (2017) and is part of the Red Letter Christians.    @revtruax     //     facebook.com/laura.truax1   Rev. Dr. Stephany Rose Spaulding is pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Colorado Springs, associate professor of Women's and Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (UCCS) and former U.S. Senate candidate for the state of Colorado. She holds a B.A. in English from Clark Atlanta University, as well as a M.A. in American Literature and a Ph. D. in American Studies both from Purdue University. She is the author of Recovering from Racism: A Guidebook to Beginning Conversations (2015) and Abolishing White Masculinity from Mark Twain to Hiphop: Crisis in Whiteness (2014).   @drstephanyrose     //      facebook.com/stephanyrose    The Common Good Podcast is produced and edited by Daniel Deitrich. @danieldeitrich Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon  

Thinking with Plato: Gregg's Guide to the Republic
5.1 The Roots of American Order | An Introduction with Dr. Bradley J. Birzer

Thinking with Plato: Gregg's Guide to the Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:52


In this episode, McConnell Center Director Dr. Gary Gregg is joined by Dr. Bradley J. Birzer, Professor of History and Russell Amos Kirk Chair in American Studies at Hillsdale College, for a conversation on Russell Kirk's The Roots of American Order. The two discuss the McConnell Center's new book in common project and Kirk's inspiration for the book. This season of Vital Remnants uses Russell Kirk's The Roots of American Order to explore the historical roots from which America has grown. Rather than focusing on one defining moment, episodes explore America's inheritance from thousands of years of human history grounded in five key cities—Jerusalem, Athens, Rome, London, and Philadelphia. Each episode relates to a corresponding chapter and includes a conversation with a guest expert that goes beyond the text. Important Links  Purchase a copy of Russell Kirk's The Roots of American Order Download the corresponding reading guide to The Roots of American Order here Learn more about this year-long project at https://louisville.edu/mcconnellcenter/programs-events/bic Subscribe to our newsletter and receive McConnell Center updates directly in your mailbox Share any thoughts, questions, comments, or concerns with us via email at connor.tracy@louisville.edu This podcast is a production of the McConnell Center at the University of Louisville. For more information, including upcoming events, please visit us online at mcconnellcenter.org or on social media at:  Facebook: @mcconnellcenter   Instagram: @ulmcenter   Twitter: @ULmCenter  Contributors  Host: Dr. Gary L. Gregg II, McConnell Center Director  Guest: Dr. Bradley J. Birzer, Professor of History and Russell Amos Kirk Chair in American Studies at Hillsdale College Producer and Editor: Connor Tracy, McConnell Center SBS Coordinator   Co-Editor: Will Randolph, McConnell Scholar    

McConnell Center Podcast
The Roots of American Order with Dr. Bradley J. Birzer

McConnell Center Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 57:52


In Season 5 of the McConnell Center's Vital Remnants Podcast, we are using Russell Kirk's The Roots of American Order to explore the historical roots from which America has grown. Rather than focusing on one defining moment, we are exploring America's inheritance from thousands of years of human history grounded in five key cities—Jerusalem, Athens, Rome, London, and Philadelphia. Each episode relates to a corresponding chapter and includes a conversation with a guest expert that goes beyond the text. Our journey begins in this episode with a conversation between McConnell Center Director Dr. Gary Gregg and Dr. Bradley J. Birzer, Professor of History and Russell Amos Kirk Chair in American Studies at Hillsdale College. The two discuss the purpose of the project, the context and relevance of the book, and Kirk's meaning of the word "order." Important Links  Purchase a copy of Russell Kirk's The Roots of American Order Download the corresponding reading guide to The Roots of American Order here Learn more about this year-long project at https://louisville.edu/mcconnellcenter/programs-events/bic Subscribe to our newsletter and receive McConnell Center updates directly in your mailbox Share any thoughts, questions, comments, or concerns with us via email at tracy@louisville.edu This podcast is a production of the McConnell Center at the University of Louisville. For more information, including upcoming events, please visit us online at mcconnellcenter.org or on social media at:  Facebook: @mcconnellcenter   Instagram: @ulmcenter   Twitter: @ULmCenter  Contributors  Host: Dr. Gary L. Gregg II, McConnell Center Director  Guest: Dr. Bradley J. Birzer, Professor of History and Russell Amos Kirk Chair in American Studies at Hillsdale College Producer and Editor: Connor Tracy, McConnell Center SBS Coordinator   Co-Editor: Will Randolph, McConnell Scholar  

I Want You To Meet
Yasser Alghaslan: The Middle East - Yesterday, Today, & Tomorrow

I Want You To Meet

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 85:14


Yasser Al-Ghaslan is a Saudi journalist, and media personality. A graduate of King Saud University, in Riyadh with a major in journalism and media. In 1990, Yasser began his journalistic career as a press correspondent with the RAI (the national public broadcasting company of Italy) covering the second Gulf War. Early in his career, he joined several of the most prominent Saudi and Arab newspapers, including Riyadh Newspaper, where he worked as a reporter in the local news department with many contributions in the departments of culture and social investigations. He later joined the editorial staff of the newspaper's economic section as one of its first journalists. He also worked in Okaz newspaper as a reporter in local affairs in the Riyadh office before transferring to work in “Al-Hayat” newspaper as an economic journalist in the newspaper's regional office in Riyadh. In 2006, he was appointed managing editor of the London-based newspaper Asharq Al-Awsat and director of its offices in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. He interviewed the founder of Microsoft, Bill Gates, and Saudi billionaire Prince Al-Waleed bin Talal. Since 2011, he has become a weekly opinion writer in a number of Saudi newspapers such as Al-Bilad, Al-Iqtisadiah and Al-Watan, in which he has been writing since 2013, in addition to his participation as a writer in a number of specialized news sites such as CNN in Arabic. His articles appear on well-known websites Such as Al Arabiya Net and Elaf website and several other websites. Yasser's work includes time as a media advisor and member of several important committees and events, including the saudi Ministry of Labor and Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, the Media Committee in the Riyadh Chamber of Commerce, the advisory committee for the “Our Home is a Trust” campaign, the Committee for the Kingdom's Participation in the Venice Biennale, and currently a member At the National American Press Club in Washington DC. Yasser is a published author. His books include “Information.com": An Attempt to Reveal the True Color of the Red Line by Dar Al-Rayes in Lebanon, "Back to the Front" The Search for so called Saudi uniqueness by the Arab Science House publishers in Lebanon, and his most recent book, Pillars of the Triangle .. Saudi Arabia, America and the War on Terror published by Dar Difaf in Lebanon in 2018. Founder and President of the Arab Center for American Studies based in Washington, DC, where he has lived for the past five years. Website: http://alghaslan.me/ Arab Center for American Studies: https://usaarabic.com/contact/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/alghaslan?lang=en You Tube: https://www.youtube.com/alghaslan

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast
THIS IS REVOLUTION>podcast Ep. 192: Crisis in Black Politics III Who Controls the Culture Industry w/ Touré Reed and Bertrand Cooper

THIS IS REVOLUTION >podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 75:10


Black popular culture has been viewed by some as the creative expression of Black American identity. What does it mean when those who create that popular culture don't belong to the class of Black folks they seem to portray while potentially fulfilling the worst trappings of underclass ideology regarding the Black poor?"   Touré F. Reed: Dr. Reed earned his BA in American Studies from Hampshire College (Amherst, MA), and his PhD in History from Columbia University (New York, NY). He is a fourth generation African American educator and third generation professor. Having spent his formative years in South West Atlanta, GA and New Haven, CT, Dr. Reed's research interests center on race, class, and inequality. In addition to being a historian of African American and 20th Century US History, Dr. Reed is a shred guitar enthusiast.   Get Touré's book "Towards Freedom" here: https://www.versobooks.com/books/3166-toward-freedom   Read Bertrand Cooper's Piece here: https://www.currentaffairs.org/.../who-actually-gets-to...   Thank you, guys, again for taking the time to check this out. We appreciate each and every one of you. If you have the means, and you feel so inclined, BECOME A PATRON! We're creating patron only programing, you'll get bonus content from many of the episodes, and you get MERCH!   Become a patron now https://www.patreon.com/join/BitterLakePresents?   Please also like, subscribe, and follow us on these platforms as well, (specially YouTube!)   THANKS Y'ALL   YouTube: www.youtube.com/thisisrevolutionpodcast   Twitch: www.twitch.tv/thisisrevolutionpodcast www.twitch.tv/leftflankvets   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Thisisrevolutionpodcast/   Twitter: @TIRShowOakland Instagram: @thisisrevolutionoakland   The Dispatch on Zero Books (video essay series): https://youtu.be/nSTpCvIoRgw   Medium: https://jasonmyles.medium.com/i-was-a-teenage-anarchist...   Pascal Robert's Black Agenda Report: https://www.blackagendareport.com/author/PascalRobert   Get THIS IS REVOLUTION Merch here: www.thisisrevolutionpodcast.com   Get the music from the show here: https://bitterlakeoakland.bandcamp.com/.../coronavirus...

Show-Me Institute Podcast
America's Big Tech Panic with Robby Soave

Show-Me Institute Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 27:00


Robby's latest book is Tech Panic: Why We Shouldn't Fear Facebook and the Future - https://amzn.to/3a8dcNV Join Robby live in St. Louis on October 21 for discussion of big tech, cancel culture and more. Details and registration information here: https://bit.ly/3Bpn9ma Robby Soave is a senior editor at Reason. He enjoys writing about culture, politics, education policy, criminal justice reform, television, and video games. His work has also appeared in The New York Times, The Daily Beast, U.S. News & World Report, The Orange County Register, and The Detroit News. In 2016, Forbes named him to the “30 Under 30” list in the category of law and policy. In 2017, he became a Novak Fellow at The Fund for American Studies. He also serves on the D.C. Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Produced by Show-Me Opportunity

Raising a Powerful Girl
Open Spirituality: Intuition, the Witch Wound and Healing Generational Trauma to empower our Children

Raising a Powerful Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 51:55


Andrea Donnelly is a New England based Celestial Mentor, Angelic Channel, Sacred Artist, Intuitive Sound and Energy Healer, amateur comedian, mother to two cat children, many plants and neighborhood birds, and aspiring daytime talk show host, who's been learning to calm down and ride the wave since the day she was born. She was extremely jealous of Raffi as a child, earnestly tried to get her peace activist mother to let her enroll in an elementary school beauty pageant, and caught a pigeon as a very small child, in one of the nation's oldest parks, after announcing her intention to do so.After learning how to meditate in high school in a course on mindfulness, at the Center for Mindfulness, based on the ground breaking work of Jon Kabat-Zinn, something shifted in the way she related to her body, mind and spirit. It sparked something. She'd always prayed, even as a little kid. It wasn't anything forced. She never much liked church but praying, that she loved. It brought her great comfort, clarity and kept her busy brain occupied. She felt that with meditation, it made her feel at home. Using light & speed codes, energy healing, crystal bowls, song, intuitive coaching, and channeled messages from the Archangels, Pleiades, Fairy, Ancestral and Star Realms, she helps remove intergenerational trauma, illness, fears, and pain, aligning her clients with new levels of grace, clarity, understanding of life purpose, success and general ease. She healed herself using the method she now shares with people.She is a graduate of Julie Ryan's ‘Angelic Attendant Training' and studied privately with Angelic Channel and Quantum Healer, Shelly Ayers. She holds a BA in American Studies from Wesleyan University--and studied theater, costume & makeup design, Gamelan and voice there, which is likely the most practical thing she's ever done. She is a lifelong learner, forevergreen nerd, extremely enthusiastic human and jack of all trades, who hopes to move to a warmer climate very soon and one day have a foundation that gives grants to people around the world to build JOY in their own lives and communities.Join us on todays podcast episode where we explore a variety of spiritual topics related to empowering our children from Intuition to the Divine Masculine and Feminine, the witch wound, epigenetic and more.

Keen On Democracy
What Do NFTs Have to Do with the Music Industry?

Keen On Democracy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 36:54


Hosted by Andrew Keen, Keen On features conversations with some of the world's leading thinkers and writers about the economic, political, and technological issues being discussed in the news, right now. In this episode, Andrew is joined by Zack Greenburg, the author of We Are All Musicians Now, to talk about NFTs and the future of the music industry. Zack Greenburg played the title role in the 1992 film Lorenzo's Oil; he started his writing career at age 14 as video game reviewer for Boys' Life. In 2007, he graduated Yale with an American Studies degree and joined Forbes, where he went on to pen over 1,000 stories. Visit our website: https://lithub.com/story-type/keen-on/ Email Andrew: a.keen@me.com Watch the show live on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajkeen Watch the show live on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankeen/ Watch the show live on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lithub Watch the show on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/LiteraryHub/videos Subscribe to Andrew's newsletter: https://andrew2ec.substack.com/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FORward Radio program archives
Sustainability Now! | Davarian Baldwin | In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower | Oct. 4, 2021

FORward Radio program archives

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 57:18


This week on Sustainability Now!, your host, Justin Mog is thrilled to be in conversation with Davarian L. Baldwin, urbanist, historian, cultural critic and the Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of American Studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. His books include Chicago's New Negroes: Modernity, the Great Migration, and Black Urban Life (UNC Press, 2007) and In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower: How Universities are Plundering Our Cities (Bold Type Books, 2021). Learn more at https://www.boldtypebooks.com/titles/davarian-l-baldwin/in-the-shadow-of-the-ivory-tower/9781568588919/ As always, our feature is followed by your community action calendar for the week, so get your calendars out and get ready to take action for sustainability NOW! Sustainability Now! airs on Forward Radio, 106.5fm, WFMP-LP Louisville, every Monday at 6pm and repeats Tuesdays at 12am and 10am. Find us at http://forwardradio.org The music in this podcast is courtesy of the local band Appalatin and is used by permission. Explore their delightful music at http://appalatin.com

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
Saying what others are afraid to & how to persuade others with Communications Leader Nancy Murphy

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 50:08


Saying what others are afraid to with Communications Leader Nancy Murphy   Founder & President, CSR Communications Nancy's spent her career saying what others are afraid to – and learning to say it in ways that others will listen. She's the founder and president of CSR Communications and creator of Intrapreneurs Influence Lab. Her passion is helping leaders of change within established organizations (intrapreneurs) influence and persuade others so that they can realize their vision for change faster, with less frustration and resistance. From her Catholic school student days challenging stereotypes of girls, to her first job after college convincing nonprofits to engage youth volunteers, or her role as board chair of a global nonprofit attempting to transform the way we do international development, Nancy's experienced the challenges of leading big change within established organizations. As an “intrapreneur” herself, she made all the mistakes you can make and now helps others learn from them. Nancy's worked in philanthropy for Steve and Jean Case's family foundation, as a federal government program officer with the Corporation for National & Community Service, and as a global consultant for APCO Worldwide, where her clients included UPS, Johnson Controls, Target, and W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Nancy mentors and advises executives from local governments, federal agencies, global nonprofits, foundations, and Fortune 100 companies. As a trainer and speaker, Nancy's shared her expertise from Kuala Lumpur to Kansas City and London to Las Vegas. Nancy holds a master's degree in public affairs from the University of Minnesota's Humphrey School, a master's in health communication from Boston University, and a bachelor's degree in American Studies from the University of Dayton.

Native Stories
Founding of Keaukaha Hawaiian Homestead

Native Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2021 27:45


Halena Kapuni-Reynolds, a PhD student in American Studies, writing his dissertation on the history of Kaukaha and Hawaiian homesteading discusses his research and experience about Puhi Bay and the founding of the Keaukaha homestead community.

Think About It
BOOK TALK 48: The American Canon, with Sarah Rivett

Think About It

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2021 59:47


Where, when, and how does American literature begin? What constitutes the canon of U.S. literature, and how is it distinct? While monuments and history books are the most prominent battlefields in our current culture wars, the debate over what belongs in the canon of great American literature has not subsided. I spoke with Professor Sarah Rivett, Professor of English and American Studies and Affiliated Faculty of Indigenous Studies at Princeton University, about American literature. As an interdisciplinary scholar, Professor Rivett specializes in early American and transatlantic literature, religion, and indigenous history. She is the author of The Science of the Soul in Colonial New England (2011), which was awarded the Brewer Prize of the American Society of Church History, and Unscripted America: Indigenous Languages and the Origins of  Literary Nation (2017).  I was especially interested in speaking with Professor Rivett since she enthusiastically endorsed Fictions of America: The Book of Firsts, which I co-edited with Smaran Dayal (Warbler Press, 2020) 

College Matters. Alma Matters.
Andrew Maguire on Hidden Curriculum and International Students.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 33:29


Episode summary introduction: Andrew Maguire is the author of a new book Teaching Between the Lines, about the Hidden Curriculum. Andrew joins us on our podcast today and talks about the Academic and Social Impact to International Students during the college applications process, the college years, and ways to mitigate the impact. In particular, we discuss the following with him: What is Hidden Curriculum? How does the Hidden Curriculum impact Int'l Students Role of Colleges Tools & Resources for International Students Topics discussed in this episode: Introducing Andrew Maguire, Author Teaching Between the Lines [] A Hidden Curriculum Recap [] Impact on International Students [] Academic Impact [] Office Hours - An Opportunity [] Social Impact [] The Application Process [] Dealing with the Hidden Curriculum [] Campus Resources to Help Int'l Students [] Things Colleges can do [] Advice for Students [] Challenges Similar: Int'l and US Students [] Our Guest: Andrew Maguire is the author of the upcoming book Teaching Between the Lines. Andrew is a graduate of Vanderbilt University with a Bachelor's degree in American Studies and Psychology. Andrew then graduated with a Master's in Public Administration from New York University. Memorable Quote: “...for international students, the challenges are not so foreign, are [not] so different from an American student's experiences. You know, there will be, of course, different ways that they experience it. But I think, you know, understanding that the impacts are in some ways universal, I think is really powerful.” Andrew Maguire on the Impact of the Hidden Curriculum. Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode's Transcript. Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Digest. Check out Andrew Maguire's book Teaching Between the Lines. To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow our podcasts at any of these locations:, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, RadioPublic, Breaker, Anchor. For Transcripts of all our podcasts, visit almamatters.io/podcasts.

Haymarket Books Live
Violent Order: Racial Capitalism, Settler Colonialism, and the Nature of the Police

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 85:15


Join us for a book launch discussion of the nature of the police project and its rootedness in racial capitalism and settler colonialism. Join David Correia, Melanie K Yazzi, Tyler Wall and Julie Sze in a discussion that will explore that idea that police and police violence are modes of environment-making. The police project, in order to fabricate and defend capitalist order, must patrol an imaginary line between society and nature, it must transform nature into inert matter made available for accumulation. Police don't just patrol the ghetto or the Indian reservation, the thin blue line doesn 't just refer to a social order, rather police announce a general claim to domination—of labor and of nature. Order the book,Violent Order: Essays on the Nature of Police from Haymarket!: https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/1663-violent-order Speakers: David Correia is a Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of Properties of Violence (University of Georgia Press, 2013), co-author with Tyler Wall of Police: A Field Guide (Verso, 2018), and co-author with Nick Estes, Melanie Yazzie, and Jennifer Denetdale of Red Nation Rising Nation: From Bordertown Violence to Native Liberation (PM Press, 2021). He is a co-founder of AbolishAPD, a research and mutual aid collective in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Julie Sze is Professor of American Studies at UC Davis. She has written 3 books, most recently Environmental Justice in a Moment of Danger and over 60 articles and book chapters, on environmental justice, the environmental humanities, geography, and public policy. She collaborates with environmental scientists, engineers, social scientists and community-based organizers in California and New York. Tyler Wall is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He is the coauthor with David Correia of Police: A Field Guide. Melanie K. Yazzie, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Native American Studies and American Studies at the University of New Mexico. She specializes in Navajo/American Indian history, political ecology, Indigenous feminisms, queer Indigenous studies, and theories of policing and the state. She also organizes with The Red Nation, a grassroots Native-run organization committed to the liberation of Indigenous people from colonialism and capitalism. Watch the live event recording: https://youtu.be/aja0_wFeUsI Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: soundcloud.com/haymarketbooks

Disrupted
Disrupted Roundtable: Afghanistan, Reproductive Rights And Michael K. Williams

Disrupted

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 49:00


This week on Disrupted, our politics roundtable explores recent headlines: The United States' withdrawal from Afghanistan, the fight for reproductive rights in Texas, California's recall election, and the legacy of Michael K.Williams. Guests: Bilal Sekou -Associate professor of Political Science at the University of Hartford Maya King - National politics reporter at POLITICO Janelle Wong - Professor of American Studies at the University of Maryland Disrupted is produced by James Szkobel-Wolff, Zshekinah Collier, and Catie Talarski. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New Books in American Studies
Jessica DuLong, "Saved at the Seawall: Stories from the September 11 Boat Lift" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 49:49


When terrorists struck the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 a small fleet of boats on a rescue mission converged on lower Manhattan. In one of the less told stories of 9/11, on those vessels—which ranged from ferries to tug boats to boats that host dinner cruises—mariners carried to safety almost half a million people. Saved at the Seawall: Stories From the September 11 Boat Lift (Cornell UP, 2021) by Jessica DuLong with a foreword by Mitchell Zukoff, tells their story. DuLong brings to this book her own skills as a journalist and her experiences as the chief engineer on the 1931 New York City fireboat John J. Harvey, a historic preservation project that was called back into service on September 11 to fight the fires around the World Trade Center. Saved at the Seawall is more than a book about September 11. It is a story of work, New York Harbor, and how the skills and mindsets that mariners developed over many years were summoned up on a terrible morning. Together, they pulled off the largest waterborne evacuation in history—larger than the evacuation at Dunkirk in World War II. Drawing on her own experiences, her reporting and the writing of Rebecca Solnit, DuLong argues that the story of the maritime rescue operations on September 11 is not one of heroes or superhuman powers, but of “pragmatism, resourcefulness and simple human decency.” The mariners who stepped up in the middle of the catastrophe, she concludes, embodied the best of our individual and collective possibilities. Robert W. Snyder, Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University-Newark, is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York (Cornell) and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York (Columbia.) He can be reached at rwsnyder@rutgers.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Jessica DuLong, "Saved at the Seawall: Stories from the September 11 Boat Lift" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 49:49


When terrorists struck the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 a small fleet of boats on a rescue mission converged on lower Manhattan. In one of the less told stories of 9/11, on those vessels—which ranged from ferries to tug boats to boats that host dinner cruises—mariners carried to safety almost half a million people. Saved at the Seawall: Stories From the September 11 Boat Lift (Cornell UP, 2021) by Jessica DuLong with a foreword by Mitchell Zukoff, tells their story. DuLong brings to this book her own skills as a journalist and her experiences as the chief engineer on the 1931 New York City fireboat John J. Harvey, a historic preservation project that was called back into service on September 11 to fight the fires around the World Trade Center. Saved at the Seawall is more than a book about September 11. It is a story of work, New York Harbor, and how the skills and mindsets that mariners developed over many years were summoned up on a terrible morning. Together, they pulled off the largest waterborne evacuation in history—larger than the evacuation at Dunkirk in World War II. Drawing on her own experiences, her reporting and the writing of Rebecca Solnit, DuLong argues that the story of the maritime rescue operations on September 11 is not one of heroes or superhuman powers, but of “pragmatism, resourcefulness and simple human decency.” The mariners who stepped up in the middle of the catastrophe, she concludes, embodied the best of our individual and collective possibilities. Robert W. Snyder, Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University-Newark, is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York (Cornell) and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York (Columbia.) He can be reached at rwsnyder@rutgers.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books Network
Jessica DuLong, "Saved at the Seawall: Stories from the September 11 Boat Lift" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 49:49


When terrorists struck the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 a small fleet of boats on a rescue mission converged on lower Manhattan. In one of the less told stories of 9/11, on those vessels—which ranged from ferries to tug boats to boats that host dinner cruises—mariners carried to safety almost half a million people. Saved at the Seawall: Stories From the September 11 Boat Lift (Cornell UP, 2021) by Jessica DuLong with a foreword by Mitchell Zukoff, tells their story. DuLong brings to this book her own skills as a journalist and her experiences as the chief engineer on the 1931 New York City fireboat John J. Harvey, a historic preservation project that was called back into service on September 11 to fight the fires around the World Trade Center. Saved at the Seawall is more than a book about September 11. It is a story of work, New York Harbor, and how the skills and mindsets that mariners developed over many years were summoned up on a terrible morning. Together, they pulled off the largest waterborne evacuation in history—larger than the evacuation at Dunkirk in World War II. Drawing on her own experiences, her reporting and the writing of Rebecca Solnit, DuLong argues that the story of the maritime rescue operations on September 11 is not one of heroes or superhuman powers, but of “pragmatism, resourcefulness and simple human decency.” The mariners who stepped up in the middle of the catastrophe, she concludes, embodied the best of our individual and collective possibilities. Robert W. Snyder, Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University-Newark, is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York (Cornell) and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York (Columbia.) He can be reached at rwsnyder@rutgers.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Choiceology with Katy Milkman
What's the Big Idea? With Guests Robert Rydell and Don Moore

Choiceology with Katy Milkman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 36:23


When young children imagine their future lives, they're often very optimistic. They'll say things like “I'm going to be an astronaut!” or “When I grow up, I want to be a movie star!” These outcomes are, of course, quite rare. Most children will grow into slightly less exotic careers as adults. But even as adults, we tend toward personal optimism. We assume that we will outlive the average person, that we will remain in better health than the average person, and that our children will be above average in school or in sports. Of course, we can't all be above average.In this episode of Choiceology with Katy Milkman, we look at the mistakes we make when we assume we're less susceptible to failure or negative outcomes than are other people.World's Fairs are large scale events requiring an immense amount of planning and organization. And while there have been many memorable and successful fairs, there have also been many expensive failures. Robert Rydell tells the story of the 1926 Sesquicentennial International Exposition in Philadelphia. Organizers were certain that they could mount a spectacular event, one that would transform their city and burnish its reputation around the world. But international events, poor weather, local politics, and the death of one of the key planners would conspire to make this a fair to remember, for all the wrong reasons.Robert Rydell is a professor of American Studies at Montana State University and the author of All the World's a Fair: Visions of Empire at American International Expositions, 1876-1916.Next, Don Moore joins Katy to discuss the ways in which overconfidence, overplacement, and overprecision can cloud your judgement, even though it may make you feel better about yourself and your abilities.Don Moore is the Lorraine Tyson Mitchell Chair in Leadership and Communication at the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business and serves as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. He is also the author of the book Perfectly Confident: How to Calibrate Your Decisions Wisely. Finally, Katy offers advice on using base rates to help offset over-optimism when it comes to planning events, starting a business, getting married, or renovating your home.Choiceology is an original podcast from Charles Schwab. For more on the series, visit schwab.com/podcast.If you enjoy the show, please leave a ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐  rating or review on Apple Podcasts.Important DisclosuresAll expressions of opinion are subject to change without notice in reaction to shifting market conditions.The comments, views, and opinions expressed in the presentation are those of the speakers and do not necessarily represent the views of Charles Schwab.Data contained herein from third-party providers is obtained from what are considered reliable sources. However, its accuracy, completeness or reliability cannot be guaranteed.The book How to Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be is not affiliated with, sponsored by, or endorsed by Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (CS&Co.). Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (CS&Co.) has not reviewed the book and makes no representations about its content.(0921-1WH3)

Musings with Montse: Artists and Their (Honest) Stories

Emily Bernard is an author and professor. She holds a B.A. and Ph. D. in American Studies from Yale University. Her most recent book is the essay collection Black is the Body: Stories from My Grandmother's Time, My Mother's Time, and Mine.In this wide-ranging conversation, Emily speaks on motherhood, fear, forgiveness, rejecting shame and staying true to who you are as an artist. We also dive deep into having “the blues” - and I truly think it was the most joyful conversation on depression I've ever had!Emily radiates kindness, and is just a remarkable person. This episode was audio produced by Aaron Moring. Music is by Madisen Ward.

Confessions of a Native Son
Why Higher Education Isn't Closing The Racial Wealth Gap for Black Americans

Confessions of a Native Son

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 29:39


I share my thoughts on Higher Education and discuss the Wall Street Journal article, “College Was Supposed to Close the Wealth Gap for Black Americans. The Opposite Happened,” By Rachel Louise Ensign and Shane Shifflett.Subscribe to the show's newsletter here: https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE Follow me on Twitter here: https://bit.ly/38CkyZfIf you like this type of dialogue and are interested in booking me to speak at your organization, just shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.com or visit my website www.ConfessionsofANativeSon.comArticles Mentioned in Today's Episode:“College Was Supposed to Close the Wealth Gap for Black Americans. The Opposite Happened” By Rachel Louise Ensign and Shane ShifflettRead it here: https://on.wsj.com/2Vsh60nSpecial Thanks to Our Sponsors:Dope Coffee: A lifestyle brand that pairs urban Black Culture with innovative product offerings in the coffee industry. We are not a coffee brand for Black people. We are a coffee brand that seeks to elevate Black culture through a lifestyle of premium coffee and candid conversation. As an investor and advisor, I couldn't be more proud of Dope Coffee and encourage you to place your order today at www.realdope.coffeeIRONBOUND Boxing: A nonprofit organization based in Newark, NJ that provides free amateur boxing training, entrepreneur education, and employment opportunities to youth and young adults. You can support the cause by visiting www.IRONBOUNDBoxing.org and making a donation today. Message me on Linkedin or shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.com, Special shoutout to my Co-Producer Mike Loyd and the team from the Gifted Sounds Network. Rooting for everybody that's black.

Common Good Podcast
Common Good Faith - Labor and Justice

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 54:28


Monday our country celebrated Labor Day, but many don't know or understand the history and meaning of this holiday. Stephany, Laura and Dominique discuss labor, essential workers, justice, and how many have tried to sanitize the radical, liberating message of Jesus.   Dominique recommended "Stockton on My Mind" as a resource.   Dominique DuBois Gilliard is the Director of Racial Righteousness and Reconciliation for the Evangelical Covenant Church. He is the author of Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice that Restores, which won a 2018 Book of the Year Award for InterVarsity Press and was named Outreach Magazine's 2019 Social Issues Resource of the Year. Gilliard also serves as an adjunct professor at North Park Theological Seminary and serves on the board of directors for the Christian Community Development Association. In 2015, the Huffington Post named him one of the “Black Christian Leaders Changing the World.” Gilliard's forthcoming book, Subversive Witness: Scripture's Call to Leverage Privilegewill be released on August 24, 2021. @DDGilliard     //      facebook.com/dominique.dg.7   Rev. Dr. Laura Truax is senior pastor of LaSalle Street Church in Chicago and serves on the Seminary Advisory Board at the University of Dubuque. Dr. Truax holds a master of divinity degree from Loyola University and a Doctor of Ministry degree from the joint program of North Park Seminary and Fuller Theological Seminary. She is the author of Undone: When coming apart puts you back together (2013) and Love Let Go: Radical Generosity for the real world (2017) and is part of the Red Letter Christians.    @revtruax     //     facebook.com/laura.truax1   Rev. Dr. Stephany Rose Spaulding is pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Colorado Springs, associate professor of Women's and Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (UCCS) and former U.S. Senate candidate for the state of Colorado. She holds a B.A. in English from Clark Atlanta University, as well as a M.A. in American Literature and a Ph. D. in American Studies both from Purdue University. She is the author of Recovering from Racism: A Guidebook to Beginning Conversations (2015) and Abolishing White Masculinity from Mark Twain to Hiphop: Crisis in Whiteness (2014).   @drstephanyrose     //      facebook.com/stephanyrose    The Common Good Podcast is produced and edited by Daniel Deitrich. @danieldeitrich Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
A Unique Journey to CRM with Maggie Barry - CRMArch 222

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 62:23


Maggie Barry didn't even know what CRM Archaeology was when she was in college at the University of Davis. Upon graduation with a degree in American Studies and a focus on Culture and Consumption, Maggie joined the Peace Corps and spent over two years in Botswana. When she came home she hiked the Pacific Crest Trail - a 2000+ hike along the west coast of the United States. She landed a few jobs in CRM some time later and is still working as an archaeologist. We talk to Maggie about her journey, what it taught her, and what it can teach others about their path to this unique lifestyle. Follow Our Panelists On Twitter Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet Blogs: Bill White: Succinct Research Doug Rocks-MacQueen: Doug's Archaeology Stephen Wagner: Process - Opinions on Doing Archaeology Chris Webster: Random Acts of Science ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The CRM Archaeology Podcast
A Unique Journey to CRM with Maggie Barry - Ep 222

The CRM Archaeology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 62:23


Maggie Barry didn't even know what CRM Archaeology was when she was in college at the University of Davis. Upon graduation with a degree in American Studies and a focus on Culture and Consumption, Maggie joined the Peace Corps and spent over two years in Botswana. When she came home she hiked the Pacific Crest Trail - a 2000+ hike along the west coast of the United States. She landed a few jobs in CRM some time later and is still working as an archaeologist. We talk to Maggie about her journey, what it taught her, and what it can teach others about their path to this unique lifestyle. Follow Our Panelists On Twitter Bill @succinctbill; Doug @openaccessarch; Stephen @processarch; Bill A. @archaeothoughts; Chris W @Archeowebby, @DIGTECHLLC, and @ArchPodNet Blogs: Bill White: Succinct Research Doug Rocks-MacQueen: Doug's Archaeology Stephen Wagner: Process - Opinions on Doing Archaeology Chris Webster: Random Acts of Science ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur
AEP 96: Universities are Plundering Cities, with Davarian Baldwin

The Anti Empire Project with Justin Podur

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 61:57


I'm joined by Davarian Baldwin, who is Paul E. Raether Distinguished Professor of American Studies at Trinity College, to talk about his new book In the Shadow of the Ivory Tower: How Universities are Plundering Our Cities. Davarian's book helped a lot of ideas about the university and where it's been headed click in my … Continue reading "AEP 96: Universities are Plundering Cities, with Davarian Baldwin"

Progressive Voices
Lorena Chambers Guest Hosts 'In The Know With Moe' - 9/2/21

Progressive Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2021 40:52


Today's guest host is Lorena Chambers, PhD, CEO of Chambers Lopez Strategies LLC. Lorena is the only Latina — and one of only two women — to have produced broadcast commercials for a U.S. presidential campaign. In 2020, she was the media strategist for People For the American Way's Latinos Vote campaign and the Latina strategist for Senate Majority PAC (SMP) to elect John Hickenlooper as the new U.S. Senator from Colorado. Dr. Chambers is also a Visiting Research Affiliate at Yale University. Lorena is first joined by Margaret Salazar-Porzio, Curator of Latinx History and Culture at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. The two discuss “¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues,” a bilingual exhibition that Salazar-Porzio is curator of at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. (The exhibition will also be traveling to 15 different cities through 2025) You can find out more about the exhibit here: https://www.si.edu/newsdesk/releases/pleibol-slides-smithsonian-summer-2021 During the second half of the show, Lorena is joined by George J. Sanchez, Professor of American Studies & Ethnicity, and History at the University of Southern California. They talk about his new book, "Boyle Heights: How a Los Angeles Neighborhood Became the Future of American Democracy." It's described as "the radical history of a dynamic, multiracial American neighborhood." The book is available for purchase here: https://bookshop.org/books/boyle-heights-59-how-a-los-angeles-neighborhood-became-the-future-of-american-democracy/9780520237070 You can find out more about guest host Lorena Chambers at her website: www.chamberslopez.com

Confessions of a Native Son
Reflections on the Final Days of The Afghanistan Withdrawal with Col. Thomas Hobbs, USMC (Ret.)

Confessions of a Native Son

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 82:18


Col. Hobbs and I discuss the final days of the withdrawal of US forces from Afghanistan, the Narrative in the Media, and where we go from here as a Country. Leave a comment on today's show on my Substack at https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE For all of our listeners and superfans tuning in all over the world, visit www.ConfessionsofANativeSon.com to sign-up for our newsletter on substack at the following link: https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE. If you like this type of dialogue and are interested in booking me to speak at your organization, just shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.comArticles Mentioned in Today's Episode:The War in Afghanistan Is What Happens When McKinsey Types Run Everything by Matt StollerRead here: https://bit.ly/2WIk8hkTrying to Find the Signal in the Noise of Afghanistan by Sean Patrick HughesRead here: https://bit.ly/3kJecNjSpecial Thanks to Our Sponsors:Dope Coffee: A lifestyle brand that pairs urban Black Culture with innovative product offerings in the coffee industry. We are not a coffee brand for Black people. We are a coffee brand that seeks to elevate Black culture through a lifestyle of premium coffee and candid conversation. As an investor and advisor, I couldn't be more proud of Dope Coffee and encourage you to place your order today at www.realdope.coffeeIRONBOUND Boxing: A nonprofit organization based in Newark, NJ that provides free amateur boxing training, entrepreneur education, and employment opportunities to youth and young adults. You can support the cause by visiting www.IRONBOUNDBoxing.org and making a donation today. Message me on Linkedin or shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.com, Special shoutout to my Co-Producer Mike Loyd and the team from the Gifted Sounds Network. Rooting for everybody that's black.

Common Good Podcast
Common Good Faith - We The People Ride and Immigration Reform

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 58:40


Our panel of pastors discuss the We The People Ride and the need for immigration reform.   Dominique DuBois Gilliard is the Director of Racial Righteousness and Reconciliation for the Evangelical Covenant Church. He is the author of Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice that Restores, which won a 2018 Book of the Year Award for InterVarsity Press and was named Outreach Magazine's 2019 Social Issues Resource of the Year. Gilliard also serves as an adjunct professor at North Park Theological Seminary and serves on the board of directors for the Christian Community Development Association. In 2015, the Huffington Post named him one of the “Black Christian Leaders Changing the World.” Gilliard's forthcoming book, Subversive Witness: Scripture's Call to Leverage Privilegewill be released on August 24, 2021. @DDGilliard     //      facebook.com/dominique.dg.7   Rev. Dr. Laura Truax is senior pastor of LaSalle Street Church in Chicago and serves on the Seminary Advisory Board at the University of Dubuque. Dr. Truax holds a master of divinity degree from Loyola University and a Doctor of Ministry degree from the joint program of North Park Seminary and Fuller Theological Seminary. She is the author of Undone: When coming apart puts you back together (2013) and Love Let Go: Radical Generosity for the real world (2017) and is part of the Red Letter Christians.    @revtruax     //     facebook.com/laura.truax1   Rev. Dr. Stephany Rose Spaulding is pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Colorado Springs, associate professor of Women's and Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (UCCS) and former U.S. Senate candidate for the state of Colorado. She holds a B.A. in English from Clark Atlanta University, as well as a M.A. in American Literature and a Ph. D. in American Studies both from Purdue University. She is the author of Recovering from Racism: A Guidebook to Beginning Conversations (2015) and Abolishing White Masculinity from Mark Twain to Hiphop: Crisis in Whiteness (2014).   @drstephanyrose     //      facebook.com/stephanyrose    Doug Pagitt is the Executive Director and one of the founders of Vote Common Good. He is also a pastor, author, and social activist. @pagitt   The Common Good Podcast is produced and edited by Daniel Deitrich. @danieldeitrich Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon

Grating the Nutmeg
125. Precious Memories Captured in Hair

Grating the Nutmeg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 20:47


In this episode, join Mary Donohue, Asst. Publisher of Connecticut Explored, for a discussion with Dr. Helen Sheumaker about Victorian jewelry and wreaths made from human hair. Dr. Sheumaker is the author of Love Entwined: The Curious History of Human Hair Work.  She teaches history and American Studies at Miami University of Ohio. Find out more about this now unfashionable way to remember your loved ones!   Read Dr. Sheumaker's feature story in the Fall 2021 issue of Connecticut Explored-order your copy at ctexplored.org   And see more about her book here: https://www.amazon.com/Love-Entwined-Curious-History-Hairwork/dp/0812240146/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=Love+Entwined&qid=1630356702&sr=8-2 This episode was produced by Mary Donohue, Assistant Publisher of Connecticut Explored, and engineered by Patrick O'Sullivan. Donohue has documented Connecticut's built environment and popular culture for over 30 years. Contact her at marydonohue@comcast.net  And our thanks to the Lane Public Library in Oxford, Ohio for providing Dr. Sheumaker with a recording space. Want to know more about Connecticut's landmarks, museums, art, and history? Subscribe to Connecticut Explored-in your mailbox or inbox. And for a daily dose of history, visit Today in Connecticut History produced by the Connecticut State Historian at TodayinCThistory.com

New Books in American Studies
Lettie Gay, "Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking" ( U South Carolina Press, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 56:33


Southern Food Historian Rebecca Sharpless discusses a new edition of Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking released in 2021 by University of South Carolina Press. Sharpless added a new critical introduction to the historic cookbook, first published in 1930 from a New York press as a collaboration between Blanche Rhett, Helen Woodward, and Lettie Gay. Woodward had married into a family with South Carolina ties and for a time rented a home that shared a courtyard with Rhett. As Woodward tells the story, she wanted to send some recipes back to her Northern connections, and Rhett suggested she write a book of recipes instead. Gay tested the recipes in a New York kitchen, standardizing measurements and translating them to a wider audience. Sharpless immediately foregrounds the Northern sensibility that informs the rhetorical situation of the book. Published just a few years before Gone With the Wind, the cookbook represented a version of Charleston's sumptuous antebellum past to an audience with an appetite for consuming moonlight and magnolias. Sharpless's 2021 introduction asks the question, “What do readers today need to know to put the book in context?” Sharpless uses most of the limited space of the foreword acknowledging the uncredited contributors to the cookbook and offering more information about those named in the book. Sharpless is especially – and rightly – critical of the ways that Two Hundred Years erases the contributions of enslaved people, and when it does offer credit, it is usually demeaning and patronizing in its depictions of African American domestic cooks as “magical” and unscientific. Sharpless reminds today's readers that “It is a book of white nostalgia, not black.” And the final words of the foreword could not be any clearer: “Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking stands as a double monument: to the rich foodways of the Lowcountry and the efforts of White Charlestonians to put a pretty face on White Supremacy.” With this caveat, Sharpless does acknowledge some extraordinary women from Charleston's elite classes who make significant contributions to the book and have remarkable stories of their own, still waiting to be told. Sharpless encourages 21st century readers to use the cookbook in their own kitchens; the instructions and ingredients are as accessible today as they would have been in 1930. However, she cautions readers to read the nostalgic textual interludes between recipes with skepticism, and to maintain an attitude of respect for the enslaved and anonymous contributors who made Low Country cuisine into the hot cultural commodity it is today. Rebecca Sharpless is professor of history at Texas Christian University. She is author of Fertile Ground, Narrow Choices: Women on Texas Cotton Farms and Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960. Her newest book, Grain and Fire: A History of Baking in the American South, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press in Spring 2022. Carrie Helms Tippen is Assistant Professor of English at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, PA, where she teaches courses in American Literature. Her 2018 book, Inventing Authenticity: How Cookbook Writers Redefine Southern Identity (University of Arkansas Press), examines the rhetorical strategies that writers use to prove the authenticity of their recipes in the narrative headnotes of contemporary cookbooks. Her academic work has been published in Gastronomica, Food and Foodways, American Studies, Southern Quarterly, and Food, Culture, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in African American Studies
Lettie Gay, "Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking" ( U South Carolina Press, 2021)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 56:33


Southern Food Historian Rebecca Sharpless discusses a new edition of Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking released in 2021 by University of South Carolina Press. Sharpless added a new critical introduction to the historic cookbook, first published in 1930 from a New York press as a collaboration between Blanche Rhett, Helen Woodward, and Lettie Gay. Woodward had married into a family with South Carolina ties and for a time rented a home that shared a courtyard with Rhett. As Woodward tells the story, she wanted to send some recipes back to her Northern connections, and Rhett suggested she write a book of recipes instead. Gay tested the recipes in a New York kitchen, standardizing measurements and translating them to a wider audience. Sharpless immediately foregrounds the Northern sensibility that informs the rhetorical situation of the book. Published just a few years before Gone With the Wind, the cookbook represented a version of Charleston's sumptuous antebellum past to an audience with an appetite for consuming moonlight and magnolias. Sharpless's 2021 introduction asks the question, “What do readers today need to know to put the book in context?” Sharpless uses most of the limited space of the foreword acknowledging the uncredited contributors to the cookbook and offering more information about those named in the book. Sharpless is especially – and rightly – critical of the ways that Two Hundred Years erases the contributions of enslaved people, and when it does offer credit, it is usually demeaning and patronizing in its depictions of African American domestic cooks as “magical” and unscientific. Sharpless reminds today's readers that “It is a book of white nostalgia, not black.” And the final words of the foreword could not be any clearer: “Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking stands as a double monument: to the rich foodways of the Lowcountry and the efforts of White Charlestonians to put a pretty face on White Supremacy.” With this caveat, Sharpless does acknowledge some extraordinary women from Charleston's elite classes who make significant contributions to the book and have remarkable stories of their own, still waiting to be told. Sharpless encourages 21st century readers to use the cookbook in their own kitchens; the instructions and ingredients are as accessible today as they would have been in 1930. However, she cautions readers to read the nostalgic textual interludes between recipes with skepticism, and to maintain an attitude of respect for the enslaved and anonymous contributors who made Low Country cuisine into the hot cultural commodity it is today. Rebecca Sharpless is professor of history at Texas Christian University. She is author of Fertile Ground, Narrow Choices: Women on Texas Cotton Farms and Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960. Her newest book, Grain and Fire: A History of Baking in the American South, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press in Spring 2022. Carrie Helms Tippen is Assistant Professor of English at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, PA, where she teaches courses in American Literature. Her 2018 book, Inventing Authenticity: How Cookbook Writers Redefine Southern Identity (University of Arkansas Press), examines the rhetorical strategies that writers use to prove the authenticity of their recipes in the narrative headnotes of contemporary cookbooks. Her academic work has been published in Gastronomica, Food and Foodways, American Studies, Southern Quarterly, and Food, Culture, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

New Books Network
Lettie Gay, "Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking" ( U South Carolina Press, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 56:33


Southern Food Historian Rebecca Sharpless discusses a new edition of Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking released in 2021 by University of South Carolina Press. Sharpless added a new critical introduction to the historic cookbook, first published in 1930 from a New York press as a collaboration between Blanche Rhett, Helen Woodward, and Lettie Gay. Woodward had married into a family with South Carolina ties and for a time rented a home that shared a courtyard with Rhett. As Woodward tells the story, she wanted to send some recipes back to her Northern connections, and Rhett suggested she write a book of recipes instead. Gay tested the recipes in a New York kitchen, standardizing measurements and translating them to a wider audience. Sharpless immediately foregrounds the Northern sensibility that informs the rhetorical situation of the book. Published just a few years before Gone With the Wind, the cookbook represented a version of Charleston's sumptuous antebellum past to an audience with an appetite for consuming moonlight and magnolias. Sharpless's 2021 introduction asks the question, “What do readers today need to know to put the book in context?” Sharpless uses most of the limited space of the foreword acknowledging the uncredited contributors to the cookbook and offering more information about those named in the book. Sharpless is especially – and rightly – critical of the ways that Two Hundred Years erases the contributions of enslaved people, and when it does offer credit, it is usually demeaning and patronizing in its depictions of African American domestic cooks as “magical” and unscientific. Sharpless reminds today's readers that “It is a book of white nostalgia, not black.” And the final words of the foreword could not be any clearer: “Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking stands as a double monument: to the rich foodways of the Lowcountry and the efforts of White Charlestonians to put a pretty face on White Supremacy.” With this caveat, Sharpless does acknowledge some extraordinary women from Charleston's elite classes who make significant contributions to the book and have remarkable stories of their own, still waiting to be told. Sharpless encourages 21st century readers to use the cookbook in their own kitchens; the instructions and ingredients are as accessible today as they would have been in 1930. However, she cautions readers to read the nostalgic textual interludes between recipes with skepticism, and to maintain an attitude of respect for the enslaved and anonymous contributors who made Low Country cuisine into the hot cultural commodity it is today. Rebecca Sharpless is professor of history at Texas Christian University. She is author of Fertile Ground, Narrow Choices: Women on Texas Cotton Farms and Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960. Her newest book, Grain and Fire: A History of Baking in the American South, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press in Spring 2022. Carrie Helms Tippen is Assistant Professor of English at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, PA, where she teaches courses in American Literature. Her 2018 book, Inventing Authenticity: How Cookbook Writers Redefine Southern Identity (University of Arkansas Press), examines the rhetorical strategies that writers use to prove the authenticity of their recipes in the narrative headnotes of contemporary cookbooks. Her academic work has been published in Gastronomica, Food and Foodways, American Studies, Southern Quarterly, and Food, Culture, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Lettie Gay, "Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking" ( U South Carolina Press, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 56:33


Southern Food Historian Rebecca Sharpless discusses a new edition of Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking released in 2021 by University of South Carolina Press. Sharpless added a new critical introduction to the historic cookbook, first published in 1930 from a New York press as a collaboration between Blanche Rhett, Helen Woodward, and Lettie Gay. Woodward had married into a family with South Carolina ties and for a time rented a home that shared a courtyard with Rhett. As Woodward tells the story, she wanted to send some recipes back to her Northern connections, and Rhett suggested she write a book of recipes instead. Gay tested the recipes in a New York kitchen, standardizing measurements and translating them to a wider audience. Sharpless immediately foregrounds the Northern sensibility that informs the rhetorical situation of the book. Published just a few years before Gone With the Wind, the cookbook represented a version of Charleston's sumptuous antebellum past to an audience with an appetite for consuming moonlight and magnolias. Sharpless's 2021 introduction asks the question, “What do readers today need to know to put the book in context?” Sharpless uses most of the limited space of the foreword acknowledging the uncredited contributors to the cookbook and offering more information about those named in the book. Sharpless is especially – and rightly – critical of the ways that Two Hundred Years erases the contributions of enslaved people, and when it does offer credit, it is usually demeaning and patronizing in its depictions of African American domestic cooks as “magical” and unscientific. Sharpless reminds today's readers that “It is a book of white nostalgia, not black.” And the final words of the foreword could not be any clearer: “Two Hundred Years of Charleston Cooking stands as a double monument: to the rich foodways of the Lowcountry and the efforts of White Charlestonians to put a pretty face on White Supremacy.” With this caveat, Sharpless does acknowledge some extraordinary women from Charleston's elite classes who make significant contributions to the book and have remarkable stories of their own, still waiting to be told. Sharpless encourages 21st century readers to use the cookbook in their own kitchens; the instructions and ingredients are as accessible today as they would have been in 1930. However, she cautions readers to read the nostalgic textual interludes between recipes with skepticism, and to maintain an attitude of respect for the enslaved and anonymous contributors who made Low Country cuisine into the hot cultural commodity it is today. Rebecca Sharpless is professor of history at Texas Christian University. She is author of Fertile Ground, Narrow Choices: Women on Texas Cotton Farms and Cooking in Other Women's Kitchens: Domestic Workers in the South, 1865-1960. Her newest book, Grain and Fire: A History of Baking in the American South, is forthcoming from University of North Carolina Press in Spring 2022. Carrie Helms Tippen is Assistant Professor of English at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, PA, where she teaches courses in American Literature. Her 2018 book, Inventing Authenticity: How Cookbook Writers Redefine Southern Identity (University of Arkansas Press), examines the rhetorical strategies that writers use to prove the authenticity of their recipes in the narrative headnotes of contemporary cookbooks. Her academic work has been published in Gastronomica, Food and Foodways, American Studies, Southern Quarterly, and Food, Culture, and Society. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Two Nice Jewish Boys
#256 - The Elites Vs. The People (Gadi Taub)

Two Nice Jewish Boys

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 59:12


Check out our NEW merch store! www.2njb.com/merch *** The government in Israel is celebrating 2 months since its establishment, and boy, what a ride has it been! This week, PM Bennet will go to Washington for his first meeting with President Biden. But here in Israel, many people feel this government doesn't represent them. 1 million Likud voters were left out of the party, because their leader, Benjamin Netanyahu, is boycotted by the leaders of the left and central wing parties. Some people in Israel claim that Israeli society is divided into two - First Israel, mostly left wing ashkenazis, and second Israel - mostly right wing mizrahis. The elites, which includes mostly ‘first Israel', is depriving second Israel from the game, according to those who believe in this theory. Many of them are Likud voters. In his new book, ‘The Mobiles and The Fixed - The Struggle of the Elites Against Israeli Democracy', Taub is debating that the struggle between First Israel and Second Israel, will define the future of the country. Dr. Gadi Taub is probably one of the most hated and despised people among Tel Aviv's intellectual elite. The reason is simple: once, he was one of them. An eloquent left winger, a senior lecturer at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, with a PhD in American Studies from Rutgers University and all the right opinions. But alas, Dr. Taub woke up one morning and decided to “shift sides”. Now Taub publishes in-depth, highly controversial, right-wing op-eds in Haaretz. We're thrilled to have Dr. Taub on the show to talk about his new book.

the only one in the room podcast
SUNDAY EDITION: Ariel D. Smith Is The Only One Who Started A Ph.D. And A Podcast Because She Was Hungry

the only one in the room podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 35:19


Ariel D. Smith, M.Ed is the founder of The Food Truck Scholar and the host of its podcast of the same name. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in American Studies, where her research examines the role of the food truck industry in American Culture and African American entrepreneurs' experiences and involvement in the mobile food industry specifically. Instagram: @thefoodtruckscholar Facebook: @Arielthefoodtruckfoodie Special Thanks to our Sponsors: We love our new sponsor, ReadySlim! Say Hello to a better, brighter you. And right now, for a limited time, you can save 25% on your first order of ReadySlim's 28-day Detox tea kit, plus you get a FREE collapsible water bottle! GO to ReadySlim.Com/THEONLYONE and use the code: The Only One. That's ReadySlim.Com/THEONLYONE and use the code: The Only One. Best Fiends: Join us and the millions of Americans who are already playing this game. Download Best Fiends for FREE on The Apple APP store or Google Play. That's friends without the R, Best Fiends. Voyage et Cie: Voyage et Cie's curator Melanie Apple has cultivated a passion for notable moments using the sense of smell. Voyage et Cie is the ultimate luxury blend of travel, fragrance, and design. Each original fragrance is created by Melanie, 100% organic and natural which will transport you on a journey. Visit https://www.voyageetcie.com/ and enter the code: theonlyone to get your 10% off your purchase! Be sure not to miss our weekly full episodes on Tuesdays, Scott Talks on Wednesdays and our brand new series On My Nightstand on Fridays by subscribing to the show wherever you listen to podcasts.  Join our Only One In The Room Facebook Group if you'd like to ask a question of any of our upcoming guests for this series.  Also visit the website www.theonlyonepod.com for the latest from our host Laura Cathcart Robbins like featured articles and more. We love hearing from you in the comments on iTunes and while you're there don't forget to rate us, subscribe and share the show! All of us at The Only One In The Room wish you safety and wellness during this challenging time. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Psychology Podcast
Heather McGhee || What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together

The Psychology Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 64:35


Today we have Heather McGhee on the podcast. Heather is an expert in economic and social policy. The former president of the inequality-focused thinktank “Demos” McGhee has drafted a legislation testified before Congress and contributed regularly in news shows including MBC's “Meet the Press”. She now chairs the board of “Color of Change”, the nation's largest online racial justice organization. McGhee holds a BA in American Studies from Yale University and a JD from the University of California Berkeley School of Law. Her latest book is called “The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together”. Topics · Disconnect between policy makers and working families · Heather's hope for America · Zero-sum racial competition in White and Black People · The true definition of “White Privilege” · Racist policy-making in determining economic opportunity · How the Subprime Mortgage Crisis was fueled by racism · Heather meeting a white supremacist-turned-anti-racist advocate · “The Big Lie” in election results · Trump's “Populist” Agenda · Black and White people on environmentalism · Systems in America as the biggest barrier in racial education --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-psychology-podcast/support

Confessions of a Native Son
The Importance of Building Bridges of Social Capital Within The Black Community with Phillip Jones

Confessions of a Native Son

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2021 49:46


My long-time friend, fraternity brother, and fellow Marine, Phillip Jones, joins the show to discuss how we can build bridges of social capital within our community. Leave a comment on today's show on my Substack at https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE For all of our listeners and superfans tuning in all over the world, visit www.ConfessionsofANativeSon.com to sign-up for our newsletter on Substack at the following link: https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE. If you like this type of dialogue and are interested in booking me to speak at your organization, just shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.comSpecial Thanks to Our Sponsors:Dope Coffee: A lifestyle brand that pairs urban Black Culture with innovative product offerings in the coffee industry. We are not a coffee brand for Black people. We are a coffee brand that seeks to elevate Black culture through a lifestyle of premium coffee and candid conversation. As an investor and advisor, I couldn't be more proud of Dope Coffee and encourage you to place your order today at www.realdope.coffeeIRONBOUND Boxing: A nonprofit organization based in Newark, NJ that provides free amateur boxing training, entrepreneur education, and employment opportunities to youth and young adults. You can support the cause by visiting www.IRONBOUNDBoxing.org and making a donation today. Message me on Linkedin or shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.com, Special shoutout to my Co-Producer Mike Loyd and the team from the Gifted Sounds Network. Rooting for everybody that's black.

Common Good Podcast
Common Good Faith - Subversive Witness Book Launch

Common Good Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 56:52


Doug, Stephany and Laura celebrate and discuss the launch of co-host Dominique Gilliard's new book Subversive Witness: Scripture's Call to Leverage Privilege.   Dominique DuBois Gilliard is the Director of Racial Righteousness and Reconciliation for the Evangelical Covenant Church. He is the author of Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice that Restores, which won a 2018 Book of the Year Award for InterVarsity Press and was named Outreach Magazine's 2019 Social Issues Resource of the Year. Gilliard also serves as an adjunct professor at North Park Theological Seminary and serves on the board of directors for the Christian Community Development Association. In 2015, the Huffington Post named him one of the “Black Christian Leaders Changing the World.”   Subversive Witness: Scripture's Call to Leverage Privilege was released on August 24, 2021. @DDGilliard     //      facebook.com/dominique.dg.7   Rev. Dr. Stephany Rose Spaulding is pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Colorado Springs, associate professor of Women's and Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs (UCCS) and former U.S. Senate candidate for the state of Colorado. She holds a B.A. in English from Clark Atlanta University, as well as a M.A. in American Literature and a Ph. D. in American Studies both from Purdue University. She is the author of Recovering from Racism: A Guidebook to Beginning Conversations (2015) and Abolishing White Masculinity from Mark Twain to Hiphop: Crisis in Whiteness (2014).   @drstephanyrose     //      facebook.com/stephanyrose    Rev. Dr. Laura Truax is senior pastor of LaSalle Street Church in Chicago and serves on the Seminary Advisory Board at the University of Dubuque. Dr. Truax holds a master of divinity degree from Loyola University and a Doctor of Ministry degree from the joint program of North Park Seminary and Fuller Theological Seminary. She is the author of Undone: When coming apart puts you back together (2013) and Love Let Go: Radical Generosity for the real world (2017) and is part of the Red Letter Christians.    Doug Pagitt is the Executive Director and one of the founders of Vote Common Good. He is also a pastor, author, and social activist. @pagitt   The Common Good Podcast is produced and edited by Daniel Deitrich. @danieldeitrich Our theme music is composed by Ben Grace. @bengracemusic   votecommongood.com votecommongood.com/podcast facebook.com/votecommongood twitter.com/votecommon

New Books in Literature
Larry Kirwan, "Rockaway Blue" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 45:07


Twenty years after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the novel Rockaway Blue (Cornell UP, 2021) probes the griefs, trauma and resilience of Irish American New Yorkers wresting with the deaths and aftershocks of that terrible day. The book weaves throughout New York City, from the Midtown North precinct in Manhattan to Arab American Brooklyn, but it is so grounded in the Irish section of Rockaway in the borough of Queens that Rockaway itself becomes a kind of character Like all of Kirwan's work, it has a strong sense of history. In Rockaway Blue, Kirwan looks back on September 11 with admiration for the genuine heroism of first responders and skepticism about the “blue wall of silence” in the New York City Police Department. Equally important, he approaches the dead of September 11, and their surviving friends, relatives and colleagues, as three-dimensional human beings with their own mix of strengths, weaknesses, virtues and flaws. Kirwan is the author of five other books, including the novel Rocking the Bronx, the memoir Green Suede Shoes: An Irish-American Odyssey, A History of Irish Music, and 16 plays and musicals. He is also the host of Celtic Crush, a radio show on Sirius XM. He is probably best know as the leader of Black 47, an Irish rock band whose songs mixed Irish music, rock and roll, rhythm and blues and rap to celebrate immigrant experiences old and new and the socialist strain in Irish republicanism embodied by James Connolly. Robert W. Snyder, Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University, is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York (Cornell) and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York (Columbia.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Larry Kirwan, "Rockaway Blue" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 45:07


Twenty years after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the novel Rockaway Blue (Cornell UP, 2021) probes the griefs, trauma and resilience of Irish American New Yorkers wresting with the deaths and aftershocks of that terrible day. The book weaves throughout New York City, from the Midtown North precinct in Manhattan to Arab American Brooklyn, but it is so grounded in the Irish section of Rockaway in the borough of Queens that Rockaway itself becomes a kind of character Like all of Kirwan's work, it has a strong sense of history. In Rockaway Blue, Kirwan looks back on September 11 with admiration for the genuine heroism of first responders and skepticism about the “blue wall of silence” in the New York City Police Department. Equally important, he approaches the dead of September 11, and their surviving friends, relatives and colleagues, as three-dimensional human beings with their own mix of strengths, weaknesses, virtues and flaws. Kirwan is the author of five other books, including the novel Rocking the Bronx, the memoir Green Suede Shoes: An Irish-American Odyssey, A History of Irish Music, and 16 plays and musicals. He is also the host of Celtic Crush, a radio show on Sirius XM. He is probably best know as the leader of Black 47, an Irish rock band whose songs mixed Irish music, rock and roll, rhythm and blues and rap to celebrate immigrant experiences old and new and the socialist strain in Irish republicanism embodied by James Connolly. Robert W. Snyder, Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University, is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York (Cornell) and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York (Columbia.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in American Studies
Larry Kirwan, "Rockaway Blue" (Cornell UP, 2021)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 45:07


Twenty years after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the novel Rockaway Blue (Cornell UP, 2021) probes the griefs, trauma and resilience of Irish American New Yorkers wresting with the deaths and aftershocks of that terrible day. The book weaves throughout New York City, from the Midtown North precinct in Manhattan to Arab American Brooklyn, but it is so grounded in the Irish section of Rockaway in the borough of Queens that Rockaway itself becomes a kind of character Like all of Kirwan's work, it has a strong sense of history. In Rockaway Blue, Kirwan looks back on September 11 with admiration for the genuine heroism of first responders and skepticism about the “blue wall of silence” in the New York City Police Department. Equally important, he approaches the dead of September 11, and their surviving friends, relatives and colleagues, as three-dimensional human beings with their own mix of strengths, weaknesses, virtues and flaws. Kirwan is the author of five other books, including the novel Rocking the Bronx, the memoir Green Suede Shoes: An Irish-American Odyssey, A History of Irish Music, and 16 plays and musicals. He is also the host of Celtic Crush, a radio show on Sirius XM. He is probably best know as the leader of Black 47, an Irish rock band whose songs mixed Irish music, rock and roll, rhythm and blues and rap to celebrate immigrant experiences old and new and the socialist strain in Irish republicanism embodied by James Connolly. Robert W. Snyder, Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University, is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York (Cornell) and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York (Columbia.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

Wake Up with KC
Personal Empowerment and Sexual Intellectual Female With Regina Hanson!

Wake Up with KC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2021 52:35


Regina G. Hanson has a B.A. in American History from Armstrong Atlantic University (now Georgia Southern), and a M.A. in American Studies from Kennesaw State University.  As a writer she incorporates a conversational tone that affords the reader a more intimate experience. Her writing genres include historical documentaries, cultural studies, children's books, memoirs, blogs and general content.  Regina is a music lover and nature observer. She finds inspiration in both, as well as, cultural circumstances and societal needs.  This author is also a dynamic public speaker and activist. Promoting equality for all and cultural appreciation is the foremost of her agenda. Having founded Personal Empowerment Publishing, it is Regina's hope that each work published will empower her reader's to grow and evolve into their best selves.You can contact Regina here: https://youtu.be/XN02UDNzwKIMy website is www.personalempowermentpublishing.com. Instagram: @reginahansonAlso @sexualintellectualfemale Twitter: @reginahansonEM: reginahanson@yahoo.com 

Confessions of a Native Son
Confessions of Two Afghan War Veterans

Confessions of a Native Son

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2021 70:50


I'm joined by fellow Afghan War Veteran, Author, and Army Green Beret, Herb Thompson, to discuss our feelings on the withdrawal of US forces from Afghanistan. Let me know what you think of today's episode by subscribing to my Substack at https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE and leaving a comment. For all of our listeners and superfans tuning in all over the world, sign-up for our newsletter on substack at the following link: https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE , I haven't had time to update my website, so head over to substack if you want to subscribe. If you like this type of dialogue and are interested in booking me to speak at your organization, just shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.comSpecial Thanks to Our Sponsors:Dope Coffee: A lifestyle brand that pairs urban Black Culture with innovative product offerings in the coffee industry. We are not a coffee brand for Black people. We are a coffee brand that seeks to elevate Black culture through a lifestyle of premium coffee and candid conversation. As an investor and Advisor, I couldn't be more proud of Dope Coffee and encourage to place your order today at www.realdope.coffeeIRONBOUND Boxing: A nonprofit organization based in Newark, NJ that provides free amateur boxing training, entrepreneur education, and employment opportunities to youth and young adults. You can support the cause by visiting www.IRONBOUNDBoxing.org and making a donation today. Message me on Linkedin or shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.com, Special shoutout to my Co-Producer Mike Loyd and the team from the Gifted Sounds Network. Rooting for everybody that's black.

IndoctriNation
Leaving The Family Compound w/ Cody & Kandi

IndoctriNation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 62:08


This week's guests Cody & Kandi are a married couple from a small town in the Ozarks, located near the Arkansas-Missouri border. They met and began dating in 2012. Cody grew up living on his family's cult compound in rural Missouri, coincidentally near other infamous cult compounds. In July 2013, Cody found out the truth about his family. He was reunited with his mother after 15 years. Cody and his mother have developed a close relationship. Cody also met his father in July 2013, for the first time in 20 years. In November 2013, against the wishes of his family, Cody and Kandi married. After experiencing ongoing harassment by "the family" In 2019, Cody and Kandi moved several hours away from the Ozarks. Cody is now in college, pursuing a degree in American Studies, and with the fierce support of his wife Kandi, he has finally started going through the process of leaving the cultic mindset behind. Kandi continues to support him through this process as she continues pursuing her law school where she is due to graduate in May of 2022. Cody shares with Rachel his experience of being raised in an isolated family compound after being taken away from his parents by other family members involved in the cultic commune. He explains how these relatives attempted to cover up the sex abuse of his mother by elders of the group when she was a child. He talks about experiencing the effects of the religious trauma that affected multiple generations. Throughout the conversation, Kandi shares her perspective of discovering the abuses and cultic behaviors in Cody's family and explains her thought process as she slowly and graciously led her husband away from the trauma and indoctrination of his family. Kandi explains the negative effects these destructive relatives had on their relationship and what she did to overcome the difficulties. Before You Go: Rachel examines the ingrained fears that people who grow up with apocalyptic doctrine experience and the difficulties they have in shedding those worries later in life. Thanks to all our Patreon supporters!! You can help the show for free by leaving a review on Apple/ iTunes. It really helps the visibility of the show! To help support the show monthly and sign up for cool Indoctrination stickers and tote bags, please visit: www.patreon.com/indoctrination Want to support the IndoctriNation show with a one-time donation? Use this link! www.paypal.me/indoctriNATION

New Books Network
Joshua Jelly-Schapiro, "Names of New York: Discovering the City's Past, Present, and Future Through Its Place-Names" (Pantheon, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 46:20


Geographer and writer Joshua Jelly-Schapiro has a sharp appreciation for place, history, and the stories we tell to give meaning to our lives. All of these are present in his new book Names of New York: Discovering the City's Past, Present and Future Through Its Place Names, published by Pantheon. Place names hold stories, Jelly-Schapiro argues, and Names of New York contains many narratives--from how Europeans garbled Native American place names to the story behind Dead Horse Bay to why New Yorkers give so many streets honorary names. “If landscape is history made visible,” he concludes, “the names we call its places are the words we use to forge maps of meaning in the city.” Before Names of New York, Jelly-Schapiro wrote Island People: The Caribbean and the World and created, with Rebecca Solnit, Nonstop Metropolis: A New York City Atlas. He has written for The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and Harper's and is scholar in residence at the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. Robert W. Snyder is Manhattan Borough Historian and professor emeritus of American Studies and Journalism at Rutgers University. He is the author of Crossing Broadway: Washington Heights and the Promise of New York (Cornell, paperback, 2019) and co-author of All the Nations Under Heaven: Immigrants, Migrants and the Making of New York (Columbia, 2019). He can be reached at rwsnyder@rutgers.edu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

Outlook
Josephine Baker: My mother, the superstar singer and spy - Part 2

Outlook

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 30:29


When Jari Hannu Bouillon was growing up, his mother was one of the most famous women in the world. Josephine Baker had shot to fame in the 1920s in Paris as a dancer, singer and actress. She also worked as a spy during the Second World War and was a fierce civil rights activist. By the 1950s she was living in a 15th-century castle in France with her 12 adopted children. They were from all over the world and meant to be a symbol of racial harmony and 'true brotherhood'. But, eventually, Josephine Baker couldn't sustain her expenses and she was evicted from the chateau. Luckily a friend, Princess Grace of Monaco, helped her find a new place to live. Jari didn't stay there for long. When Josephine found out he was gay, she held a family vote and it was decided that he should be sent to Argentina to live with his father. Jari was able to reconcile with his mother before her death in 1975. Many years later he was contacted by a journalist who said his Finnish birth family was looking for him. Professor Matthew Pratt Guterl wrote a book called Josephine Baker and the Rainbow Tribe about the family. He was interested in the story because he is an academic who teaches Africana Studies and American Studies, but also because he has a personal connection to the story. Matthew grew up in a large multiracial adoptive family too. Get in touch: outlook@bbc.com Presenter: Emily Webb Producer: Saskia Edwards Picture: Josephine Baker with some of her adopted children in France in the 1950s, including Jari (front row, second from right) Credit: A. Schorr/Ullstein Bild via Getty Images

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw
The Moral Case for Capitalism | Dr. Samuel Gregg

Hold These Truths with Dan Crenshaw

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 67:56


Conservatives are losing the debate over capitalism and free markets, and not just among young college students - a growing number of Americans on the right want more government intervention and stimulus checks. How can we change their minds? Dr. Samuel Gregg thinks it would help if conservatives reframe the economic argument for capitalism as a moral argument - and he joins us to show just how we can do that. Dr. Samuel Gregg is a Visiting Scholar at The Heritage Foundation's Center for American Studies and the Research Director at the Acton Institute. Follow him on Twitter at @DrSamuelGregg.

Confessions of a Native Son
Vanity Metrics

Confessions of a Native Son

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 49:25


Why do we care so much about vanity metrics, even when common sense tells us otherwise? Let me know what you think of today's episode on by subscribing to my Substack at https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE For all of our listeners and superfans tuning in all over the world, sign-up for our newsletter on substack at the following link: https://bit.ly/2Xc2TVE , I haven't had time to update my website, so head over to substack if you want to subscribe. If you like this type of dialogue and are interested in booking me to speak at your organization, just shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.comSpecial Thanks to Our Sponsors:Dope Coffee: A lifestyle brand that pairs urban Black Culture with innovative product offerings in the coffee industry. We are not a coffee brand for Black people. We are a coffee brand that seeks to elevate Black culture through a lifestyle of premium coffee and candid conversation. As an investor and advisor, I couldn't be more proud of Dope Coffee and encourage to place your order today at www.realdope.coffeeIRONBOUND Boxing: A nonprofit organization based in Newark, NJ that provides free amateur boxing training, entrepreneur education, and employment opportunities to youth and young adults. You can support the cause by visiting www.IRONBOUNDBoxing.org and making a donation today. Message me on Linkedin or shoot me an email at Mike@weareironbound.com, Special shoutout to my Co-Producer Mike Loyd and the team from the Gifted Sounds Network. Rooting for everybody that's black.

KEXP Live Performances Podcast
No-No Boy [Performance Only]

KEXP Live Performances Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 16:41


For Julian Saporiti, music is not just an opportunity for creative expression but also an avenue to share his rich knowledge of Asian American history. Armed with a PhD in American Studies from Brown, Saporiti recounts these tales, both personal and historical, through No-No Boy. On this episode of Live on KEXP, find out more about Saporiti's journey from professor to rock star before diving into a stirring set of songs off his sophomore album, '1975.' Recorded 05/04/2021. St. Denis or Bangkok, From a Hotel Balcony Khmerica Hapa Book Club: In Praise of Japanese Breakfast, Nina & Luling Little Saigon Born in the USA Watch the full Live on KEXP session on YouTube Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

KEXP Live Performances Podcast

For Julian Saporiti, music is not just an opportunity for creative expression but also an avenue to share his rich knowledge of Asian American history. Armed with a PhD in American Studies from Brown, Saporiti recounts these tales, both personal and historical, through No-No Boy. On this episode of Live on KEXP, find out more about Saporiti's journey from professor to rock star before diving into a stirring set of songs off his sophomore album, '1975.' Recorded 05/04/2021. St. Denis or Bangkok, From a Hotel Balcony Khmerica Hapa Book Club: In Praise of Japanese Breakfast, Nina & Luling Little Saigon Born in the USA Watch the full Live on KEXP session on YouTube Support the show: https://www.kexp.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.