The Daily Dive

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Start your day with The Daily Dive. News without the noise, told straight. Explore the most interesting news of the day. Connect with the writers, analysts and reporters that know the real story. Hosted by Oscar Ramirez in Los Angeles, this 20 minute podcast will be ready for you when you wake up. (Posted by 6 AM EST)

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    • May 15, 2022 LATEST EPISODE
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    Latest episodes from The Daily Dive

    WEEKEND EDITION- Protecting Recess for Kids, Bird Flu, Ads Coming to Streaming Platforms

    Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 19:44

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Who Calculates Inflation, Baby Formula Shortage, Guns Stolen From Vehicles

    Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 19:42

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    What's Behind the Baby Formula Shortage?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 19:58

    A baby formula shortage has caused parents to scramble to find alternatives to keep their kids fed with the appropriate nutrition.  The FDA has shut down Abbot Nutrition's factory in Michigan amid an investigation into bacterial infections which has been the biggest problem with supply as they are the largest producer in the country.  Dr. Steven Abrams, Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Texas, joins us what to know about the shortage as the FDA will start allowing Abbot to releasing some formula.   Next, the bird flu is currently wreaking havoc on farms across the country wiping out 36 million chickens and turkeys.  The virus itself is really bad for the birds and has a near 100% mortality rate, but it's actually the culling that is claiming so many of them.  If one bird gets infected, the whole flock must be taken out.  Kenny Torella, staff writer at Vox, joins us for what to know as the bird flu has already spread to 32 states.   Finally, Happy the elephant will have her day in court next week.  The 51-year-old elephant currently lives in the Bronx Zoo, but her lawyers are arguing that she be granted legal personhood.  If she wins, her detention at the zoo would be considered unlawful and she would be sent to a sanctuary.  She is part of a small but growing group of animals and natural entities like lakes and wild rice fighting for legal rights.  Corinne Ramey, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Ads Could Be Coming Very Soon to Your Favorite Streaming Platform

    Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 19:52

    Very soon you could be seeing ads on your favorite streaming platform.  Netflix has long been a holdout when it came to placing ads during their content, but a huge loss of subscribers has them scrambling for how to make up the lost revenue.  To that end, a cheaper pricing tier with ads could be coming by the end of the year.  Peter Kafka, senior correspondent at Recode, joins us for why it makes sense and if viewers will stick around for it.   Next, the withholding of recess has long been a punishment tactic for teachers when kids misbehave or miss assignments.  Now, there is growing momentum to pass laws that protect recess time and prohibit schools from taking it away to punish kids.  Research has shown that unstructured free time is important for child development as it fosters good social, communication, and coping skills.  Jackie Mader, early education reporter at The Hechinger Report, joins us for the fight for recess.   Finally, we all know that coworker who might not be the brightest or hardest worker, but still gets promoted anyway.  Whether it's schmoozing, brown-nosing, or riding coattails, some have mastered the art of ‘failing up.'  As more are going back to the office and after too many pandemic Zoom meetings, it is becoming more evident again.  Callum Borchers, On the Clock columnist at the WSJ, joins us for how some are turning failure into success. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Who Measures Inflation? It's Calculated by 477 Government Workers

    Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 19:56

    High inflation persists as President Biden points to the pandemic and the war in Ukraine as top causes for high prices.  Each month we get updated numbers on the Consumer Price Index, but how is that number calculated?  477 government workers spend their days going to grocery stores and other businesses to track the costs of over 100,000 goods and services each month.  Rachel Wolfe, consumer trends reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how we calculate inflation.   Next, what is the largest source of stolen guns in country?  Stolen guns from cars.  From 2019-2020, 180 cities saw a rise in gun thefts from vehicles.  This new trend is very concerning and simply a crime of opportunity.  Thieves are rolling through neighborhoods and pulling on door handles looking for open cars and laws vary from state to state on how guns should be secured in unattended vehicles.  Melissa Chan, reporter at NBC News, joins us for this disturbing trend.   Finally, a new report confirms that most working parents are burned out.  Research from Ohio State University says that 66% of working parents meet the criteria for parental burnout, meaning they feel they have nothing left to give.  This study was conducted at the height of the pandemic, but researchers think high rates of burnout are here to stay.  Catherine Pearson, reporter at the NY Times, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Your Next Covid Booster Shot Could Be a Nasal Vaccine

    Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 20:02

    Researchers are constantly working on new vaccine delivery methods for Covid and are hoping that nasal vaccines could be better at preventing transmission and infection.  Several candidates are in the works and in early clinical trials but the hope is that it could work better by taking hold in mucus membranes where the virus enters the body.  Karen Weintraub, health reporter at USA Today, joins us for how you next booster could be taken up the nose.   Next, many people took advantage of programs that paused federal student loan payments and interest and saved money or put it into other financial priorities.  But there were also some that remained diligent and continued to make payments as they could.  The result for them was being able to pay off completely or a huge chunk of their federal loans.  For those that did pay them off, now it's about building new savings since this debt is now gone.  Julia Carpenter, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more.   Finally, less than six months ago, Netflix launched a website called Tudum that was supposed to build more fandom for their properties.  Billed as place to offer news about shows, in-depth interviews, and exclusives, they site has had to lay off employees already.  Current and former employees say that it suffered from lack of direction and strategy.  Mia Sato, reporter at The Verge, joins us for what happened at Tudum. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    First Lady Visits Ukraine and the Hyperpolyglot Who Cleans Carpets

    Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 19:53

    As the war in Ukraine rages on, we saw another high-profile U.S. visitor go to the country to show support.  First Lady Jill Biden met with her counterpart Olena Zelenska, Ukraine's first lady.  The met at a school and showed support for mothers across the war-torn country.  Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for this and a look at the fallout since the leak of the draft opinion of the Supreme Court.  Justice Clarence Thomas has said the court can't be bullied and that young people now show no respect for the law.   Next, we'll tell you about a man named Vaughn Smith who cleans carpets for a living. Vaughn is also a hyperpolyglot. A hyperpolyglot is someone who can speak 11 languages or more, but Vaughn is special, by his count her can speak closer to 37 languages. To see what makes his brain tick, he decided to undergo an MRI at MIT and found that his brain does not function like that of a monolingual person. Jessica Contrera, reporter at The Washington Post, joins for more about Vaughn and what drove him to learn so much, a deep need for understanding others.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Parents Happy Despite Culture War Noise on Education and Gen Z Doesn't Want to Work

    Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 20:01

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Supreme Court Draft Opinion Signals End to Roe v. Wade and UFO Briefings on Capitol Hill

    Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 19:49

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Classified UFO Briefings on Capitol Hill Have Begun, but Some Lawmakers Not Happy

    Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 19:56

    UFOs continue to be in the news as classified briefings have begun on Capitol Hill, but some lawmakers are frustrated saying that intelligence agencies are not taking it seriously enough.  Lawmakers see these sightings as national security issues and want more analysts and surveillance systems dedicated to finding the origins of these aircrafts instead of just more reports of sightings.  Bryan Bender, senior national correspondent at Politico, joins us for what we know about these briefings.   Next, the war in Ukraine continues as Russia keeps intensifying its attacks on multiple fronts.  On the cyber front however, Russia has not been able to make the impact it had hoped.  Ukraine has managed to stay online with the help of Elon Musk's Starlink terminals, crowdsourced intelligence collection, and even deployed facial recognition programs to identify captured or killed Russian soldiers.  Justin Ling, contributor to Wired, joins us for the ongoing digital battle.   Finally, a check in on the gig economy as we are in this next phase of the pandemic.  A rebound in travel has led Uber to post revenue at a 136% increase from pandemic lows making $6.9 billion in the first quarter.  Still, drivers are having a tough time with high gas prices.  On the other side of things, companies like Instacart are having a tough time finding their footing as people are ordering less groceries to be delivered.  Kellen Browning, tech reporter at the NY Times, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Draft Supreme Court Opinions Signals It Could Overturn Roe v. Wade. What's Next and How Did We Get Here?

    Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 19:57

    The big story of the week is the draft opinion by the Supreme Court that was leaked on Monday.  The draft may still undergo some changes, but everything points to the overturning of Roe v. Wade and with it, the constitutional right to an abortion.  So how did we get here?  Lawsuits over the years haven't explicitly challenged that ruling, rather they have asked the Court to uphold restrictions that make is more difficult and expensive for clinics to provide abortions.  If overturned, there are 22 states with laws on the books that could outright ban or ban abortions in the very early stages of pregnancy.  Ian Millhiser, senior correspondent at Vox, joins us for what to expect.   Next, the leak of this draft opinion has been a rare breach that many say has never happened before.  There have been calls for the leaker to be identified and criminally charged, but legal experts say that is unlikely.  The draft opinions are not classified materials and if the person who did leak it had legitimate access to the document, then there is little that could be done.  Also in question is how much the Justice Department could become involved in an investigation.  Matt Zapotosky, national security correspondent at The Washington Post, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Culture War Discussions in Education Are Background Noise for Most Parents According to New Poll

    Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 19:56

    The education culture war is raging with discussions on everything from how we teach history, gender and sexuality and race.  We are seeing textbooks being banned and laws being implemented restricting certain conversations in school settings.  While some of these discussions have been loud and very contentious, a new poll says that for most parents, its more background noise.   Majorities of parents, across party lines say that many of these issues are being taught in a way that does align with their personal values.  Anya Kamenetz, education correspondent at NPR, joins us for how leading into the midterms, a very vocal minority is driving the discussion around education.   Next, it was one of the main tools that helped us transition to a work from home model during the pandemic, Zoom and other video conferencing apps.  They helped us connect and collaborate when we could not do so in person.  But a new study shows that compared to meeting in-person, creativity did take a bit of a hit.  Because we are so focused on the video screen during these meetings, we lose sight of our environments and move less, both of which stimulate creativity.  Erica Pandey, business reporter at Axios, joins us for the toll that video conferencing took on workplace creativity. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Some Police Reports Are Showing AirTags Are Being Used as Stalking Devices

    Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 19:55

    Police records are showing that across the country, women are being stalked with Apple AirTags. When released the devices were touted as a way to help users keep track of missing items like your keys, wallet or car, but police reports are showing that some women were getting notifications that their phones were tracked by an AirTag they didn't own. In some of those cases they could identify a man in their lives, usually an ex-partner, they suspected were trying to track them. Samantha Cole, tech reporter at Motherboard, joins us for how some are using them as stalking tools.   Next, the military has long had a special relationship with the Jeep, specifically the WWII Jeep. In 1940 the Army was taking bids for a new military vehicle and settled on a design by the Willys-Overland company that would be produced by Ford. How it got its name? The common belief is that it comes from the abbreviation of “G.P.” which was a common term of any military vehicle. The Jeep even drove up the Capitol steps. Miranda Summers Lowe, contributor to Task and Purpose, joins us for how the Jeep became America's favorite military vehicle. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Economists Mixed on Whether a Recession Is Coming and What Gen Z Thinks About Working

    Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 20:00

    Despite some positive signs in the economy, record high inflation, rising interest rates, and the GDP shrinking 1.4% has led many to worry about a possible recession coming our way.  While it doesn't seem like we are there quite yet, economists are mixed in their views of what to expect.  This is also reflected in ongoing, sagging poll numbers for President Biden.  He still has very low marks on the economy and voters say they trust Republicans more to fix it which doesn't bode well for the midterms.  Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us this and Nancy Pelosi goes to Ukraine to show support.   Next, Gen Z doesn't seem like they want to work and they are broadcasting it over social media.  Many have said that they don't have a dream job because they “don't dream of labor.”  The past few years of the pandemic have changed many attitudes when it comes to the work/life balance and young people entering the workforce at this time don't want to get bogged down in toiling away with nothing to show for it.  They have gained reputations as job hoppers and aren't afraid to air grievances on social media with hashtags like #QuitTok.  Terry Nguyen, reporter at Vox, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- How the Jeep Became America's Favorite Military Vehicle and the Hyperpolyglot Who Cleans Carpets

    Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 19:59

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Temporary Restraining Order on Lifting of Title 42, Menthols Cigarettes to Be Banned, More Covid Pills Available

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 19:53

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Menthol Cigarettes Set to Be Banned by the Biden Administration

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 19:57

    Start saying goodbye to menthol cigarettes.  The Biden administration has moved to ban the sales of menthols and flavored cigars, although it most likely would not take effect until 2024.  A third of all cigarettes sold in the U.S. are menthols with $20 billion in annual sales and 18.6 million Americans who smoke them.  We have already seen signals that at least one tobacco company plans to sue over the order.  Menthols have been seen as especially dangerous to minorities who smoke them in greater numbers and also harder to quit.  Jennifer Maloney, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more.   Next, social media influencers are being given free or discounted beauty procedures in exchange for posts and some are beginning to regret it.  Surgeons, clinics and med spas cannot advertise through official channels on platforms like TikTok, but they have gravitated toward exchanges with influencers to target larger and younger audiences.  For the influencers themselves, they say it can be addictive starting with fillers and Botox and progressing into other surgical procedures, all in the bid to look perfect because of social media pressures.  Kat Tenbarge, tech and culture reporter at NBC News, joins us for what to know. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Strategy on Overdose-Reversal Drugs Is Changing as Fentanyl Continues Its Rapid Spread Through U.S. Drug Supply

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 19:57

    Fentanyl continues to spread rapidly through the U.S. drug supply and the community groups that work closely with those most at risk of overdosing say that Naloxone is needed in greater quantities and closer to users. Naloxone which reverses the effects of opioids comes in a nasal spray and an injectable, but cost has always been a problem. Speed is also of the utmost importance as the drug can quickly prove to be fatal. Julie Wernau, health and medicine reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how the strategy is changing on overdose-reversal drugs.   Next, a sound hack called 'binaural beats' is helping people to get a digital high. Our ears process sounds one before the other to figure out where the sound is coming from and the 'binaural beats' disrupts that with two similar but different sounds with no greater than a 30 Hz difference. People have said that these beats are helping them with focus, sleep, sexual arousal and even getting high. Sofia Quaglia, contributor to the Daily Beast, joins us for how it all works.   Finally, the country is drowning in spam. We are getting more spam in all its forms... texts, emails, social media and robocalls. In March alone, the average American received 42 spam texts. For spammers, it's all about the money and it's working as Americans reported losing $131 million to fraud schemes that were initiated by texts. The difficulty is that even as service providers try to crack down, spammers change their tactics. Sara Fischer, media reporter at Axios, joins us for more. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Netflix Is Losing Subscribers Fast and Exploring Ad-Supported Model

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 20:02

    Netflix is scrambling to figure out a way to retain subscribers as they ended the first quarter with 200,000 less people paying for their content. Netflix has long sold itself as a commercial free space for TV shows and movies, but is now exploring a lower priced option that is ad-supported. Another area the company hopes to cut back on is rampant account sharing. They estimate that 222 million households pay for the platform and it is being shared with another 100 million more homes. Price sensitive customers are also leaving for competitors with cheaper subscriptions. Joe Flint, media reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Next, let's talk about death… specifically what happens to your body. Cremation is now more popular than a traditional casket burial with 56% of Americans being cremated. Estimates say that by 2040, 80% of people could go that way. A number of factors are influencing these decisions such as the significantly cheaper cost and increasingly secular population. There have also been an increase in green burials where the body is put into biodegradable containers or even reduced to soil. Karen Heller, national features writer at The Washington Post, joins us for the rise of cremation. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    New Technology Being Tested to Monitor Student Emotions Over Zoom

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 19:59

    A software startup named Classroom Technologies has teamed up with Intel to monitor student emotions on Zoom. The system can detect whether students are bored, distracted or confused by looking at facial expressions and how they interact with content. There are a lot of critics of this “emotion AI” technology that say you can't properly read students in this manner and also concerns over privacy and student surveillance. Real psychologists were brought in to teach the AI however. Kate Kaye, senior reporter at Protocol, joins us for more. Next, there has been renewed attention on what the country does with its nuclear waste. Currently there are 80 sites in 35 states where spent nuclear fuel is being stored, but the problem is there is no long-term plan for its disposal. The ultimate goal would be to have an underground geological repository where it can be buried, but there have been many obstacles to getting it done. And if you wondered what this waste looks like, it's not the glowing green ooze that you think. Rebecca Tuhus-Dubrow, contributor to The Washington Post, joins us for what to know. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inmate Set to Be Executed Chooses Firing Squad but Calls His Options Unconstitutional

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 19:59

    In less than two weeks, Richard Bernard Moore is set to be executed in South Carolina. The method he chose is firing squad. If this goes through he will be fourth prisoner in the country to die that way since 1976. Because of a law passed last year, it made the electric chair the default method of execution if lethal injection drugs could not be obtained. Moore chose firing squad because he opposes the electric chair, but still said that his two choices were unconstitutional. He is scheduled to be shot in the heart by 3 riflemen on April 29. Andrea Salcedo, reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for more. Next, California may have reached a turning point when it comes to crime and homelessness. One of the bluest states in the country, CA has voted for policies aimed at reshaping criminal justice, but polls are showing a growing dissatisfaction with the direction that the state is going and has fueled recall efforts of progressive district attorneys in LA and SF. Christal Hayes, national correspondent at USA Today, joins us for how crime data tells a complicated story despite all the headlines and crimes that people have witnessed. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    President Biden's Approval Ratings at Lowest They Have Been

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 19:58

    President Biden has a number of issues that continue to bog down his approval ratings. Starting with the war in Ukraine, Biden recently said that Putin is a war criminal and that he is committing genocide there. Biden projects calm about Covid publicly, but officials are nervous another wave could hit. And approval rating are the lowest they have been, especially with young people. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for what to know. Next, there is a top-secret world to the lavish and private gigs of music stars. While these have always been around and evolved over the years, music stars can get paid millions to play private parties, weddings and more. The key thing in all of this is secrecy. Attendees to these parties usually sign NDAs to protect all parties from criticism of wealth inequality and how much money is transferred. Experts say this trend will continue as it has moved beyond old rock and nostalgia acts to pop stars. David Browne, senior writer at Rolling Stone, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Children as Young as 8 Should Be Screened for Anxiety, CA Proposes 4-Day Work Week, Secret to Ukraine's Military Success

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 20:00

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Inflation Rate at Highest in 41 Years, Next Big Addiction Treatment, Another Massive Cargo Ship Stalled in Chesapeake Bay

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2022 19:46

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Elon Musk Offers to Buy Twitter for $43 Billion

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2022 19:57

    Elon Musk continues to take Twitter on a roller coaster ride as he has now made an offer to buy the rest of the company. Musk has offered to buy it for $43 billion and said that Twitter has extraordinary potential and wants to unlock it. He is worth about $259 billion, so he can afford it, but says that to make the changes he thinks are necessary, the company needs to go private. Aaron Gregg, business reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for Musk's hostile takeover bid. Next, the CDC's latest round of Covid guidelines are facing their first test. The guidelines now reflect a shift in priorities. They are moving away from trying to eliminate the transmission of the virus to reducing deaths and strain on the healthcare system. We will know if the guidelines fail right away, but a measure of success may be harder come by. Keren Landman, senior reporter for health and science, joins us for more. Finally, more states and school districts are making moves to address the mental health of children, but there are some parents and activists that are pushing back saying school officials are acting in inappropriate roles and pushing progressive thinking. A lot of this stems from people wanting more parental rights in education. Caitlin Owens, health care reporter at Axios, joins us for how kids' mental health could be America's next culture war. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Magic Mushrooms Could Be the Next Big Treatment for Addiction and the Secret to Ukraine's Military Success

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 19:55

    The next big treatment for addiction may have presented itself. Several psychedelic drugs have been touted as effective treatments for alcohol and drug abuse, but psilocybin also known as magic mushrooms seems to be the most effective when combined with therapy. Psilocybin still remains illegal under federal law, but there are some clinical trials running to study the drug and how it can address the psychological needs of addiction. Brenden Borrell, contributor to the NY Times, joins us for more. Next, when the Russian invasion of Ukraine began, many thought it would be a swift victory for Putin, but the Ukrainian military has fought valiantly and pushed them back as best they can. The secret to that success… years of training with NATO and other Western allies. For more than eight years, NATO and its members have worked with them to become a modern military with Western standards where soldiers are taught to think on the move rather than the rigid Soviet style of war that they came from and one that Russia currently employs. Daniel Michaels, Brussels Bureau Chief at the WSJ, joins us for how Ukraine's military has improved over the years. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Inflation at 8.5% A New Four-Decade High

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 19:59

    Inflation ticks up again to a new four-decade high of 8.5%. This is now the sixth straight month of inflation over 6%. The current rate of inflation continues to be driven by high energy costs and more rises in grocery prices. Some economists hope that we are hitting a peak as prices in some sectors begin to ease, but the overall problem persists. Gwynn Guilford, economics reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Next, a new proposal in California would shorten the work week to four days and force overtime beyond that. The plan would apply to companies with more than 500 employees and could in effect raise employees' wages by 25% increasing costs for employers. There are currently pilot projects with 38 companies exploring the effects of switching to a four day work week. Wes Venteicher, reporter at The Sacramento Bee, joins us for what to know. Finally, health experts with the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force will be issuing draft guidance that all children as young as 8 years old should be screened for anxiety. One of the things they point to is the effect that the pandemic has had on young kids and also an increase in numbers of kids aged 6-17 that have been diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Brianna Abbot, health reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what's in the recommendations. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Thousands of Etsy Sellers Go On Strike, but Will It Make an Impact?

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 19:55

    Thousands of Etsy sellers have gone on strike. Protesting an increase of transaction fees, we are seeing as many as 14,000 sellers put their shops into vacation mode. The impact is unclear at the moment as Etsy has about 5 million sellers on the platform. Charity Scott, e-commerce reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more on this strike as the company makes efforts to become a bigger destination for shoppers. Next, there's another massive cargo ship that is stranded in Chesapeake Bay in Maryland and it has been there for a month now! The circumstances aren't as disruptive as the last time a cargo ship was stuck in Suez Canal, but it is becoming somewhat of a destination for gawkers and those bored enough wanting to see a stranded ship. Julie Bykowics, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how the Coast Guard will be making a third attempt to get the ship free. Finally, the Army wants to build new barracks for its soldiers at Fort Bliss in Texas, but to save time and money, they will be using a 46-foot 3D printer. A machine called the Vulcan uses a special kind of concrete called Lavacrete to build the walls of the building at a lower cost than traditional construction. David Roza, Air Force reporter at Task and Purpose, joins us for what will be the largest 3D printed building in the western hemisphere once it's done. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Democrats Hoping to Change Narrative Around Economy Ahead of Midterms Where Losses Are Predicted

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 19:59

    There is a Covid outbreak in Washington D.C. where many that are close to the president have tested positive in recent days. A number of people attended a high profile dinner last week including the Attorney General and Agriculture Secretary. President Biden continues to test negative. Also as the midterm elections are on the horizon, former President Trump is endorsing Dr. Oz for Senate and Democrats are scrambling to change the narrative on the economy as many experts say they will have a tough time keeping majorities in Congress. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for more. Next, Epic Games has just released the latest version of their 3D software development tool called Unreal Engine 5. This tool allows gaming and movie developers to present intricate 3D details, facial realism, and large-scale world building. Epic says that the new update will make it the backbone of everything from movies and video games to metaverse experiences. It is free to download and use, but Epic will take a cut once projects developed using Unreal Engine 5 make over $1 million in revenue. Andrew Chow, culture and tech reporter for Time magazine, joins us for the impact it might have. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Young Men Driving Theater Rebound, the New Sober-Ish, Tik Tok Tics

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 10, 2022 19:58

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    WEEKEND EDITION- Freeze on Federal Student Loans Payments Extended, Walmart Raising Truckers' Wages, PPP Looted by Millions

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 24:39

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Ukrainian Refugees Are Showing Up at the Southern Border as More Migrants Seeking Asylum Are Also Expected

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 22:38

    As the war in Ukraine continues we are seeing a new surge of refugees at the border. More than 2,000 Ukrainians have reached the U.S. border with Mexico and more migrants from other countries are expected to seek asylum as the coronavirus public health order known as Title 42 will be lifted soon. Ukrainians have also been frustrated as there hasn't been official guidance on how they can enter the U.S. Miriam Jordan, national immigration correspondent at the NY Times, joins us for more. Next, drone deliveries are now a thing in Texas. ‘Wing' is a division of Alphabet, Google's parent company and just launched the first commercial service in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area. People will be able to order things like small items from Walgreens, pet medication and even ice cream and have it delivered straight to their door in a matter of minutes. Harry Guinness, contributor to Popular Science, joins us for how it works and whether it will catch on beyond a novelty. Finally, we have a jobs alert! Walmart is raising the starting salary of its truck drivers to at least $95,000 and up to $110,000 for their first year. Walmart will also start a training program to help people earn their commercial driver's license. As consumer buying habits have changed, Walmart needs to beef up its supply chain workers to make sure stores are stocked. Melissa Repko, retail and consumer reporter at CNBC, joins us for what to know. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Biden Administration Extends Federal Student Loan Payment Freeze Through August

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 22:41

    Good news for those with federal student loans. The Biden administration has extended the suspension of loan payments through August 31. This is the sixth time it has been extended. This will benefit about 41 million people so they don't accrue interest on their loans. Danielle Douglas-Gabriel, reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for what to know about the extension what politics are at play. Next, as people made the shift to working from home during the pandemic and starting new jobs because of the Great Resignation, everyone was using their cell phones instead of their old business lines and caller ID has been outing people. Because caller ID is linked to the plan holder, many young professionals are being outed as still being on their parents' phone plane. Lindsay Ellis, careers reporter at the WSJ joins us for more. Finally, young men have been driving the rebound of movie theaters. As studios have begun to release big budget movies in theaters, the films that have made the most money are those catering to this demographic. Young men have been more comfortable returning than older people and women after shutdowns. Erich Schwartzel, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how this is influencing what entertainment looks like for everyone else. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Could Elon Musk Bring Changes to Content Moderation Now That He Sits on Twitter's Board?

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 22:42

    Elon Musk has acquired a 9.2% stake in Twitter making him the largest shareholder. That's 73 million shares worth about $3 billion and now, he also has a seat with the board of directors. Musk has about 80 million followers and has been critical of Twitter in the past. Sarah Needleman, tech reporter at the WSJ, joins us for where many think Elon could play a big role at the company… issues of content moderation. Next, are some people ‘super immune' to Covid? There are many who have had Covid multiple times, while others have avoided infection all together. Researchers are currently studying health care workers whose bodies fought off infection, but never created specific antibodies for it. The hope is that understanding what kept them from getting sick could lead to better vaccines. Madison Muller, health reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for more. Finally, the use of certain drugs in small amounts is beginning to be claimed by wellness culture. Microdosing of magic mushrooms or even MDMA is getting more attention and even rewriting the definition of what it means to be sober. While research remains limited, many feel that the positive effects of small doses can be beneficial to their lives. Luke Winkie, contributor to Vox, joins us for the new sober-ish. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Inflation Is Making People Change Their Buying Habits to Find Deals

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 22:37

    Inflation continues to be at a 40-year high with no signs of letting up. In response, shoppers are starting to change their buying habits and cutting back on staples. Consumers are buying things in smaller quantities and also switching to store brands to save money. The big question is whether consumer product giants will adjust prices after betting big that people would stick with them. Sharon Terlep, consumer products reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Next, there is an estimated 7.7 to 23 million people that might have had long Covid. In an effort to find root causes and treatments, patients suffering from these prolonged symptoms are joining with researchers to come up with answers. While that might seem like a given, that is not the usual partnership in place when studying diseases.. Frances Stead Sellers, senior writer at The Washington Post, joins us for how long Covid is changing medical research. Finally, why are people acting so weird? We are seeing more crime, unruly people and other strange behavior recently and it begs the question, what's up with that? Experts suggest a range of things have been influencing people with stress as the main culprit. People are also drinking more and are dealing with isolation. Olga Khazan, staff writer at The Atlantic, joins us for what's going on with all this weird behavior. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Covid Paycheck Protection Program Has Lost Billions of Dollars to Fraud

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 22:43

    Amid shutdowns during the pandemic, the government stepped in quickly to provide much needed financial support to Americans and business owners, but maybe they moved too quickly. One of the plans to help was the Paycheck Protection Program also known as PPP which we now know has been looted by fraudsters to the tune of billions of dollars. The true amount may not be known, but in this program alone it could be about $80 billion and much of it is unrecoverable. To scam the government people inflated the number of employees they had or even created companies out of whole cloth and there was little verification. Laura Strickler, national investigative reporter at NBC News, joins us for the looting of the PPP. Next, in an update to a story that was first reported on last fall, teen girls are still going to doctors offices with TikTok-related tics and other disorders as well. While some of these tics might seem like Tourette's, they are actually being diagnosed with functional neurological disorders which can include verbal tics and abnormal body movements. New research is supporting other theories that some of these girls were also susceptible to other disorders. Once they got treatment for the tics, other disorders began to develop, but doctors still think that social media videos play a factor. Julie Jargon, family and tech columnist joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Positive Drug Tests at All-Time High, Why Inflation Is So Hard to Fix, Lawsuit That Influenced the Don't Say Gay Bill

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2022 24:47

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Student Test Scores Improve as They Return to Schools, FDA Approves Next Round of Boosters for People 50 and Older, Redacted UFO Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 2, 2022 24:31

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Positive Drug Tests at Jobs Hit 2-Decade High

    Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 22:31

    Positive drug tests have hit a two-decade high mostly driven by an increase of positive marijuana tests. A couple of things are at play here. First, attitudes about marijuana are changing as more states move to legalize recreational use. Secondly, due to labor shortages, many businesses loosened drug screening policies to open themselves up to a wider pool of applicants. Will Feuer, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Next, President Biden has unveiled his plan to try and help ease gas prices across the country. We will be releasing one million additional barrels of oil per day from the national Strategic Petroleum Reserve for the next six months. The plan also includes putting pressure on energy companies to ramp up domestic production of oil. Jeff Stein, White House economics reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for the plan to lower gas prices. Finally, over 5,000 sellers on the Etsy platform are planning a strike starting on April 11 to protest an increase in transaction fees that will be implemented on the same day. Sellers say that the company is making record sales and revenue but continues to saddle them with more fees and an influx of resellers and drop shippers on the site. Mia Sato, reporter at The Verge, joins us for why you might not be able to buy from your favorite sellers very soon. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Many Who Quit During the Great Resignation Are Having Major Regrets

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 22:36

    Many people who left their jobs during the Great Resignation are having regrets. About 20% of those that left didn't think it was a good idea after all and many aren't even planning on staying very long in their new positions. Reasons why they aren't happy range from the new role being different from what they expected or even missing the culture of their old job. Paul Davidson, economics and jobs reporter at USA Today, joins us for more. Next, according to the U.N. an estimated 4 million Ukrainians have fled the country mostly to nearby countries, especially Poland, which has taken in about 2.4 million people. Most of them have been women and children because of a law barring men of fighting age from leaving. While the numbers have begun to slow down, the refugee crisis will have long lasting effects. Joanna Sugden, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how the number of those fleeing is larger than they first predicted. Finally, the battle for your toilet paper is on. Due to the scarcity of traditional toilet paper during the pandemic, many people tried alternatives such as recycled toilet paper and paper made out of bamboo. Now these alternative companies are trying to maintain the momentum they have gained. Daniela Sirtori-Cortina, consumer goods reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for how they are marketing to you, making sure you know it's sustainable and most importantly, soft.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    FDA Authorizes Second Booster Shot for People 50 and Older Will Examine Long-Term Strategy Soon

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 22:41

    The FDA has authorized a second Covid booster shot for people 50 and older and those 12 and older that have weakened immune systems. The decision was mostly based on data from Israel that shows it could be lifesaving for those over 60 but has only marginal benefits for younger people. Carolyn Johnson, science reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for the latest and also how the FDA will soon meet to discuss the long-term booster strategy for the rest of the population. Next, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has signed the controversial Parental Rights in Education bill, known to opponents as the “Don't Say Gay” bill. One of the key stories that influenced the formation of the bill is a lawsuit by January Littlejohn and her husband against Leon County Schools where they claimed that school officials helped their child transition to a different gender without keeping them informed. The conversation on this will continue as it doesn't go to trial until next year and for Republicans, they see parental rights as a winning issue for the midterms. Andrew Atterbury, Florida education reporter at Politico, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    America's Inflation Problem Is a Complicated Issue to Fix

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 22:42

    Inflation continues to be a problem with a not so easy solution. Part of the problem is not everyone agrees on the absolute causes so the fixes are also not agreed upon. Most can agree that supply chain issues, rising oil prices and shifting consumer demands are all contributors. While the Fed and the White House try to help, they are limited in what they can do. Emily Stewart, senior correspondent at Vox, joins us for the complicated issue. Next, a new supply chain issue could be on its way soon to one of the busiest ports in the world. New contract negotiations for more than 22,000 union dockworkers will begin soon and if history is any indicator, we are in for some disruptions. These workers have been working around the clock for most of the pandemic and some points of resistance could be more automation at the ports. Peter Goodman, global economics correspondent at the NY Times, joins us for this possible supply chain risk. Finally, crime concerns in Los Angeles are leading to wealthier homeowners to seek out panic room installs in their homes. Depending on the build-out, the price can range anywhere from $100,000 to a million dollars. These safe rooms can be outfitted with biometric scans for entry and even with high-end amenities. Hadley Meares, contributor to the Hollywood Reporter, joins us for the rising demand for safe rooms. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Takeaways From Biden's European Trip and Sagging Poll Numbers

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 22:42

    President Biden wrapped up his European trip with a message of unity for European allies, reassurances for Poland and a gaffe that some thought was him calling for regime change in Russia. We also saw a new round of poll numbers that don't look good for Biden. Approval rating is low and confidence in handling of Russia and the economy also took hits. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for more. Next, the return to in-person learning for students this year has yielded some improvement in test scores in reading and math, but still not to pre-pandemic levels. Young students still seem to be struggling, especially those that were learning to read in the last two years. Many teachers were alarmed to see how behind some were academically and emotionally when returning. Sara Randazzo, education reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how test scores are rising. Finally, last June the Department of Defence released its much hyped UFO report and it landed without much information. Now an activist has published a longer and redacted report that members of Congress were briefed with. While still lacking a lot of clear information we did get an idea of other sections in the report that focused on possible new advanced technologies and most interestingly, the most common shapes of UFOs observed. Jason Koebler, editor in chief at Motherboard, joins us for this latest development. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Students Flourish in Schools Who Did Less to Contain COVID, Russian Refugees at the U.S. Southern Border

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2022 24:41

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Stimulus Checks for High Gas Prices, COVID Infection Linked to Increased Rate of Type 2 Diabetes, Confusing Way NFTs Are Taxed

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 24:32

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Could You Get Stimulus Checks for Rising Gas Prices?

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 22:42

    Could stimulus checks for gas be headed your way soon? Consumers could see increased costs of $2,000 this year due to gas prices. Three different plans have been proposed on the federal level to help ease the pain of high prices. But while lawmakers are trying to hand out more money, there are concerns it could make inflation worse. Aimee Picchi, reporter at CBS Moneywatch, joins us for what's in these plans. Next, President Biden is in Europe meeting with NATO and European allies to discuss next steps with Russia and how to help Ukraine. In response to the refugee crisis, Biden said that the U.S. will welcome up to 100,000 Ukrainians and is looking for ways to expedite the process. Biden also pledged more than $1 billion in new humanitarian assistance. Stef Kight, politics and immigration reporter at Axios, joins us for how the refugee process could work. Finally, Hollywood loves its sequels, so much so that they barely even bother to change the name. Take the latest “Scream” or “Texas Chainsaw Massacre,” often new movies in the same franchise just add or subtract “the” or it remains exactly the same. Filmmakers say it's not being lazy, rather it pays homage to the original and gets a new generation interested in a franchise. Chris Kornelis, contributor to the WSJ, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    If You Bought NFTs Last Year, Figuring Out the Taxes You Owe Could Be Very Confusing

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 22:43

    If you traded in crypto or bought NFTs last year, don't forget you might be on the hook for all those taxes. NFTs in particular are posing a problem for consumers and accountants. Depending on the crypto used to buy it and who's doing the selling, NFT transactions can be taxed as income, short or long-term capital gains, collectibles or dividends. Sam Sutton, reporter at Politico, joins us for the confusing classifications of NFTs. Next, according to a review of patient data, people who had Covid-19 were at a greater risk of developing Type 2 diabetes within a year, than those who avoided getting sick. Looking at the records of over 180,000 VA patients researchers calculated that those that got Covid were 46% more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes for the first time or prescribed medication to control blood sugar. Lenny Bernstein, health and medicine reporter at The Washington post, joins us for more. Finally, as sanctions hit Russian oligarchs to put pressure on Putin to end his invasion of Ukraine, we have seen their yachts try to get to friendlier waters. Yacht watchers have been tracking their movements as they try to avoid being seized and as they even get denied fuel. Benoit Faucon, senior reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how some Russian oligarchs' yachts are on the run. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Some Russian Families Also Feeling the War Are Trying to Cross the CA/Mexico Border

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 22:45

    The war in Ukraine has caused a refugee crisis where the U.N. says that over 3.5 million people have fled the country, but we are also hearing that Russians are also leaving because of the invasion. While most are going to nearby countries some have made the trip here to the southern border with Mexico attempting to seek asylum and frustration has been mounting that they are not getting in like Ukrainians are. For those that do get in, they are being given a 1-year stay in the country. Steve Gregory, reporter for KFI News in Los Angeles, took a trip to the border and spoke to one Russian family seeking asylum. Next, as we progress through the pandemic and we see some positive trends with fewer cases and hospitalizations, the concern is always what could be coming next. A new strain circulating in Europe and quickly spreading here may not lead to a new wave, but vaccine makers have asked for approval for a 4th round of booster shots and the question is, where does that end? We could be in store for boosters every year until we can develop a universal coronavirus vaccine. Robert Langreth, science and health reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for the future of booster shots. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    This School District Did Less to Contain Covid and Their Students Thrived

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 22:45

    One of the biggest debates of the pandemic was how to proceed with school as the virus disrupted everything. Everything from learning remotely or in person to wearing masks was a point of contention, but at the Lewis-Palmer school district in Colorado, they chose to keep kids in class and made masks optional. What resulted were students who flourished and boosted some of their test scores when other districts in the state lagged behind. Perry Stein, education reporter at The Washington post, joins us for how this district tried to proceed as normal. Next, for many people that have experienced long Covid, they have had to deal with not only prolonged symptoms, but the hassle of trying to fight for disability benefits. We still understand very little about long Covid and how severe the effects are can be difficult to measure. Insurers demand that there be evidence that a person cannot work, and some medical tests may not clearly show an impairment leading to denials of benefits. Christopher Rowland, business of health reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for the fight for disability payments. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Could Russian War in Ukraine Be Headed Toward a Stalemate?

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 22:45

    The war in Ukraine stretches on as reports come in that Russia is using hypersonic missiles as well reports that they shelled an art school where 400 residents were taking shelter. Despite the continued onslaught, some experts say that the war could be headed toward a stalemate. Russia has mounting casualties, loss of equipment, and had their progress on the ground slow down. The thought is that Ukraine might not be able to push them out of the country, but Russia can't take more of Ukraine. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for this and a preview of the confirmation hearings for Kentanji Brown Jackson. Next, the country runs on Amazon deliveries and we have all seen the Amazon branded vans in our neighborhoods. Back in 2018, they launched their Delivery Service Partner program as an opportunity for people to build small businesses using Amazon's technology, processes and experience in logistics. While definitely an opportunity, it can be tough to turn a profit as partners must foot the cost for worker compensation claims, leases on vans, and damage repairs. Amazon also holds control on almost all aspects of the business. Lauren Kaori Gurley, reporter at Vice News, joins us for how some Amazon delivery companies are being crushed by debt. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- CA High-Speed Rail at a Crossroads, Selling Used Cars at a Profit, High Cost of Police Misconduct

    Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2022 24:46

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

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