The Daily Dive

Follow The Daily Dive
Share on
Copy link to clipboard

Start your day with The Daily Dive. News without the noise, told straight. Explore the most interesting news of the day. Connect with the writers, analysts and reporters that know the real story. Hosted by Oscar Ramirez in Los Angeles, this 20 minute podcast will be ready for you when you wake up. (Posted by 6 AM EST)

iHeartRadio


    • Nov 26, 2021 LATEST EPISODE
    • daily NEW EPISODES
    • 23m AVG DURATION
    • 1,310 EPISODES


    Search for episodes from The Daily Dive with a specific topic:

    Latest episodes from The Daily Dive

    How This Holiday Shopping Season Is Different From When the Pandemic First Began

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 25:09

    The holiday shopping season is in full swing and a lot has changed since the pandemic began. The biggest shift is that businesses are expecting to see more customers in-person, so expect big crowds. E-commerce is expected to slow, but only slightly as it should top the $200 billion mark for the first time. Customers will have more buy now, pay later options and get ready for live-streaming shopping events. Melissa Repko, retail reporter at CNBC, joins us for what to expect this season. Next, the snowball effect in the supply chain is raising prices and making it harder to get some of the items you want. The biggest challenge that beer and liquor makers are facing is obtaining glass bottles. America loves their chicken tenders, and prices have jumped because of delays at meat processing plants and in Tyson's case a bad rooster. Medical equipment, toys, video game consoles, and even your favorite athleisure wear are all facing setbacks. Phil McCausland, reporter at NBC News, joins us for a look at some specific items hurt by back backlogs and rising prices. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Climate Change Comes for America's Supply of Pies and Thanksgiving Food Power Rankings

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 25:12

    Supply chain issues have plagued various industries as we continue on our way back from the pandemic. Now it is coming for America's supply of pies! Compounding the issue is climate and bad weather effects on pretty much every ingredient in our favorite pies. Case in point is Tampa-based Mike's Pies who is struggling to fulfill orders and maintain stock of ingredients, starting with their graham cracker crumb vendor. Laura Riley, business of food reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for how even after supply chain issues get resolved, climate change still poses a problem. Next, Thanksgiving is here and it's time to talk about our favorite foods! To end the show today we will give you the official Thanksgiving food power rankings. We will speak to Lucas Kwan Peterson, food columnist at the LA Times, for his take on where all your favorite Thanksgiving foods rank. A little preview of what you are in for… Turkey ranks dead last in his list, pumpkin pie doesn't fare much better, and cranberries might just be the most controversial food item.   Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Biden Releasing 50 Million Barrels of Oil From Strategic Petroleum Reserve Hoping to Bring Down Gas Prices

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:16

    President Biden is tapping the Strategic Petroleum Reserve to release 50 million barrel of oil in hopes that it will bring down the price of gas. This is an effort done in coordination with 6 other countries to bring down prices which is a big contributor to inflation. The only snag is that it still may take some time before we see the effects or if it works at all. Tim Puko, energy policy reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to know. Next, the Bay Area and Los Angeles have been hit with a spat of flash-mob style robberies targeting luxury retail stores, jewelry stores, and even marijuana dispensaries. In coordinated efforts large groups of people rush a store, grab as much as they can, and then retreat to cars waiting outside. It underscores the huge challenge that law enforcement has and many also point to Prop 47 which reduced some property crimes to misdemeanors. Rachel Swan, reporter at the SF Chronicle, joins us for more. Finally, the Democratic Party is going through an identity crisis. Recent polls and focus groups of voters who supported President Biden are hard pressed to know what they currently stand for. Even passing the infrastructure bill and the Build Back Better plan in the House isn't fixing the issue as voters don't feel Biden is getting it done. David Siders, national political reporter at Politico, joins us for how the Democratic brand is broken. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Michigan Woman Going to Prison After Trying Contract a Killer by Going to RentaHitman.com

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 25:16

    A Michigan woman named Wendy Wein is going to prison after trying to hire a hitman to kill her ex-husband. She didn't want to kill him herself and didn't trust the people she knew, so she went online and landed at RentaHitman.com. She went as far as meeting someone and paying a $200 down payment. The problem was that that it is a fake website. Jonathan Edwards, reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for more. Next, booster shots have been approved for anyone over 18 that has already been fully vaccinated. Protection from getting infected starts to wane after about 6 months especially for those that are older or immunocompromised. But what should you do if you are healthy and not at risk? Does getting a booster shot take away someone's opportunity to get their first shot? Kelsey Piper, staff writer at Vox, joins us for what to know about boosters. Finally, you might think that marijuana and parenting don't mix, but there is a growing movement of ‘cannamoms' who say that consuming weed helps them to calm down, reduce anxieties and be more present in their kids' lives. They want to fight the stigma around it and also make clear that they aren't getting blazingly high and consider it low risk, just like a glass of wine. Jesse Staniforth, contributor to the BBC, joins us for more on ‘cannamoms.' Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    House Passes Build Back Better Plan and Pfizer Fights to Keep Their Vaccine Recipe Secret

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:12


    The House has passed President Biden's $1.7 trillion Build Back Better plan and it will now move on to the Senate where it will most likely undergo some changes before it gets voted on. The Senate is aiming for a vote before Christmas. While it was passed along party lines, everyone came out with a win as progressives will get to expand the social safety net, moderates got the CBO score they wanted, and even House minority leader Kevin McCarthy drew the praise of Donald Trump for his 8 hour speech delaying the vote. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for this and how the U.S. is spending billions on Covid treatments other than vaccines. Next, Pfizer recently struck a licensing deal with the Medical Patents Pool which in turn can strike deals with other manufacturers to make generic versions of its Covid antiviral pill for poorer countries, but when it comes to its mRNA vaccine, Pfizer has not been so willing to share the recipe. They stand to make $36 billion in revenue this year and have said that they will increase their shipments to poor countries at adjusted prices. Stephanie Baker, senior writer at Bloomberg News, joins us for the fight over profits and the lopsided global supply of vaccines. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com


    WEEKEND EDITION- Thanksgiving Travel Could Be a Mess, 9 Different Political Ideologies in America

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 26:14

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Staples Center Renamed to Crypto.com Arena, Poll Shows Americans Think Biden Mentally Unfit, Esperanza Patient Possibly Cured Her HIV

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 26:08

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Schools Use COVID Tests to Keep Students in Classroom

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 25:16

    Covid disruptions to classrooms continue to happen across the country, but many schools are turning to testing over quarantine to keep kids in class. Test-to-stay programs are screening students regularly after exposure to known cases rather than sending them straight home. This allows them to remain in class while they continue to test negative. Sabrina Siddiqui, White House reporter at the WSJ, joins us for how schools are finding ways to keep kids in the classroom. Next, the iconic Staples Center in Los Angeles will have a new name come Christmas day. In a branding deal worth $700 million, it will now be known as Crypto.com Arena. Crypto.com allows people to trade in popular cryptocurrencies and boasts over 10 million users. Anna Hirtenstein, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for the larger play… the crypto industry's latest move to get mainstream recognition. Finally, CVS said it will be closing 900 stores over the next three years as it shifts its strategy to focus on digital sales and more healthcare services. They will be spinning off into three different kinds of stores. One will be their traditional retail locations, one will offer primary care services, and the last will be HealthHubs that offer mental health services and other wellness features. Melissa Repko, retail reporter at CNBC, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Thanksgiving Travel Could Be a Mess, Will the TSA Be Ready?

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 25:14

    Millions of American are expected to travel for Thanksgiving and if you are heading out, you should expect delays. One of the biggest mysteries is how many TSA agents will be in compliance with vaccine mandates for federal workers set for Nov. 22nd. The government doesn't think there will be any delays, but long wait times are inevitable as TSA employees are leaving for other reasons too. Suzanne Rowan Kelleher, staff writer at Forbes, joins us for how holiday travel could be a mess. Next, President Biden has been on the wrong side of the polls recently amid missteps and verbal flubs. According to a Politico/Morning Consult poll, just 44% of voters approve of his job performance and worse yet, 48% say he is not mentally fit. Beyond that, voters didn't find him to be a clear communicator or a strong leader. Marc Caputo, national political reporter at Politico, joins us for more bad poll numbers for Biden. Finally, everyone has done it at some point, but it might be wise to stop sucking in your stomach all the time, it could be bad for your health. We're not talking about the occasional time when taking a picture or trying to fit into an outfit, but prolonged stomach gripping can affect your pelvic floor muscles, make it harder to take deep breaths, or cause soreness and stiffness in you lower back. Allyson Chiu, wellness reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Known at the “Esperanza Patient,” Woman's Own Immune System Cured Her of HIV

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 25:10

    A woman in Argentina known as the “Esperanza patient” has become only the second documented person whose own immune system cured her of HIV. She is what's known as a so-called elite controller of HIV. This happens in an estimated 1 in 200 people and their immune systems are able to suppress the virus from replicating to very low levels without using antiretroviral treatments. While still unknown how this occurs, it does provide hope for the 38 million people living with the virus. Benjamin Ryan, contributor to NBCNews.com, joins us for what to know about the “Esperanza patient.” Next, where have all the public bathrooms gone? Going through the pandemic and seeing the closures of bars, restaurants and other public spaces, it laid bare how very few places there are for a person to relieve themselves. It was a trend that was definitely happening before the pandemic with many places being closed or just neglected which also gave public restrooms bad reputations. According to a “Public Toilet Index,” the U.S. only has eight toilets per 100,000 people overall. Elizabeth Yuko, contributor to Bloomberg CityLab, joins us for what to know about the lack of public bathrooms. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Beto O'Rourke Throws Is Hat in the Ring Again, This Time for Texas Governor

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 25:14


    Former congressman from El Paso and Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke, has thrown his hat in the ring again… this time into the Texas governor's race. He has an uphill battle in a solidly red state that hasn't chosen a Democratic governor since 1991 and there is also a wild card factor if actor Matthew McConaughey chooses to run. David Siders, national political reporter at Politico, joins us O'Rourke's announcement. Next, President Biden and his administration have had a messaging problem when it comes to inflation, coronavirus and Afghanistan. It is causing Democrats to worry whether his is underestimating the scale of the challenges we face in the country. Constant re-branding of legislative priorities have also made it tough to gain traction all while approval ratings keep dropping. Tyler Pager, White House reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for what to know. Finally, phone notifications are driving people crazy. The constant pings and chirps are causing distractions as our communication has become more fragmented. Work and personal messages are blurring together for a non-stop flow of distractions and when we lose out focus, it can take an average of 25 minutes to get back on track. Rachel Feintzeig, work and life columnist at the WSJ, joins us for how it can be hard to get anything done. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com


    Inflation Continues to Be a Concern for the Biden Administration and Beyond Red vs. Blue - The Nine Distinct Political Groups

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 25:13


    Inflation is the latest issue that Biden and his administration need to get under control. Everything is more expensive right now and supply chain issues continue to affect the economy. While Democrats try to bring prices down, there is also more urgency to pass Biden's Build Back Better plan, with some notable holdouts like Sen. Joe Manchin who is concerned with how it could impact inflation. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for this, Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg stepping into the spotlight, and Steve Bannon being indicted for contempt of Congress. Next, every wonder why you feel like you might not fit into a particular political party? Americans are divided for sure, but it goes beyond a left or right thing. Even within each party there are deep divides. Pew Research sorted American ideologies into nine distinct categories, four that lean left, four that lean right, and stressed sideliners in the middle. And for those that do fit into the center, they often hold little common ground. Baxter Oliphant, senior researcher at the Pew Research Center, joins us for the wide spectrum of political beliefs. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com


    WEEKEND EDITION- Consumer Prices at a 30-Year High, There Is No Thanksgiving Turkey Shortage, Inside a Fast Food Walkout

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 26:15

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- CA Couple Sues Over Embyro Mix-Up, Crowd Surge at Astroworld, Next Step for RNA Is Stopping Moldy Food

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021 26:06

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Introducing Essential Voices: The Future of Journalism

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 54:09


    Since you love this podcast, we think you might like this one as well. Check out Essential Voices where in each episode, host Wilmer Valderrama will have intimate conversations with people on the frontlines of the food system, transportation, child-care and other workers who are so often overlooked. That conversation leads to a round-table discussion with activists and politically-active celebrities, discussing themes, issues and areas of needed change. About this Episode When the pandemic began, journalist Ashton Pittman began working at the Mississippi Free Press, a new nonprofit media outlet, not realizing what the future would hold. At a time when local, national, and global communities relied heavily on news outlets for an accurate portrayal of the Covid pandemic, Ashton's work to provide fair and accurate journalism became essential. Not only reporting on Covid-19 but also on the Black Lives Matter protests in Mississippi, Ashton came face to face with combating misinformation and vaccine hesitancy, all the while uplifting stories of Mississipians in a media desert. Roundtable guests: Award-winning journalists Maria Hinojosa from Latino USA on NPR and Julio Ricardo Varela from Latino Rebels, both produced by the Futuro Media Group. Listen and Subscribe to Essential Voices with Wilmer Valderrama on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts! https://www.iheart.com/podcast/1119-essential-voices-with-wil-84986899/ Learn more about the Mississippi Free Press: http://mississippifreepress.org/ Learn more about Maria and Julio's podcast, In The Thick: https://www.inthethick.org Learn more about Futuro Media: https://www.futuromediagroup.org Learn more about Latino Rebels: https://www.latinorebels.com Episode Transcript: https://app.trint.com/public/bb77b0f4-77a8-4888-bd34-0da794a592ae Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com


    Prices Rise at Fastest Pace in 30 Years

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 25:17

    Prices were up 6.2% last month which is the largest rise in 30 years. Inflation is making everything more expensive and the era of cheap everything is over. Supply chain issues continue to be the main culprit for most of our post-pandemic woes, but inflation could wipe away wage gains and savings that many Americans are now having to spend. Kevin Dugan, reporter at NY Magazine, joins us for how everything is more expensive. Next, Thanksgiving is quickly approaching and we are hearing that it will be more expensive than in years past and also that there might be a turkey shortage. The expensive part is true, but there won't be a mass shortage of turkeys. Rather, it might be difficult to find the turkey you want. Last year, small birds were all the rage because of smaller family gatherings, this year is all about the mid-size birds. Emily Stewart, senior reporter at Vox, joins us for why you should start shopping now. Finally, electric vehicle company Rivian Automotive just went public and is proving to be a very attractive stock netting about $12 billion on an $80 billion valuation. Rivian has had a slower and more deliberate approach to its rollout which will also be a good test of the meme stock craze that has lifted various companies' value. Andrew Hawkins, transportation reporter at The Verge, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Veterans You Should Know Ep 4: Finding Your Path with Nishant Roy

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 43:36

    Airman Nishant Roy talks to host Rob Riggle about his choice to join the military and what it was like deploying in the months following the attacks of September 11th. Nishant discusses his storied civilian career working for the Clinton Foundation, Goldman Sachs, the USDA and USAID, and his current role as Chief of Staff to the CEO of Chobani.    Post-9/11 GI Bill https://www.va.gov/education/about-gi-bill-benefits/post-9-11/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Astroworld Festival Emergency Plans Didn't Include Protocol for Crowd Surge

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 25:14

    Many are still reeling from the tragedy at the Astroworld Festival where eight people died and hundreds were injured. Many questions remain on how things escalated so quickly, but crowd surges like the one that night happen fast and often go unnoticed until it's too late. Emergency plans for the event covered other things like active shooters, but nothing in the case of a crowd surge. Ahiza Garcia-Hodges, reporter at NBC News, joins us for more. Next, we have been learning a lot about mRNA because of the Covid vaccines, but the next big thing for RNA could be fixing moldy food. The next generation of pesticides and fungicides could use RNA to target very specific insects and fungi. One particular type of fungus they hope to target is responsible for at least $10 billion in damage to crops every year. Matt Reynolds, senior writer at Wired, joins us for how RNA may be used next to help farmers. Finally, the crypto market continues to be the Wild West. The combined value of all cryptocurrencies is over $3 trillion and that is driving interest and investors to snatch up newer cryptocurrencies and unfortunately, fall for scams. One example is “Squid coin” which capitalized on the popular Netflix show, but ended up being a “rug pull” scam. Thomas Urbain, markets and tech reporter at AFP, joins us for what to know. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Robinhood Data Breach and Inside an Employee Walkout at a Pennsylvania McDonald's

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 25:16

    The brokerage app Robinhood is the latest company to have been hit with a data breach. In this case it is affecting about 7 million users and has been linked to a phone call where a hacker duped a customer support staffer for access. No money has been lost yet and most of the breach concerned names and email addresses, with about 300 people that had more details exposed. There is still concern as other scammers can do a lot with just names and emails. Annie Massa, investing reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for more. Next, we have seen walkouts and protests across the country at fast food restaurants and now we'll take a look at a rebellion inside a McDonald's in Bradford, Pa. Workers at this fast food chain were unhappy with wages and conditions and banded together to walkout. Frustrated with the lack of support from the franchise owner and even corporate offices the workers left and in a good twist all found better paying jobs. Online and elsewhere these workers received scathing criticism saying they were entitled, but they also got some support from others in the service industry. Greg Jaffe, national reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for how this walkout took place. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    California Parents File Lawsuit After Giving Birth to Wrong Baby After IVF MIX-up

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 25:07

    A couple in California has filed a lawsuit against a fertility clinic that mixed up their embryos with another couple. Daphna and Alexander Cardinale carried the baby of another couple, gave birth to a baby girl and raised her for four months until the couples decided to swap babies. The other couple was implanted with the Cardinale's embryo. Adam Wolf, attorney for the Cardinale family, joins us for what happened and the effort to never let this happen again. Next, there is a new etiquette for post-pandemic office life. Many still have anxieties about being back and others are just rusty from being away for so long. Hugs and handshakes are out, be honest with those close talkers so they give you space, and it is OK to ask about vaccination status. Rachel Feintzeig, work and life columnist at the WSJ, joins us for how to avoid the awkward return. Finally, there is such a thing as being too positive and it could be very annoying. Positivity given in the wrong way is called “toxic positivity” and it can come off as dismissive or condescending when you don't listen and just offer up platitudes like “Cheer up!” and “Try to have a better attitude.” There is a better approach when someone just wants to vent to you. Elizabeth Bernstein, author of the Bonds column at the WSJ, joins us for more on toxic positivity. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Biden Gets a Win With Passage of Infrastructure Bill, but Any Political Gains Will Take Time to Be Seen

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 25:15

    President Biden got a big win when the House finally passed the bi-partian infrastructure bill, but any political gains will take time to be seen. Still in flux for now is the $1.75 trillion Build Back Better plan and polls continue to show that Biden's approval rating keeps dropping. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News joins us for this, a federal judge halts the vaccine requirement for companies with 100 or more employees, and things don't look good for a Democratic majority as many are retiring before the midterms. Next, we'll continue to look at how the Great Resignation is affecting the job market. While many have left to pursue better wages and working environments, millions of Americans have been left behind and still can't find work. Millions of jobs are available, but they are not connecting with those who need them. Karla Miller, work advice columnist at the Washington Post, joins us for those left behind and the flip side, what employers did right to hold on to their workers... trust, appreciation, and support go a long way. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Finding a Better Job During the Great Resignation and Why So Many Teachers Are Thinking About Quitting

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 26:19

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- New Vax Mandate Rules, Election Day Fallout, Microdosing Vaccine for Kids

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 26:03

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Biden Administration Sets New Vaccine Rules for Companies With a January 4th Deadline

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 25:05

    The Biden administration has released new vaccine rules that could cover more than 100 million workers. For companies with more than 100 employees, the deadline is now January 4th for them to be fully vaccinated or get tested weekly. Employers are not required to pay for testing so the burden will most likely be placed on the employee. There is already opposition to the new rules and lawsuits will follow. Mo'Kelly, host of the Mo'Kelly Show on KFI Radio, joins us for what to know. Next, there's a plumbing problem on the SpaceX Crew Dragon. When astronauts return home later this month from the International Space Station they will have to wear backup “undergarments” if they need to do any business. A possible urine leak in the space toilet is the culprit. Alex Knapp, senior editor at Forbes, joins us for why it's more important than ever for these astronauts to use the restroom before they launch. Finally, there's a new rulebook for first dates and it includes dressing down. We're talking sweatpants or athleisure wear and no makeup. This can also extend to dating app profiles. The effort behind this is to put forth more authenticity, so a potential partner can get to know you better versus some perfect version of you. Rory Satran, fashion director and columnist at the WSJ, joins us for why first dates are much more casual. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Pfizer Vaccine Ready for Kids Ages 5-11, Dosage is 1/3 of Adults

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 25:06


    The Pfizer vaccine has been approved for kids ages 5-11 and while there are a lot of concerns with giving the vaccine to children, the dosage has been adjusted. Children in this age range will only be getting 10 micrograms of RNA in each shot, versus 30 micrograms for those 12 and up. Katherine Wu, staff writer at The Atlantic, joins us for why the dosage is less about weight and size and more about how the body can marshal a defense. Next, election night 2021 did not look too good for Democrats. In a very closely watched race for governor in Virginia, Republican Glen Youngkin pulled out the win over Terry McAuliffe. Messaging was off for Democrats and Youngkin proved he could win without fully embracing Trump. David Siders, national political correspondent at Politico, joins us for election night takeaways. Finally, residents in Minneapolis voted down the ballot measure that would have gotten rid of the police department in favor of a Department of Public Safety. People on both sides agree that police reform must be done there, but a majority did not want to dismantle the current structure. Janelle Griffith, national reporter at NBC News, joins us for all the fallout from “Question 2.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com


    Workers Continue to Rebel Over Vaccine Mandates

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 24:54

    Vaccine mandates continue to be a problem for many companies that contract with the federal government. The clock is ticking with a December 8th deadline and thousands of employees have yet to be vaccinated. Many are requesting exemptions for religious and medical reasons and others are readying to file lawsuits in opposition. Tina Bellon, reporter at Reuters, joins us for the rebellion over these mandates. Next, we have been hearing a lot about the Great Resignation and its effects on the job market. Right now, the normal rules don't apply. In some cases people have quit their jobs and found better ones, many are finding success with gig jobs. Employers desperately searching for new workers aren't worried about gaps in your resume as people are looking for their first post-pandemic jobs outside of what they did before 2020. Karla Miller, work advice columnist at the Washington Post, joins us for more. Finally, this year's Thanksgiving dinner is going to be very expensive. Pretty much every ingredient and other components like the disposable aluminum roasting pan is going to cost more or be harder to find. The usual suspects are responsible for this… supply chain issues, transportation costs and labor shortages. Kim Severson, national food correspondent at the NY Times, joins us for why you should shop smart and early for Thanksgiving. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Instagram Ghost Stores and Why Teachers Are Still Quitting

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 25:14

    Instagram has changed itself to become a shopping destination for many, but be careful who you're buying and don't fall victim to “ghost stores.” You may think you are buying items from independent, small business owners and designers and paying a premium for it, but with some digging, you might be able to find some of those same items for half the price at places like Shein, AliExpress or Amazon. Terry Nguyen, reporter at Vox, joins us for the ghost stores of Instagram. Next, the pandemic was a big inflection point for workers of all industries, but teachers were put in an especially difficult spot dealing with remote learning, back-to-school craziness, and concerns for their own health. Many teachers quit, and others are still thinking about it. Leslie Gray Streeter, author and contributor to The Washington Post Magazine, joins us to talk about conversations she had with teachers that left their profession because of the pandemic. Many felt guilt, anger and heartbreak over their choices. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Build Back Better Plan Slimmed Down and How to Solve the Facebook Problem

    Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 25:12


    Biden's Build Back Better plan continued to be slimmed down in an effort to get all Democrats on board. The plan now stands at $1.75 trillion and had some key things taken out like paid family leave and efforts to lower prescription drug prices. Biden said that his presidency and House and Senate majorities hinge on what happens with the plan. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for this, Florida suing over vaccine mandates and a preview of election day. Next, there has been a lot of scrutiny placed on social media recently in light of the Facebook Papers, and while social media has opened the line of communication for many, maybe we weren't meant to talk to each other so much? The number of meaningful relationships a person can have is far less than the number of people you can accumulate in a social network, and that's where the problems can start. Both genuine speech and misinformation gets muddled together very quickly. Ian Bogost, contributing writer at The Atlantic and Director of Film and Media Studies at Washington University, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com


    WEEKEND EDITION- Minneapolis Voting on Replacing Police Department, a Century in Horror Movies

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 26:09

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Alec Baldwin Movie Set Shooting Accident, CA Bill on Gender Neutral Toy Sections, Mass Firings of Unvaccinated

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 25:59

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Why You'll Be Paying More for Everyday Items and a Century in Horror Movies

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 25:14

    Beware of higher prices for everyday items. You'll be paying more for everything from coffee to toilet paper… and big companies are betting that you'll keep paying those prices. Procter & Gamble, Nestle, Verizon and others all plan to continue raising prices and push customers to more expensive products well into 2022 to help offset the growing costs of the supply chain crisis. Sharon Terlep, consumer products reporter at the WSJ, joins us for why companies think you'll stick with them as things get more expensive. Next, Halloween means it's time for spooky movies and horror movies in general have had quite the evolution. Some of the best horror movies have acted as a mirror reflecting our own fears of the time back at us and built upon each other to get us where we are today. From the early days with the classic movie monsters, to the slashers and serial killer flicks, all the way to modern horror movies, they have all been commentaries of what is going on in the world at the time. Next step will be to see how the pandemic impacts the horror genre. Aja Romano, culture writer at Vox, joins us for the horror century of movies. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Facebook Papers: How Their Algorithm Spread Anger and Misinformation

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 25:16

    The Facebook Papers are out and it is shedding more light on how executives there weighed various tradeoffs between their bottom line and impacts on public safety. In one instance, it took them years to implement a fix for the algorithm that was feeding people angry, emotional content filled with misinformation. If you used the angry emoji on a post instead of the like button, it carried more weight and then feed you more of the same, despite the signal that you did not like it. Jeremy Merrill, data reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for more. Next, despite all the rain that dropped in West recently, it wasn't enough to pull it out of a drought. Water continues to be scare, getting more expensive and it is leading places like California to invest in more water treatment facilities. Recycled wastewater get a bad rap because of where it's coming from, but the filtration technology being used now is producing water so clean, it would actually harm you if minerals weren't put back into it. Matt Simon, science journalist at Wired, joins us for why people should drink more recycled wastewater. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Details From the Set of ”Rust” Paint Picture of a Production That Failed to Follow Basic Safety Protocols

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 25:15

    A clearer picture is starting to develop of the situation that unfolded on the set of “Rust” where Alec Baldwin handled a firearm that discharged and killed cinematographer Halyna Hutchins and injured director Joel Souza. We are learning that the assistant director who handed Baldwin the hot gun was also fired from another movie where a gun discharged too. Sonia Rao, pop culture reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for how some basic safety protocols were not followed. Next, there is a new effort to eliminate gender bias in new toys on the market and also the marketing associated with them. In California, a bill was signed requiring retailers to have gender-neutral sections for children items and toys. This is a move that many toy makers have been moving toward, but this law is bringing more attention to the issue. Allison Prang, reporter at the WSJ, joins us for the fight over gender-neutral toys. Finally, this coming election day, police are on the ballot in Minneapolis. If passed, the ballot initiative called “Question Two” would replace the police department with a department of public safety that would include officers, but also mental health and substance abuse experts. The new department would be overseen by the mayor and city council, but residents and public officials are split on the subject. Janelle Griffith, national reporter at NBC News, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Moderna Data Shows Its Vaccine Is Safe and Produces Antibodies in Children Ages 6-11

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 25:18

    Falling in line with what we heard from Pfizer's mRNA vaccine, Moderna has released interim data showing that their vaccine is also safe and produced the desired immune response in children ages 6-11. The dosage would be half of what it is for adults, but still come in a 2-shot protocol. Peter Loftus, pharmaceutical reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to expect as the vaccines get closer to being approved for children. Next, remember all those vaccine lotteries? It went something like this… get you vaccine and you're automatically entered to win a million bucks. 19 states in total ran some type of lottery and spent at least $89 million, unfortunately, they didn't work too well. Research says that the increases were “very small in magnitude and statistically indistinguishable from zero.” Erin Schumaker, science editor at Business Insider, joins us for more. Finally, for those that enjoy a good night out dancing with friends or having a drink, you may be asking when you can enjoy nightlife again. The pandemic changed a lot, but as things open up more, it is all about accessing your personal risk. Clubs and bars are after all perfect places to spread Covid with crowds of people and poor ventilation. Alex Abad-Santos, senior correspondent at Vox, joins us for what to know. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Biden's Spending Plan Back on Track and Mass Firings Due to Vaccine Mandates Could Happen Soon

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 25:17

    Progress has been slow, but it seems that Biden's Build Back Better plan is back on track with a vote expected this week. The spending plan has been pared down to about $2 trillion from the initial $3.5 trillion. In order to get there, paid leave for new parents has been reduced, expanded Medicare that would include dental and vision will now be a voucher, and tuition free community college has been scrapped. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for this, the Supreme Court taking on the Texas abortion law, and Dr. Fauci is in the GOP crosshairs again. Next, we could very soon see mass firings across the country as deadlines for vaccine mandates approach. The federal government, certain states, and private companies have faced opposition from employees as some are still resisting their shots for a variety of reasons, but what happens after that? Disruptions to some essential services could occur as rehiring and training may lag. Firefighters, police, and nursing staff are not so easily replaced. Pedro Gonzalez, associate editor at Chronicles Magazine, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Trump's Truth Social and the Nasty Logistics of Returning Your Online Items

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 26:17

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- The Metaverse Could Be the Next Generation of the Internet and Teens With TikTok Tics

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2021 26:05

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Teen Girls Are Developing Tourette Syndrome-Like Tics and TikTok Could Be a Part of It

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 28:19

    A recent phenomena has been turning up in doctors' offices where teen girls are exhibiting sudden and severe physical tics. After digging into it, many of the girls had one thing in common, they are were watching Tourette syndrome TikTok videos. Most of these teens had also previously been diagnosed with anxiety or depression, but girls with tics are rare and these teens had a high number of them and in some cases the same tic, such as saying the word ‘beans.' Julie Jargon, family and tech columnist at the WSJ, joins us for how these tics were developing because of social media. Next, former President Trump has announced that he will be launching a digital media network complete with a social media platform called “Truth Social.” With this venture he seems to be taking aim at everyone in three distinct divisions: social media, subscription based content and news, and even alternatives to internet services like AWS. Truth Social could be launching in early 2022, but there seems to be a lot of work yet to be done as some reports said the site was already hacked. Kia Kokalitcheva, tech and business reporter at Axios, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    In a First, Pig Kidney Is Transplanted Into Human and It Worked!

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 25:15

    In a first of its kind procedure, surgeons transplanted a pig kidney into a human and it immediately began to work. The kidney was grown in a genetically altered pig modified so the human body wouldn't reject the organ. While the procedure was a success, it was only monitored for 54 hours. So the big question is what would be the long-term viability of the organ. Roni Rabin, health writer at the NY Times, joins us for this success that could one day be a new source for transplant organs. Next, the White House has unveiled its plan for getting kids aged 5-11 vaccinated once the Pfizer vaccine is approved for that age range. The vaccines would be distributed at pediatric offices, pharmacies, and schools. The vaccine would be two shots at a lower dosage given three weeks apart. Kids are largely spared the worst effects of the virus so the big hurdle will be getting parents to vaccinate their kids while there is already so much pushback. Sabrina Siddiqui, White House reporter at the WSJ, joins us for more. Finally, a story of a multimillion-dollar shoplifting scheme run by a father-daughter duo. Robert and Noni Whitely have been sentenced to five years in prison after orchestrating a scheme that got them $6.1 million dollars over a decade. They would give shoplifters a list of items like razor blades, toothpaste, shampoo and over the counter drugs then turn around and sell them on online marketplaces at a discount. Lukas Alpert, financial crime reporter at MarketWatch, joins us for how it all happened Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Mix-n-Match Covid Booster Shots Could Be Very Effective, Here's What You Should Know

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 25:09

    Mix-n-match Covid booster shots could be on their way soon. The FDA may be allowing Americans to switch to another shot when choosing a booster. Preliminary data shows that it is still safe and gives a huge boost to your protection particularly if you had the J&J shot. The Pfizer vaccine boosted antibody levels by a factor of 35 and Moderna raised it 76-fold. Carl Zimmer, columnist at the NY Times, joins us for more on mix-match boosters. Next, the Haitian gang accused of kidnapping American missionaries goes by the name of 400 Mawozo, and they have reportedly asked for $17 million, a ransom of $1 million per hostage. Kidnappings have increased as the president there was recently assassinated and poverty persists throughout the country. This group has been responsible for 80% of the kidnappings in the last few months. Miriam Berger, international news reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for what to know. Finally, nearly 40% of state workers in California remain unvaccinated despite Gov. Gavin Newsom's orders. The orders are to be vaccinated or undergo weekly testing and state workers are lagging compared to the general public. The big hurdle comes soon as state offices begin to reopen and the testing infrastructure still needs to be completed. Wes Venteicher, state worker reporter at the Sacramento Bee, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Get Ready for the Next Generation of the Internet, the ‘Metaverse'

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 25:11

    It could be the next generation of the internet. It could be bigger than the impact of the mobile revolution and many companies are gearing up to make it happen. I am talking about the ‘metaverse.' It is an immersive digital world where you can shop, gather with friends in the form of digital avatars, and experience a world that goes beyond the real one. The technology isn't completely there yet, but big tech companies like Microsoft and Facebook are working toward that goal. Sarah Needleman, tech reporter at the WSJ, joins us for what to expect from the metaverse and what it will take to get there. Next, interventions in diet, exercise and mental outlook are some of the best ways to add healthy years to your life. Experts who have studied longevity say that by the end of this century, it's possible that someone could live longer than the current record of 122 years old. There is a process in which certain stressors can activate genes that slow down cell growth and aging, and a lot of that can be triggered with diet and exercise. Matt Fuchs, contributor to The Washington Post, joins us for how to how to add healthy years. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Bill Clinton Gets Out of the Hospital and the Nasty Logistics of Returning Your Online Purchases

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 25:14


    It is always a little worrisome when a former president goes into the hospital, but former President Bill Clinton has responded well to his medications and been discharged after a urological infection went into his bloodstream. He will now go back home to NY to continue treatment. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News joins us for the update on Bill Clinton and what is next for election day. The race for governor in Virginia and school board races across the country are making education a central issue as critical race theory and Covid rules loom large.  Next, what happens when you order things online and send them back? You may think it makes its way back to the shelf and on its way to another person, but that is rarely true. Oftentimes items make their way to bulk resellers overseas, stripped for parts, or just thrown away. Returns are a big problem for companies that are expected to have generous return policies as a default. These reverse logistics are many times cost prohibitive to deal with. Amanda Mull, staff writer at The Atlantic, joins us for the nasty logistics of returning your online items. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com


    WEEKEND EDITION- Biden Expands Port of LA Hours, Gov. Greg Abbott Bans Vaccine Mandates, Navy Engineer Busted in Spy Plot

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 26:09

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Merck's New COVID Pill, America's Broken Supply Chain

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 24:37

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WH Hopes to Avert Holiday Shopping Crisis and Ease Supply Chain Issues

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 25:16

    The White House has scrambled to help ease the situation at ports off the coast of California and avert a holiday shopping crisis. President Biden announced this week that the Port of Los Angeles will be open 24/7 and that major companies will also expand their working hours to help offload products. While this may help in the short term, supply chain issues are expected to last into next year. Steven Overly, global trade and economics reporter at Politico, joins us for more. Next, some good airline news for a change. For all those that love their carryon bags, overhead bin space is getting bigger and there are also more spots. The changes are rolling out on newer planes, but space is increasing by 50% and both passengers and the airlines are finding that it is reducing the friction of loading on the plane. Scott McCartney, Middle Seat columnist at the WSJ, joins us for more space in those overhead bins. Finally, we recently heard that the ivory-billed woodpecker was deemed extinct and now the American bumblebee could be at risk. Their population has decreased by 89% across the country and has already disappeared from 8 states. Climate change, pesticides, loss of habitat, and competition from honey bees are driving their numbers down. Asha Gilbert, trending reporter at USA Today, joins us for what to know. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Texas Gov. Greg Abbott Bans Vaccine Mandates and Employers Are Now Caught in the Middle When It Comes to Federal Mandates

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 25:19

    Confusion in Texas over vaccine mandates. Gov. Greg Abbot just banned vaccine mandates for all entities in the state including private businesses. This could pose a problem for many companies that contract with the federal government since Biden has mandated that they do get vaccinated. Now, some companies are caught in the middle and could lose federal funding or run afoul of the state law. Mitchell Ferman, economy reporter at the Texas Tribune, joins us for more. Next, the employment recovery in the country is still a bumpy and uneven one. There are still more jobs than there are unemployed people and the pace of new hires was weak for last month. More women have dropped out of the labor force due to messy back to school rollouts and child care issues and lower-wage workers are waiting for new opportunities instead of going back to old jobs. Eli Rosenberg, labor reporter at the Washington Post, joins us for what we are seeing in unemployment numbers. Finally, while the majority of migrants coming to the border are very poor and take long perilous trips, some of the more affluent migrants and taking different routes. In some cases middle-class migrants from Brazil and Venezuela are taking flights to Mexico and then making the last leg of the trip by cab or bus. Alicia Caldwell, immigration reporter at the WSJ, joins us for some are flying to the border. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Manufacturing and Supply Chain Issues Have Come for Home Appliances, Expect Delays

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 25:17

    Manufacturing and supply chain issues continue to affect most industries and if you are remodeling your kitchen or buying new appliances you might want to prepare for some delays. Some people have had to wait months and in extreme cases a year to get the appliances they ordered. To get by, some are using loaners from appliance stores or even doing dishes in the bathtub. Austen Hufford, manufacturing reporter at the WSJ, joins us for all the appliance delays. Next, President Biden's numbers have not been improving much and it seems to be the very thing he promised to fix, the pandemic, that's dragging him down. While there have been some really bad headlines with Afghanistan and immigration, the pandemic looms large as people experience fatigue with continued regulations. Christopher Cadelago, White House reporter at Politico, joins us for why Democrats are worried that Biden can't shake the pandemic. Finally, Facebook and Instagram have been under a lot of scrutiny after a whistleblower leaked internal documents about what the social media giant knows about how toxic Instagram can be to teen girls. In response, Instagram is working on features to help them take a break and nudge them away from harmful content. Kim Lyons, deputy news editor at The Verge, joins us for more. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Plot to Sell Navy Nuclear Submarine Secrets to Foreign Country Thwarted by FBI

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 25:17

    A plot to sell nuclear submarine secrets to a foreign country has been thwarted by the FBI. A Navy nuclear engineer and his wife were both charged in the attempt. In one instance, Jonathan Toebbe, who had top-secret clearance and conducted a “dead drop” where he placed an SD card with gigs of sensitive data inside a peanut butter sandwich for what he thought was an agent of a foreign country. Devlin Barrett, reporter at The Washington Post, joins us for espionage plot. Next, pharmaceutical company Merck is seeking emergency use authorization for its Covid-19 pill. If approved, it would be the first oral antiviral for Covid. Other treatments such as remdesivir and monoclonal antibody treatments both require an intravenous infusion. The pill reduces risk of hospitalization by 50%. Riley Griffin, healthcare reporter at Bloomberg News, joins us for more on this pill that directly targets the virus. Finally, Southwest Airlines was a mess this past weekend as it cancelled over 2,000 flights. The airline blamed air traffic control, bad weather, and staffing shortages for the delays. There was speculation that many employees, including pilots were calling out sick in response to vaccine mandates, but the company said those reports were inaccurate. Leslie Josephs, airline reporter at CNBC, joins us for Southwest's problems. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Debit Limit Fight Kicked to December and America's Broken Supply Chain

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 25:17

    The debt limit has been extended and kicked down the road to December. So get ready for more fighting very soon. Mitch McConnell says that Republicans won't vote to extend it again putting all the pressure on Democrats to pass it through reconciliation. Republicans are hoping to use the rising debt as an issue during the midterms. Ginger Gibson, deputy Washington digital editor at NBC News, joins us for the ongoing fight, how the Build Back Better plan will be slimmed down, and thousands of U.S. service members have yet to be fully vaccinated despite upcoming deadlines. Next, America's supply chain is broken and there is no better example than looking at all of the ships sitting off the coast of California. The pandemic caused a major shift in consumer spending and it triggered a huge influx of imports and it's all bottlenecked due to lack of coordination and worker shortages. Ships are at ports waiting to be unloaded, not enough workers there can offload containers in a timely manner, and a shortage of truck drivers is delaying shipments to the rest of the country. This all results in price hikes for everyone and possible shortages for holiday shopping. David Lynch, global economics correspondent at The Washington Post, joins us for the broken supply chain. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Pandora Papers, The Hunt for Cambodian Treasure

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 26:10

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    WEEKEND EDITION- Religious Exemptions for Vaccines Are Harder to Get Than You Think, USPS Slowdowns, Why 'Squid Game' Is So Popular

    Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 26:03

    This is a compilation of some of the most compelling stories of the week. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

    Claim The Daily Dive

    In order to claim this podcast we'll send an email to with a verification link. Simply click the link and you will be able to edit tags, request a refresh, and other features to take control of your podcast page!

    Claim Cancel