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The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

HR Liftoff
Are You the Right Leader at the Right Time?

HR Liftoff

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 27:30


We welcome Robert Jordan and Olivia Wagner to the show! They are authors of a new book called Right Leader, Right Time: Discover Your Leadership style for a Winning Career. They are also co-founders of Interim Execs! They bring their expertise to assess distinct leadership styles and a step-by-step plan for optimizing that best suits businesses to scale and grow. They have identified 4 distinct leadership styles found in business today, what success looks like for each style, and what leaders can do right now to make sure that they're the leader the company needs.  InterimExecs is a leadership executive matching firm that has helped fix global giants like Pepsi, Microsoft, UPS, and more by identifying the right leaders to step in during times of trouble or stagnation. By conducting interviews with thousands of executives, they have identified 4 distinct leadership styles and when and where those styles are the most useful. For example:When a company is in chaos or decline, it's time to call in a Fixer.When a company needs a creative jolt to jump out of stagnation, turn to an Artist.When a company needs new markets and big growth, hire a Builder.When a company reaches complexity and scale, align with a Strategist.  https://interimexecs.com/

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2836 - The Willful Denial That Republicans Are Fundamentalists Out To Suppress Women

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 64:45


Sam and Emma break down the biggest headlines of the week! They begin with the response from Democratic leadership to this mass stripping of rights, as they immediately step in… to expand police details for Supreme Court justices, before diving into non-Roe news from Biden once again putting domestic COVID aid on the back burner, Russian continued strikes in Odessa and along weapons supply lines, and the upcoming decisions by Finland and Sweden on joining NATO. Then, Emma and Sam dive back to the 1970s as they tackle the last fifty years of reproductive rights, with the GOP assimilating anti-choice policy into their platform as early as 1976 in an attempt to win over the apolitical evangelical wing, before becoming a foundational value as the Republican party shifted into the Reagan years. Next, they look to the Democratic Leadership's apparently ahistorical view of party politics, as Nancy Pelosi continues to push the absolute fetishization of her opposition, pining for a strong Republican party, one that loves a woman's right to choose and environmental activism, while reality continues to see more and more right-wing fundamentalist policy pass, before Emma dives into Pelosi's belief that the GOP must look at their base like she looks at hers, taking it back from these “extremists,” rather than using their popularity to get your agenda passed. Next, Chuck Schumer assumes his riveting monotone delivery as he exemplifies the Democrats' fecklessness on the Senate floor, and Joe Scarborough dives into Alito's takedown of the 14th Amendment, walking through the myriad other rights that it puts on weak footing, and pushing the Democrats to please compromise, maybe taking like 60% of a right? Like half of a right to interracial marriage or something. They also wrap up the first half by diving into updates on the leak, the right's continued insistence that a FELONIOUS liberal clerk leaked this decision… to hold the conservative justices to their anti-choice decision. And in the Fun Half: Sam and Emma cover DeSantis' new school of propaganda, as he announces a mandatory education on “Victims of Communism Day,” and dive into his CRT-related banning of… a math textbook. They also dive into Alabama advancing a bill to criminalize all trans people under the age of 19, bolstering the already sky-high rates of depression and suicidal intent in genderqueer teens, and lending credence to the abuse and harassment that causes it. Notorious ally Jimmy Dore then rants on this mass swath of trans activists (it's one tweet) and their violent nature, before Sam and Emma dive into the culmination of Hillary Clinton's “use the invasion of Ukraine to weaken Russia” talking points after Russia's invasion, as Dem consultants discuss our role in the “conflict” as “fundamentally at war by proxy.” Kev from Quincy discusses the relationship between abortion and child poverty, Julian from Spokane discusses the devastating emotion of this week, and what avenues to protect abortion exist, and Sam and Emma dive into the myth of student debt relief being an elitist policy. Plus, your calls and IMs! Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE:   https://majorityreportradio.com/live-show-schedule Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: Aura: Protect yourself from America's fastest-growing crime. Try Aura for 14 days for free: https://aura.com/majority Stamps.com: Taking trips to the Post Office is probably not how you want to spend your time. – that's why you should mail and ship online at Stamps dot com., the place where you get the services of the Post Office and UPS all in one place. There's NO risk - and with my promo code, MAJORITYREPORT, you get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. Just go to https://www.stamps.com/, click on the Microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in MAJORITYREPORT - that's https://www.stamps.com/, promo code MAJORITYREPORT. Stamps.com - never go to the post office again. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

Tech Talks
Understanding mental wellbeing and nurturing neurodiversity

Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 57:28


To recognise Mental Health Awareness Month we're giving you insight into steps to make your working environment the best it can be for a range of individuals, as well as steps to look after your own wellbeing. First we're chatting to Alex Craven, co-founder of The Data City, and then getting advice on good practice from Anne-Sophie Fluri from MindLabs.

Happy Market Research Podcast
Ep. 552 – HMRP Monday Edition: John Dick, Founder & CEO of Civic Science; Managing Gen Z in the Modern Workplace

Happy Market Research Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 43:11


Today I'm joined by John Dick, Founder and CEO of Civic Science. Founded in 2007, Civic Science is a consumer intelligence research platform that polls millions of Americans each week covering thousands of topics. Their proprietary InsightStore analyzes the responses so decision-makers can discover the market and cultural trends.  There are a few things that are very interesting about Civic Science that you may not know.  First, they have a “whos who” set of investors including Jeff Wilkie of Amazon, Thomas Tall, founder of Legendary Entertainment, NPD Group, and Marc Cuban.  Second, you will find them referenced daily in nearly every credible news source from the Wall Street Journal to daily blogs.  Find John Online:  LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johndick/  Company: https://civicscience.com/   Find Jamin Online: Email: jamin@happymr.com LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/jaminbrazilTwitter: www.twitter.com/jaminbrazil  Find Us Online:  Twitter: www.twitter.com/happymrxp LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/happymarketresearch Facebook: www.facebook.com/happymrxp Website: www.happymr.com  Music:  “Clap Along” by Auditionauti: https://audionautix.com “As It Was” by Harry Styles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H5v3kku4y6Q References: Millennials at work by PWC: https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/news/hr-magazine/documents/millennials-at-work.pdfThe Science Behind Social Media's Hold on Our Mental Health BY BRITTNEY MCNAMARA: https://www.teenvogue.com/story/the-science-behind-social-medias-hold-on-our-mental-health This Episode is Sponsored by: The Michigan State University's Master of Science in Marketing Research Program delivers the #1 ranked insights and analytics graduate degree in three formats:  Full-time on campus Full-time online Part-time online NEW FOR 2022:  If you can't commit to their full degree program, simply begin with one of their 3-course certificates: Insights Design or Insights Analysis.  In addition to the certification, all the courses you complete will build toward your graduation. If you are looking to achieve your full potential, check out MSMU's programs at: broad.msu.edu/marketing HubUX is a research operation platform for private panel management, qualitative automation including video audition questions, and surveys.  For a limited time, user seats are free. If you'd like to learn more or create your own account, visit hubux.com.  Today is May 9th, 2022. Happy Monday!  You're listening to the Happy Market Research podcast. I'm Jamin Brazil, your host.  Support for the Happy Market Research Podcast and the following message comes from Michigan State's Marketing Research Program & HubUX.  This is episode 552.  And, today, according to Spotify, Harry Styles' “As It Was” is the number one song in the US.  I love how the music review site, pitchfork.com put it, “If Styles' last record was about having sex and feeling sad, “As It Was” seems to be about having sex, feeling sad, then getting over it.” Alright, let's make this a kick ass day!    Today I'm going to cover the topic of managing employees, specifically Gen Z. This is the first of a two part series on the topic.  To start, let me be honest with you…I'm not perfect and am still figuring this out. So, feedback is welcome and appreciated! Let's start with a sclesious statement. If you are a Gen Xer, that is 42 to 57 years old, then you recall the disruption to the hiring, training and engaging of Millennials as they entered the workforce.  A whitepaper published in Novermber 2011 by PWC said, “The millennial generation, now entering employment, will reshape the world of work.” And they did.  The risk management group Thomas McGee said, “As young professionals, they look for processes, documentation, and recruitment language as evidence of a commitment to workplace safety.” One great example is how UPS adopted VR for driver safety trainin...

Super the Hardest
MoJoWeekly - 05.08.2022

Super the Hardest

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 26:48


News: Summer Game Fest, Xbox Showcase, Final Fantasy 16, River City Saga New Releases Dale's Retro Recap Spotlight: Beat 'em Ups

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
REPOST: 5 Trends Shaping Logistics with Ben Gordon

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 44:42


5 Trends Shaping Logistics with Ben Gordon Ben Gordon and Joe Lynch discuss 5 trends shaping logistics and supply chain. In the interview, Ben reviews and discussed trends and interesting companies in ecommerce, final mile, cold chain, reverse logistics, and fulfillment. About Ben Gordon Benjamin Gordon is the Founder and Managing Partner of Cambridge Capital. He draws on a career building, advising, and investing in supply chain companies. Benjamin has led investments in outstanding firms including XPO, Grand Junction, Bringg, Liftit, and others. As CEO of BGSA Holdings, Benjamin has spent his career investing in and helping to build supply chain and technology companies. Benjamin led the firm's efforts, advising on over $1 billion worth of supply chain transactions. Benjamin has worked with firms such as UPS, DHL, Kuehne & Nagel, Agility Logistics, NFI Logistics, GENCO, Nations Express, Raytrans, Echo Global, Dixie, Wilpak, and others. Prior to BGSA Holdings, Ben founded 3PLex, the Internet solution enabling third-party logistics companies to automate their business. Benjamin raised $28 million from blue-chip investors including Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, BancBoston Ventures, CNF, and Ionian. 3PLex was then purchased by Maersk. Prior to 3PLex, Benjamin advised transportation and logistics clients at Mercer Management Consulting. Prior to Mercer, Benjamin worked in his family's transportation business, AMI, where he helped the company expand its logistics operations. Benjamin received a Master's in Business Administration from Harvard Business School and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Yale College. About Cambridge Capital Cambridge Capital is a private equity firm investing in the applied supply chain. The firm provides private equity to finance the expansion, recapitalization or acquisition of growth companies in our sectors. Our philosophy is to invest in companies where our operating expertise and in-depth supply chain knowledge can help our portfolio companies achieve outstanding value. Cambridge Capital was founded in 2009 as the investment affiliate of BG Strategic Advisors (www.bgsa.com), the advisor of choice for a large, growing number of supply chain CEOs. Cambridge Capital leverages BGSA's unique approach to strategy-led investment banking for the supply chain. BGSA is known for its work helping companies achieve outsized returns via targeted acquisitions and premium sales processes, and has worked with category leaders such as UPS, DHL, Agility Logistics, New Breed, NFI, Genco, Nations Express, Raytrans, and others. Our relationship with BGSA gives us deep market expertise, access to outstanding deal flow and people flow, transactional capabilities, additional resources, and a powerful core competency in the supply chain sector. The Partners and Advisory Board members of Cambridge Capital have diverse backgrounds with complementary technical, operating and financial expertise. The Cambridge Capital team has spent their careers building, growing, and advising outstanding companies in the supply chain sector. They include former leaders of UPS Logistics, Ryder Logistics, ATC Logistics, APL Logistics, Kuehne + Nagel, and other globally recognized firms. Cambridge Capital's professionals know what it takes to build great companies. Key Takeaways: 5 Trends Shaping Logistics with Ben Gordon In the podcast, Ben reviewed the following 5 trends shaping logistics:  Ecommerce Ecommerce has not only reshaped logistics, but it is also has reshaped the entire economy. According to McKinsey, 10 years of e-commerce adoption was compressed into three months. Because of explosive growth of ecommerce, small parcel companies, UPS, FedEx and DHL experienced exceptional growth. The U.S. Postal Service and Amazon have also seen huge growth in shipments due to the growth of ecommerce. Returns and reverse logistics Traditional retailers experience 6-8% of sales to be returned. Ecommerce sellers have returns of approximately 30%. Returned items are a major pain point for both sellers and logistics providers because they are unplanned, very expensive, and difficult to manage. To address the returns and reverse logistics challenge, companies like ReverseLogix have created reverse logistics technology that reduces costs and enhances the customer's experience, while increasing inventory recovery and visibility into the reverse logistics life-cycle. Last mile Last mile or final mile is perhaps the most important and difficult part of direct-to-consumer (DTC) shipping. Last mile accounts for 41% of the cost of business-to-consumer shipping. Amazon has raised customer expectations with a superior DTC experience that many companies will fail to replicate. In response, firms like Bringg are helping their clients deliver a last-mile experience that is comparable to the Amazon experience. Delivery software and service companies like Delivery Circle are helping companies leverage technology to make local delivery service more efficient and profitable. Ecommerce fulfillment Ecommerce fulfillment is the backbone of the direct-to-consumer supply chain and to successful, fulfillment companies must excel at both technology and warehousing & logistics. Many companies entering the fulfillment space from a technology background struggle with warehousing, logistics, and operations, while traditional warehousing & logistics companies may initially lack the technical expertise. Medical logistics and cold chain During COVID, the importance of the medical logistics and supply chain was highlighted especially in the areas of the cold chain. The lack of adequate cold chain infrastructure is proving to be a problem in the developing world. Cold chain monitoring and compliance is an area primed for growth. Learn More About the 5 Trends Shaping Logistics Ben Gordon Cambridge Capital 2021 BGSA Holdings Supply Chain Conference 2021 BGSA Holdings Supply Chain Conference – Welcome Remarks from Ben Gordon Related Podcasts Faster, Better Freight Quotes with Dawn Salvucci-Favier Alternatives to UPS and FedEx The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Hammer Lane Legends
BACK IT UP | 59: The Brown Van Man

Hammer Lane Legends

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 112:45


In Episode 59: The Brown Van Man, Tony and Brian have a lively chat with John, a long time driver for UPS. John's life as a driver all started as a joke and what John believed would only be a year of driving. That one year turned into a career spanning  33 years and counting! With over three decades of experience, John has no shortage fascinating and wild stories as a driver, both behind the wheel and while dropping off packages. From being hit at 100mph to being so close to black bears that he could pet them (but at first not realizing they were bears!), the conversation is an enjoyable look back at John's long life as a driver. So buckle up and listen in as John delivers a whopper of a show. KEEP US FUELED: buymeacoffee.com/hammerlane EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FOOD: www.preparewithhll.com LEAVE A VOICEMAIL: 515-585-MERK(6375) EMAIL US YOUR STORIES: hllpodcast@protonmail.com Website: www.hammerlanelegends.com Gear: https://www.hammerlanelegends.com/gear YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UC5TWlB5Yqx8JlQr3p3bkkMg Facebook: www.facebook.com/hammerlanelegends Instagram Desktop: www.instagram.com/hammerlanelegends Instagram Mobile: @hammerlanelegends Twitter Desktop: www.twitter.com/HLLPodcast Twitter Mobile: @HLLpodcast Produced by: Jack Merkel Follow Jack on Instagram @jack_theproducer

Ringside Mayhem presented by the SSAW Network
MAYHEM OR MID?? WWE MONDAY NIGHT RAW 05/02/2022 REVIEW

Ringside Mayhem presented by the SSAW Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 96:22


TUNE IN AS THE MAYHEM FAM BREAKS DOWN THE 05/02/2022 Airing of WWE RAW. We breaks down all the Ups and Down to determine if this was a MAYHEM FILLED RAW OR WAS IT JUST MID! JOIN THE RSM MOVEMENT AND CATCH ALL THE MAYHEM THAT GOES DOWN ON SOCIAL MEDIA HERE: https://linktr.ee/ringsidemayhempod LISTEN TO THIS INTERVIEW MORE PAST EPISODES ON: Apple Podcast https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/ringside-mayhem-presented-by-the-ssaw-network/id1511817732 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/40YcGG1qidrgyrP1pOHohP?si=8a-n7TaQQMOOd2twHLVjrw And more https://link.chtbl.com/RSMPodcast

The Gayla Scrivener Show
#209 - From Broadcasting to Leading Through Reading with Jeff Brown

The Gayla Scrivener Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:44


On this show, I like to interview folks who have created fun work for themselves to fuel their lifestyle. I'm excited to bring you my conversation with Read to Lead's podcast host Jeff Brown. Through one chapter of Jeff's life closing, he opened another opportunity for himself. And he did it through his experience in learning from books. In 2013, Jeff Brown left behind a 26-year career in broadcasting and launched the Read to Lead Podcast, a podcast that would go on to become a Top 3 Career podcast in Apple Podcasts and receive, so far, four Best Business Podcast nominations. For nearly 9 years now, Jeff has published weekly interviews with some of the world's most successful and inspiring authors, totaling over four-hundred episodes. The show's success eventually led to the publication of his own book called Read to Lead: The Simple Habit That Expands Your Influence and Boosts Your Career. Reviews for the book average 4.9 stars on Amazon and it has ranked in the Top 3 on Amazon for Career Guides. Through his virtual and in-person speaking and workshops, Jeff evangelizes leaders and teams on the benefits of lifelong learning and professional development and has recently accepted invitations to speak from leaders at LinkedIn, Disney, the National Speakers Association, UPS, Docket, Anvl, and the Virginia Council of CEOs.   Continue the conversation. Join the Live Full Work Fun Facebook group and share your biggest takeaway from this episode. Additional Resources: Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable | Seth Godin Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smart| Liz Wiseman Rookie Smarts: Why Learning Beats Knowing in the New Game of Work | Liz Wiseman Die Empty: Unleash Your Best Work Every Day | Todd Henry Connect with Jeff Brown: Website: http://readtoleadbook.com/  Website: http://readtoleadpodcast.com/  Instagram: http://instagram.com/thejeffbrown  Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thejeffbrown  Twitter: http://twitter.com/thejeffbrown  LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/brownjeff  Connect with Gayla: Website: https://www.gaylascrivener.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/gaylascrivener/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GaylaScrivenerWorkFromAnywhere/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gscrivener/ Content Marketing Resources: Scrivener Solutions | Content Plan Implementation Team: https://scrivenersolutions.com/ Free Download: Quick Content Creation Guide: The Super Simple Strategy to Jumpstart Your Content Creation: https://scrivenersolutions.com/checklist

Entrepreneur Network Podcast
Marc Gorlin, Founder of Roadie, On New Type of Delivery Platform

Entrepreneur Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 30:12


Marc Gorlin is the founder and CEO of crowdsourced delivery platform Roadie, which he launched in 2014. Roadie puts unused capacity in passenger vehicles to work by connecting people with items to send with drivers heading in the right direction. The company works with consumers and businesses across almost every industry to enable a faster, cheaper and more scalable solution for same-day and urgent delivery. Roadie became a wholly owned subsidiary of UPS in 2021.

Paid The Co$t Podcast
Alejandro Grijalva

Paid The Co$t Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 73:21


Alejandro Grijalva is making a lot of noise on the central coast with his caricature art of local residents and PTC guests but, that's only one reason I wanted to get him on the show. His heart is massive and the work he does for the community is what really sets this man apart from the rest. Working for a local non profit, he does outreach work for the unhoused. He's also a CrossFit coach. You put all these things together and you have yourself a caring, creative and loving human who's mission on earth is to get it right. Ups and downs are nothing but learning lessons for Alejandro. He knows where he's been and knows where he wants to go. Tune in and get inspired on this episode of Paid The Cost Podcast. 

How Success Happens
Marc Gorlin, Founder of Roadie, On New Type of Delivery Platform

How Success Happens

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 30:09


Marc Gorlin is the founder and CEO of crowdsourced delivery platform Roadie, which he launched in 2014. Roadie puts unused capacity in passenger vehicles to work by connecting people with items to send with drivers heading in the right direction. The company works with consumers and businesses across almost every industry to enable a faster, cheaper and more scalable solution for same-day and urgent delivery. Roadie became a wholly owned subsidiary of UPS in 2021.

Positive Mindset for Entrepreneurs from The Mind Aware

Who: Dana Wilde - Bestselling Author of Train Your Brain, Creator of The Celebrity Formula, and Host of Positive Mindset for Entrepreneurs What This Show is About: “How Do I Avoid the Daily Grind of Ups and Downs?” This business coach wants to know how to keep the big picture in mind and avoid being pulled down into the daily grind of ups and downs. Dana helps this audience member with a mindset shift. Dana Wilde, the #1 bestselling author of Train Your Brain, delivers motivation, marketing ideas, and business tips designed to break through your limiting beliefs, and manifest freedom and success in your business. Dana Wilde goes beyond positive thinking and the Law of Attraction. This podcast is the ultimate in Entrepreneur Mindset. Click here to ask Dana: http://www.danawilde.com/askdana In today's episode ... Learn how to stay ON TRACK with your positive feelings and centeredness. Discover why it's good to feel NEGATIVE EMOTIONS sometimes. How to know the importance of BEING AWARE of your emotions. Find out how to set yourself up for SUCCESS. Listen in for TIPS on how to do small, happy ROUTINES to make your day a great one. Resources on this episode: CLICK HERE to get the Positive Mindset for Entrepreneurs free daily newsletter, and get your JOLT of HAPPINESS every morning! CLICK HERE if you want to ask questions and have them featured on the show. Where to Learn More: http://www.danawilde.com/class http://www.danawilde.com

TD Ameritrade Network
Stocks To Invest In: SBUX, UPS, GLW

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 7:16


This is an opportunity for a reset for Starbucks (SBUX), says Max Wasserman. He discusses SBUX as shares hit a 52-week low. He also previews SBUX's earnings which will be released today, postmarket. He also talks about the impact of the union push on SBUX's model. He then goes over his stock picks, UPS Inc. (UPS) and Corning (GLW). Tune in to find out more.

Tech Talks
Can technology help tackle the cost of living crisis?

Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 29:16


Inflation is rising, energy prices are rising, petrol is rising, food costs more. Low income workers are feeling the pinch and it is only set to get worse. So what solutions are there which might help people? We meet Wagestream CEO Peter Briffett, 3 years on from his last Tech Talks appearance, to find out how their platform might help.

Lois Koffi's Healthy N Wealthy N Wise Podcast
True Freedom & Van Life With The Rolling Rogans

Lois Koffi's Healthy N Wealthy N Wise Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 50:00


Amy & Joe Rogan, a couple of crazy 40 somethings that made a decision to change their lives from the corporate world to a life of adventure and freedom. Life is too short. They enjoy working together to inspire change and encourage people to go after their dreams while rolling along in their custom-built RV.They love meeting and helping amazing people along the way.   AMY ROGAN had an extensive career in the fashion industry as a technical fashion designer. She has worked for companies such as QVC and Disney in product development. She then partnered up with Joe in their entrepreneurial adventures with their granola bar business, elite coffee catering businesses, network marketing businesses, and more. She keeps them organized with the back-office details and planning events.   AMY has battled multiple health issues including Fibromyalgia, Manic Depression, Anxiety, Insomnia, as well as having multiple surgeries. The chronic and severe pains have given Amy a different view of life and what's most important to her. Gratitude is the foundation of happiness and she uses that to look for the good in all things.   JOE ROGAN was labeled as "learning disabled" he discovered self-reliance and determination to experience the world as he sees it, from a different point of view. That label drives him to prove they did not understand how to teach a creative mind.   After getting a Bachelor's degree in computer art and traditional animation, Joe has always kept drawing even though he gave up pursuing his career to take care of Amy. He worked various jobs, each leading to new and exciting experiences building to the next one. As a UPS driver, Graphic Artist for a t-shirt printing company, Bartender, Catering Floor Captain, PR for his own YoYo Business, Published Illustrator, and Gig Economy worker, he has learned valuable life skills and built lasting relationships. His entrepreneurial heart and persistence have created multiple businesses and explored high-risk/high-reward opportunities. His ability to see the bigger picture takes us to places we never thought possible.   https://www.rollingrogans.com/happy-medium is where you can find their book   FOR COACH LOIS' RESOURCES - go to www.loiskoffi.com/resources   FIND HER 4 STEP PROVEN FRAMEWORK AT: https://loiskoffi.lpages.co/4-step-proven-framework/   JOIN HER FACEBOOK COMMUNITY AT HER PODCAST WEBSITE: www.loiskoffi.com/podcast   SUBSCRIBE TO HER YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/loiskofficoffee   BECOME A FOUNDING MEMBER OF HER INNER CIRCLE MEMBERSHIP AT: http://loiskoffi.com/membership  

SHIRT SHOW
Chris & Adam | Denial Print Co. | Shirt Show 99

SHIRT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 156:44


We had one hell of a therapy session with Chris & Adam from Denial Print Co. These two have been working together for about 20 years, through almost as many business ventures. These two went from being young professional roller bladers, who were running a skate shop, a wheel company, and a massive clothing brand with a worldwide distribution, to becoming the specialty focused printers they are today. Topics of discussion include: Their extreme business evolution, knowing what happens behind the scenes at UPS, shipping/receiving etiquette, learning on the fly, electrical headaches, the importance of an operations manager, respecting your own time, on press approvals, and we truly dissect the yin and yang shared between Andy & Dylan, and Adam & Chris.

Story Behind
Teen Baby in a Shoebox to the Hospital | Doorbell Camera Captures UPS Driver's Touching Message

Story Behind

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 7:53


When a teen boy turned up at the hospital with a shoebox baby, God used dedicated nurse Jeannie Joseph to make all the difference in this little one's life!ANDA doorbell camera recorded a sweet message for a new mom left by UPS delivery driver Dallen Harrell.To see videos and photos referenced in this episode, visit GodUpdates!https://www.godupdates.com/nurse-reunited-shoebox-baby-saved/https://www.godupdates.com/ups-driver-message-for-a-new-mom/

Jungunternehmer Podcast
Was mache ich, wenn ich mit dem Rücken zur Wand stehe? | mit Max Lambsdorff von ExpressGroup

Jungunternehmer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 64:31


2021 nahezu zahlungsunfähig aufgrund einer geplatzten Finanzierungsrunde, heute erfolgreiches Series A-Startup.Max Lambsdorff hat in seiner Startup-Laufbahn sämtliche Ups and Downs mitgenommen, die es gibt. In dieser Folge teilt er seine Erfahrungen, damit du für solche Herausforderungen besser vorbereitet bist.Wie bewahrt man einen kühlen Kopf, wenn die Finanzen plötzlich nicht mehr passen?Mit wem rede ich, wenn ich mal neutrales Feedback brauche?Wie stelle ich mich auf, um Momentum aufbauen zu können?Was muss man bei einer VC-Runde beachten?Außerdem sprechen wir über Expresssteuer und schauen uns an, wie man den Mehrwert für den Kunden zum Erfolgsmodell macht. Die Kapitel:00:58Was man über die ExpressGroup wissen sollte02:18Ausgangslage von ExpressGroup08:29Was macht die ExpressGroup?13:12Warum ist jetzt die Zeit für den Launch neuer Verticals & Länder?18:22Optimierte Lösungen für Menschen außerhalb der FinTech-Welt20:20Warum ist die Investorenrunde Anfang 2021 gescheitert?23:06Was macht man als Gründer, wenn das Geld ausgeht?31:29Unterschied zwischen einer Not-Finanzierungs-Runde & der aktuellen VC-Runde33:05Mit wem kann man sich neutral beraten & wo kann man sich Ratschläge/Entscheidungshilfen holen?40:52Wie man gute Entscheidungen trifft44:22Wie geht ihr vor, damit eure Hypothesen nicht komplett falsch laufen (Investments, KPIs, Daten etc.)? 53:22Fundraising: Was rätst du Gründern & welche Tipps hast du?58:30Intro, Pitchdeck & Analyst Call: (Wann) Muss dort der Fokus liegen?MAX LAMBSDORFFMax auf LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/maximilianlambsdorff/ ExpressSteuer: https://www.expresssteuer.com/ Die Podcastfolge mit Daniel Weinand findest du hier: https://www.jungunternehmerpodcast.com/wie-treffe-ich-als-grunderin-bessere-entscheidungen-mit-daniel-weinand-co-founder-shopify/ WHATSAPP NEWSLETTER:1-2x wöchentlich bekommst du eine persönliche Sprachnotiz oder Inhalte von mir, die dich zu einem besseren Gründer machen, melde dich jetzt mit einem Klick an: https://jungunternehmerpodcast.com/newsletterDU GRÜNDEST EIN STARTUP?Falls du bei deiner Startup Gründung Hilfe brauchst, meld dich gerne. Fabian, der Host dieses Podcasts, arbeitet mit diversen Startups die zwischen Pre-Seed und Series A stecken zusammen und vielleicht kann er dir ja auch helfen: https://jungunternehmerpodcast.com/startup-advisory See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight
Thomas Budinick, Co-Founder and President of All That Ship, A DotCom Magazine Interview

The DotCom Magazine Entrepreneur Spotlight

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 25:04


About Thomas Budinick and All That Ship: Tom is a serial entrepreneur and has founded, built and sold a number of different companies in varying industries. Currently, he is the CEO of Budinick & Associates, LLC, which provides expert supply chain consulting services including global retained talent acquisition. Tom possesses deep domain expertise in end-to-end supply-chain management solutions. His clients have included each of the Big Four consulting firms, numerous private equity clients along with many Fortune 500 companies. Most recently, Tom helped scale a consulting firm from a startup to over $100 Million in revenue and helped position it for a recent sale. Prior, Tom served as the Managing Partner of Austin Henley and Company where he led the firm's supply chain practice and served as the Chair of the firm's supply chain management Center of Excellence. All That Ship is the multicarrier platform designed to simplify your business and Save You Money in the Process. Ship anything, anywhere, for less. All the Carriers You Know including FedEx. UPS, USPS, DHL & more! We partner with dozens of global carriers and platforms, which means you can get started immediately. No integration work necessary. Let us show you how we can streamline your shipping and save you money with our discounted rates!

NTD News Today
Putin: Quick Response If West Intervenes; US Economic Growth Shrank in First Quarter | NTD News Today

NTD News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 50:41


NTD News Today—4/28/2022 1. Soldiers at Azovstal Call for Evacuation 2. Putin: Quick Response if West Intervenes 3. Ukrainian Farmers Wear Body Armor to Work 4. Holocaust Survivors Flee Ukraine for Israel 5. NY Human Rights Center Condemns Russian Invasion, Supports Holocaust Survivors in Ukraine 6. $7B of Military Equipment Left in Afghanistan 7. U.S. Economic Growth Shrank in First Quarter 8. Joe Biden Met Hunter's Close Business Partner 9. Blinken: U.S. Officials Are Under Threat 10. Desantis Signs Bill on Election Integrity 11. GA Bill Authorizes Voter Fraud Investigations 12. Justice Breyer's Last Day on the Bench 13. Archegos Founder, Former CFO Plead Not Guilty 14. AZ: Cold Case Arrest in 30 Year Old Murder 15. LA Sheriff Announces Probe Into Stolen Video 16. OH: Teen Jumps From Moving Car During Chase 17. AZ: Mountain Lion Spooked by Automatic Door 18. 'Ida' Retired From List of Hurricane Names 19. U.S. Report: China Unfairly Dominates Markets 20. U.S. Trade Representative Recognizes Taiwan's Intellectual Property Protection 21. Manufacturers Say Trade Report Shows Concrete Steps to Protect Innovation 22. Many Countries Have 'Far to Go' to Protect Intellectual Property: U.S. Innovation Center 23. Lockdowns Hurt China's Commuter Workers 24. 1st Ever Human Case of H3n8 Bird Flu 25. AUS Politician's 'Nazi' Remarks Anger Beijing 26. Election Shows Polarized France: Analyst 27. Macron Expected to Name New Prime Minister 28. Toxic Foam Floats on Colombian River 29. Nadal Unveils Rafa Nadal Sports University 30. Zverev Apologizes for Munich Open Loss 31. Prades Crashes Mistakenly Celebrating Stage Win 32. Sistine Chapel Replica Opens in Mexico City 33. The Dutch Celebrate First King's Day Holiday 34. World's Largest Blue Diamond Auctioned for $57m 35. The Ups and Downs of the Sun Hormone 36. One Lucky Winner for $473 Mil Powerball Ticket

The New Wave Entrepreneur
Getting Real About Life, Business and The Creative Journey w/ Dustin Lien

The New Wave Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 75:15


Dustin Lien is an entrepreneur with experience in several different industries. This is a casual conversation between friends about the realities of life and business. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

SoFi Daily Podcast
SoFi Daily Podcast - 4/27/2022

SoFi Daily Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 5:07


US stocks fell Tuesday. Plus, United Airlines plans to increase its trans-Atlantic service by 25%, while both PepsiCo and UPS beat analyst earnings expectations.

Alles auf Aktien
Teslas 275-Milliarden-Debakel und Aktien, die glücklich machen

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 19:29


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Nando Sommerfeldt und Holger Zschäpitz über einen unangenehmen Turnaround Tuesday, Gazproms Lieferstopp und Alphabets unmögliche Mission. Außerdem geht es um GE, UPS, 3M, Visa, Microsoft, Texas Instruments, Nvidia, Pinterest, Amazon, Meta, Spotify, Roku, iShares MSCI Denmark (WKN: A1W8E4), Orstedt, Novo Nordisk, Maersk, Vestas, Genmab, Coloplast und Novozymes.Und abstimmen beim Deutschen Podcastpreis könnt ihr hier: https://www.deutscher-podcastpreis.de/podcasts/aaa-alles-auf-aktien/

Motley Fool Money
Twitter's New Owner

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 29:25


Now that Elon Musk has a deal in place to take Twitter private, we have a few questions. (0:20) Bill Mann discusses: - The mediocre performance (to date) of Twitter's business - Whether Tesla shareholders should be nervous about Musk running another company - How other ad-driven businesses like Pinterest and Facebook are feeling - The latest results, and near-term future, for bellwether stock UPS (14:00) Inflation is rising, but that's probably not a good enough reason by itself to expect a raise at work. Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp talk with Kara Chambers, head of People Development at The Motley Fool, for insights and suggestions. Stocks discussed: TWTR, DRI, TSLA, FB, PINS, UPS Want even more stock ideas? Get a copy of our FREE investing starter kit - http://fool.com/starterkit Host: Chris Hill Guests: Bill Mann, Alison Southwick, Robert Brokamp, Kara Chambers Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Dan Boyd, Rick Engdahl

The tastytrade network
From Theory to Practice - April 26, 2022 - Earnings Bonanza

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 27:54


Today is one of the heaviest earnings days of the year. So we put on Call Broken-Wing Butterfly in GOOGL, an Expected Move Butterfly in MSFT, a Short Call Spread in CMG, a Short Put in FB, and a Super Bull in V. Our Super Bull from UPS yesterday worked so well, that we decided to try it again for tonight's call in Visa.Did you catch my naked strategies for a $5,000 account segment?Check out my YouTube Series on Trade Management!

The tastytrade network
From Theory to Practice - April 26, 2022 - Earnings Bonanza

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 28:44


Today is one of the heaviest earnings days of the year. So we put on Call Broken-Wing Butterfly in GOOGL, an Expected Move Butterfly in MSFT, a Short Call Spread in CMG, a Short Put in FB, and a Super Bull in V. Our Super Bull from UPS yesterday worked so well, that we decided to try it again for tonight's call in Visa.Did you catch my naked strategies for a $5,000 account segment?Check out my YouTube Series on Trade Management!

Squawk on the Street
Markets Digest the Earnings Parade, An Exclusive With GE CEO Larry Culp, and Twitter Accepts Musk's $44B Takeover Offer. 4/26/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 46:14


Jim Cramer and Sara Eisen explored market reaction to earnings from the likes of General Electric, 3M, UPS and Raytheon. Jim interviewed GE CEO Larry Culp about the company's quarterly results -- the stock taking a hit on cautious guidance in wake of “inflation and other evolving pressures.” The future for Twitter also in the spotlight after the company accepted Elon Musk's $44 billion buyout offer to take the social media firm private. David Faber joined the Twitter discussion. Also in focus: Warner Brothers Discovery with eye-opening comments on its earnings call about the demise of CNN+, Oil prices rebound, what to expect from Alphabet, Microsoft and General Motors earnings, and Carnival's Arnold Donald to step down as CEO.

CPA Exam Experience from SuperfastCPA
Rodger's Retention Routine He's Using to Pass His CPA Exams

CPA Exam Experience from SuperfastCPA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 58:13


In this episode, you'll hear Rodger's study breakthrough that made a huge difference in his study process, and how his daily CPA study routine changed his life. Important LinksLearn our “ultra-efficient” CPA study methods here: https://www.superfastcpa.com/study-secrets/ Enter the free podcast giveaway: https://www.superfastcpa.com/enter See CPA score release dates here: https://www.superfastcpa.com/cpa-score-release-dates/ How to study for the CPA exams: https://www.superfastcpa.com/how-to-study-for-the-cpa-exams/ Episode Timestamps00:00 SuperfastCPA Reviews with Rodger 04:12 Rodger's CPA Journey 05:52 "The process was taking forever to get through lessons" 07:10 Ups & downs of passing the first exam then failing the next 08:04 "It's kind of a defeating feeling..." 09:47 Some of Rodger's First Study Breakthroughs 12:57 From having all day to working + CPA study 16:45 "I thought that was a total game changer...: 21:02 "This has to be your life" 23:58 "Just more exposure, the more you'll know it" 25:01 "I wish I could talk to myself from last April..." 26:34 Preparing for FAR Retake 28:24 Changing His Mindset and Setting Priorities 33:26 "That's what matters. You live and learn..." 35:32 Constant Use of SuperfastCPA Filled the Gaps in Rodger's Day 36:33 Using the App for Mini Quizzes 42:13 "I changed my whole life basically..." 42:55 Making Motivation a Habit 46:18 You have to "keep your head in the game" 53:11 Study Tips for People Currently Studying FULL PAGE EPISODE: https://www.superfastcpa.com/cpa-study-retention/ Learn the SuperfastCPA Study Approach, Free You'll hear me mention the SuperfastCPA study process multiple times in this episode.  What we teach our customers is how to have a 2-hour main session each day where you can get more done than someone studying 4-5 hours the "normal way".  We cover this in our free "study trainings", which are 1-hour webinars where you'll learn exactly what to do when you sit down to study so that you can 1) move through new material faster, 2) understand and retain it better, and 3) spend less time in front of your review course WHILE getting better results. Register for a free session here: https://www.superfastcpa.com/passnow OR, just text PASSNOW to 44222 and we'll text you back a link to the training. This is one hour that will literally save you months of time and frustration from trying to figure this stuff out on your own, so register for a session today! Register for a free session here: https://www.superfastcpa.com/passnow

Bob Sirott
Associated Bank Market Outlook: 4/26/22

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022


On April 26th, 2022, Steve Grzanich shares today's potential market drivers: Durable good orders for March Case-Shiller US National Home Price Indexes are due Earnings from General Electric, Jet Blue, UPS, Warner Bros. Discovery, Alphabet, General Motors, Mondelez International, Microsoft, ADM, and Visa

Tech Talks
What does a technology role model sound like?

Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 44:53


As Elon Musk buys Twitter we talk to two technology entrepreneurs we think are far better role models! We're often told women need more role models but we put it to you that they're already there and just need to be heard. First we talk to the Joy Club's Hannah Thomson, before we spend time talking to WalkSafe's Emma Kay. Both have real insight into being a founder as well as leading innovative tech businesses.

The Majority Report with Sam Seder
2825 - The Double Edged Sword That Is Union Pension Muscle w/ Sandy Jacoby

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 66:15


It's Sam's triumphant return to the show! He and Emma host Sandy Jacoby, Research Professor at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, to discuss his recent book Labor in the Age of Finance: Pensions, Politics, and Corporations from Deindustrialization to Dodd-Frank, on the contradictions ingrained in the relationship between organizing and shareholders. Professor Jacoby begins by situating the first era of union financialization at the end of the 19th Century with the birth of labor banks as a way to bolster worker funds, until the Great Depression flipped nearly every single one belly up, burning the relationship between the two sectors for much of the next fifty years over the New Deal era. The start of the neoliberal era in the 70s forced unions to look for ways to boost their power once again, turning to union pension funds, which offered both direct and indirect control over money for their workers, with a particular focus on the public State and Local funds such as CalPERS, which used their billions to bolster myriad labor fights in their state. After briefly touching on the different structures of the public pension funds, Professor Jacoby, Emma, and Sam dive into how this led to these funds putting in place shareholder policies, trading financial support for policies that favor shareholders' profits over workers, particularly pushing stock options and stock-based pay for executives, seeing a complete shift to marketization, including swapping pensions for 401ks, and commitments to labor squeezes to bolster share prices. Next, Professor Jacoby dives into how this financialization tied the roles of these pensions, shareholders, and CEOs together, fighting for the same short term returns despite their inverse relationship with the health of corporations, labor, and community, and how this structure forced union objections to be made in alignment with shareholder profits. They wrap up the interview by exploring what separating unions' organizing interests from their pension interests could look like, the role that de-financializing corporations plays, and where the world of labor is at in this conversation. Sam also unpacks his personal pandemic experience these past two weeks, before he and Emma unpack the continued escalation of Russian violence in Ukraine, Kevin McCarthy scrambling to get back in Trump's good graces, and how the labor movement got to the incredible moment it finds itself in. And in the Fun Half: Sam celebrates his return as he and Emma take calls from Kowalski and John from San Antonio, giving their typical rundowns on the worlds of agriculture and progressive campaigns, respectively, Nancy Mace and Marjorie Taylor Greene show off the right's ability to never acknowledge any potential shortcomings, and Trump campaigns for JD Vance and his ability to clamor back to Trump's feet. The Georgia Governor's debate sees political elite and political elite battle over who's LESS elite, Steven Crowder and Megyn Kelly discuss the horrors of watching trans people beat women (at sports) in public, and Brennan calls in to explore unionizing his workplace. Plus, your calls and IMs! Check out Sandy's book here: https://sanfordjacoby.com/ Purchase tickets for the live show in Boston on May 15th HERE:   https://majorityreportradio.com/live-show-schedule Become a member at JoinTheMajorityReport.com: https://fans.fm/majority/join Subscribe to the AMQuickie newsletter here:  https://madmimi.com/signups/170390/join Join the Majority Report Discord! http://majoritydiscord.com/ Get all your MR merch at our store: https://shop.majorityreportradio.com/ Check out today's sponsors: LiquidIV: When you push your body too hard or just feel run down, it's extremely important to stay hydrated - making hydration a priority helps us feel better on a day-to-day basis. Liquid I.V. contains 5 essential vitamins—more Vitamin C than an orange and as much potassium as a banana. Healthier than sugary sports drinks, there are no artificial flavors or preservatives and less sugar than an apple. Grab your favorite Liquid I.V. flavors nationwide at Walmart or you can get 25% off when you go to https://www.liquid-iv.com/ and use code MAJORITYREP at checkout. That's 25% off ANYTHING you order when you get better hydration today using promo code MAJORITYREP at https://www.liquid-iv.com/. ZipRecruiter: Some things in life we like to pick out for ourselves - so we know we've got the one that's best for us - like cuts of steak or mattresses. What if you could do the same for hiring - choose your ideal candidate before they even apply? That's where ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' comes in - it gives YOU, as the hiring manager, the power to pick your favorites from top candidates. According to ZipRecruiter Internal Data, jobs where employers use ZipRecruiter's ‘Invite to Apply' get on average two and a half times more candidates — which helps make for a faster hiring process. See for yourself! Just go to this exclusive web address, https://www.ziprecruiter.com/majority to try ZipRecruiter for free! Stamps.com: Taking trips to the Post Office is probably not how you want to spend your time. – that's why you should mail and ship online at Stamps dot com., the place where you get the services of the Post Office and UPS all in one place. There's NO risk - and with my promo code, MAJORITYREPORT, you get a special offer that includes a 4-week trial PLUS free postage and a digital scale. Just go to https://www.stamps.com/, click on the Microphone at the TOP of the homepage and type in MAJORITYREPORT - that's https://www.stamps.com/, promo code MAJORITYREPORT. Stamps.com - never go to the post office again. Support the St. Vincent Nurses today! https://action.massnurses.org/we-stand-with-st-vincents-nurses/ Check out Matt's show, Left Reckoning, on Youtube, and subscribe on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/leftreckoning Subscribe to Matt's other show Literary Hangover on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/literaryhangover Check out The Nomiki Show on YouTube. https://www.patreon.com/thenomikishow Check out Matt Binder's YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/mattbinder Subscribe to Brandon's show The Discourse on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/ExpandTheDiscourse Check out The Letterhack's upcoming Kickstarter project for his new graphic novel! https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/milagrocomic/milagro-heroe-de-las-calles Check out Jamie's podcast, The Antifada. https://www.patreon.com/theantifada, on iTunes, or at https://www.twitch.tv/theantifada (streaming every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 7pm ET!) Subscribe to Discourse Blog, a newsletter and website for progressive essays and related fun partly run by AM Quickie writer Jack Crosbie. https://discourseblog.com/ Subscribe to AM Quickie writer Corey Pein's podcast News from Nowhere. https://www.patreon.com/newsfromnowhere  Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter: @SamSeder @EmmaVigeland @MattBinder @MattLech @BF1nn @BradKAlsop The Majority Report with Sam Seder - https://majorityreportradio.com/

TD Ameritrade Network
United Parcel Service (UPS) Earnings Preview

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 8:24


Ahead of United Parcel Service (UPS) reporting 1Q earnings on Tuesday, April 26, 2022 before markets open, Kim Forrest and Scott A. Schneeberger join Nicole to break down analyst expectations for the company's quarterly performance. Consensus calls for UPS to report EPS of $2.87 on $23.90B in total revenue, which would indicate a roughly 11.5% rise in sales year-over-year.

Congressional Dish
CD250: Congress Saves the Postal Service

Congressional Dish

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 89:36


Congress did a good thing! In this encouraging episode, learn about a new law that saved the Postal Service from financial doom without spending one extra penny in taxpayer money. Then, listen to the highlights from a recent hearing about the electrification of the Postal Service's vehicle fleet. Louis DeJoy may not have sabotaged the 2020 election, but is he sabotaging the effort to transition the Postal Service away from fossil fuels? Executive Producer: Stephen McMahan Please Support Congressional Dish – Quick Links Contribute monthly or a lump sum via PayPal Support Congressional Dish via Patreon (donations per episode) Send Zelle payments to: Donation@congressionaldish.com Send Venmo payments to: @Jennifer-Briney Send Cash App payments to: $CongressionalDish or Donation@congressionaldish.com Use your bank's online bill pay function to mail contributions to: 5753 Hwy 85 North, Number 4576, Crestview, FL 32536. Please make checks payable to Congressional Dish Thank you for supporting truly independent media! Background Sources Recommended Congressional Dish Episodes CD220: Postal Service Sabotage Lobbying Open Secrets. Bill Profile: H.R. 3076. “Specific Issues Reports for H.R.3076 by: Blue Cross/Blue Shield, 117th Congress.” Open Secrets. Bill Profile: H.R. 3076. “Clients Lobbying on H.R.3076: Postal Service Reform Act of 2021.” Open Secrets. Darrell Issa: Federal Congressional Candidacy Data “Contributors 1997 - 2022.” Jon Stewart Podcast “Jon Talks about the Media -- and It Talks Back.” March 24, 2022. The Problem with Jon Stewart. The Law H.R. 3076: Postal Service Reform Act of 2022 Full Text Summary Cost Estimate House Vote Breakdown: 342-92 (All no votes GOP) Senate Vote Breakdown: 79-19 (All no votes GOP) H.R.6407 - Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act Became law on December 20, 2006 Vote Breakdown Audio Sources It's Electric! Developing the Postal Service Fleet of the Future House Committee on Oversight and Reform April 5, 2022 The Committee on Oversight and Reform held a hearing to examine the benefits, opportunities, and challenges of electrifying the Postal Service fleet through the acquisition of the Next Generation Delivery Vehicle (NGDV). Witnesses: Tammy L. Whitcomb, Inspector General, U.S. Postal Service Office of Inspector General Victoria K. Stephen, Executive Director, Next Generation Delivery Vehicle, USPS Kenny Stein, Director, Policy, Institute for Energy Research Jill Naamane, Acting Director, Physical Infrastructure Team, General Services Administration Joe Britton, Executive Director, Zero Emission Transportation Association Clips 10:00 Rep. James Comer (R-KY): While Republicans are not against the Postal Service acquiring electric vehicles, we're against mandates that ignore the business needs and the financial situation of the Postal Service. Republicans believe the postal service must be self funded. This means the Postal Service should pay for its own capital needs, like purchasing new vehicles. Meanwhile, Americans can't afford to fill up their gas tanks, let alone buy an electric vehicle. But that isn't stopping Democrats from demanding your mailman has one. 26:30 Tammy L. Whitcomb: Last February, the Postal Service awarded a contract to produce and deploy up to 165,000 new delivery vehicles over the next 10 years. While the contract allows for both electric and gasoline powered vehicles, the Postal Service's current plan is for most of the new vehicles to be gasoline powered. We have two recent reports related to this purchasing decision. One of our reports was a research paper that identified the opportunities and challenges for the Postal Service in adopting these electric vehicles. We found electric vehicles are well suited for most postal routes, and there are clear benefits to their adoption. For example, a large fleet of electric vehicles would help the Postal Service decrease its greenhouse gas emissions and encourage the growth of the electric vehicle market in the United States. Additionally, electric vehicles are more mechanically reliable than gas powered vehicles and require less scheduled maintenance. They would also result in the Postal Service incurring lower and more reliable and stable energy costs. However, there are challenges associated with adopting an electric vehicle fleet. The upfront costs are significantly higher than gasoline powered vehicles. The Postal Service would need to pay a higher per vehicle price and incur the cost of installing the charging infrastructure. The Postal Service has over 17,000 delivery units that may host electric vehicles and the cost and issues associated with installing charging infrastructure will vary by each depending on the parking layout, power availability and required upgrades. Good planning along with early and consistent communication with local governments and utility companies could help overcome these challenges. We found the Postal Service could save money in the long term by deploying electric vehicles on certain routes. For example on longer routes in in areas of the country where gas prices are traditionally higher. The Postal Service might also be able to lower the costs associated with electric vehicles by exploring different mixes of the type and number of chargers. Because many delivery routes are short, it is unlikely that every vehicle would need to plug into a charger every night. There are two other factors that could significantly change the cost benefit analysis of purchasing electric vehicles: federal funding and local incentives. The Postal Service has stated it could achieve full electrification of its delivery fleet if Congress provided $6.9 billion. Incentive programs by local utility companies might also help offset costs. 33:57 Victoria Stephen: Any mix of replacement vehicles will deliver significant reductions in emissions and improvements in fuel economy over our existing long-life vehicles. I would note, however, that we have 12,500 routes over 70 miles in length that are not candidates for electrification today, and another 5000 that require all wheel drive vehicles due to extreme climate conditions. Electrification also comes with the challenge of installing infrastructure at a multitude of postal facilities. 42:36 Jill Naamane: Last month, the Postal Service ordered 50,000 new delivery vehicles including about 10,000 that will be electric. To inform its decision, USPS conducted a total cost of ownership analysis of a range of types of vehicles. information in this analysis included the maintenance and fuel costs of each vehicle. It also developed a model that recommends the lowest cost vehicle for each delivery route, and a mix of vehicles to purchase each year. The model is based on a set of assumptions including information from the total cost of ownership analysis and details on individual delivery routes. 43:28 Jill Naamane: Our preliminary analysis of the model raises questions about the way in which certain assumptions estimate the costs and benefits of the gas and electric vehicles. I'll highlight a few examples. First, the model we reviewed used a 2020 gas price that is almost $2 per gallon less than the current national average. 43:57 Jill Naamane: Second, the model appears to assume maintenance would be more expensive for electric vehicles than gas. This is inconsistent with research we have identified, our interviews with private delivery companies, and Postal Service documents that show electric vehicles are expected to be less expensive to maintain. 44:16 Jill Naamane: Third, the total cost of ownership analysis does not include a reduction in emissions as a benefit of electric vehicles. A separate USPS Environmental Impact Statement found that with no tailpipe emissions, electric vehicles would have this benefit. 44:40 Jill Naamane: I'll turn now to factors that have so far affected the widespread acquisition of electric vehicles in federal fleets. We've previously reported that these factors include the higher upfront costs of electric vehicles and uncertainties around the cost and installation of charging infrastructure. Our ongoing work indicates that these factors remain relevant. For example, USPS officials said the higher upfront cost was a key factor in their decision making. They estimate that the new electric and gas delivery vehicles will not cost the same until 2031. In addition, USPS estimates a range in the cost of installing chargers depending on the site and it is uncertain whether older facilities have sufficient power capacity to support the charging infrastructure. 51:50 Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY): On March 24, the Postal Service placed its first purchase order of 50,000 vehicles with Oshkosh. And although the Postal Service initially insisted it could buy only 5000 electric vehicles in this first order, it doubled that amount to 10,000 after this committee and others began to ask questions. So I'd first like to ask Miss Steven, can you briefly explain what changed the Postal Service's analysis to allow for the increase of EVs in this purchase order? Victoria Stephen: Yes, thank you for the question. The first thing that that it's important to note is that the Postal Service has committed to continuing to reassess changes in the market. And so the point that you and some of the other speakers have made today about changing fuel prices…$2.19 was the price at the time that we prepared the analysis, we have continued to do ongoing analysis on changing fuel prices and sensitivity analysis to determine if that change is our mix. It certainly does. The gas prices are higher today than they were when we prepared the initial analysis. So that's one factor. The other key factor is that through the efforts of you and your colleagues, postal reform is making a big difference for the Postal Service. It allows us the flexibility to consider our capital position differently than prior to the passage of postal reform. So between those two key variables, we were able to go back and assess our ability to increase the proportion of electric vehicles within our financial resources and within our means, and we're happy to do that. 1:44:00 Rep. Clay Higgins (R-LA): What would the Postal Service do right now if a postal service vehicle runs out of fuel on its route? Victoria Stephen: A conventional vehicle today? Rep. Clay Higgins (R-LA): Yes, yes, ma'am. Victoria Stephen: Yeah, we will call our local team and they would— Rep. Clay Higgins (R-LA): And you'd bring in gas pretty quick, wouldn't you? Victoria Stephen: That's right. Rep. Clay Higgins (R-LA): What do you what are you going to do it for the electric postal service vehicle runs out of juice? Victoria Stephen: It's more challenging— Rep. Clay Higgins (R-LA): You're gonna have to tow it. So listen, I say to my colleagues across the aisle, maybe the time has come for this discussion, but let's have it honestly. It's not going to work. We're spending billions of dollars of the people's treasury to accomplish some dream. Not to mention what my colleague has brought up: the raw materials for these batteries being mined by child slave labor overseas. That raw product bought by China is assembled into the finished product by slave labor in China. Do we support that? For God's sakes, let's take a step back. As a committee, we owe it to the American people that we serve to take a hard look at this thing. 2:01:06 Rep. Glen Grothman (R-WI): Some of my colleagues proposed requiring 75% of the vehicles to be electric. Do you think that's a reasonable possibility? Do you think that's really something that could be handled right now? Victoria Stephen: I think it's a bit beyond what our estimates say is possible. When we were asked by some of the congressional committee members and staff throughout the last year to assess how far we could go with our electrification, the response we provided was 70% of our delivery fleet acquisitions over the course of the decade could be electrified if resources were made available. 3:16:05 Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA): And then there's the problem with the Postal Service assumptions about EV range, a 70 mile vehicle range. In your extensive work in this field, including the vehicles that companies like GM, Ford and rivian? are providing to private fleets, did USPS use the correct assumption about battery range? Joe Britton: No, it is far inconsistent with what we're seeing in the marketplace and I'll give you a couple examples. The Ford eTransit van? gets nearly two miles per kilowatt hour in the battery pack. The workhorse C Series? gets one and a half miles per kilowatt hour in the battery pack. The Arrival van that is being contracted with UPS gets 1.7 miles per kilowatt hour in the battery pack. The USPS assumption is that this vehicle gets seven tenths of a mile per kilowatt hour in the battery pack. The only other vehicle that we have seen that has that inefficient of an electric drive train would be a Class A tractor trailer or semi truck fully weighted down. It is impossible [unintelligible] -- Rep. Jared Huffman (D-CA): And if the model used the correct range assumptions, wouldn't that significantly affect the total cost of ownership analysis, including the number of charging stations needed to support these vehicles? Joe Britton: That's correct. You would not need nearly as many charging stations as the Postal Service is asserting. 3:20:12 Rep. James Comer (R-KY): It's a worthy cause to try to change to try to transfer from fossil fuels to electric vehicles. But the policies in the Biden administration are making that even more difficult than the economics of it. For example, the Biden administration war on coal is making it more difficult to mine coal and to burn coal. I know that from being from a coal burning state and a coal producing state. You have to have coal to make electricity. You also have to have natural gas to make electricity. We have a lot of problems with our energy policy in America from the Biden administration. And he's gonna make electrifying vehicles even more difficult. Senate Session February 8, 2022 Highlighted PDF Clips 20:40 Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT): Because the Postal Service is required to deliver to every American even on unprofitable routes. The postal service may be charging lower than market rates in its service contracts with private companies. This may not only shortchange the Postal Service making further taxpayer bailouts likely, but it could also distort competition in the package delivery market. 22:45 Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT): Senator Scott's amendment would alleviate some of the financial burdens that this bill would impose on taxpayers and the Medicare program by forcing the Postal Service to reimburse Medicare for all of the additional costs that would be created by requiring future postal retirees to enroll in Medicare. 2:38:33 Sen. Rob Portman (R-OH): I would also like to note what this bill does not do because there has been some misinformation out there. One, it does not appropriate new funds to the post office, period. Two, it does not change the accounting or costing structure for packages and letters so it does not disadvantage private-sector carriers. That is very important to me. This is the status quo that we are putting in place here. It does not change the accounting or costing structure for packages and letters. Third, it does not allow the Postal Service to enter into new commercial services like postal banking. That is also very important to me. And contrary to the claims of this bill's opponents, this bill does not impact the solvency of the Medicare hospital trust fund. That is the trust fund we all talk about. It is going belly-up in 2026. It does not affect it, period. CBO has actually written us something saying that, but it just makes sense. People are already in Part A. And this bill does not increase the Medicare Part B and Part D premiums based on the CBO analysis. Why? Partly because it is such a small number of people. Only 25 percent of postal employees were not already in Part B and Part D, so additional ones make very little difference. But part of it is they are paying their premiums. House Session February 8, 2022 Highlighted PDF Clips 37:10 Rep. Darrell Issa (R-CA): The fact is they haven't made a profit since 2006 as they are mandated. The truth is, the post office isn't lacking liquidity, it is bankrupt and nothing in this bill will make the post office truly solvent. It simply wipes out and wipes away debts and shifts the burden onto taxpayers. The bill forgives $46 billion in debts owed by the Postal Service, forcing the taxpayers to pay it. House Committee on Oversight and Reform Business Meeting May 13, 2021 Clip 44:45 Rep. Speier (D-CA): Believe it or not, prohibition has been over for 90 years, but somehow, we never fixed it so that the US Postal Service could be in a position to mail and process liquor and wine. So for 90 years, they have had their hands tied, while others were able to do that task. We can't have the Postal Service break even or even become profitable if we keep tying its hands. So we also have an interest in protecting small businesses, micro breweries, small retail establishments, small wineries. They cannot ship their product because they either have to have the sanctions of the wholesalers or they don't ship. Hearing: Examining the Finances and Operations of the United States Postal Service During COVID-19 and Upcoming Elections Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee August 21, 2020 Watch on YouTube Clips 12:30 Louis DeJoy: Our business model established by the Congress requires us to pay our bills through our own efforts. I view it as my personal obligation to put the organization in a position to fulfill that mandate. With action from the Congress and our regulator, and significant effort by the Postal Service, we can achieve this goal. This year, the Postal Service will likely be reported loss of more than $9 billion. Without change, our losses will only increase in the years to come. It is vital that Congress enact reform legislation that addresses our unaffordable retirement payments. Most importantly, Congress must allow the postal service to integrate our retiree health benefits program with Medicare. Hearing: Financial State of U.S. Postal Service Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee August 6, 2009 Speakers: John Potter, Former Postmaster General David Williams, Former Inspector General, USPS Clips 46:10 David Williams: The Postal accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006 requires the postal service to make 10 annual payments of $5 billion each in addition to the $20 billion already set aside for pre funding its retiree health benefits, the size of the $5 billion payments has little foundation and the current payment method is damaging to the financial viability of the Postal Service even in profitable times. The payment amounts were not actuarially based instead, the required payments were built to ensure that the Postal Act did not affect the federal budget deficit. This seems inexplicable since the Postal Service is not part of the federal budget, does not receive an appropriation for operations and makes its money from the sale of postal services. The payment amounts are fixed through 2016 and do not reflect the funds earnings. Estimates of the Postal Service liability as a result of changing economic circumstances, declining staff size or developments in health Care and pharmaceutical industries. The payments do not take into account the Postal Service's ability to pay and are too challenging even in normal times. 1:10:10 John Potter: And when I look around the world and see what other posts are, if you're in Australia and you want to update your driver's license, renew it, you go to the post office. If you're in Italy and you go into a bank, more than likely going to the post office, if you're in Japan and you want to buy insurance, more than likely you're going to the post office. And if you're in France and you have a cell phone issue, more than likely, again, you're going to the post office. Cover Art Design by Only Child Imaginations Music Presented in This Episode Intro & Exit: Tired of Being Lied To by David Ippolito (found on Music Alley by mevio)

Footwork
Stoppage Time with Joe-Joe Richardson (Highlights from Episode 00:88)

Footwork

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 9:15


Welcome to Stoppage Time: a segment where we choose some of our favorite highlights from the episode. Today we clipped together some amazing moments from episode 00:88 The Pursuit with Joe-Joe Richardson Moments: DFB Pokal Against Bundesliga Side FC Augsburg Understanding How Unique This Path Is The Benefits of Being Abroad & Alone Knowing the Ups and Downs are Part of the Process Check out the Full Episode too for more amazing conversation! This week we sit down with Joe-Joe Richardson. A Seattle, Washington native, Joe-Joe is currently playing soccer for Greifswalder FC(5th Tier) in Germany. We dive into how & why he made the jump to Germany at the age of 19, the hardships that come with it, as well as all the benefits. The pressures of going to college were there but he stuck with making his own path. He has already played in the DFB Pokal against Bundesliga side Augsburg, and is currently pushing for promotion into the 4th tier. This episode is the second episode of our Path Possibilities series, showing the various routes players take. This is The Pursuit with Joe-Joe Richardson. • Follow Joe-Joe on Instagram here: www.instagram.com/joejoerichardson/ • WHAT IS FOOTWORK? Sponsored by https://footwork.club • Sean and Dylan are two Division 3 graduates, who dropped everything to pursue their dream of being professional soccer players. Both playing in Germany now, the boys tell their stories as well as those of amazing guests to help you pursue your own dreams and ultimately MAKE YOUR OWN PATH.
 • Subscribe to our show on Youtube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCCnInbiimv9oZGUgkInR1tA • 
Email us at: footworkpodcast@gmail.com • Subscribe to Footwork: https://eepurl.com/hKT0zD • CHECK OUT ALL THINGS FOOTWORK: https://footwork.club/

The Near Memo
Amazon's Buy with Prime; AI content & the future of the internet, What content drives SMB research?

The Near Memo

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 25:16


Amazon's bold play to push Prime benefits across all of e-commerce is not only a direct threat to Shopify but UPS and FedEx as well. While it will bring trust and convenience to small and local websites,  which types of businesses will actually benefit from Buy Prime on their site?Google's has stated that AI generated content is against their guidelines. But their guidelines are not so clear as they seem to imply that human edited content will be ok. What is the future of on-line content? Will Google be able to moderate the coming tsunami of AI generated content?Very small businesses want to do their own research when buying SAAS products but which sorts of content do they use to do that? There isn't really a single content source that drives uptake. Perhaps AI driven content might be able to allow content to be more easily repurposed across content types. The Near Memo is a weekly conversation about Search, Social, and Commerce: What happened, why it matters, and the implications for local businesses and national brands.Near Memo Ep 61

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Business News Headlines 21 April 2022

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 10:58


Welcome to the business news headlines and make sure you click through for a conversation about the acquisition of Iowa Watch by the Midwest Center for Investitive Reporting and what that means for the two non-profits.  My guests are Lyle Muller and Pam Dempsey.  But, first the news: Higher Interest Rates; Netflix and Password Sharing; Debt Collection of Debt...not owed; Amazon taking on UPS and FedEx; That KitKat Bar...gonna cost you more; The company lost money but the stock goes up; The Wall Street Report; That didn't take long as CNN+ bites the dust. For the interview you'll meet returning guest Lyle Muller from Iowa Watch which was just acquired by the Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting or Investigate Midwest. The Executive Director of the news agency is Pam Dempsey who joins us on this call. To listen to that conversation click here. Thanks for coming by! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour. 

Tech Talks
Tech Talks Extra: Interview with MacPaw CEO Oleksandr Kosovan

Tech Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 32:42


To we are interviewing MacPaw CEO and founder Oleksandr Kosovan, who along with 30 or 40 of his team have remained in Kyiv. This is his experience. If you wish to donate these funds might be worth considering: MacPaw Development Foundation, their own fund to help with humanitarian aid: https://humanitarian-aid.macpaw.com/ KOLO, a foundation for rapid support for the Ukrainian military, organized by a group of top IT executives from Ukraine: https://www.koloua.com/en Come Back Alive is an NGO fund that supports the Armed Forces of Ukraine: https://www.comebackalive.in.ua/ National Bank of Ukraine has also opened an account to support Ukraine's Armed Forces: https://bank.gov.ua/en/news/all/natsionalniy-bank-vidkriv-spetsrahunok-dlya-zboru-koshtiv-na-potrebi-armiyi Finally some of our own colleagues are raising funds via Unicef: http://www.justgiving.com/team/harveynashers?invite=true