Podcasts about delta airlines

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Best podcasts about delta airlines

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Latest podcast episodes about delta airlines

The CMO Podcast
Tim Mapes (Delta Airlines) | Bewitched by Advertising

The CMO Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 55:05


Tim Mapes is the Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing and Communications Officer at Delta Airlines. Based in Atlanta, Delta is the global leader in air travel and the country's oldest. They have 75,000 employees, 200 million yearly customers, and did about $35 billion in sales the latest fiscal year. Tim has been with Delta for over 30 years, making him somewhat of a marketing executive unicorn. He jumped to Delta after spending 4 years on the agency side with BBDO Worldwide.Recorded in June, this wide ranging conversation goes through Tim's jump from agency to client and how his longevity at Delta has benefitted him and the brand. He also highlights how much Delta stresses the importance of focusing on their employees.CMOs often hold one of the most innovative and challenging roles in business today. Those who excel can operate at the highest level to drive growth and create value for their organizations. To learn more how Deloitte helps bolster the value CMOs deliver, visit www.cmo.deloitte.com.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

All Things Aviation & Aerospace
Aviation Career Conversations - Live On Location at EAA AirVenture 2022 - Oshkosh, Wisconsin at Wittman Regional Airport with Airbus Americas and Delta Air Lines in the glass-enclosed Airbus Pavilion

All Things Aviation & Aerospace

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 50:39


If the thought of being totally immersed in aviation, seeing every type of aircraft from unique looking homebuilts, to a full assortment of military aircraft, to state of the art commercial airliners, and everything in between, block out the last week of July next summer with plans to head to Oshkosh, Wisconsin. It is the Experimental Aircraft Association's annual EAA AirVenture at Oshkosh, a one of a kind aviation experience.With all of the conversation about workforce development in aviation, I took advantage of the opportunity to talk with four aviation industry professionals with Airbus Americas and Delta Airlines. First, I spoke with Captain Patrick Burns, Vice President of Delta's flight operations and system Chief Pilot supervising over 14,000 pilots; followed by John O'Leary, Vice President of Engineering for Airbus Americas; then the relatively young, but energetic and passionate Yeimy Daniela Garcia, an Account Director for Satair an Airbus company; closing out with Amanda Simpson, Vice President of Research and Technology for Airbus Americas. What an incredible opportunity to hear them share their perspectives on the amazing possibilities and opportunities for future generations of aspiring young aviation and aerospace professionals. Take a listen.

Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata
Nicole's Gotta See 111 Species of Lemurs

Best Friends with Nicole Byer and Sasheer Zamata

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 43:26 Very Popular


This week Nicole buys Sasheer hot dog eating shorts in real time on the podcast. Then Nicole and Sasheer manifest their next career dreams, and Sasheer realizes she has opening weekend audience energy but always sees a movie after it's been out for a few weeks. These two best friends continue to plan their trip to Africa which includes Nicole needing to see 111 species of lemurs. Then Nicole and Sasheer answer some fan questions which include staying in touch with friends while working as a driver, picking out furniture for a therapy office and some Delta Airlines gossip. So don't be a CC, and enjoy this episode! Check Out Fashion Brand Company: https://www.fashionbrandcompany.com/ Email or call Nicole & Sasheer with your friendship questions at:nicoleandsasheer@gmail.com424-645-7003

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast
How Leaders can Connect with People and Reduce Isolation with Ryan Jenkins and Steven Van Cohen

The Remarkable Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 42:02


We may be more connected than ever before; yet studies show we are also lonelier. Further, research indicates that for the first time, the emerging generation (Gen Z) is feeling more isolated and lonelier than the elderly population, and this was pre-Covid. Ryan Jenkins and Steven Van Cohen share with Kevin that we underestimate how much we need connection. When people show up lonely for work, they are 7x more likely to be disengaged, 5x more likely to miss work, and twice as likely to think about quitting their job. We need to be intentional about our connections and less transactional. This episode was recorded during our Mental Fitness Day, a Virtual LeaderCon event in April 2022. Key Points In this episode, Ryan and Steven discuss loneliness in the workplace.  They share the difference between loneliness and solitude.  They talk about belonging as an antidote to loneliness. Meet Ryan and Steven Name: Ryan Jenkins and Steven Van Cohen   Their Story: Ryan Jenkins, CSP and Steven Van Cohen, MSOD are founders of LessLonely.com, the world's #1 resource for addressing workplace loneliness and creating more belonging at work. They are also the authors of Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams from Isolated to All In. Collectively they have over 20 years of experience helping organizations like Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, State Farm, John Deere, Delta Air Lines and Salesforce improve their teams. Their work has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Wall Street Journal, SUCCESS, Inc., and Entrepreneur Magazine. When they are not writing and speaking, you can find them sampling craft beers, attempting to play golf together, and spending quality time with their respective families. Worth Mentioning: 

Baseball and BBQ
Baseball and BBQ Episode #144: Features Youth Baseball Coach Justin Sherman of JustinTime Baseball and Pizza Cook-Off Association Founder, Jerry Belcastro

Baseball and BBQ

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 98:50


Episode 144 Features Youth Baseball Coach Justin Sherman of JustinTime Baseball and Pizza Cook-Off Association Founder, Jerry Belcastro Justin Sherman founded JustinTime Baseball in 2015.  It is an independent baseball/softball training and coaching business located in Westchester, New York.  Their mission statement is, "We believe in building and developing fundamental skills in baseball and softball, while also instilling a sense of confidence and independence through individualized instruction."  Justin did not play Major League Baseball, and he may have never been the best player on his team at other levels, but that matters very little.  Having to always work hard for success helps him now as he understands the hard work and dedication required to play the game, and he uses this knowledge to teach children the basic skills to help them become better ballplayers.  Various topics are covered and it is very interesting to hear the opinions of someone who is extremely familiar with the game and how it should be played.  More information is available at, https://www.justintimebaseball.com/ Jerry Belcastro is giving pizza lovers as well as those who love to cook competitively something to get excited about. As the founder of the recently formed Pizza Cook-Off Association (PCA), Jerry is providing the pizza community with something which the barbecue community has been enjoying for years; a chance to compete and enjoy delicious food.  Jerry's involvement with food has spanned many years. He previously owned an Italian restaurant/pizzeria, was the regional manager of international catering for Delta Air Lines, and is a certified BBQ judge. There are many aspects involved with increasing the number of PCA events and expanding the organization to include a national audience. Jerry has been able to secure some great sponsors and is getting closer to his goals. More information, including upcoming events, information on becoming a member, competition rules, and even information on becoming a judge is available at, https://www.pizzacook-off.com/ We recommend you go to BBQ Buddha, https://bbqbuddha.com/ for rubs and award-winning sauces, Baseball BBQ, https://baseballbbq.com for special grilling tools and accessories, the Pandemic Baseball Book Club, https://www.pbbclub.com  to find many of the wonderful books we have featured as well as some additional swag, Magnechef, https://magnechef.com/ for excellent and unique barbecue gloves, and Cutting Edge Firewood https://www.cuttingedgefirewood.com/ for high-quality firewood and cooking wood. We conclude the show with the song, "Baseball Always Brings You Home" by the musician, Dave Dresser, and the poet, Shel Krakofsky. We truly appreciate our listeners and hope that all of you are staying safe. If you would like to contact the show, we would love to hear from you.   Call the show:  (516) 855-8214 Email:  baseballandbbq@gmail.comTwitter:  @baseballandbbqInstagram:  baseballandbarbecueYouTube:  baseball and bbqWebsite:  https//baseballandbbq.weebly.com Facebook:  baseball and bbq

FAIRtax Power Radio
#327 It's Your Choice

FAIRtax Power Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 30:17


Suppose you need to fly across the country on business. Your boss is going to pay for your ticket and you're offered two choices. You can fly in the back seat of a 70-year-old Piper Cub, or you can go First Class on one of Delta Airlines' new A321 Neos. Easy choice, isn't it?Most people don't know it, but they have a similar choice when it comes to Federal taxation. They can choose to remain subject to the 109-year-old income tax system, or they can choose the FAIRtax. Truth be told, the difference between the income tax and the FAIRtax is about as dramatic as the difference between the Cub that cruises at around 90 MPH, and the modern jet that moves along at over 500 MPH. In this episode of FAIRtax Power Radio, the FAIRtax Guys present several of the choices you have when it comes to taxation, and show why people should choose the FAIRtax.

Travel Guys Radio
Delta Airlines is testing FREE Wi-Fi on some aircraft

Travel Guys Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2022 42:54


Listen Now On the Sunday, July 24th edition of The Travel Guys…  In the Travel News, two Alaska pilots have to return their plane to the gate…because they couldn't get along in the cockpit. Delta Airlines is testing FREE Wi-Fi on some aircraft and Hertz climbs another stupidity ladder with a long time customer. When you are on a plane, you might relax a little and not be concerned about your belongings. That would be...

Aujourd'hui l'économie
La reprise en demi-teinte du secteur aérien mondial

Aujourd'hui l'économie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 3:49


Le salon aéronautique de Farnborough, premier rendez-vous majeur de l'aéronautique mondiale depuis la pandémie de Covid-19, se tient cette semaine au Royaume-Uni. La crise sanitaire avait contraint les compagnies à clouer au sol des milliers d'avions. Aujourd'hui, le trafic reprend. Il était en mai à un peu plus des deux tiers de son niveau de 2019 et devrait le retrouver en 2023 pour le trafic domestique, en 2025 pour les long-courriers, selon l'Association internationale du transport aérien. Lors de la dernière édition du salon de Farnborough en 2018, pas moins de 192 milliards de dollars de commandes et de contrats avaient été conclus. Ce record ne sera sans doute pas battu mais déjà les annonces commerciales se multiplient. L'américain Boeing continue de caracoler en tête face à Airbus, notamment sur son avion vedette, le 737 MAX. Cent cinquante appareils ont été commandés cette semaine, pour un montant total de 7,5 milliards de dollars, notamment par la compagnie Delta Air Lines. Un autre enjeu du secteur aérien en cette période estivale consiste à pouvoir assurer les vols avec de nombreuses grèves qui viennent perturber le ciel européen. La reprise s'accompagne de pénuries de personnels dans de nombreuses compagnies aériennes et aéroports, en raison de nombreux licenciements pendant la crise sanitaire. Les compagnies, incapables de faire face à la demande soudaine, sont contraintes d'annuler des vols par milliers. Ce qui rend les analystes prudents quant au redémarrage du secteur aérien, les avions sont loin d'être pleins et les prix des billets ont, eux aussi, grimpés. ► À lire aussi : British Airways va annuler 10300 vols jusqu'à la fin octobre Enfin, les obligations environnementales obligent les compagnies aériennes à s'adapter. Le trafic aérien, responsable d'environ 2,5% des émissions de CO2 mondiales, va drainer 10 milliards de passagers en 2050, plus du double de son niveau de 2019. Les compagnies cherchent donc à renouveler leurs flottes avec des avions plus modernes et plus économes, qui consomment moins de carburant. Airbus a annoncé effectuer des vols d'essais pour étudier la composition des traînées de condensation formées par la combustion de l'hydrogène. Ce démonstrateur, baptisé Blue Condor, s'inscrit dans l'engagement qu'a pris l'avionneur européen à mettre en service un avion à hydrogène en 2035. Le Royaume-Uni a de son côté publié une stratégie destinée à atteindre la neutralité carbone dans l'aviation britannique et les aéroports anglais d'ici 2040. Mais les ONG sont sceptiques : les technologies basées sur les carburants synthétiques, l'électrification des appareils ou encore la combustion directe d'hydrogène dans les moteurs sont encore très expérimentales et leur coût n'a pas été réellement mesuré. Les matériels de défense en plein essor L'invasion russe de l'Ukraine a conduit la plupart des Européens à annoncer des augmentations de leurs budgets de défense pour renforcer leurs forces armées. Ainsi, Dassault Aviation annonce avoir déjà enregistré des prises de commandes « exceptionnelles » de 16,3 milliards d'euros au premier semestre, avec l'entrée en vigueur du plus important contrat de l'histoire de l'avionneur français portant sur 80 avions de combat Rafale pour les Émirats arabes unis, ainsi que la vente de six Rafale supplémentaires à la Grèce. Dassault Aviation a cependant fait état des difficultés chez sa chaîne de fournisseurs qui a du mal à suivre : ainsi les incertitudes sont nombreuses sur les approvisionnements en énergie, en composants électroniques et en matières premières, notamment chez Thalès, qui mobilise pas moins de 20 sites industriels pour le seul Rafale et qui envisage de produire jusqu'à une cadence de 4,5 équipements par mois, contre 2,5 actuellement.

ALBERTO PADILLA
¿Qué tan cerca está Argentina de entrar en default, y qué tan desastroso sería? Análisis de Claudio Loser de @Centennial_Intl.

ALBERTO PADILLA

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 56:04


-Resultados de bancos no parecen presagiar una recesión. -Gasolina va de bajada....¿Hasta cuándo? -Delta Airlines finalmente cae por el 737 MAX. -Netflix tendrá su ¨dia D¨. -Tres Países de Latinoamérica con mayor riesgo de default.

Almuerzo de Negocios
Delta Airlines compra 100 aviones 737 MAX a Boieng

Almuerzo de Negocios

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 19:03


WSJ Minute Briefing
Stocks Close Lower; IBM Reports Higher Q2 Sales

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 2:19 Very Popular


Also: Apple shares fall 2% on report of hiring slowdown. Delta Air Lines shares rise 3.5% after saying it plans to purchase 100 of Boeing's largest 737 MAX jets. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Squawk on the Street
CNBC Rings the Opening Bell, Big Banks Report, Boeing's Big Boost 7/18/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 42:45 Very Popular


Carl Quintanilla, Jim Cramer and David Faber celebrated a special morning at the New York Stock Exchange as Jim and the “Mad Money” team rang the opening bell to celebrate the show's permanent move to the NYSE. The anchors then shifted their focus to the market rally, getting a boost from Goldman Sachs and Bank of America, which reported before the bell. Another big mover to watch today was Boeing, as Delta Air Lines bought 100 planes from the company, its first major order with Boeing in more than a decade. Also in the mix: GSK spun off its $36 billion consumer health business Haleon, the largest listing in Europe in more than 10 years.

The Leadership Hacker Podcast
Leaders Learn from Leaders with Adrian Simpson

The Leadership Hacker Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 46:17


Adrian Simpson is a Co-founder of Wavelength leadership group; for over 20 years he's taken top leaders into the boardrooms and shop floors of the world's most successful, innovative and admired companies. Today you can learn about:   What makes a great leader? Why leaders learn best from leaders? How great leaders talk candidly about failure. The secrets behind some global transformative cultures.   Join our Tribe at https://leadership-hacker.com   Music: " Upbeat Party " by Scott Holmes courtesy of the Free Music Archive FMA   Transcript: Thanks to Jermaine Pinto at JRP Transcribing for being our Partner. Contact Jermaine via LinkedIn or via his site JRP Transcribing Services   #some audio issues in this show – thanks for your patience.   Find out more about Adrian below: Adrian on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adrian-simpson-b600139/ Adrian on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AdieSimpson Wavelength on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wavelengthleadership/ Wavelength Website: https://www.wavelengthleadership.com   Full Transcript Below     Steve Rush: Some call me Steve, dad, husband, or friend. Others might call me boss, coach or mentor. Today you can call me The Leadership Hacker.   Thanks for listening in. I really appreciate it. My job as the leadership hacker is to hack into the minds, experiences, habits and learning of great leaders, C-Suite executives, authors, and development experts so that I can assist you developing your understanding and awareness of leadership. I am Steve Rush, and I am your host today. I am the author of Leadership Cake. I am a transformation consultant and leadership coach. I cannot wait to start sharing all things leadership with you   Adrian Simpson is a special guest on today's show. For over 20 years he's really been immersing himself in amongst some of the top firms around the world, including the likes of Apple, Tesla, Netflix, and Google. And we're going to dive into some of those leadership secrets, but before we do, it's The Leadership Hacker News. The Leadership Hacker News Steve Rush: Purpose is a real key part of all leaders' capabilities, but often leaders get it wrong. Commonly, we see leaders think that purpose should be the same as their company's vision, mission, or purpose, but it shouldn't. Believe writing a leadership purpose statement is not a onetime exercise at all. It's something that should evolve, and it should connect the individual to the purpose of the organization. It's incredibly important and it needs deep insight and deep thoughts. So, what is leadership purpose? Your leadership purpose is your statement about who you are as a person and how you bring those unique qualities into your world. First and foremost, leadership purpose is about your values and what's important to life for you. It's often also considered as your why statement or your reason, your beliefs. Think about your leadership purpose statement as being your beacon, enabling people to have a real clear understanding of what your direction in life and work is. In doing so, it'll help you drive the right behaviors on a daily basis and keep you engaged when circumstances around you can be challenging. It doesn't need to be overly complicated. Your leadership purpose statement must be a living and breathing document that you can share so, others understand it too. And it'll likely change as you change as a person, or your career grows or changes shape. So, you should always update it regularly. And remember your leadership purpose will not only help keep you grounded, and you stay on your path, will help you be a better leader and the leader you're meant to be. Most important, it sets a declaration of the kind of support you're prepared to give as a leader for the people around you. So, they can also buy into your journey. So simply put, think about the purpose, your why, and make sure it describes your values, your beliefs, and your vision, and how that aligns to the organization that you work and serve with. That's been The Leadership Hacker News. Let's dive into the show. Start of Podcast Steve Rush: Adrian Simpson is a Co-founder of Wavelength leadership group. For over 20 years he's taken top leaders into the boardrooms and shop floors. Some of the world's most successful, innovative and admired companies, including Alibaba, Netflix, Apple, Tesla, Lego, and Google but a few. Andrew, welcome to The Leadership Hacker Podcast. Adrian Simpson: Thanks, Steve. It's great to join you this morning. Steve Rush: Really looking forward to diving into some of the lessons learned from some of these huge conglomerates, but tell us a little bit about you, your background and how you've arrived to do what you've done? Adrian Simpson: Gosh, so yeah, so a very, very brief resume. Started my career in retail with John Lewis Partnership then decided at sort of age 21 to go off to University in Manchester, did a degree in business and marketing. And just after University, I managed to stumble into a role with the incredible Tom Peters Group. And for those that aren't old enough, Tom Peters was certainly in the 1980s, nineties, the most successful management guru of his time, his Jim Collins of his day, who wrote an amazing book called In Search of Excellence and sold many millions of copies and to give us sort of sense. So, I was putting him on stage in the 1990s at about $120,000 U.S. dollars a day back in those days. So, and then one day, yeah, after being at the Tom Peters Group where I was helping put him on stage and find some, he really wrote about companies that had kind of amazing cultures that really just sort of got it. And indeed, I'm still visiting some of the companies he wrote about wrote about 30 years ago, like Southwest Airlines. The phone rang and a small innovation company called What If was on the phone. And one thing led to the other and a conversation snowballed into a coffee, a coffee into a lunch, a lunch into a come join us. And I moved into to join What If for 11 years. When I joined, we were 10 people when I left, there were 355 countries. And it was the ride of my life and had an incredible opportunity there to provide our clients with some inspirations, started running for the study tour events, and then 14 years ago made the jump to co-found Wavelength. Steve Rush: So, what is it specifically that Wavelength do? Adrian Simpson: Our specialism is bringing the outside world in. Basically, we scour the world looking for examples of practitioners. What are the leaders? The organizations that have compelling stories to share with our clients and really providing our clients with a combination of what I would call inspiration, education and provocation. And our hypothesis really is at the level at which we operate at, is the leaders learn best from leaders. So, as I mentioned, sort of, you know, scouring the world, looking for practitioners you know, got real experience on topics that our clients were interested in. Albeit, you know, I was literally in America 10 days ago with a group of 20 leaders from all around the world. We had clients from Australia, from India, from Japan, from the Middle East, six across North America, the rest from across Europe, from lots of different organizations. They flew into Dallas Texas on a Saturday. We began on a Sunday morning with a sort of half day workshop. And then for the first day and a half, we spent going inside the legendary Southwest Airlines and Ritz Carlton, really focusing on excellence in culture and leadership and service. So, they can value the three and a half days, looking at innovation, disruption, new business models, what's next? And what's next? Next. Doing some set piece visits but also doing some incredible things like going for drives in the world's first, fully autonomous robots, taxis operated by crews to have no drivers in them at all [laugh] or doing metaverse meetings in the metaverse, Oculus quest headsets. So, we do things like that to very, very intense one-week immersions for very senior business leaders. We have at the other end of the spectrum, we have a digital only program called inspire, which is every single month. Typically, on a third Thursday of the month, we take a cohort of leaders from lots of different client companies live inside a great business, somewhere around the world of an audience with a really accomplished leader. Last week we hosted a session with Alastair Campbell on mental health. Next week, we have the former Prime Minister of Denmark. Helle Thorning Schmidt on how to lead the country. We've got Jesper Boring coming up IKEA Chief Exec. We've hosted Alan Jope Unilever's Chief Exec. We are hosting Tim Steiner, Ocado Chief Exec in September, and they are just short, sharp, regular doses of live world class inspiration for our clients. And we've got amazingly 700 people signed up to that program from around the world. So, we do, you know, whether it's digital only, short, sharp, live inspiration, whether it's weeklong, or we have other programs, one called connect, which is sort of, has about 50 people on it and is UK based, it runs about nine months or whether it's just, you know, helping clients bring speakers in for a particular offsite or conference. But again, any speakers we will use, will be practitioners. Steve Rush: How awesome. So, you managed to really bump shoulders with, and as you said, immerse other leaders with these great leaders from around the world. What's the reason your focus is heavily aimed at making leaders learn from other leaders. Adrian Simpson: I just think there is a relevancy that you cannot get and that applicability that you cannot get from any other kind of learning when it comes to leadership is in my view. Now I'm not for a second saying there is not a role for, you know, academics and business schools and some kind of provocative, rigorous thinking. I think there is a role for that, but I suppose my best sort of summary when I had a chief exec who has been with me, a chap. He was chief exec of a fortune 500 company. He came with me to America for a week. He came with me to China for a week. And I said, you know, John, why are you doing these programs? And he said, it was very simple Adrian. He said, my previous HR leader, he said, kept on telling me to go to Harvard. And I kept on saying to her, tell me where I should go to business school to learn about business from someone who never run a business and I'll go. He said she didn't. So, I didn't [laugh]. And I thought, and he said, so when, you know, she put in front of me the chance to spend a week in the U.S. alongside peers from different industries, different sectors, learning from companies and leaders that were perhaps bit further ahead of us in terms of their narrative. He said it was a compelling proposition because they know what it's like to sit in my seat. They know what it's like to sit it as a board director with multiple stakeholders, internal and external, limited resources, having to make informed decisions. And he said with the greatest respect, no academic, no guru, no consultant knows that reality unless they have also at some point run a major business. So I think it's that sort of you know, real applicability I think and I think it's, you know, what, I've, I've learned as well is that, you know, when you give clients the opportunity to hear from other leaders and learn from other leaders, you know, it's easier almost to swipe with glee, if you like, what it is that they've done, you know. I mean, I'll just give you an example. There was a, you know, I actually did a podcast myself with a tremendous guy called Fred Reid couple of months back, and Fred was the founding chief executive Virgin in America. He was the president of Delta Airlines, the president of Lufthansa. He went on to work with five years of Brian Chesky Airbnb and he also did a stint with Larry Page at his private company Kitty Hawk. So, you know, he is worked with Richard Branson, Larry Page you know, Brian Chesky, and also been a twice president and onetime CEO. And I was talking to him about the challenge of, you know, communication and how do you, as a leader, you know, build an understanding in the business of what business you are in and operational realities. And he told this fantastic story about when he was both at Lufthansa and Delta faced with that challenge, he decided to create a board game. And basically, what he did was he would invite cross sectioned cohorts of leaders from across the business, whether it's air stewart's, pilots, mechanics, ramp agents, didn't matter. And they would be invited to take a day out, fully paid to play this board game. But what the board game was full of was real operational data and decisions. And in sort of teams of eight, they have to like to make a decision. Are you going to give people a 3% pay rise? Are you going to buy new uniforms for the air stewardess? Are you going to pay the loan off on that plane? Are you going to buy the new plane? Are you going to make invest in the innovation fund? Because innovation director says we're not innovating fast enough. Are we going to, you know, are we going to hedge on oil right? And he said, throughout the day, they had to make real operational decisions based on real operational data that we'd given them from the airline. And he said, the only decision in the day they had to make was to appoint a president. And he said, it was hilarious. They all pointed each other and said, it's you, it's you.

Alles auf Aktien
Abo-Optimismus bei Disney und das zweite Leben von Spotify

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 23:34


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ berichten die Finanzjournalisten Nando Sommerfeldt und Felix Eick über den Schnellstarter Lufthansa und das bevorstehende Boeing-Comeback. Außerdem geht es um Citigroup, Delta Airlines, Sony, Universal, Warner, Netease, Amazon und Apple.

AP Audio Stories
Delta places order for 100 Boeing 737 aircraft

AP Audio Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 0:36


AP correspondent Shelley Adler reports on Delta Airlines getting more aircraft.

Insight On Business the News Hour
The Business News Headlines 18 July 2022

Insight On Business the News Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 11:50


When one of the world's largest and most wealthy companies says it's going to "pause" its spending that gets the attention of everybody. It's the business news headlines for Monday the 18th of July thanks, as always for being with us. And, a remember that you can hook up with us all day on Twitter @IOB_NewsHour and on Instagram.  Here is what we've got for you today: Apple "pauses" and that gets noticed; Corporate CEO's are not worried about inflation and why; The world's largest car market about to lose a nameplate; Netflix is facing some real issues; Ford is clearly not giving up on gasoline trucks; Boeing gets new life from Delta Airlines; Something really odd in the job market; The Wall Street Report; And Toys R Us - Comeback Number Two. Thanks for listening! The award winning Insight on Business the News Hour with Michael Libbie is the only weekday business news podcast in the Midwest. The national, regional and some local business news along with long-form business interviews can be heard Monday - Friday. You can subscribe on PlayerFM, Podbean, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher or TuneIn Radio. And you can catch The Business News Hour Week in Review each Sunday Noon on News/Talk 1540 KXEL. The Business News Hour is a production of Insight Advertising, Marketing & Communications. You can follow us on Twitter @IoB_NewsHour. 

CommSec
Morning Report 19 Jul 22: US sharemarkets eased on Monday

CommSec

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 5:33


US sharemarkets were dragged down by weaker bank stocks and a fall in the Apple share price. Apple lost 2.1% on a Bloomberg report that said the company plans to slow hiring and spending growth next year in some units to cope with a potential economic downturn. The S&P financial sector fell by 0.5%. Shares in Bank of America ended flat after its earnings report. But energy rose by 2% on a rise in the oil price. Shares in Boeing ended flat after Delta Air Lines said it would buy 100 MAX 10 jets worth about $13.5 billion. After being up 356 points early in the session, the Dow Jones index closed lower by 216 points or 0.7%, the S&P 500 index lost 0.8%. And the Nasdaq index lost 92 points or 0.8%. Commonwealth Securities Limited ABN 60 067 254 399 AFLS 238814 (CommSec) is a wholly but non-guaranteed subsidiary of Commonwealth Bank of Australia  ABN 48 12 12 124 AFSL: 234945 (the Bank) and a  Market Participant of the ASX Limited and Cboe Australia Pty Limited, a Clearing Participant of ASX Clear Pty Limited and a Settlement Participant of ASX Settlement Pty Limited. Any advice contained in this broadcast is general advice only. As the information in this  broadcast has not been prepared with reference to your objectives, financial or taxation situation or needs, you should, before acting on it, consider its appropriateness to your circumstances and seek appropriate professional advice. CommSec, the Bank, and their related entities do not accept any liability arising out of or in relation to reliance on the information in this broadcast. We believe that the information in this broadcast is correct as at the time of its compilation, but no warranty is made as to its accuracy, reliability or completeness. This report is under copyright to CommSec and the Bank and may not be used without their prior consent.

Travel Guys Radio
New “Tesla Tunnel” on the Las Vegas Strip

Travel Guys Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 42:11


Listen Now On the Sunday, July 17th edition of The Travel Guys…  In the Travel News, there is a new “Tesla Tunnel” on the Las Vegas Strip, creating an exciting new way to get around in Sin City. Delta Airlines, faced with a canceled overseas flight, decides to fly a plane home from Europe full of lost luggage. Ride share companies have a number of unknown rules regarding charges to riders. Some are pretty secret....

Really Charlie
Anthony ‘AJ' Joiner

Really Charlie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 52:15


Anthony ‘AJ' Joiner is an entrepreneur, author, radio personality and is the founder of BLOOKSY.COM - the software platform that uses artificial intelligence to make writing simple for writers and researchers in academia.. AJ previously built software for companies such as CDC, Delta Airlines, and Georgia Department of Transportation, and since leaving corporate America has published over 250 authors and helped thousands more start writing their books over the last 5 years. His software platform Blooksy is being piloted in several universities, and hundreds of writers are using it to write books. He has a 5 year segment about marketing/entrepreneurship/small business on the #1 drivetime radio show - The WIllie Moore Jr. Show on Radio One , is a passionate New Orleans Saints fan, and proudly represents the #1 HBCU in America – Southern University. A native of Leesville, Louisiana, AJ loves nothing more than, eating authentic Louisiana food, and yelling WHODAT during football season. You can find out more about AJ by visiting: www.anthonyjoiner.com or @ajjoiner on Instagram - and if you're interested in writing a book, academic article, or white paper - visit: www.blooksy.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/charles-perry/message

WSJ Minute Briefing
Inflation Hit 9.1% in June, a Four-Decade High

WSJ Minute Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 2:21 Very Popular


Gas, housing and food prices rose the most. President Biden arrives in Israel on high-stakes Mideast trip. Delta Air Lines reports second-quarter profit. J.R. Whalen reports. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

CommSec
Morning Report 14 Jul 22: US sharemarkets tumbled on Wednesday

CommSec

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 5:31


Investors digested surprisingly strong US inflation data, fuelling fears of a larger-than-expected interest rate hike by the US Federal Reserve later this month. Shares of Delta Air Lines slid 4.5% after its second-quarter earnings missed expectations. But Tesla shares climbed 1.7% with Twitter shares up 7.9% as the social media company sued Elon Musk. At the close of trade, the Dow Jones index fell by 208.5 points or 0.7% and the S&P 500 index dipped by 0.5%. The technology-heavy Nasdaq index shed 17 points or 0.2%.  Commonwealth Securities Limited ABN 60 067 254 399 AFLS 238814 (CommSec) is a wholly but non-guaranteed subsidiary of Commonwealth Bank of Australia  ABN 48 12 12 124 AFSL: 234945 (the Bank) and a  Market Participant of the ASX Limited and Cboe Australia Pty Limited, a Clearing Participant of ASX Clear Pty Limited and a Settlement Participant of ASX Settlement Pty Limited. Any advice contained in this broadcast is general advice only. As the information in this  broadcast has not been prepared with reference to your objectives, financial or taxation situation or needs, you should, before acting on it, consider its appropriateness to your circumstances and seek appropriate professional advice. CommSec, the Bank, and their related entities do not accept any liability arising out of or in relation to reliance on the information in this broadcast. We believe that the information in this broadcast is correct as at the time of its compilation, but no warranty is made as to its accuracy, reliability or completeness. This report is under copyright to CommSec and the Bank and may not be used without their prior consent.

Marketplace Minute
Inflation remained stubbornly high in June - Midday - Marketplace Minute - July 13, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 1:50


The June consumer price index was 9.1 percent; Delta Airlines reports $735 million in Q2 profits; Spirit Airlines again delays vote on Frontier takeover bid; Boeing delivers 51 planes in June, a milestone in its recovery from safety crisis Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Marketplace Minute
Prices kept rising in June - Closing Bell - Marketplace Minute - July 13, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2022 1:50


Stocks fall; prices up 9.1 percent over the last year; Delta Air Lines profits rise; Netflix partners with Microsoft for ad-supported subscription Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Ash Said It® Daily
Flight Attendant Chronicles: Reserve Life

Ash Said It® Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 9:02


The tastytrade network
Options Trading Concepts Live - July 8, 2022

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 57:46


Today the tastytrade crew walks through their top 5 stocks to watch in July, and they see what sort of options trading opportunities there are in the underlyings as well. Full stock article here - https://www.tastytrade.com/news-insights/best-stocks-july-2022 Delta Air Lines, Inc. (DAL) Bank of America Corp. (BAC) AT&T (T) Coca-Cola Co. (KO) Merck & Co., Inc. (MRK) Tune in to learn more and a live Q&A as well!

The tastytrade network
Options Trading Concepts Live - July 8, 2022

The tastytrade network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 56:55


Today the tastytrade crew walks through their top 5 stocks to watch in July, and they see what sort of options trading opportunities there are in the underlyings as well. Full stock article here - https://www.tastytrade.com/news-insights/best-stocks-july-2022 Delta Air Lines, Inc. (DAL) Bank of America Corp. (BAC) AT&T (T) Coca-Cola Co. (KO) Merck & Co., Inc. (MRK) Tune in to learn more and a live Q&A as well!

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged
#1,214 - Delta Offers Passengers $10,000 Each to Voluntarily Deboard Flights

Only in Seattle - Real Estate Unplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 18:13


A passenger with a ticket on an oversold Delta flight said he and other passengers were offered $10,000 to give up their seats and travel at a later date, according to a report in Inc. magazine.Inc. tech columnist Jason Aten said he and his family recently traveled on a Delta Air Lines flight to Minneapolis, and that passengers on the oversold flight were offered a whopping $10,000 in cash — not flight credit — to give up their seats. Delta sought eight volunteers, according to Aten's account of the event. "If you have Apple Pay, you'll even have the money right now," the flight attendant said, according to Aten.LIKE & SUBSCRIBE for new videos everyday. https://bit.ly/3KBUDSK

Champagne Strategy
Ted Wright - Revenue success sans advertising excess - Word of Mouth marketing as a growth lever - S3 Ep13

Champagne Strategy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 75:35


Great products sell themselves and advertising is just the price you pay for a bad product right? Word of Mouth Marketing or WOM. Is it even a channel? Can you really grow without spending money on advertising? Can you enhance the natural rate of WOM? The TL:DR answer is Yes. Yes and Yes. Right now, budgets are getting crimped and the heat is on for high-cash burn marketing channels. And there's nothing higher cash-burn than advertising. So how do you grow a brand and sell your product without advertising? Everyone knows the most powerful growth-driver is word-of-mouth. It's especially critical for higher-involvement, more complex, higher priced products/services which require a lot of trust. There are lots of products and services which we don't exactly purchase after seeing a few ads. Especially if your brand is less known. For finance, invasive medical, real estate, estate planning, and accounting...this is especially the case. WOM hits at the core of great marketing. In fact, it's a great barometer of organic growth as well as the degree of product-market fit you have. But is it fixed? Is it just a the result of upstream activity? Can we use it as a growth channel? Is there even a playbook to make it work? Ted Wright, former Booze Allen consultant, ex-Delta Airlines global brand manager, Lecturer at Wharton, Founder and CEO of WOM marketing agency Fizz spills the beans. In this episode, you'll learn how important it is to go back to basics. Understand your core offering. Identify those who are most likely to recommend your product to others and then, put in place a program to enhance this natural process. But there's 3 factors necessary before this holy grail of marketing will work. And there's 3 product categories where it's almost impossible. We also delve into a bit of attribution and channel strategy. Especially the problems with spending money on channels which claim to contribute to sales, but don't. Something which can be easily overlooked when presented with a good-looking MMM report or a fancy digital attribution dashboard. In this episode, you'll find out: - how New Zealand sauvignon blanc became something from nothing. - which two simple Viagra ads originally catapulted the drug into popular culture - what the difference is between WOM and referrals, advocates, super fans and influencers - why getting your story right so critical - the difference between truth vs authenticity in your brand story - why brands who pay Kim Kardashian for social exposure almost never use her again - the parallels between WOM and Einstein's comments on dark matter - what rasterization is - why you should follow Steakumms on social media And finally, Find out why, word of mouth is this podcast's most powerful growth channel. All these questions and more will be answered in this interview. Just remember to tell at least one other person about this episode or Ted is going to mark me down!

Best of News Talk 590 WVLK AM

Jack talks to retired airline pilot Mike Hatton about the recent Delta Airline strike.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Brief from WABE
The Brief for Thursday, July 7th, 2022

The Brief from WABE

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 10:46


"They tried to make me go to testify, but I won't go, go, go!" --U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) to Fulton County following being subpoenaed by a special grand jury looking into Pres. Trump's alleged interference in the 2020 election; Hartsfield-Jackson's Concourse D ['D,' as in 'David,' (those who ride the Plane Train at will totally get that. 'David' is incorrect, by the way--at least under the official NATO phonetic alphabet. 'D,' officially, should be "as in 'Delta'." Think about it though--if that's the phonetic example read over the Plane Train's PA, everyone who halfway hears it would be all like, "Delta concourse? That's what I'm flying... better get off here!" And that'd be pandemonium, especially in Atlanta, where Delta Air Lines operates like 70+% of all flights.] gets $50-million in federal cash to get fatter; and Georgia's Sec. of State, Republican Brad Raffensperger, says purging the official voter list by tens of thousands of folks helps more people vote, and makes it easier for them to do it. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Sarah and Jess Show
Airport Tragedy Ft. My Boyfriend

Sarah and Jess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 6, 2022 22:54


This podcast is for Delta Airlines and Delta Airlines only....... GET YOUR SHIT TOGETHER. Let me tell you about the tragedy of a trip that I had getting to my podcast interviews in LA. BUT WE MADE IT and this is the unfortunate close of the LA episodes. Which means you get just Jess for a while! We also discuss the liquor laws in Utah vs. any other state and let me just say this. Our liquor laws are out of this world. At least I only have to deal with them for 40 more days, then I will be an official Florida Resident. xoxo Jess @jesss.arielle @shesintimidating Guest: @humble_hulk801 

Lynch and Taco
8:45 Idiotology July 5, 2022

Lynch and Taco

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 11:23


Florida Man loses hand in fireworks accident, Police investigate after 31 bodies--some in 'advanced stages of decomposition' found at Indiana funeral home, Delta Airlines offered $10K to passengers willing to give up their seat on overbooked flight,

Travel Guys Radio
Delta Airlines offered passengers almost $10,000 to give up their seats

Travel Guys Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 42:53


Listen Now On the Sunday, July 3rd edition of The Travel Guys…  Highlights from The Travel News – It appears Delta Airlines DID offer passengers almost $10,000 to give up their seats on a flight from Grand Rapids to Minneapolis Friday evening; and Holland America is eliminating the proof of vaccination requirement for a limited number of upcoming cruises. In our Smarter Traveler segment, Mark again reminds those traveling this summer to choose non-stop flights...

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 4: An update on Jack's fiber-eating friend

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 31:29


6PM - Travelers face delays, cancellations ahead of 4th of July weekend // Delta Air Lines reportedly offers passengers $10,000 each to get off 'oversold' flight // Here's why ketchup does belong on a hot dog // Shari worries about her flight getting canceled and Jack complains about the ads on cable television // Any updates on your fiber-eating friend, Jack?  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Tom and Curley Show
Hour 2: Travelers face delays, cancellations ahead of 4th of July weekend

The Tom and Curley Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 30:25


4PM - Travelers face delays, cancellations ahead of 4th of July weekend // Delta Air Lines reportedly offers passengers $10,000 each to get off 'oversold' flight // Here's why ketchup does belong on a hot dog // How and why do American couples argue? // Viral Burger King employee who never missed a day of work in 27 years receives over $270K in donations  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Mark And Melynda Show
7-1-22 Hour 3 Podcast

The Mark And Melynda Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 40:31


Less Americans are proud of the USA and Delta Airlines is paying $10,000 to travelers who give up their seat on oversold flights? All that and more!  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Guy Gordon Show
Joann Muller ~ The Guy Gordon Show

The Guy Gordon Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 7:21


June 30, 2022 ~ Joann Muller, Transportation Reporter for Axios & Co-Author of Axios' “What's Next” Newsletter, talks with Guy Gordon about Delta Air Lines admitting they'll face "operational challenges" this holiday weekend.

Jason & Alexis
6/29 WED HOUR 1: Ghislaine Maxwell sentenced & Disney Chapek's contract

Jason & Alexis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 42:18 Very Popular


Delta Airlines offers passengers $10K to be bumped from flight from Grand Rapids to Minneapolis. Ghislaine Maxwell sentenced to 20 years in prison and $750K fine for her part in Jeffrey Epstein abuse. Disney extends Bob Chapek's contract 3 years. Ariana Grande stalker breaks in.

Embrace the Pivot with Dr. Cheryl Robinson
Episode 59: Lillian Forsyth Shares How Believing In Your Vision Helps Pivoting In Your Career

Embrace the Pivot with Dr. Cheryl Robinson

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 13:53


Part of pivoting comes down to your self-confidence; the self-confidence to believe that you deserve something better in your life. The self-confidence to take a risk knowing that the journey is part of the success. Lillian Forsyth joins me on this episode of Embrace the Pivot Podcast to discuss her journey from human resources to starting her own leadership consultancy, Lead With Equity. Lillian Forsyth is a coach, workshop facilitator, and consultant in the areas of communications, leadership, and diversity, equity & inclusion. She has 15 years of experience leading Operations and Human Resources for both for-profit and nonprofit organizations, and has gained unique leadership perspectives from her extensive experience living and working abroad. Lillian's passion for diversity, equity & inclusion work was born from her experience growing up in St. Louis, MO, one of the most racially segregated cities in the US. Since then, Lillian has found ways to bring equity & inclusion into her work, whether that's developing training programs on unconscious bias or helping organizations develop equitable systems for performance management. In 2020, Lillian co-founded Lead with Equity, a company whose mission is to help leaders make space for the voices of historically marginalized people to drive change in organizations. With Lead with Equity, Lillian helps leaders drive retention and engagement of diverse teams by providing training and coaching on equitable & inclusive leadership practices, and helping organizations build the support systems to hold leaders accountable to these practices. Lillian has coached and trained leaders from companies like Facebook, Siemens, Delta Airlines, and IBM. She holds an MBA from the University of Hawaii's Shidler College of Business, and a BA in Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures from Barnard College in New York City.

MPR News Update
Travelers at MSP could be headed for a Delta airlines meltdown this weekend

MPR News Update

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 5:13


Travelers at MSP could be headed for a Delta airlines meltdown this weekend as U.S. carriers struggle to cope with hiring and a post pandemic surge in demand. This is an evening update from MPR News, hosted by Tim Nelson. Music by Gary Meister.

Komando On Demand
Amazon scandal, self-aware AI, new airport rules

Komando On Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 40:04


A software engineer says Google has a self-aware AI that's as smart as a seven-year-old child. Plus, Apple plans to end passwords forever and Delta Air Lines just set strict time limits for airport lounges. I've also got the disgusting details on an encrypted messaging app Amazon needs to rein in. In this 30-minute podcast episode, you'll also get a few helpful tech tips. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trust My Work
Leadership - Special Ops Operator Brent Gleeson

Trust My Work

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 33:15


Brent Gleeson is an award-winning entrepreneur, 2x bestselling author of TakingPoint and Embrace the Suck, globally renowned keynote speaker, and the CEO of TakingPoint Leadership. The mission of TakingPoint is to equip committed teams with the leadership tools and development necessary for navigating change and growth with military precision. TPL is honored to work with organizations such as Bank of America, Google, NFL, Wells Fargo, Delta Airlines, and many more. Gleeson has built several high growth companies that hit the Inc. 500 list of fastest growing companies for seven years in a row. As a Navy SEAL combat veteran, he has applied the leadership, mindset, behavior, and culture principles from the world of special operations to partnering with organizations across the globe in improving leadership, performance, and the ability to lead change successfully. Gleeson holds undergraduate degrees in finance and economic from Southern Methodist University, certificates in English Literature and Criminal Justice from Oxford University, and a business masters degree from the University of San Diego. He was names a top 10 CEO by Entrepreneur Magazine. Learn more at www.TakingPointLeadership.com

Love in Action
Ryan Jenkins: Connectable

Love in Action

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 52:29


The authors of Connectable, Ryan Jenkins, CSP, and Steven Van Cohen, MSOD, are founders of LessLonely.com, the world's #1 resource for addressing workplace loneliness and creating more belonging at work. Collectively they have over 20 years of experience helping organizations like FedEx, Coca-Cola, The Home Depot, Salesforce, Wells Fargo, State Farm, John Deere, and Delta Air Lines improve their teams. Their work has been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Wall Street Journal, SUCCESS, Inc., and Entrepreneur Magazine. When they are not writing and speaking, you can find them sampling craft beers, attempting to play golf together, and spending quality time with their respective families. Stay connected with them on social media @RyanAndSteven. Highlights: “One of our primary goals is to destigmatize loneliness, and to make it much more accessible because it's a universal human condition and we all experience it. So it shouldn't be shameful, it's simply a signal.” [8:10] Ryan explains the stigma of loneliness and how he and his co-author, Steven Van Cohen, want to help. “Let's bring the book front and center; Connectable, what's the big idea behind it? It's not just a book about loneliness…is it?” [11:52] Marcel introduces Ryan's book, ready to dive deep about the meaning of loneliness in the workplace.  “Work is the most fertile ground to lessen loneliness because there is routine, and there's meaningful relationships that can occur, there's purpose, there's learning. There's all these loneliness lifelines that we can all grasp onto.” [12:22] Ryan shares the thinking behind his book why connection is important and how work can make the difference. “This is so real for people that are listening, they understand ‘oh this is happening right now'....let's start with the why…why are so many workers suffering right now from loneliness?' [15:00] As Marcel relates the rising loneliness rates to his audience, Ryan explains the big ticket reasons as busyness and social media! “Loneliness was an epidemic pre COVID, and then COVID comes along…BAM...now we're in crisis, there is an increase in loneliness and isolation. People go remote for the first time, they don't know how to manage…that work life blend.” [18:30] Acknowledging the escalation of loneliness caused by the pandemic and the increase of remote work, Marcel challenges how to engage isolated workers.  “If we experience loneliness our reaction should be to reach out and connect with others but what happens is we turn inward and it just creates this downward spiral where we isolate further.” [26:46] In Connectable, Ryan and his co-author share 10 ways to identify signals of loneliness, here he shares a few ways to see this in your co-workers or friends.  “Even as an introvert, you still need to connect as well. It is in your human design to do that.” [32:50] Marcel recognizes that there are some personality types that may be assumed to prefer less connection, but still genuinely benefit from interaction. “Leaders at any level of the organization, one of the best ways is to communicate clearly. Make sure everyone knows what's going on: What we're doing in the organization, why we're doing things in the organization. For every leader, they should make sure that people know how they're fitting into that bigger picture.” [43:30] What can leader's do to create belonging in the work environment? Ryan shares some closing advice for leaders to foster connection in their organizations.  Resources: Less Lonely  Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams From Isolated to All In 

H3 Leadership with Brad Lomenick
103 | Frank Blake, Former CEO of The Home Depot and Current Delta Air Lines Chairman of the Board + 5 Things from the Internet

H3 Leadership with Brad Lomenick

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 49:14


Frank Blake is the former chairman and CEO of The Home Depot and currently serves as Chairman of the Board of Delta Air Lines. Frank also spent several years working for the Bush White House administration and is the founder of the popular Crazy Good Turns Podcast. We discuss how churches can more effectively connect digitally, what makes a great CEO, building a culture of recognition, the power of a good question and more. Plus, the 5 Things from the Internet list. Make sure to visit http://h3leadership.com to access the list and all the show notes. Thanks again to our partners for this episode: Convoy of Hope—the trusted partner for delivering food and relief by responding to disasters all around the world. Donate at http://convoyofhope.org/donate. Right now, Convoy is helping war victims in Ukraine, providing basic needs like food, hygiene supplies, medical supplies, blankets, bedding, clothing and more—all through partnering with local churches. To donate, visit http://convoyofhope.org/donate. And, Overflow—a powerful new stock and cryptocurrency giving platform. Visit http://overflow.co/H3. Overflow is a digital software that empowers donors to seamlessly give crypto and stock donations to churches and non-profits within minutes. Let's all unlock unprecedented generosity together. Reach out to Vance Roush and the team at Overflow. Visit http://overflow.co/H3 to sign up for a free demo today.

Generations Radio
How to Celebrate Humble Month in Your Company - Lining Up to Persecute Christians

Generations Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 39:00


How to Celebrate Humble Month in Your Company-Corporations Lining Up to Persecute Christians-It's Humble Month, for those who would rather escape the wrath of God.--Proud month is back for the wicked.--But how does a Christian working for a Fortune 500 company celebrate Humble Month during Proud Month- Also, over 400 companies have lined up to support the Equality Act, which will bring withering persecution upon Christian in this country.--These include Tesla, Pfizer, Delta Air Lines and Amazon, Apple, PepsiCo, General Motors, CVS, Facebook, Marriott, Capital One, Starbucks and Home Depot, McDonald's, Harley-Davidson, Sony, REI, Hewlett Packard, Johnson and Johnson, Morgan Stanley, Oracle, Sysco, United Airlines, Walt Disney, Whirlpool, Wells Fargo, Honeywell, Edward Jones and Stop - Shop. Hilton, American Airlines, and Air B-B.---This program includes---1. The World View in 5 Minutes with Adam McManus -10 rogue Republican senators support gun control, China to Taiwan- -We will fight to the very end-, Man who memorized 20 books of the Bible equips Creation Museum visitors---2. Generations with Kevin Swanson

MoneyBall Medicine
Eric Daimler at Conexus says Forget Calculus, Today's Coders Need to Know Category Theory

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 56:12


Harry's guest Eric Daimler, a serial software entrepreneur and a former Presidential Innovation Fellow in the Obama Administration, has an interesting argument about math. If you're a young person today trying to decide which math course you're going to take—or maybe an old person who just wants to brush up—he says you shouldn't bother with trigonometry or calculus. Instead he says you should study category theory. An increasingly important in computer science, category theory is about the relationships between sets or structures. It can be used to prove that different structures are consistent or compatible with one another, and to prove that the relationships in a dataset are still intact even after the data has been transformed in some way. Together with two former MIT mathematicians, Daimler co-founded a company called Conexus that uses category theory to tackle the problem of data interoperability. Longtime listeners know that data interoperability in healthcare, or more often the lack of interoperability, is a repeating theme of the show. In fields from drug development to frontline medical care, we've got petabytes of data to work with, in the form of electronic medical records, genomic and proteomic data, and clinical trial data. That data could be the fuel for machine learning and other kinds of computation that could help us make develop drugs faster and make smarter decisions about care. The problem is, it's all stored in different databases and formats that can't be safely merged without a nightmarish amount of work. So when someone like Daimler says they have a way to use math to bring heterogeneous data together without compromising that data's integrity – well, it's time to pay attention. That's why on today's show, we're all going back to school for an introductory class in category theory.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is The Harry Glorikian Show, where we explore how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.My guest today is Eric Daimler, a serial software entrepreneur and a former Presidential Innovation Fellow in the Obama Administration.And he has an interesting argument about math. Daimler says if you're a young person today trying to decide which math course you're going to take, or maybe an old person who just wants to brush up, you shouldn't bother with trigonometry or calculus.Instead he says you should study category theory.That's a field that isn't even part of the curriculum at most high schools. But it's increasingly important in computer science.Category theory is about the relationships between sets or structures. It can be used to prove that different structures are consistent or compatible with one another, and to prove that the relationships in a dataset are still intact even after you've transformed that data in some way.Together with two former MIT mathematicians, Daimler co-founded a company called Conexus that uses category theory to tackle the problem of data interoperability.Now…longtime listeners of the show know that data interoperability in healthcare, or more often the lack of interoperability, is one of my biggest hobby horses. In fields from drug development to frontline medical care, we've got petabytes of data to work with, in the form of electronic medical records, genomic and proteomic data, and clinical trial data.That data could be the fuel for machine learning and other kinds of computation that could help us make develop drugs faster and make smarter decisions about care. The problem is, it's all stored in different databases and formats that can't be safely merged without a nightmarish amount of work.So when someone like Daimler says they have a way to use math to bring heterogeneous data together without compromising that data's integrity – well, I pay attention.So on today's show, we're all going back to school for an introductory class in category theory from Conexus CEO Eric Daimler.Harry Glorikian: Eric, welcome to the show.Eric Daimler: It's great to be here.Harry Glorikian: So I was reading your varied background. I mean, you've worked in so many different kinds of organizations. I'm not sure that there is a compact way or even an accurate way to describe you. So can you describe yourself? You know, what do you do and what are your main interest areas?Eric Daimler: Yeah, I mean, the easiest way to describe me might come from my mother. Well, where, you know, somebody asked her, is that the doctor? And she says, Well, yes, but he's not the type that helps people. So I you know, I've been doing research around artificial intelligence and I from a lot of different perspectives around my research in graph theory and machine learning and computational linguistics. I've been a venture capitalist on Sand Hill Road. I've done entrepreneurship, done entrepreneurship, and I started a couple of businesses which I'm doing now. And most notably I was doing policy in Washington, D.C. is part of the Obama administration for a time. So I am often known for that last part. But my background really is rare, if not unique, for having the exposure to AI from all of those angles, from business, academia and policy.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, I was looking at the obviously the like you said, the one thing that jumped out to me was the you were a Presidential Innovation Fellow in the Obama administration in 2016. Can you can you give listeners an idea of what is what is the Presidential Innovation Fellowship Program? You know, who are the types of people that are fellows and what kind of things do they do?Eric Daimler: Sure, it was I guess with that sort of question, it's helpful then to give a broader picture, even how it started. There was a a program started during the Nixon administration that's colloquially known as the Science Advisers to the President, you know, a bipartisan group to give science advice to the president that that's called the OSTP, Office of Science and Technology Policy. There are experts within that group that know know everything from space to cancer, to be super specific to, in my domain, computer security. And I was the authority that was the sole authority during my time in artificial intelligence. So there are other people with other expertise there. There are people in different capacities. You know, I had the particular capacity, I had the particular title that I had that was a one year term. The staffing for these things goes up and down, depending on the administration in ways that you might be able to predict and guess. The people with those titles also also find themselves in different parts of the the executive branch. So they will do a variety of things that are not predicted by the the title of the fellow. My particular role that I happened to be doing was in helping to coordinate on behalf of the President, humbly, on behalf of the President, their research agenda across the executive branch. There are some very able people with whom I had the good fortune of working during my time during my time there, some of which are now in the in the Biden administration. And again, it's to be a nonpartisan effort around artificial intelligence. Both sides should really be advocates for having our research agenda in government be most effective. But my role was coordinating such things as, really this is helpful, the definition of robotics, which you might be surprised by as a reflex but but quickly find to be useful when you're thinking that the Defense Department's definition and use, therefore, of robotics is really fundamentally different than that of health and human services use and a definition of robotics and the VA and Department of Energy and State and and so forth.Eric Daimler: So that is we find to be useful, to be coordinated by the Office of the President and experts speaking on behalf. It was started really this additional impulse was started after the effects of, I'll generously call them, of healthcare.gov and the trip-ups there where President Obama, to his great credit, realized that we needed to attract more technologists into government, that we had a lot of lawyers to be sure we had, we had a ton of academics, but we didn't have a lot of business people, practical technologists. So he created a way to get people like me motivated to come into government for short, short periods of time. The the idea was that you could sit around a cabinet, a cabinet meeting, and you could you would never be able to raise your hand saying, oh, I don't know anything about economics or I don't know anything about foreign policy, but you could raise your hand and say, Oh, I don't know anything about technology. That needs to be a thing of the past. President Obama saw that and created a program starting with Todd. Todd Park, the chief technologist, the second chief technology officer of the United States, is fantastic to to start to start some programs to bring in people like me.Harry Glorikian: Oh, yeah. And believe me, in health care, we need we need more technologists, which I always preach. I'm like, don't go to Facebook. Come here. You know, you can get double whammy. You can make money and you can affect people's lives. So I'm always preaching that to everybody. But so if I'm not mistaken, in early 2021, you wrote an open letter to the brand new Biden administration calling for sort of a big federal effort to improve national data infrastructure. Like, can you summarize for everybody the argument in that piece and. Do you see them doing any of the items that you're suggesting?Eric Daimler: Right. The the idea is that despite us making some real good efforts during the Obama administration with solidifying our, I'll say, our view on artificial intelligence across the executive, and this continuing actually into the Trump administration with the establishment of an AI office inside the OSTP. So credit where credit is due. That extended into the the Biden administration, where some very well-meaning people can be focusing on different parts of the the conundrum of AI expressions, having various distortions. You know, the popular one we will read about is this distortion of bias that can express itself in really ugly ways, as you know, as individuals, especially for underrepresented groups. The point of the article was to help others be reminded of of some of the easy, low hanging fruit that we can that we can work on around AI. So, you know, bias comes in a lot of different ways, the same way we all have cognitive distortions, you know, cognitive biases. There are some like 50 of them, right. You know, bias can happen around gender and ethnicity and age, sexual orientation and so forth. You know, it all can also can come from absence of data. There's a type of bias that's present just by being in a developed, rich country in collecting, for example, with Conexus's customers, my company Conexus's customers, where they are trying to report on their good efforts for economic and social good and around clean, renewable energies, they find that there's a bias in being able to collect data in rich countries versus developing countries.Eric Daimler: That's another type of bias. So that was that was the point of me writing that open letter, to prioritize, these letters. It's just to distinguish what the low hanging fruit was versus some of the hard problems. The, some of tthe low hanging fruit, I think is available, I can say, In three easy parts that people can remember. One is circuit breakers. So we we can have circuit breakers in a lot of different parts of these automated systems. You know, automated car rolling down a road is, is the easiest example where, you know, at some point a driver needs to take over control to determine to make a judgment about that shadow being a person or a tumbleweed on the crosswalk, that's a type of circuit breaker. We can have those circuit breakers in a lot of different automated systems. Another one is an audit. And the way I mean is audit is having people like me or just generally people that are experts in the craft being able to distinguish the data or the biases can become possible from the data model algorithms where biases also can become possible. Right. And we get a lot of efficiency from these automated systems, these learning algorithms. I think we can afford a little bit taken off to audit the degree to which these data models are doing what we intend.Eric Daimler: And an example of a data model is that Delta Airlines, you know, they know my age or my height, and I fly to San Francisco, to New York or some such thing. The data model would be their own proprietary algorithm to determine whether or not I am deserving of an upgrade to first class, for example. That's a data model. We can have other data models. A famous one that we all are part of is FICO scores, credit scores, and those don't have to be disclosed. None of us actually know what Experian or any of the credit agencies used to determine our credit scores. But they they use these type of things called zero knowledge proofs, where we just send through enough data, enough times that we can get to a sense of what those data models are. So that's an exposure of a data model. A declarative exposure would be maybe a next best thing, a next step, and that's a type of audit.Eric Daimler: And then the third low hanging fruit, I'd say, around regulation, and I think these are just coming towards eventualities, is demanding lineage or demanding provenance. You know, you'll see a lot of news reports, often on less credible sites, but sometimes on on shockingly credible sites where claims are made that you need to then search yourself and, you know, people in a hurry just won't do it, when these become very large systems and very large systems of information, alert systems of automation, I want to know: How were these conclusions given? So, you know, an example in health care would be if my clinician gave me a diagnosis of, let's say, some sort of cancer. And then to say, you know, here's a drug, by the way, and there's a five chance, 5 percent chance of there being some awful side effects. You know, that's a connection of causation or a connection of of conclusions that I'm really not comfortable with. You know, I want to know, like, every step is like, wait, wait. So, so what type of cancer? So what's the probability of my cancer? You know, where is it? And so what drug, you know, how did you make that decision? You know, I want to know every little step of the way. It's fine that they give me that conclusion, but I want to be able to back that up. You know, a similar example, just in everyday parlance for people would be if I did suddenly to say I want a house, and then houses are presented to me. I don't quite want that. Although that looks like good for a Hollywood narrative. Right? I want to say, oh, wait, what's my income? Or what's my cash? You know, how much? And then what's my credit? Like, how much can I afford? Oh, these are houses you can kind of afford. Like, I want those little steps or at least want to back out how those decisions were made available. That's a lineage. So those three things, circuit breaker, audit, lineage, those are three pieces of low hanging fruit that I think the European Union, the State of New York and other other government entities would be well served to prioritize.Harry Glorikian: I would love all of them, especially, you know, the health care example, although I'm not holding my breath because I might not come back to life by how long I'd have to hold my breath on that one. But we're hoping for the best and we talk about that on the show all the time. But you mentioned Conexus. You're one of three co founders, I believe. If I'm not mistaken, Conexus is the first ever commercial spin out from MIT's math department. The company is in the area of large scale data integration, building on insights that come out of the field of mathematics that's called category algebra, categorical algebra, or something called enterprise category theory. And to be quite honest, I did have to Wikipedia to sort of look that up, was not familiar with it. So can you explain category algebra in terms of a non mathematician and maybe give us an example that someone can wrap their mind around.Eric Daimler: Yeah. Yeah. And it's important to get into because even though what my company does is, Conexus does a software expression of categorical algebra, it's really beginning to permeate our world. You know, the the way I tell my my nieces and nephews is, what do quantum computers, smart contracts and Minecraft all have in common? And the answer is composability. You know, they are actually all composable. And what composable is, is it's kind of related to modularity, but it's modularity without regard to scale. So the the easy analogy is in trains where, yeah, you can swap out a boxcar in a train, but mostly trains can only get to be a couple of miles long. Swap in and out boxcars, but the train is really limited in scale. Whereas the train system, the system of a train can be infinitely large, infinitely complex. At every point in the track you can have another track. That is the difference between modularity and composability. So Minecraft is infinitely self referential where you have a whole 'nother universe that exists in and around Minecraft. In smart contracts is actually not enabled without the ability to prove the efficacy, which is then enabled by categorical algebra or its sister in math, type theory. They're kind of adjacent. And that's similar to quantum computing. So quantum computing is very sexy. It gets in the press quite frequently with forks and all, all that. If it you wouldn't be able to prove the efficacy of a quantum compiler, you wouldn't actually. Humans can't actually say whether it's true or not without type theory or categorical algebra.Eric Daimler: How you think of kind categorical algebra you can think of as a little bit related to graph theory. Graph theory is those things that you see, they look like spider webs. If you see the visualizations of graph theories are graphs. Category theory is a little bit related, you might say, to graph theory, but with more structure or more semantics or richness. So in each point, each node and each edge, in the vernacular, you can you can put an infinite amount of information. That's really what a categorical algebra allows. This, the discovery, this was invented to be translating math between different domains of math. The discovery in 2011 from one of my co-founders, who was faculty at MIT's Math Department, was that we could apply that to databases. And it's in that the whole world opens up. This solves the problem that that bedeviled the good folks trying to work on healthcare.gov. It allows for a good explanation of how we can prevent the next 737 Max disaster, where individual systems certainly can be formally verified. But the whole plane doesn't have a mechanism of being formally verified with classic approaches. And it also has application in drug discovery, where we have a way of bringing together hundreds of thousands of databases in a formal way without risk of data being misinterpreted, which is a big deal when you have a 10-year time horizon for FDA trials and you have multiple teams coming in and out of data sets and and human instinct to hoard data and a concern about it ever becoming corrupted. This math and the software expression built upon it opens up just a fantastically rich new world of opportunity for for drug discovery and for clinicians and for health care delivery. And the list is quite, quite deep.Harry Glorikian: So. What does Conexus provide its clients? Is it a service? Is it a technology? Is it both? Can you give us an example of it?Eric Daimler: Yeah. So Conexus is software. Conexus is enterprise software. It's an enterprise software platform that works generally with very large organizations that have generally very large complex data data infrastructures. You know the example, I can start in health care and then I can I can move to an even bigger one, was with a hospital group that we work with in New York City. I didn't even know health care groups could really have this problem. But it's endemic to really the world's data, where one group within the same hospital had a particular way that they represented diabetes. Now to a layman, layman in a health care sense, I would think, well, there's a definition of diabetes. I can just look it up in the Oxford English Dictionary. But this particular domain found diabetes to just be easily represented as yes, no. Do they have it? Do they not? Another group within the same hospital group thought that they would represent it as diabetes, ow are we treating it? A third group would be representing it as diabetes, how long ago. And then a fourth group had some well-meaning clinicians that would characterize it as, they had it and they have less now or, you know, type one, type two, you know, with a more more nuanced view.Eric Daimler: The traditional way of capturing that data, whether it's for drug discovery or whether it's for delivery, is to normalize it, which would then squash the fidelity of the data collected within those groups. Or they most likely to actually just wouldn't do it. They wouldn't collect the data, they wouldn't bring the data together because it's just too hard, it's too expensive. They would use these processes called ETL, extract, transform, load, that have been around for 30 years but are often slow, expensive, fragile. They could take six months to year, cost $1,000,000, deploy 50 to 100 people generally from Accenture or Deloitte or Tata or Wipro. You know, that's a burden. It's a burden, you know, so the data wasn't available and that would then impair the researchers and their ability to to share data. And it would impair clinicians in their view of patient care. And it also impaired the people in operations where they would work on billing. So we work with one company right now that that works on 1.4 trillion records a year. And they just have trouble with that volume and the number of databases and the heterogeneous data infrastructure, bringing together that data to give them one view that then can facilitate health care delivery. Eric Daimler: The big example is, we work with Uber where they they have a very smart team, as smart as one might think. They also have an effectively infinite balance sheet with which they could fund an ideal IT infrastructure. But despite that, you know, Uber grew up like every other organization optimizing for the delivery of their service or product and, and that doesn't entail optimizing for that infrastructure. So what they found, just like this hospital group with different definitions of diabetes, they found they happen to have grown up around service areas. So in this case cities, more or less. So when then the time came to do analysis -- we're just passing Super Bowl weekend, how will the Super Bowl affect the the supply of drivers or the demand from riders? They had to do it for the city of San Francisco, separate than the city of San Jose or the city of Oakland. They couldn't do the whole San Francisco Bay Area region, let alone the whole of the state or the whole of the country or what have you. And that repeated itself for every business question, every organizational question that they would want to have. This is the same in drug discovery. This is the same in patient care delivery or in billing. These operational questions are hard, shockingly hard.Eric Daimler: We had another one in logistics where we had a logistics company that had 100,000 employees. I didn't even know some of these companies could be so big, and they actually had a client with 100,000 employees. That client had 1000 ships, each one of which had 10,000 containers. And I didn't even know like how big these systems were really. I hadn't thought about it. But I mean, they're enormous. And the question was, hey, where's our personal protective equipment? Where is the PPE? And that's actually a hard question to ask. You know, we are thinking about maybe our FedEx tracking numbers from an Amazon order. But if you're looking at the PPE and where it is on a container or inside of a ship, you know, inside this large company, it's actually a hard question to ask. That's this question that all of these organizations have. Eric Daimler: In our case, Uber, where they they they had a friction in time and in money and in accuracy, asking every one of these business questions. They went then to find, how do I solve this problem? Do I use these old tools of ETL from the '80s? Do I use these more modern tools from the 2000s? They're called RDF or OWL? Or is there something else? They discovered that they needed a more foundational system, this categorical algebra that that's now expressing itself in smart contracts and quantum computers and other places. And they just then they found, oh, who are the leaders in the enterprise software expression of that math? And it's us. We happen to be 40 miles north of them. Which is fortunate. We worked with Uber to to solve that problem in bringing together their heterogeneous data infrastructure to solve their problems. And to have them tell it they save $10 million plus a year in in the efficiency and speed gains from the solution we helped provide for them.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's leave a rating and a review for the show on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing a lot to help other listeners discover the show.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in print and ebook formats. Just go to Amazon or Barnes & Noble and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: So your website says that your software can map data sources to each other so that the perfect data model is discovered, not designed. And so what does that mean? I mean, does that imply that there's some machine learning or other form of artificial intelligence involved, sort of saying here are the right pieces to put together as opposed to let me design this just for you. I'm trying to piece it together.Eric Daimler: Yeah. You know, the way we might come at this is just reminding ourselves about the structure of artificial intelligence. You know, in the public discourse, we will often find news, I'm sure you can find it today, on deep learning. You know, whatever's going on in deep learning because it's sexy, it's fun. You know, DeepMind really made a name for themselves and got them acquired at a pretty valuation because of their their Hollywood-esque challenge to Go, and solving of that game. But that particular domain of AI, deep learning, deep neural nets is a itself just a subset of machine learning. I say just not not not to minimize it. It's a fantastically powerful algorithm. But but just to place it, it is a subset of machine learning. And then machine learning itself is a subset of artificial intelligence. That's a probabilistic subset. So we all know probabilities are, those are good and bad. Fine when the context is digital advertising, less fine when it's the safety of a commercial jet. There is another part of artificial intelligence called deterministic artificial intelligence. They often get expressed as expert systems. Those generally got a bad name with the the flops of the early '80s. Right. They flopped because of scale, by the way. And then the flops in the early 2000s and 2010s from IBM's ill fated Watson experiment, the promise did not meet the the reality.Eric Daimler: It's in that deterministic A.I. that that magic is to be found, especially when deployed in conjunction with the probabilistic AI. That's that's where really the future is. There's some people have a religious view of, oh, it's only going to be a probabilistic world but there's many people like myself and not to bring up fancy names, but Andrew Ng, who's a brilliant AI researcher and investor, who also also shares this view, that it's a mix of probabilistic and deterministic AI. What deterministic AI does is, to put it simply, it searches the landscape of all possible connections. Actually it's difference between bottoms up and tops down. So the traditional way of, well, say, integrating things is looking at, for example, that hospital network and saying, oh, wow, we have four definitions of diabetes. Let me go solve this problem and create the one that works for our hospital network. Well, then pretty soon you have five standards, right? That's the traditional way that that goes. That's what a top down looks that looks like.Eric Daimler: It's called a Golden Record often, and it rarely works because pretty soon what happens is the organizations will find again their own need for their own definition of diabetes. In most all cases, that's top down approach rarely works. The bottoms up approach says, Let's discover the connections between these and we'll discover the relationships. We don't discover it organically like we depend on people because it's deterministic. I, we, we discover it through a massive, you know, non intuitive in some cases, it's just kind of infeasible for us to explore a trillion connections. But what the AI does is it explores a factorial number actually is a technical, the technical equation for it, a factorial number of of possible paths that then determine the map of relationships between between entities. So imagine just discovering the US highway system. If you did that as a person, it's going to take a bit. If you had some infinitely fast crawlers that robot's discovering the highway system infinitely fast, remember, then that's a much more effective way of doing it that gives you some degree of power. That's the difference between bottoms up and tops down. That's the difference between deterministic, really, we might say, and probabilistic in some simple way.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I'm a firm believer of the two coming together and again, I just look at them as like a box. I always tell people like, it's a box of tools. I need to know the problem, and then we can sort of reach in and pick out which set of tools that are going to come together to solve this issue, as opposed to this damn word called AI that everybody thinks is one thing that they're sort of throwing at the wall to solve a problem.Harry Glorikian: But you're trying to solve, I'm going to say, data interoperability. And on this show I've had a lot of people talk about interoperability in health care, which I actually believe is, you could break the system because things aren't working right or I can't see what I need to see across the two hospitals that I need information from. But you published an essay on Medium about Haven, the health care collaboration between Amazon, JPMorgan, Berkshire Hathaway. Their goal was to use big data to guide patients to the best performing clinicians and the most affordable medicines. They originally were going to serve these first three founding companies. I think knowing the people that started it, their vision was bigger than that. There was a huge, you know, to-do when it came out. Fireworks and everything. Launched in 2018. They hired Atul Gawande, famous author, surgeon. But then Gawande left in 2020. And, you know, the company was sort of quietly, you know, pushed off into the sunset. Your essay argued that Haven likely failed due to data interoperability challenges. I mean. How so? What what specific challenges do you imagine Haven ran into?Eric Daimler: You know, it's funny, I say in the article very gently that I imagine this is what happened. And it's because I hedge it that that the Harvard Business Review said, "Oh, well, you're just guessing." Actually, I wasn't guessing. No, I know. I know the people that were doing it. I know the challenges there. But but I'm not going to quote them and get them in trouble. And, you know, they're not authorized to speak on it. So I perhaps was a little too modest in my framing of the conclusion. So this actually is what happened. What happens is in the same way that we had the difficulty with healthcare.gov, in the same way that I described these banks having difficulty. Heterogeneous databases don't like to talk to one another. In a variety of different ways. You know, the diabetes example is true, but it's just one of many, many, many, many, many, many cases of data just being collected differently for their own use. It can be as prosaic as first name, last name or "F.last name." Right? It's just that simple, you know? And how do I bring those together? Well, those are those are called entity resolutions. Those are somewhat straightforward, but not often 100 percent solvable. You know, this is just a pain. It's a pain. And, you know, so what what Haven gets into is they're saying, well, we're massive. We got like Uber, we got an effectively infinite balance sheet. We got some very smart people. We'll solve this problem. And, you know, this is some of the problem with getting ahead of yourself. You know, I won't call it arrogance, but getting ahead of yourself, is that, you think, oh, I'll just be able to solve that problem.Eric Daimler: You know, credit where credit is due to Uber, you know, they looked both deeper saying, oh, this can't be solved at the level of computer science. And they looked outside, which is often a really hard organizational exercise. That just didn't happen at Haven. They thought they thought they could they could solve it themselves and they just didn't. The databases, not only could they have had, did have, their own structure, but they also were stored in different formats or by different vendors. So you have an SAP database, you have an Oracle database. That's another layer of complication. And when I say that these these take $1,000,000 to connect, that's not $1,000,000 one way. It's actually $2 million if you want to connect it both ways. Right. And then when you start adding five, let alone 50, you take 50 factorial. That's a very big number already. You multiply that times a million and 6 to 12 months for each and a hundred or two hundred people each. And you just pretty soon it's an infeasible budget. It doesn't work. You know, the budget for us solving solving Uber's problem in the traditional way was something on the order of $2 trillion. You know, you do that. You know, we had a bank in the U.S. and the budget for their vision was was a couple of billion. Like, it doesn't work. Right. That's that's what happened Haven. They'll get around to it, but but they're slow, like all organizations, big organizations are. They'll get around to solving this at a deeper level. We hope that we will remain leaders in database integration when they finally realize that the solution is at a deeper level than their than the existing tools.Harry Glorikian: So I mean, this is not I mean, there's a lot of people trying to solve this problem. It's one of those areas where if we don't solve it, I don't think we're going to get health care to the next level, to sort of manage the information and manage people and get them what they need more efficiently and drive down costs.Eric Daimler: Yeah.Harry Glorikian: And I do believe that EMRs are. I don't want to call them junk. Maybe I'm going too far, but I really think that they you know, if you had decided that you were going to design something to manage patients, that is not the software you would have written to start. Hands down. Which I worry about because these places won't, they spent so much putting them in that trying to get them to rip them out and put something in that actually works is challenging. You guys were actually doing something in COVID-19, too, if I'm not mistaken. Well, how is that project going? I don't know if it's over, but what are you learning about COVID-19 and the capabilities of your software, let's say?Eric Daimler: Yeah. You know, this is an important point that for anybody that's ever used Excel, we know what it means to get frustrated enough to secretly hard code a cell, you know, not keeping a formula in a cell. Yeah, that's what happened in a lot of these systems. So we will continue with electronic medical records to to bring these together, but they will end up being fragile, besides slow and expensive to construct. They will end up being fragile, because they were at some point hardcoded. And how that gets expressed is that the next time some other database standard appears inside of that organization's ecosystem from an acquisition or a divestiture or a different technical standard, even emerging, and then the whole process starts all over again. You know, we just experience this with a large company that that spent $100 million in about five years. And then they came to us and like, yeah, we know it works now, but we know like a year from now we're going to have to say we're going to go through it again. And, it's not like, oh, we'll just have a marginal difference. No, it's again, that factorial issue, that one database connected to the other 50 that already exist, creates this same problem all over again at a couple of orders of magnitude. So what we discover is these systems, these systems in the organization, they will continue to exist.Eric Daimler: These fragile systems will continue to exist. They'll continue to scale. They'll continue to grow in different parts of the life sciences domain, whether it's for clinicians, whether it's for operations, whether it's for drug discovery. Those will continue to exist. They'll continue to expand, and they will begin to approach the type of compositional systems that I'm describing from quantum computers or Minecraft or smart contracts, where you then need the the discovery and math that Conexus expresses in software for databases. When you need that is when you then need to prove the efficacy or otherwise demonstrate the lack of fragility or the integrity of the semantics. Conexus can with, it's a law of nature and it's in math, with 100 percent accuracy, prove the integrity of a database integration. And that matters in high consequence context when you're doing something as critical as drug side effects for different populations. We don't want your data to be misinterpreted. You can't afford lives to be lost or you can't, in regulation, you can't afford data to be leaking. That's where you'll ultimately need the categorical algebra. You'll need a provable compositional system. You can continue to construct these ones that will begin to approach compositionality, but when you need the math is when you need to prove it for either the high consequence context of lives, of money or related to that, of regulation.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, well, I keep telling my kids, make sure you're proficient in math because you're going to be using it for the rest of your life and finance. I always remind them about finance because I think both go together. But you've got a new book coming out. It's called "The Future is Formal" and not tuxedo like formal, but like you're, using the word formal. And I think you have a very specific meaning in mind. And I do want you to talk about, but I think what you're referring to is how we want automated systems to behave, meaning everything from advertising algorithms to self-driving trucks. And you can tell me if that my assumption is correct or not.Eric Daimler: Though it's a great segue, actually, from the math. You know, what I'm trying to do is bring in people that are not programmers or research technology, information technology researchers day to day into the conversation around automated digital systems. That's my motivation. And my motivation is, powered by the belief that we will bring out the best of the technology with more people engaged. And with more people engaged, we have a chance to embrace it and not resist it. You know, my greatest fear, I will say, selfishly, is that we come up with technology that people just reject, they just veto it because they don't understand it as a citizen. That also presents a danger because I think that companies' commercial expressions naturally will grow towards where their technology is needed. So this is actually to some extent a threat to Western security relative to Chinese competition, that we embrace the technology in the way that we want it to be expressed in our society. So trying to bring people into this conversation, even if they're not programmers, the connection to math is that there are 18 million computer programmers in the world. We don't need 18 million and one, you know. But what we do need is we do need people to be thinking, I say in a formal way, but also just be thinking about the values that are going to be represented in these digital infrastructures.Eric Daimler: You know, somewhere as a society, we will have to have a conversation with ourselves to determine the car driving to the crosswalk, braking or rolling or slowing or stopping completely. And then who's liable if it doesn't? Is it the driver or is it the manufacturer? Is it the the programmer that somehow put a bug in their code? You know, we're entering an age where we're going to start experiencing what some person calls double bugs. There's the bug in maybe one's expression in code. This often could be the semantics. Or in English. Like your English doesn't make sense. Right? Right. Or or was it actually an error in your thinking? You know, did you leave a gap in your thinking? This is often where where some of the bugs in Ethereum and smart contracts have been expressed where, you know, there's an old programming rule where you don't want to say something equals true. You always want to be saying true equals something. If you get if you do the former, not the latter, you can have to actually create bugs that can create security breaches.Eric Daimler: Just a small little error in thinking. That's not an error in semantics. That level of thinking, you don't need to know calculus for, or category theory for that matter. You just need to be thinking in a formal way. You know, often, often lawyers, accountants, engineers, you know, anybody with scientific training can, can more quickly get this idea, where those that are educated in liberal arts can contribute is in reminding themselves of the broader context that wants to be expressed, because often engineers can be overly reductionist. So there's really a there's a push and pull or, you know, an interplay between those two sensibilities that then we want to express in rules. Then that's ultimately what I mean by formal, formal rules. Tell me exactly what you mean. Tell me exactly how that is going to work. You know, physicians would understand this when they think about drug effects and drug side effects. They know exactly what it's going to be supposed to be doing, you know, with some degree of probability. But they can be very clear, very clear about it. It's that clear thinking that all of us will need to exercise as we think about the development and deployment of modern automated digital systems.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, you know, it's funny because that's the other thing I tell people, like when they say, What should my kid take? I'm like, have him take a, you know, basic programming, not because they're going to do it for a living, but they'll understand how this thing is structured and they can get wrap their mind around how it is. And, you know, I see how my nephew thinks who's from the computer science world and how I think, and sometimes, you know, it's funny watching him think. Or one of the CTOs of one of our companies how he looks at the world. And I'm like you. You got to back up a little bit and look at the bigger picture. Right. And so it's the two of us coming together that make more magic than one or the other by themselves.Harry Glorikian: So, you know, I want to jump back sort of to the different roles you've had in your career. Like like you said, you've been a technology investor, a serial startup founder, a university professor, an academic administrator, an entrepreneur, a management instructor, Presidential Innovation Fellow. I don't think I've missed anything, but I may have. You're also a speaker, a commentator, an author. Which one of those is most rewarding?Eric Daimler: Oh, that's an interesting question. Which one of those is most rewarding? I'm not sure. I find it to be rewarding with my friends and family. So it's rewarding to be with people. I find that to be rewarding in those particular expressions. My motivation is to be, you know, just bringing people in to have a conversation about what we want our world to look like, to the degree to which the technologies that I work with every day are closer to the dystopia of Hollywood narratives or closer to our hopes around the utopia that's possible, that where this is in that spectrum is up to us in our conversation around what these things want to look like. We have some glimpses of both extremes, but I'd like people, and I find it to be rewarding, to just be helping facilitate the helping catalyze that conversation. So the catalyst of that conversation and whatever form it takes is where I enjoy being.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, because I was thinking about like, you know, what can, what can you do as an individual that shapes the future. Does any of these roles stand out as more impactful than others, let's say?Eric Daimler: I think the future is in this notion of composability. I feel strongly about that and I want to enroll people into this paradigm as a framework from which to see many of the activities going around us. Why have NFTs come on the public, in the public media, so quickly? Why does crypto, cryptocurrency capture our imagination? Those And TikTok and the metaverse. And those are all expressions of this quick reconfiguration of patterns in different contexts that themselves are going to become easier and easier to express. The future is going to be owned by people that that take the special knowledge that they've acquired and then put it into short business expressions. I'm going to call them rules that then can be recontextualized and redeployed. This is my version of, or my abstraction of what people call the the future being just all TikTok. It's not literally that we're all going to be doing short dance videos. It's that TikTok is is an expression of people creating short bits of content and then having those be reconfigured and redistributed. That can be in medicine or clinical practice or in drugs, but it can be in any range of expertise, expertise or knowledge. And what's changed? What's changed and what is changing is the different technologies that are being brought to bear to capture that knowledge so that it can be scalable, so it can be compositional. Yeah, that's what's changing. That's what's going to be changing over the next 10 to 20 years. The more you study that, I think the better off we will be. And I'd say, you know, for my way of thinking about math, you might say the more math, the better. But if I were to choose for my children, I would say I would replace trig and geometry and even calculus, some people would be happy to know, with categorical algebra, category theory and with probability and statistics. So I would replace calculus, which I think is really the math of the 20th century, with something more appropriate to our digital age, which is categorical algebra.Harry Glorikian: I will tell my son because I'm sure he'll be very excited to to if I told him that not calculus, but he's not going to be happy when I say go to this other area, because I think he'd like to get out of it altogether.Eric Daimler: It's easier than calculus. Yeah.Harry Glorikian: So, you know, it was great having you on the show. I feel like we could talk for another hour on all these different aspects. You know, I'm hoping that your company is truly successful and that you help us solve this interoperability problem, which is, I've been I've been talking about it forever. It seems like I feel like, you know, the last 15 or 20 years. And I still worry if we're any closer to solving that problem, but I'm hopeful, and I wish you great success on the launch of your new book. It sounds exciting. I'm going to have to get myself a copy.Eric Daimler: Thank you very much. It's been fun. It's good to be with you.Harry Glorikian: Thank you.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find a full transcript of this episode as well as the full archive of episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at our website. Just go to glorikian.com and click on the tab Podcasts.I'd like to thank our listeners for boosting The Harry Glorikian Show into the top three percent of global podcasts.If you want to be sure to get every new episode of the show automatically, be sure to open Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast player and hit follow or subscribe. Don't forget to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. And we always love to hear from listeners on Twitter, where you can find me at hglorikian.Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

The New Yorker: Politics and More
Sara Nelson on the Drive to Unionize Delta Flight Attendants

The New Yorker: Politics and More

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 13:41 Very Popular


Before the pandemic, Sara Nelson had emerged as one of the most visible leaders in the labor movement. The Association of Flight Attendants represents some fifty thousand workers and nearly twenty airlines, and, as the union's international president, Nelson made regular appearances on CNN, MSNBC, CNBC, and Fox Business. During the pandemic, she became a critical voice amid reports of unruly and abusive passengers, urging Congress to pass greater protections for airline staff and pushing for restrictions on the sale of alcohol in airport terminals. “We've got a lot more work to do to get things under control,” Nelson tells Jennifer Gonnerman, who profiled her last month, “and make sure that people don't think that when you get on a plane you get to punch the flight crew.” Organized labor is newly resurgent, with recent drives at Amazon making headlines. Nelson speaks about the push to unionize flight attendants of Delta Air Lines, which—if successful—would be one of the largest union wins in recent history, covering almost twenty-four thousand workers.

No Vacancy with Glenn Haussman
637: Hospitality News and Insights

No Vacancy with Glenn Haussman

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 57:53


Anthony & Glenn discuss the latest in hospitality news including summer travel expectations, how Delta Airlines' service is cratering at JFK, NFTs and how one hotel is trying to use this tech to force guests who cancel rooms to sell it on a third party site, and much more.

Checking In with Anthony & Glenn
518: Hospitality Next

Checking In with Anthony & Glenn

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 57:25


Anthony & Glenn discuss the latest in hospitality news including summer travel expectations, how Delta Airlines' service is cratering at JFK, NFTs and how one hotel is trying to use this tech to force guests who cancel rooms to sell it on a third party site, and much more.