Podcasts about The Home Depot

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American home improvement supplies retailing company

  • 2,578PODCASTS
  • 4,553EPISODES
  • 38mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • May 20, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about The Home Depot

Show all podcasts related to home depot

Latest podcast episodes about The Home Depot

Emprendeduros
EP. #111 | El salvador de Robinhood

Emprendeduros

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 54:57


¡Usa el código "emprendeduros" en https://mezcalaleronusa.com para un 15% de descuento! ¡Emprendeduros! En el episodio de hoy Rodrigo y Alejandro nos dan una actualización de mercado donde discuten la reciente volatilidad del mercado, la inflación, lo que está pasando con India, China y el conflicto en Europa. Después hablan los reportes de ingresos de esta semana incluyendo Walmart, Target, Home Depot y Lowes. También hablan de la Oferta Inicial de Instacart y del salvador de Robinhood. Finalmente nos dan la actualización de Cryptos donde hay varias noticias de que hablar incluyendo a Australia, Japón y la nueva movida de Jack Dorsey con Block.

Trader's Breakfast
S&P 500 kurz vor Bärenmarkt

Trader's Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 5:38


Die US-Börsen haben heute nach den zuletzt starken Verlusten nur zeitweise etwas Boden gutmachen können. Doch dann drückten neue Konjunktursorgen auf die Stimmung und die Kurse.Die Aktien an den asiatisch-pazifischen Märkten stiegen am Freitag, wobei die Aktien aus Hongkong zum Abschluss einer volatilen Handelswoche die Gewinne anführten.Heute werden Zahlen zur Industrieproduktion in der Eurozone veröffentlicht.In den USA werden die Import- und Exportpreise sowie das Verbrauchervertrauen der Uni Michigan bekannt gegeben.Fresenius und Porsche halten ihre Hauptversammlung ab.Geschäftszahlen kommen von Deutsche Telekom, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Ceconomy, Nagarro und Vitesco. Die Futures bewegen sich gemischt. Der Dax ist 1,12% im Plus. Der Dow Jones ist 0,59% im Plus und der S&P 500 ist 0,76% im Plus. Der technologielastige Nasdaq ist 1% im Plus.Support the show

Founders
#247 Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 33:38


What I learned from reading Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean by Les Standiford.Listen to every full episode for $10 a month or $99 a year. The key ideas you'll learn pays for the subscription cost thousands of times over.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey."I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested, so my poor wallet suffers.”"I can't get enough of your podcast. You add a new layer to the books I've already read and make connections to ones I haven't, but now must read."“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 255 full length episodes.You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 255 full length episodes.

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova
Feeling Connected at Work with Steven Van Cohen

What's Next! with Tiffani Bova

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 30:38


Welcome to the What's Next! podcast with Tiffani Bova. Leadership consultant and executive coach, Steven Van Cohen, MSOD, connected with the What's Next! Podcast to discuss his thoughts on workplace loneliness. Along with Ryan Jenkins, he is a co-author of the book Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams From Isolated to All In which gives insight on how to create meaningful connections within an organization. Dubbed “The Leadership Whisperer,” he's spent more than a decade working alongside leading organizations like Salesforce, Home Depot, Komatsu, Bank of America, CAT, and Blackstone to improve worker well-being, reduce employee isolation and boost team belonging.  Steven is a co-founder of LessLonely.com, the premier resource for addressing workplace loneliness and CEO of SyncLX, a leading consultancy specializing in employee development.  As a proud Big Brother, (from Big Brothers and Big Sisters), as well as a volunteer with Boys & Girls Club and Young Americans, Steven has helped build confidence in the future leaders of America.  He holds a BA from the University of Illinois and a MSOD from Pepperdine University. He lives in Orange County CA with his wife and two daughters.   THIS EPISODE IS PERFECT FOR…  workers who are seeking validation and understanding in the loneliness of their workplace environment and managers who are striving to create a more connected workforce to inspire, engage, and properly appreciate their employees.   TODAY'S MAIN MESSAGE… While managing the emotional state of employees might not directly exist on a team leader's job description, the fact is that disengaged and lonely employees are less productive and more susceptible to burnout. We must find the balance between caring about people and getting stuff done if we want to succeed as a healthy workplace.   WHAT I LOVE MOST… The business case for caring about employee loneliness is clear: workers who feel seen and heard perform better for your team. Building workplace connections is in your best interest because it inspires people to come to work as the best versions of themselves – everyone wins.     Running time: 30:37 Subscribe on iTunes     Find Tiffani on social: Facebook Twitter LinkedIn   Find Steven online: Official Website Twitter LinkedIn   Steven's Book: Connectable: How Leaders Can Move Teams from Isolated to All In

The Financial Exchange Show
Wave of Layoffs Coming? // Emma Schwartz of NYT, Producer/Director of "Elon Musk's Crash Course" - 5/18 (Hour 2)

The Financial Exchange Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 40:29


(0:56) - Barry and Chuck open the second hour with a discussion about layoffs and whether or not we're heading for a trend of big companies making major layoffs.(11:15) - Emma Schwartz, producer/director of "Elon Musk's Crash Course", joined the show to talk about the movie she helped create as well as what to expect from the self-driving car sector in the near-term.(22:41) - A conversation about Lowe's, which saw a decline in sales for Q1 despite its rival Home Depot posting strong sales for the same quarter.(32:59) - Touching on Americans dining out more in April than the previous month. Why is this trend happening amid high inflation and food costs?

Squawk on the Street
Markets Slump As Target Shares Get Crushed On An Earnings Miss: The Inflation Factor and Beyond 05/18/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 44:44


Carl Quintanilla and Jim Cramer took an in-depth look at the big story of the morning which helped to spark a market sell-off: Target shares plunged on a quarterly earnings miss, hurt by inflation and supply chain issues. The anchors reacted to what Target CEO Brian Cornell told CNBC -- that he should be held accountable for not properly forecasting rising transportation and freight costs. Jim compared Target's results to those of Walmart, Home Depot, Lowe's and TJX. Also in focus: Why Target's results are weighing on markets one day after stocks rallied despite Walmart's miss, earnings bright spots, Fed Chair Powell not ruling out more aggressive moves to combat inflation, JPMorgan Chase shareholders reject CEO Jamie Dimon's massive retention bonus, plus Cramer on the Elon Musk-Twitter saga.

Stock Stories | Case Studies and Mental Models for Individual Investors
Home Depot Has Historically Crushed The S&P 500 | $HD Analysis

Stock Stories | Case Studies and Mental Models for Individual Investors

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 15:21


Home Depot has dominated the home improvement industry, but how did it happen?  In today's episode we look at Home Depot's modest beginnings, how it grew into a powerhouse, and what the business offers for investors today.0:00 - Start3:00 - Home Depot Beginnings5:10 - How Home Depot Works7:54 - Financials13:20 - Home Depot Historical Returns

The Hustle Daily Show
McDonald's pulls out of Russia

The Hustle Daily Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 21:48


They're taking the arch out of Russia. Plus: Marriott launches a media network, more tech layoffs, Home Depot sales skyrocket, and more. Join our hosts Zachary Crockett, Rob Litterst, Juliet Bennett Rylah, and Jacob Cohen as they take you through our most interesting stories of the day. Thank You For Listening to The Hustle Daily Show. Don't forget to hit Subscribe or Follow us on Apple Podcasts so that you never miss an episode! If you want this news delivered to your inbox, join millions of others and sign up for The Hustle Daily newsletter, here: https://thehustle.co/?utm_source=hustle-daily-podcast&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=show-notes Plus! Your engagement matters to us. If you are a fan of the show, be sure to leave us a 5-Star Review on Apple Podcasts https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-hustle-daily-show/id1606449047 (and share your favorite episodes with your friends, clients, and colleagues). The Hustle Daily Show is brought to you by The Hustle in partnership with HubSpot Podcasts.

The Black Flame Society Podcast
The Black Flame Society Podcast Episode 4: Deleted Scenes

The Black Flame Society Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 51:28


Join Ally and Wil in Episode 4 where we discuss heaps of deleted scenes that were show in original trailers and tv spots, included on the 25th Anniversary Blu Ray and even those that were in the original 1992 shooting script! We also discuss a potentially leaked Hocus Pocus 2 release date and updates on new Halloween products from Spirit Halloween and Home Depot!

Group Chat
You're Afraid of Work | Group Chat News Ep. 635

Group Chat

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 56:54


Today, Dee and Anand discuss Elon's All-In Pod appearance, Madison Avenue's Adverts event, Netflix's layoffs, Walmart's dip, Home Depot's success, Evan Spiegel & Miranda Kerr's massive donation, Travis Scott's BMA appearance, and much more. Timeline of What Was Discussed: Dee and Anand break down the highlights from the All-In podcast with Elon Musk. (2:30)  Upfronts are BACK! (21:47)  Netflix is making some cuts. (29:31)  It looks like inflation has hit the largest retailer in the world! (33:07)  You're afraid of working, America. (37:43)  Home Depot knocked their earnings out of the park! (40:20)  Evan Spiegel does a great deed, and being the product of public vs private schools. (43:47)  Travis Scott makes his first public opinion since the Astroworld tragedy. (53:00)  Group Chat Shout Outs. (55:46)  Related Links/Products Mentioned  All-In Podcast E69: Elon Musk on Twitter's bot problem, SpaceX's grand plan, Tesla stories, Giga Texas & more  Elon Musk Says Twitter Deal Can't Move Forward Without Clarity on Fake Accounts  Madison Avenue's Biggest Event Returns, to a Whole New World  Netflix lays off 150 employees as the streaming service contends with big subscriber losses  Walmart shares fall as higher costs, supply chain problems and inventories eat into profits  Home Depot raises full-year outlook as shoppers trade up to premium products and fuel record Q1 sales  Snapchat co-founder pays off college debt of new graduates at L.A. art and design school  Travis Scott Makes First Televised Performance Since Astroworld Tragedy at 2022 Billboard Music Awards  Connect with Group Chat! Watch The Pod #1 Newsletter In The World For The Gram Tweet With Us Exclusive Facebook Content We're @groupchatpod on Snapchat

FactSet Evening Market Recap
FactSet Evening Market Recap - Tuesday, 17-May

FactSet Evening Market Recap

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 5:10


U.S. Equities finished higher today with the Nasdaq leading and the Dow lagging. Treasuries came under pressure after recent rate reprieve. Positive China headlines in the morning, and Powell staying the course this afternoon. Mostly positive economic data for Retail Sales, Capacity Utilization, and Industrial production, though homebuilder sentiment fell to a two-year low. Home Depot earnings further highlighted consumer strength, but Walmart's earnings missed on higher expenses.

Closing Bell
Closing Bell: Stocks Soar, Fmr. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew On Inflation and A Tale Of Two Retailers 5/17/22

Closing Bell

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 43:17


Stocks rallying as investors go bargain shopping following the recent sell off. Walmart one of the few members of the Dow under pressure after an earnings miss, but fellow retailer and Dow stock Home Depot reporting strong results. Evercore ISI's Greg Melich discusses whether Walmart's earnings miss is the canary in the coal mine for retail stocks and The Luethold Group's Jim Paulsen explains why he likes consumer discretionary stocks, which have been hit hard this year amid fears about inflation and a possible recession. Former Treasury Secretary Jack Lew explains why he sees some signs that inflation may be peaking and whether the Fed risks creating a recession by fighting inflation too aggressively. And Citi's Kristen Bitterly reveals why she is bullish on cybersecurity and pharmaceutical stocks.

Motley Fool Money
Walmart & Home Depot vs. Inflation

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:35


Two major retailers, two different results as they battle inflation. (0:30) Asit Sharma discusses: - Walmart's unusually large stock drop in the wake of disappointing 1st-quarter results - Being a blacksmith, not a goldsmith - Home Depot raising guidance after strong 1st-quarter profits - The role of higher mortgage rates play for home improvement retailers (15:30) Alison Southwick and Robert Brokamp continue their conversation with Business Insider's Mark Reeth about unusual economic indicators. Stocks discussed: WMT, HD, LOW, AMZN Host: Chris Hill Guests: Asit Sharma, Alison Southwick, Robert Brokamp, Mark Reeth Producer: Ricky Mulvey Engineers: Dan Boyd, Rick Engdahl

The Financial Exchange Show
Retail Sales Rise In April // Inflation Hits Walmart // Home Depot's Earnings Beat - 5/17 (Hour 1)

The Financial Exchange Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 40:29


(1:18) - The show opens with a review of the retail sales data for April which showed 0.9% rise in sales for the month.(13:48) - Mark Hamrick of Bankrate called into the show to tell us more about April's retail sales data, including what implications it might have for the economy.(23:23) - Taking a look at Walmart's earnings, which disappointed investors as inflation and supply chain issues weighed on profit.(36:20) - Touching on Home Depot's big earnings beat that saw same-store sales jump along with the company's full-year outlook being lifted.

TechCheck
Top Fund Managers Trade Tech's Volatility, Recapping the 10th Annual CNBC Disruptor 50 & Flexport CEO Ryan Petersen on Supply Chain 5/17/22

TechCheck

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 44:05


Our anchors begin today's show with CNBC's Leslie Picker looking at how some of the top fund managers have been trading the tech volatility of 2022. Then, Cambria Investment Management Founder and CIO Meb Faber weighs in on global tech plays, and CNBC's Courtney Reagan breaks down Q1 earnings from Walmart and Home Depot. Next, our Julia Boorstin recaps the newly announced members of CNBC's 10th annual Disruptor 50 list of private companies, and CNBC's Leslie Picker returns with breaking news on developments in the Department of Justice's fraud case against Allianz. CNBC's Steve Kovach also covers video game publisher Take-Two Interactive's latest results, and CNBC's Mike Santoli analyzes investor sentiment as stocks rally higher to start the morning. Later, Flexport CEO Ryan Petersen joins after the freight forwarding firm was named the number one pick in the Disruptor 50, and CNBC's Brian Schwartz shares new reporting on political campaign contributions from crypto executives.

Founders
Land's Polaroid: A Company and The Man Who Invented It

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 31:37


What I learned from reading Land's Polaroid: A Company and The Man Who Invented It by Peter C. Wensberg.Listen to every full episode for $10 a month or $99 a year. The key ideas you'll learn pays for the subscription cost thousands of times over.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey."I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested, so my poor wallet suffers.”"I can't get enough of your podcast. You add a new layer to the books I've already read and make connections to ones I haven't, but now must read."“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 254 full length episodes.You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 254 full length episodes.

Marketplace Minute
Retail sales increase faster than inflation - Midday - Marketplace Minute - May 17, 2022

Marketplace Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 1:50


Higher prices in April did not deter consumers; Walmart profits squeezed by higher costs; Home Depot earnings rise; United's Boeing 777 planes cleared to fly again, after mid-air engine failure

Squawk on the Street
Markets Rally, Home Depot Jumps, Walmart Slumps, Musk's Bot Message to Twitter, and Citigroup Gets a "Buffett Bounce" 05/17/22

Squawk on the Street

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 44:00


Jim Cramer and Scott Wapner delved into what's driving stocks sharply higher after Monday's choppy session. Shares of Home Depot jumped and Walmart shares tumbled in reaction to the retailers' respective quarterly results and guidance. The anchors discussed how certain stocks are indications of which CEOs are successfully executing their strategies versus those who are not. Also in focus: Elon Musk says his deal to acquire Twitter "cannot go forward" until he receives clarity about the number of fake accounts, Warren Buffett's big bet on Citigroup and what other billionaire investors are buying and selling, plus more earnings winners and losers as United leads the airline stock rally.

Karson & Kennedy
The Unfiltered Aftershow: ANNIE confronted her new NEIGHBOR for being RUDE!

Karson & Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 25:45


Kennedy had a dream about Tom Brady, Karson has a funny story about a Home Depot return, Annie confronted her new neighbor and Producer Dan wants to talk about rude people when flying.

Bob Sirott
Associated Bank Market Outlook: 5/17/22

Bob Sirott

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022


On May 17th, 2022, Steve Grzanich shares today's potential market drivers: April’s retail sales figures NAHB home builders index Earnings from Walmart, Home Depot, and more

Winner Take All
Winner Take All #204 | B2B News: Amazon + Home Depot Launch VC Funds, B2B Tech Investment Ramps Up

Winner Take All

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 19:46


It's a special edition of the show focused on news in the B2B industry. First, we take a look at both Amazon and Home Depot making announcements that they'll be launching funds to invest in B2B technology startups. I break down what these companies have invested in so far and explain why this should be a wake up call for traditional distributors in B2B. Also in this episode, a look at a top HVAC distributor and a top IT distributor embracing marketplace and tech investment. #VCInvesting #B2B #Distribution —

Lynch and Taco
5:35 Idiotology May 17, 2022

Lynch and Taco

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 9:15


Man calls police when a truck HE stole five days earlier is stolen from him, Columbia University did a study to conclude that having more than 2 kids could have a negative impact on your brain, Home Depot rep insisted customer return defective bale of pine straw that had already been spread

Trader's Breakfast
Dax fällt wieder unter 14.00 Punkte.

Trader's Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 6:14


Wegen schwacher Konjunkturprognosen aus China und den USA hat sich die Wall Street gestern kaum bewegt. Auch der DAX konnte seine am Freitag erreichte runde Marke von 14.000 Punkten nicht halten.Die Aktien im asiatisch-pazifischen Raum legten im Dienstagshandel zu, wobei die Aktien aus Hongkong die Gewinne in der Region anführten.Heute veröffentlicht das Mannheimer Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung seine aktuellen Konjunkturerwartungen. Erwartet wird eine leichte Verbesserung von -41,0 auf -40,4 Punkte.In den USA wird das Redbook bekannt gegeben.Die Lufthansa hält ihre Hauptversammlung ab.Geschäftszahlen kommen von Bayer, Münchener Rück, Porsche, Aurubis, Dürr, Fraport, Siltronic, TAG Immobilien, Schaeffler, SAF-Holland, Wacker Neuson, Endesa, Electronic Arts, Fox, Occidental Petroleum, Sony und Wynn Resorts.Die Futures bewegen sich im grünen Bereich. Der Dax ist 0,8% im Plus. Der Dow Jones ist 0,23% im Plus und der S&P 500 ist 0,36% im Plus. Der technologielastige Nasdaq ist 0,6% im Minus.Support the show

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act
Shake it, jerk it and the nuts will come out.

Cadillac Jack - My Second Act

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 54:15


It's Horoscope Hour with Donna Choate on the Cadillac Jack – My Second Act podcast. She gives all of you loyal listeners an update on the status of Mercury retrograde in 2022 and what it means for your lives and the decisions in front of you. Also, was it a fart, or wasn't it? Caddy clears the air on the internet joke about some supposed passed wind of a witness at the Amber Heard/Johnny Depp trial. Perhaps most importantly, Caddy brought props. Listen to the tale of his adventure with a plastic fork, a trip to Home Depot, and the dry full of acorns. And make sure to watch for The Letter this weekend for some visual evidence. Updates on the All-American Red, White & Blue Parking Lot Party THIS Saturday at Gallery Furniture! We hope to see you there. 1600 Browns Bridge Road, Gainesville. All that and more on this episode of the Cadillac Jack – My Second Act podcast! Will you be at the Parking Lot Party this Saturday? Let us know! We'd ove to see you there. Text or call 770-464-6024.

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal
Building affordable housing is hard, but so is changing minds about where to build it

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:16


Today, the Joe Biden administration released a plan to tackle the shortage of starter homes. The move incentivizes high-density housing and manufactured or mobile homes. But there’s a hurdle for lower-cost housing developments: the communities that don’t want them there. Also on the program: looking at a new tool for mapping wildfire risks, grappling with higher utility bills and trading in a gig at Home Depot for one in a glassmaking studio.

Marketplace All-in-One
Building affordable housing is hard, but so is changing minds about where to build it

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 27:16


Today, the Joe Biden administration released a plan to tackle the shortage of starter homes. The move incentivizes high-density housing and manufactured or mobile homes. But there’s a hurdle for lower-cost housing developments: the communities that don’t want them there. Also on the program: looking at a new tool for mapping wildfire risks, grappling with higher utility bills and trading in a gig at Home Depot for one in a glassmaking studio.

CNBC's
Countdown to Retail Earnings and Can Anyone Really Know How Many Bots Twitter Has? 05/16/22

CNBC's "Fast Money"

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 43:34


Walmart and Home Depot give us important reads on the consumer and how they're responding to decades-high inflation when they report tomorrow. What the traders are watching and what it means for the market. Plus Twitter's CEO and Elon Musk have wildly different estimates for how many bots are on the platform. So with so much confusion, how can anyone know how to value the company?

Nightly Business Report
Beaten down, bouncing back?, Crypto Crush, and Retail Results 5/16/22

Nightly Business Report

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 44:44


Stocks are starting the week the same way they finished the previous 6: lower. We'll look at some beaten-down stocks and as if now is the time to buy. Plus, Bitcoin is sliding again today, trading back below $30K. What's going on in the crypto market, and why aren't investors buying in? We'll explore. And, as a big week of retail earnings kicks off, we'll highlight Walmart and Home Depot ahead of results in Earnings Exchange.

Jim and Them
Snuff Bullet - #726 Part 1

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 98:48


Snuff Bullet: Thanks to our Amber Heard doing drugs on the stand video we learn about the SNUFF BULLET! This is a real thing that is readily available!Evil Dead: The Game: Jim hopped on the Evil Dead videogame launch, add him if you got it! And Mike has tales of the Playdate console.Bus People In Real Life: Mike has tales of running into bus people without having to be on the bus!CAMP BLOOD!, CRAZY RALPH!, DEATH CURSE!, FRIDAY THE 13TH!, NBA JAM!, SHOOT THEM HOOPS!, COVID FREE!, 4 ADDED SOUNDS!, TWITCH!, NEW EMOTES!, KNUCKLES!, MOONFALL!, MOON CYCLES!, PERIOD!, WAVE!, COMPLIMENTS!, SOUTH SHORE BAR STYLE PIZZA!, TACO PIZZA!, HAMBURGER PIZZA!, SPENCER'S PIZZA!, LYNWOOD CAFE!, JOHNNY DEPP!, AMBER HEARD!, DOING COKE IN COURT!, COKEHEADS!, DEBATE!, CONTROVERSY!, TISSUE!, CLICK!, SNUFF BULLET!, AMAZON!, COKE ADDICT!, BUMP!, HOLLYWOOD TRICK!, MAKE HERSELF CRY!, COCAINE CLICK!, WRESTLING!, SNORT DISPENSER!, JORDAN!, VOICEMAIL!, DIE YOUNG!, THE ABORTED GOON!, GONNA BURN!, EVIL DEAD: THE GAME!, FRIDAY THE 13TH!, DEAD BY DAYLIGHT!, SUMMON A BOSS!, DEMON!, SURVIVOR!, EVOLVE!, TEXAS CHAIN SAW MASSACRE GAME!, THE PLAYDATE CONSOLE!, CHIP SHORTAGE!, DELAYS!, HANDHELD!, PORTABLE!, CRANK!, INDIE GAMES!, NO BACK LIGHT!, PC GAMING!, STEAMDECK!, NVIDIA SHIELD!, NINTENDO SWITCH!, NEW CONSOLE!, SHRINKFLATION!, APPLIANCES!, LOGISTICS!, SUPPLY CHAIN!, LIGHT AT THE END OF THE TUNNEL!, VENDOR!, BOSCH!, HOME DEPOT!, LOWES!, COVID!, ISLAND RANGE HOOD!, RAY TRACING!, IN N OUT!, ONIONS!, ANIMAL STYLE!, HOMELESS!, CRAZY!, BOTTLE TRICKS!, COCKTAIL!, TRASH THROW!, BETTER THAN I THOUGHT I WAS!, GAS STATION!, TACO BELL!, KNOWS YOUR NAME!, THROW CANS AWAY!, ASK FOR MONEY!, TATTOOS!, TANGLED!, LAS VEGAS STRIP!, SHOWGIRLS!, SUPERHEROES!, DISNEY CHARACTERS!, BELLAGIO!, WATER SHOW!, SHAMELESS!, EYE CONTACT!, BEGGING!, HARASSED!, PANHANDLING!, CHEAPENS THE VEGAS EXPERIENCE!, PSYCHOPATHIC TOUR!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

Motley Fool Money
The Hidden Upside for Stock Investors

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 38:41


"This is a once in a blue moon butt-kicking." And we've got the numbers to back it up! (0:30) Jason Moser and Maria Gallagher discuss: - Historic numbers to put the current market into perspective - Disney's better-than-you-might-think results - Rough times for coffee chain Dutch Bros - Unity Software's drive for profitability - Signs of life from Affirm Holdings - The latest from Roblox, The Trade Desk, and Peloton (19:00) Bill Mann talks with Okta co-founder Frederic Kerrest about lessons from his new book, Zero to IPO: Over $1 Trillion of Actionable Advice from the World's Most Successful Entrepreneurs. (34:15) Maria analyzes Airbnb's platform enhancements, then she and Jason share two stocks on their radar: Airbnb and Home Depot. Stocks discussed: DIS, BROS, U, AFRM, RBLX, TTD, PTON, OKTA, HD, ABNB Host: Chris Hill Guests: Maria Gallagher, Jason Moser, Bill Mann, Frederic Kerrest Engineers: Dan Boyd, Rick Engdahl

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Founders
#246 Mark Leonard's Shareholder Letters

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 32:52


What I learned from reading Constellation Software Inc. President's Letters by Mark Leonard.Listen to every full episode for $10 a month or $99 a year. The key ideas you'll learn pays for the subscription cost thousands of times over.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey."I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested, so my poor wallet suffers.”"I can't get enough of your podcast. You add a new layer to the books I've already read and make connections to ones I haven't, but now must read."“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 254 full length episodes.You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 254 full length episodes.

The Bob Culture Podcast
Vince the Voice Interview

The Bob Culture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 7:41


It was great to run into our friend Vince the Voice who is known for his stellar wrestling theme announcements at Home Depot, Impressions, and more!! Vince talks about 80s Wrestling Con and even shares some fun impressions with us. Tune in!! 

YXE Underground
Season Four - Episode Nine - Charles and Megen Olfert

YXE Underground

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 45:03


Megen Olfert smiles thinking about the backyard treehouse her father designed for her when she was a kid. It was wide enough for a motorised wheelchair to manoeuvre inside, and a cement path wound its way through the backyard up to the treehouse instead of stairs or a ladder. “I felt like I was on equal ground as a kid,” said Megen, “because sometimes when you're disabled it means you have to do things differently even though you can do the same thing. It made me feel included.”Megen was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at nine months old. It became clear to her parents, Charles and Leila Olfert, that their daughter would need a wheelchair and their house would not meet Megen's needs. So, Charles began designing a new home for the family.This is an excerpt from a story I wrote for the CBC Saskatchewan website based on this episode. I love the story of Megan's treehouse!Charles and Leila have been living in this fully accessible home for the past 36 years. Charles is an architect with AODBT architecture and interior design and is passionate about accessibility. He shares that passion in this episode and I am grateful to him for it. I am also grateful to have met Megen at her condominium at Cheshire Homes of Saskatoon, along with her service dog, Que. He makes a few appearances in this episode. What you are going to hear is the story of a young woman who was not going to let her disabilities prevent her from living a full and abundant life and the father who used his architectural and design knowledge to ensure she had access to everything she needed. Charles was kind enough to give me a tour of his house before introducing me to Megen at her condo. In between the tour and meeting Megen, I sat down with Charles to learn more about his passion for accessibility, how he is working with local businesses and organizations to make accessibility a priority, and his belief in the Rick Hansen Foundation's certification course. I had so much fun spending time with Charles and Megen and I hope you enjoy listening to their story. Thank you so much for continuing to support a local, independent podcast and don't forget to leave a 5-star review if you like what you hear. Oh, and there are some wonderful photos of Charles and Megen taken by Saskatoon photographer Rona Andreas on the website and social media sites. Thanks again for listening!Cheers...Eric

She Said Privacy/He Said Security
Jodi and Justin's Top Five Privacy and Security Lessons for 2022

She Said Privacy/He Said Security

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 18:37


Jodi Daniels is the Founder and CEO of Red Clover Advisors, a boutique data privacy consultancy and one of the few certified Women's Business Enterprises focused solely on privacy. Since its launch, Red Clover Advisors has helped hundreds of companies create privacy programs, achieve GDPR, CCPA, and US privacy law compliance, and establish a secure online data strategy that their customers can count on. Jodi is a Certified Informational Privacy Professional (CIPP/US) with over 20 years of experience helping a range of businesses — from solopreneurs to multinational companies — in privacy, marketing, strategy, and finance roles. She has worked with numerous companies throughout her corporate career, including Deloitte, The Home Depot, Cox Enterprises, Bank of America, and many more. Jodi is also a national keynote speaker, a member of the Forbes Business Council, and the co-host of the She Said Privacy/He Said Security podcast. Justin Daniels is a cybersecurity subject matter expert and business attorney who helps his clients implement strategies to better manage and recover from data breaches. As outsourced general counsel for Baker Donelson, Justin advises executives on how to successfully navigate cyber business and legal concerns related to operations, M&A, incident response, and more. In 2017, Justin founded and led the inaugural Atlanta Cyber Week, where multiple organizations held events that attracted more than 1,000 attendees. Justin is also a TEDx and keynote speaker and the co-host of the She Said Privacy/He Said Security podcast with his wife, Jodi. In this episode… It's 2022, and digital data is expanding faster than ever. Many companies are struggling to adapt to dynamic data privacy and security laws and advancements. When it comes to the privacy and security space, what mistakes are companies making?  Privacy and security experts Jodi and Justin Daniels maintain the importance of company data inventories, so you can figure out where your data is and why you're using it. Without these inventories, it becomes impossible to secure your data and comply with the latest laws. This is just one of Jodi and Justin's many lessons intended to educate companies on privacy and security. In this episode of She Said Privacy/He Said Security, Jodi and Justin Daniels sit down to discuss their top five privacy and security lessons of 2022. Tune in to learn about the privacy terms and conditions you should include in your company contract, how to make sure you're using cookies correctly on your website, and why small companies should heed privacy and security warnings.

Founders
#50 Marc Andreessen

Founders

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 34:17


What I learned from reading  The Pmarca Blog Archive Ebook by Marc Andreessen.Listen to every full episode for $10 a month or $99 a year. The key ideas you'll learn pays for the subscription cost thousands of times over.WHAT OTHER PEOPLE ARE SAYING:“Founders is the only podcast I pay for and it's worth 100x the cost.”“I've now listened to every episode. From this knowledge I've doubled my business to $500k a year. Love your passion and recommend your podcast to everyone.”“Without a doubt, the highest value-to-cost ratio I've taken advantage of in the last year is the Founders podcast premium feed. Tap into eons of knowledge and experiences, condensed into digestible portions. Highly, highly recommend. “Uniquely outstanding. No fluff and all substance. David does an outstanding job summarizing these biographies and hones in on the elements that make his subjects so unique among entrepreneurs. I particularly enjoy that he focuses on both the founder's positive and negative characteristics as a way of highlighting things to mimic and avoid.”“I just paid for my first premium podcast subscription for Founders podcast. Learning from those who came before us is one of the highest value ways to invest time. David does his homework and exponentially improves my efficiency by focusing on the most valuable lessons.”“I haven't found a better return on my time and money than your podcast for inspiration and time-tested wisdom to help me on my journey."I have listened to every episode released and look forward to every episode that comes out. The only criticism I would have is that after each podcast I usually want to buy the book because I am interested, so my poor wallet suffers.”"I can't get enough of your podcast. You add a new layer to the books I've already read and make connections to ones I haven't, but now must read."“I have listened to many podcasts on entrepreneurship (HIBT, Masters of Scale, etc.) and find Founders to be consistently more helpful than any other entrepreneurship podcast. David is a craftsperson, he carefully reads biographies of founders, distills the most important anecdotes and themes from their life, and draws commonalities across lives. David's focus is rightfully not on teaching you a formula to succeed but on constantly pushing you to think different.”“I highly highly recommend this podcast. Holy cow. I've been binge listening to these and you start to see patterns across all these incredible humans.”Listening to your podcast has changed my life and that is not a statement I make often.“After one episode I quickly joined the Misfit feed. Love the insight and thoughts shared along the way. David loves what he does and it shines through on the podcast. Definitely my go-to podcast now.”“It is worth every penny. I cannot put into words how fantastic this podcast is. Just stop reading this and get the full access.”“Personally it's one of my top 3 favorite podcasts. If you're into business and startups and technology, this is for you. David covers good books and I've come to really appreciate his perspective. Can't say enough good things.”“I quickly subscribed and it's honestly been the best money I've spent all year. It has inspired me to read biographies. Highly recommend.”“This is the most inspirational and best business podcast out there. David has inspired me to focus on biographies rather than general business books. I'm addicted.”“Anyone interested in business must find the time to listen to each any every Founders podcast. A high return on investment will be a virtual certainty. Subscribe and start listening as soon as possible.”“David saves you hundreds of hours by summarizing bios of legendary business founders and providing valuable insight on what makes an individual successful. He has introduced me to many founders I would have never known existed.”“The podcasts offer spectacular lessons on life, human nature and business achievement. David's enthusiasm and personal thoughts bring me joy. My journey has been enhanced by his efforts.”"Founders is the best self investment that I've made in years."UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 253 full length episodes.You will learn the key insights from biographies on Steve Jobs, Elon Musk, John D. Rockefeller, Coco Chanel, Andrew Carnegie, Enzo Ferrari, Estee Lauder, Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Charlie Munger, Phil Knight, Joseph Pulitzer, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Alexander Graham Bell, Bill Gates, P.T. Barnum, Edwin Land, Henry Ford, Walter Chrysler, Thomas Edison, David Ogilvy, Ben Franklin, Howard Hughes, George Lucas, Levi Strauss, Walt Disney and so many more. You will learn from the founders of Nike, Patagonia, Apple, Microsoft, Hershey, General Motors, Ford, Standard Oil, Polaroid, Home Depot, MGM, Intel, Federal Express, Wal Mart, JP Morgan, Chrysler, Cadillac, Oracle, Hyundai, Seagram, Berkshire Hathaway, Teledyne, Adidas, Les Schwab, Renaissance Technologies, IKEA, Sony, Ferrari, and so many more. UPGRADE to listen to the rest of this episode and gain access to 253 full length episodes.