Podcasts about uncrustables

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Best podcasts about uncrustables

Latest podcast episodes about uncrustables

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #539 - Mime Enough At Last

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2022 177:49


After being resurrected by a sinister entity, two hosts return for the annual tradition of heaping praise and gratitude on those they hold dear, while eating a traditional American style  Thursday night dinner. On Episode 539 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss Terrifier 2 from director Damien Leone! We also debate long run times in slasher films, we learn just who played Mack the Knight, and we think of Ted Levine while taking a bath. So grab your favorite pie, frolic through the sand in a makeshift summer dress, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Promotions and raises, The Calendar Man, falling in your Crocs, Yahtzee, Uno, Stratego, Risk, Tango and Cash, Mattual of Omaha, Empire Strikes Back Bounty Hunters, thinking about Ted Levine in the bath, Soundwave, the origins of Thanksgiving, Shao Khan, Outworld, The Last Dragon, RIP Jason David Frank, Voltron, Gatchaman, Andor, Tales of the Jedi, Count Dooku, the galaxy revolves around the Skywalkers, Star Wars, cleft chins, Mack the Knight, Doug Jones, Soul Glo, Uncrustables, favorite McDonald's commercials, black sugar, “Happy Chicken”, John Wish, White Claw, Brian Seltzer Orchestra, Cobra Kai, Chris Jericho, David Howard Thornton, Lauren LaVera, Terrifier 2, Damien Leone, Talk is Jericho, long run times in film, retro slasher films, Michael Myers, Jason Vorhees, All Hallow's Eve, Hack/Slash, Something in the Dirt, Bullet Train, Patreon Takeover returns!, The Menu, Violent Night, Tommy Wirkola, David Harbour, Spirit Halloween, Slash/back, Bodies Bodies Bodies, 31 Days of Halloween, Pearl, Barbarian, after dinner stogie, nagging family during the holidays, Comfort Media, Casablanca, Citizen Kane, If Art Could Talk, Who Slashes the Slashers?, Clowny Clown Clown, jaded Fulci'd out sickos, Tommy Boy, frolicking through the sand in a makeshift summer dress, snacking on black olives, and American Style Thursday Night Dinner.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show

Matt & Ramona Off Air
Matt Loves His Hot Pockets & Uncrustables!

Matt & Ramona Off Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 11:14


On this episode of the Matt & Ramona OFF AIR Podcast Matt & Ramona discuss the type of snacks that Matt loves to eat which would be Hot Pockets and Uncrustables. Also Ramona talks about how she wish she could excuse from having to go to a family event. Don't miss this episode of OFF AIR. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Oddcast
Ep. 100: Alex is un-trustable when it comes to uncrustables

The Oddcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 62:02


We made it to 100 episodes! This week on the Oddcast we do some trivia while eating uncrustables. Some are good. Some are bad. All are without crust. Warning: there is gaging and gross food on this episode. Listen at your own risk. Thanks for listening and remember... Stay Odd! Follow us on our socials Instagram: @2odddudes Twitter: @twoodddudes Tiktok: Twoodddudes Youtube: Two Odd Dudes

Fescoe in the Morning
10/06 9AM Sea Bass or Uncrustables, you decide

Fescoe in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 42:24


Our Survivor picks/ The Matheny era in KC/Bob has a fix for the Royals/Big plays, who needs them/The wrap up of the BDub Summer Shape Up

The Kluck Index
October 3 2022

The Kluck Index

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 3:46


Uncrustables are expanding, NFTs are down (wut?) Elon Musk has a Terminator, you can steal Dahmer's look and Olive Garden brings back a classic!See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Guiltless Podcast
163: Paw Paws And Uncrustables (featuring Lisa Sands)

Guiltless Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 134:24


We are joined by Lisa Sands of The CLE Foodcast to discuss the very best Cleveland has to offer, who the best podcast is...and Ken's high school bully (who still sucks).

OffScrip with Matthew Zachary

18 months, 72 episodes, countless Uncrustables references, and one global pandemic later, it's time to retire the VAX ON segment and transform it into an even bigger segment on the Out of Patients podcast feed. There's a whole world of opportunity outside of COVID fuckery waiting to be lauded, chastised, berated, heralded, castigated, and brazenly deconstructed. So join us as Matthew and Elura hop in the Wayback machine and reflect on how it all began, what they did to stay alive, and where we've landed across these pandemic years.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Krisha & Frank Show
Frank & Friends Show 0064

Krisha & Frank Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 40:08


Frank Murphy's friend Frank Rosamond is co-hosting today's episode. Frank plays the mayor in Encore Theatrical Company's production of Bright Star. He is the founder of Mondbiz Enterprises. He was previously the president of the Knoxville News Sentinel. He is the current chair of the Knoxville Opera board.  Remaining performances of Bright Star are July 15, and 16 at 7:30 p.m. and July 17 at 2:30 p.m. Call 423-318-8331 or visit https://etcplays.org for tickets.  Frank Rosamond was on Living East Tennessee to do a personality test of the show's hosts. It determines if you are people-oriented or task-oriented among other details.  Frank Rosamond was planning to rotate off the Knoxville Opera board when he was asked not only to stay on but to become the new chair. Frank Murphy compares it to his experience being elected president of the Front Page Foundation board.  Frank Rosamond describes how it was easier to get someone on the phone when he had the title of president of the newspaper. Frank Murphy can relate to the situation.  Frank Murphy has a friend who still uses a flip phone. She asked Frank to come over because her television audio was in Spanish and some other shows had the audio description for the blind.  Frank Murphy meant to offer Frank Rosamond some snacks like a fruit pouch or an Uncrustable. Rosamond isn't familiar with Uncrustables, which are frozen peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. You are supposed to let them thaw before eating them and are warned not to microwave them.  When Artie Rocket was visiting, he asked for some Diet Coke and Mentos. Frank only had some old cans of Diet Coke which did not produce as satisfying an explosion of fizz as a two-liter bottle does.  A friend of Frank's has pitched a show idea. The friend wants to have her daughter demonstrate the wigs and face paint she has designed for an upcoming production of Cats.  This episode is sponsored by BoneZones.com (don't forget the S). Buy books and other merchandise autographed by Body Farm founder Dr. Bill Bass at https://bonezones.com/  Support the Frank & Friends Show by purchasing some of our high-quality merchandise at https://frank-friends-show.creator-spring.com  Sign up for a 30-day trial of Audible Premium Plus and get a free premium selection that's yours to keep. Go to http://AudibleTrial.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  Find us online https://www.FrankAndFriendsShow.com/  Please subscribe to our YouTube channel at https://YouTube.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  and hit the bell for notifications.  Find the audio of the show on major podcast apps including Spotify, Apple, Google, iHeart, and Audible.  Find us on social media:  https://www.facebook.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.instagram.com/FrankAndFriendsShow  https://www.twitter.com/FrankNFriendsSh  Thanks!

Smell My Whiskey
S4E2: Jon Died (Jim Beam White Label)

Smell My Whiskey

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 38:30


A famous writer once said “We make a living by what we get, we make a life by what we give.” If that is true, then Jon made a great life. RIP Boneman. Besides that, we discuss: • Jim Beam white label, the worlds number one bourbon, and sponsor of the All American Pacer Test. • Jack Daniel's and CocaCola gone official? • Nitro soda? • Full fat soda? • Two diet sodas and one for the road? • Salmonella? • Uncrustables? • Do we have a problem? Budget bourbon on a budget podcast, it doesn't get better than this? --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/smellmywhiskey/support

Mikey and Bob
Uncrustables Dog House

Mikey and Bob

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 66:17


Mr. Suckey - The Coach Tomlin Podcast with Ryan Clark, Fred Taylor and Channing Crowder is great - Carson Daly paid us $1000 to kiss - Florida man was arrested in a cow costume - Mikey found a new show that brings him pure joy - Naked lady burned her bush in Florida - Air Fried Uncrustables - We power rank our favorite kids foods that we like as adults

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
Mark Allen - From an undersized Walmart bike to the finish of UNBOUND 100

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 39:16


This week we sit down with Mark Allen from Wichita, Kansas to learn of his experience in the UNBOUND 100 in 2022. Mark started cycling three years ago on an undersized Walmart bike. He was overweight and dealing with some health issues that convinced him he needed to make some changes. An UNBOUND poster on the wall of a friend changed everything and started him on a journey that led to completing this years 100 mile route. Episode sponsor: Bike Index, non-profit bicycle registry and stolen bike recovery platform  Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Mark Allen - UNBOUND 100 [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello, and welcome to the gravel ride podcast, where we go deep on the sport of gravel cycling through in-depth interviews with product designers, event organizers and athletes. Who are pioneering the sport I'm your host, Craig Dalton, a lifelong cyclist who discovered gravel cycling back in 2016 and made all the mistakes you don't need to make. I approach each episode as a beginner down, unlock all the knowledge you need to become a great gravel cyclist. This week on the show, we're talking to Mark Allen from Wichita, Kansas, and talking to mark about his journey from being a non cyclist three years ago, to finishing the Unbound 100 this year. I very much enjoyed this conversation with mark and I hope you do too. I think it just goes to show all of us that regardless of the challenge. What's important is putting one foot in front of the other one pedal stroke in front of the other, and just keep moving forward. Before we jump in. I want to thank this week. Sponsor, bike index. Bike index is a nonprofit bicycle registry and stolen bike recovery platform. The platform has helped recovered. Over $18 million in stolen bicycles. And you know what? The one thing they all have in common is they freely registered their bikes on bike index. So head on over to bike index.org, register your bike. All you need is the serial number, make, model, and color of your bicycle. You'll get it in the system and hopefully you never need to use their services. If you do, they've built out of robust, stolen bike recovery platform. With tools that you can use to freely share your stolen bike on social media channels. As well as ways of actually advertising against your stolen bike. To your fellow cyclists in your area, it dramatically increases your chances of recovering a stolen bicycle. So please take a look@bikeindex.org. With that said let's dive right into my conversation with Mark Allen. Hey, mark. Welcome to the show. [00:02:01] Mark Allen: Thank you very much for having me. [00:02:03] Craig Dalton: I'm excited to dig into your story as the listener knows. I always like to start just by getting a little bit about your background. So why don't you tell us where you're from, where you're living and originally how you found the bike, and then we'll get into how you got the courage to sign up for the Unbound 100 this year. [00:02:20] Mark Allen: Yes. I grew up in Wichita, Kansas did not know hardly anything about gravel cycling at all, which is amazing when you know, Unbound is basically in the backyard of Wichita. So. About three years ago, I decided I needed to get my health in check and was probably about 60 pounds overweight struggled with some thyroid issues that created me to gain an immense amount of weight. And I went to Walmart and bought a bike that just, I just decided to go ride a bike and [00:02:57] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Did you just get tipped off that cycling was a good activity, easy on the joints and [00:03:02] Mark Allen: I read yes, easy on the joints trying to not hurt my knees any further than they've been over 53 years of using them. So I jumped on this bike. That was way too small and I wrote it and I wrote it and I wrote it. And. Started losing weight. Started fixing my nutrition started fixing the proper medicines with my doctor. I mean, you put the three together and it, I really started having great results, great health results, great mental results. I mean, it was just a, you know, all on. Little itty bitty mongoose bike that I bought in Walmart. I'm six, five and 280 pounds at that time. And I'm now six, five, and kind of bounced between two 30 and two 40. But so I'm not literal at all. [00:03:52] Craig Dalton: Was was the environment in Wichita conducive to cycling? Was it, were you seeing people out there on the roads that made you say like, oh, like I see people are really passionate about this sport. [00:04:03] Mark Allen: Oh, say it all the time. It's amazing amount. You know, we don't have the greatest cycling infrastructure for the level of cycling that gets done in Wichita. Really surprised at that, but the amount of people that are. Riding bikes. I mean, everything from recreational bikes to folks on road and folks on gravel is amazing. So the, it is very popular here. It's very popular here and and. It's again, it's just amazing to see the amount of people doing it and really the amount of people not doing it. And I've been really spreading the wor word on cycling, trying to get other folks you know, involved in it because I've, I had such great benefits from it. I [00:04:46] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's amazing. I mean, a couple things I wanna drill into there, but, but first off, you know, cycling, I think can be a, a cost prohibitive sport. It can be kind of confusing and intimidating. You just jumped right in and got, got yourself a bike and started riding. Were you riding just on the, the streets and trails of Wichita at that, at that first instance? [00:05:06] Mark Allen: get up every morning, about 4:00 AM and I would ride through my neighborhood and then I would go outta my neighborhood. Down to an intersection across the street up all the way down to the next inter street intersection, cross the street and come back through the neighborhood. And I kept doing laps very early in the morning. I was a little self-conscious. I was very didn't want any traffic. Didn't just, just needed to ride at my pace. And, and. Just build upon, build upon that. So, didn't venture far, just a lot of repetitive lap [00:05:40] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah, no, it's great. I mean, it's great that you sort of knew that about yourself and said that like you just need to get started and everything else that we'll talk about that came from that start started with you just being willing to get up early and ride around the block a few times. [00:05:54] Mark Allen: is absolutely correct. [00:05:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah. The other thing I wanted to ask you about that you mentioned, obviously you started to see some health benefits. I think anybody movement is just so important for all of us and you, it was clear, you were gonna see some health benefits right away, but you also mentioned, you know, you felt mental benefits from riding a bike. So I'd love to just kind of hear a little bit about your thoughts about that and the benefits you were getting for just getting out there and riding. [00:06:20] Mark Allen: Solitude it it's, it's amazing. Just writing by myself and having time to just think I own my own business. I have 30 some employees. I have, I'm married, have seven children. I have five children that are out the house now. And two home. Very demanding. So, a lot of responsibility, a lot of working with a lot of people and just finding time for myself, just tiny, you know, sorting things out in my head and trying to find, you know, self care time to really meditate on things. Think about things, talk to yourself you know, just even positive feedback from yourself. You know, if I set a goal for the day and I accomplish it, That feeling was phenomenal. I mean, it was it just, and it was, there were little goals, you know, there were little goals at first three laps, four laps, five laps, you know, and that self feedback loop of wow, I did it was, was immense. So I get up in the morning. I do these rides. I set my daily goals. I meet my daily goals and my entire day. Starts out different. I'm not waking up with the, the weight of the world of my family or my work on my shoulders. I'm waking up and accomplishing a goal immediately. And it just sets the tone from the day, from there on out, just absolutely sets the tone. [00:07:43] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I completely agree with you. I got out this morning for an hour before anybody was at the breakfast table, got home. And honestly, anything I achieved throughout the rest of the day is, is inconsequential because I've really, I've spent that time with myself. I got a little bit of exercise in and just enjoyed, you know, the environment that I'm able to ride. [00:08:03] Mark Allen: Yes. And, and I want everybody to understand. It's just little things, right? It's little things, just getting out and doing little things to begin with. And, and, you know, my story has this. Incredible ending which is another beginning, which I'm sure we'll talk about soon, but it's just little things. I mean, it's a lap around your street. It's that simple of a, a start, you know, the, the start's the hard part. But it, it isn't you know, it isn't hours at a time, which, you know, is just a little bit, so, you know, I tell everybody don't be afraid, just start, you know, pick something easy and go. Yeah. And, and it's amazing how the rest of the day just comes together. [00:08:43] Craig Dalton: Yeah. So tell me about, so, you know, you're running laps in the neighborhood and you're building up your mileage. Was there a certain point where something clicked and you said, well, gosh, maybe I should set a target. Maybe I should try to ride. 15 miles or 20 miles. And it kind of got you a little bit outta that neighborhood routine and made you [00:09:00] Mark Allen: I started reading about single track and I was like, wow, this is pretty cool. And watched some videos. And I went and bought a specialized doubled XL rock hopper. It's a huge bike, which fit me, which was great. So that's really the first bike that. Fit me to where, you know, I wasn't scrunched up. I wasn't hurting or anything like that. And I left I Prairie, sunset trail is about five miles from my house. It's a trail that runs about 20 miles on the west side of Wichita. And I left I left the, the confines of my neighborhood and I rode that trail. It's flat. It has, it has no elevation on it at all. So it's just flat and you'll find everybody, people walking, walking their dogs, you know, riding gravel, cyclists. I mean, everybody's on that trail. And so I was first able to overcome. People seeing me on a bike. I finally had a bike that fit me, so it didn't look terribly crazy. And I started riding that trail and you know, at first, the first time I did 10 miles on that trail, I was beside myself. I was just like, this is the greatest thing ever. I did 10 miles and that's five out and five back to where I parked. So, you know, five out with a break and five back with a, you know, when I parked. And so I started doing. I did a little bit of the air cap Memorial trail, which is there too. And then I had a pretty good wreck on it as anybody that does single track. You know, I had a really good wreck. I hit a tree with my left shoulder, went over the handle bars. I'm too old. I'm too big to be going over handle bars And I was like, okay, this is, this has kind of scared me. And At that time I had met Nathan Wadsworth, who is in charge of elite training. My son had been going to him doing some personal fitness with him, and Nathan is a phenomenal gravel cyclist. So him and I had just been talking back and forth and back and forth and back and forth. And he's the one that steered me that, and the tree steered me away from single track and towards gravel cycling. [00:11:03] Craig Dalton: Okay. And were you able with, we, were you able to find gravel cycling roads out of Wichita that you could start to enjoy at that point? [00:11:11] Mark Allen: Oh, all over. They're all over. There's a 45th street is I, I would say a mile from my house and I can do a 20 mile out and back on the same street with some decent elevation with a. Boat marina at the end of the first 20 miles. So if you need to use the restroom or get something to drink, you can refill and, and head back in the gravel roads around Wichita on the west side of town are great, not a ton of elevation training wise but they are they're, they're incredible. And very rideable and they were really designed to help me, you know, learn how to ride a gravel bike. [00:11:47] Craig Dalton: Okay. And did you end up swapping the, the specialized mountain bike for a drop bar bike? Or were you still on the specialized. [00:11:54] Mark Allen: I rode that J until I could find one. My problem was, this was right pre COVID. And as COVID was hitting, every American went out and bought a bike. And and given my size there's only a few manufacturers that make a bike large enough for me anyways. So what Nathan did was steer to a, a specialized 64 carbon sport diverge. And I spent months looking for that. So I was stuck on. Rock hopper, riding gravel roads, like a gravel cyclist looking months on, in for a gravel bike that the specific 64. And I found it over the internet in North Carolina. So it was and it was at a shop that couldn't ship it to me due to specialized franchise territory rules and all that. But it was in a town that I have a friend, it was in Raleigh, North Carolina, and I called my friend and I said, Hey, they have this bike that I've been looking for for months. Could you pick it up for me and ship it to me? And, and my friend Chuck was like, absolutely. And I said, it's at all star at in quail corners, right outside of Raleigh. And he. That's the bike shop I use. And I was like, holy Mac, we we've got my bike and it's in Chuck's neighborhood and I'm gonna have this bike here in three days. And I did, it was just, it was a miracle. I mean, it was, you know, just, it was cool. It [00:13:17] Craig Dalton: That's amazing. Yeah. I'm glad you were able to get something relatively efficiently. Cause I've heard tons of stories about people trying to find a bike. And in your particular case, as you describe it, when you've only got a model or a couple models that are gonna work for you, you probably have an even li more limited opportunity to grab a hold of a gravel bike. [00:13:36] Mark Allen: Yes. Yeah. There's just not for my size. There's not, and that's something I'm hoping in the future that the gravel industry will look at, cuz there's a lot of guys, my size that would do this. If there was, I think more availability you know, of, of, of bikes, of size. [00:13:53] Craig Dalton: So you'd been riding maybe about a, a year. Did I get the timeline right? When you got that gravel bike [00:13:58] Mark Allen: Yes. It was a, it was about a year, [00:14:00] Craig Dalton: was when you first sort of stepped over the gravel bike and started riding with dropped handle bars. How did you, how did that feel? Was that a, a rough transition from a straight bar mountain bike, which is a little bit maybe easier to ride. I'd argue [00:14:15] Mark Allen: Scared me to death I had never, I mean, I had never written any written, anything. Like that. And so just the basics of trying to master a bike that is beyond your technical skill and also way beyond your physical skills. So the, the, the bike was way out ahead of my abilities and just having a thumb shifter. I mean, literally I I'd never, I'm like, I didn't know what gear I was in , you know, just trying to Technically learn how to ride the bike. It took me, it took me quite a while. I mean, it took me, I don't know, several months to finally get into the flow, get into a fill. I went through three different fits. Trying to just get very comfortable in it. So I'm, I'm writing it every day. I'm going, you know, weeks at a time I go get a fit and then I get another fit and I ride and get another fit. And finally it all starts coming together and it, it, it's not easy on gravel. It's, it's not easy at all, as we all know, but it was, it's funny trying to. Me to shift before I go up. And then how am I managed to go down properly without crashing and, and just, it was an amazing. Transformation. It just was, everybody thinks you'd jump on the bike. And yeah, I just jumped on the bike from Walmart and rode. I just absolutely rode. I got on the rock hopper and I just rode. And then all of a sudden, I'm now leaning forward and I've got gears to manage and I've got gravel to manage and all of this comes together where it takes a while before you can technically maneuver with, you know, any kind of efficiency. [00:15:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Did you, did you see some immediate performance benefits on being on that bike versus the heavier mountain bike? [00:16:02] Mark Allen: Oh, yeah. It the, the street that I would ride on EV every night had a lot of gravel cyclists on him. I could never stay up with them. I mean, I never, I couldn't even get near 'em. So, you know, we would all start out together and I'd be the one in one behind. So, yeah, it was it's, it's amazing. The difference in. Performance that you get with it. And that bike has been phenomenal. It's it's, it's amazing. When, when you get your bike working good and you have confidence in your bike. It's just, you're unbeatable and you're unbeatable in the sense of the perception you have for yourself. You know, what, what you expect out of yourself, you're, you're meeting and surpassing your, your own expectation. I'm not worried about beating this guy or beating this guy. I'm worried about my perception. You know, what should I expect out myself? And when that bike is together, it's just, it's amazing. It's amazing. [00:16:54] Craig Dalton: Yeah. It sounds like in those months you were really feeling yourself and feeling just kind of great about the journey you've been on. Did you go back to Nathan and talk to him? And at what point did you see this sign on the wall that said Unbound and thought about doing that? [00:17:09] Mark Allen: it is pretty funny. It actually happened before I got the gravel bike. I said, would you coach me? If I get a gravel bike, if I go get this gravel bike, will you coach me? He says, yes, he'll coach me. I said, great. And I said, well, I've been looking at this sign this map on your wall for, you know, a bunch of time. Now, every time I'm in here with my son, I said, what is this? And he says, that's the Unbound 100. And I just laughed. I said, people ride a hundred miles around Emporia and I was like in the Hills and, and I love the Flint Hills and I know the Flint Hills, like the back of my hands. And I was like, why, why would you ride those Hills? How do you get up? 'em you know? And, and And he was, you know, laughing at me and, and, and I said, okay, I'm gonna get the bike and you're gonna coach me. He says, yeah. And I just, matter of fact, Lee looked at him and I said, I'm going to finish that in three years. And I'm so happy. He didn't laugh at me. I'm so happy. He just didn't start cracking up and go. You, you know, you're naive. You don't know what you're talking about. And I said, Nathan, you'll learn. You'll learn. You know, I'm I'm, if I say, I'm gonna do it, if I believe I'm gonna do it, then it's gonna happen. And so. It, it sounds a lot easier. I'm, I'm probably making it much more simpler than what I went through, but I made a promise to myself and I made a promise to him. If he coaches me and I follow him and he helps me that I'm gonna finish finish that. And I did. And it was incredible. Incredible. [00:18:31] Craig Dalton: Amazing. So when you had sign, did you sign up sort of for you raced obviously the 20, 22 event, how long before did you know you had gotten the slot? [00:18:41] Mark Allen: Oh a couple months. It was a couple months before that. So, you know, I was, I was just worried. I'm like, why would they pick me out of, you know, Thousands and thousands of people that are doing this, I'm like, why would they pick me? What was the, you know, and, and when they did, I was, Ugh, I was ecstatic. I was like, I can keep my word in Nathan now , you know, [00:19:00] Craig Dalton: Did you go through some special process because of the journey you're on. Was there like an application for, you know, someone who's doing something bold? [00:19:08] Mark Allen: It was a long application. I mean the, the actual physical application and, and I was like, I answered all the questions and I was like, why would they pick me? I was like, I hope they're some, somewhere on the application. I could tell my story a little bit. And there was a box that says, tell us a cool cycling story. And I was like, oh, I got one, you know, old, heavy guy that needs to get better grabs a bike and rides and fast forward, he's in the Unbound, you know? So. [00:19:34] Craig Dalton: So, so you've got Nathan in your corner, obviously advising you as to what to expect when you got to the start line, what was your confidence level? Like when you arrived at the start line, is it something you knew you could do? Or is it something that you're like, I'm gonna try my best. [00:19:49] Mark Allen: I knew if I could get to Madison in which Madison is the cutoff. If you don't get to Madison by one 30 they'll stop you on the, on the ride. And so I was very confident that if I got to Madison, I could finish. If I cannot have a mechanical, if I cannot have a flat tire. If, if the bike held together, I knew I could get 64 miles in that time. And I did the 64 miles to Madison in five hours. It was the fastest I'd ever written. I, it was pure adrenaline. It was pure. It was just I man, I'm in the, I'm in this thing. Let's go now. And I was highly confident that I was I was gonna get there and I was what was looming over me was a little bit of the declines. But also I'm every mile somebody had a flat tire every mile. It was just flat tire after flat tire after flat tire. And I was like, please, no, please. No, so. [00:20:48] Craig Dalton: Going back to the start line. I mean, what did you feel like you're surrounded by a thousand people or what, whatever the number was starting, the Unbound 100. Were you intimidated? I'm assuming you hadn't done a lot of group riding to that scale? I. [00:21:02] Mark Allen: Not to that scale. I had done a two years worth of rides, two years worth of rides. But nothing ever to that scale I was in awe. I was just awe struck. I just kept looking around at all these people. Feeling that I didn't believe belong there still that I was like, how in the heck am I in this thing? I was just like, wow, this is awesome. And I was ready to go. It was about the best way to say it. I'm not, I, I was just, let's go. I'm I've worked three years for this. Let's go. But still didn't believe I belonged. There still didn't believe that I was in the middle of this. It was very surreal left the start line and couldn't quit smiling. Through Emporia. [00:21:43] Craig Dalton: Yeah. You know, I think for anybody who hasn't done an event, there is an electricity you feel at the start line. And that can go a long way. I mean, if you're leaning in and really enjoying that experience, like the miles just sort of fall behind you because you're, you're part of this thing. That's bigger than yourself. [00:22:00] Mark Allen: Yeah. And that's absolutely, that's absolutely what it was. It was just. It, it's hard to put in words, the experience of starting it was wow. I mean, two to three minutes to get people out of the, across the finish or the start line. I , it was cool. [00:22:20] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think that's always the funny thing you hear the, the cannon go off and then you look around and no one around you is moving for a few minutes. [00:22:28] Mark Allen: Yeah. Yep. [00:22:29] Craig Dalton: When, when you're rolling out in those, you know, say the first 25 miles, when I assume that that the pack is still pretty thick, was that challenging for you to kind of be around all those riders? [00:22:39] Mark Allen: Yes, because it would. I usually end up in the middle of a race and at a start of a race of a, you know, the smaller races that I do. I mean, peop their separation happens very quickly. So you have the, the first 25% they get gone, they get outta everybody's way. And then you have me the 20 to 75% fall in that line, you know, we're we talk, , you know, we draft, we ride, we enjoy ourselves and we all have our goals for the day and we're trying to achieve our goals. That's not a big pack. And a lot of the time I end up solo, I just end up solo on these races. So, being, I had to be much more aware of what was going on around me. I had to understand If the person in front of me is struggling a little bit it, it is just a lot more, lot more going on. Your head had to be in it more than I've ever experienced before. So two there's tons of stuff going on. [00:23:34] Craig Dalton: Yeah, yeah. A hundred percent. And I think, you know, oftentimes you're, you're pushed into a line that maybe you wouldn't have selected if you were out there on your own. And I imagine that's where a lot of the flat tires happen because people just get forced into riding through a little bit more Rocky section. They, then they would've selected. But when there's a dozen people around you, you can't just go swerving, picking the best. [00:23:54] Mark Allen: Yeah there abso absolutely what happened. There was a lot of people that went through areas that they probably normally wouldn't gone through. One of the things that I noticed was yes, people were riding over Flint rock. That I was like, don't do that. I was like, do not ride over that Flint rock. And there were scenarios where they were stuck and, and at any point in time we were all stuck. I was stuck on one climb. Where the person in front of me was slowed down to the point where I had to come outta my come outta my pedals to keep my balance because they just they're and I couldn't go right. And I couldn't go left. And I, if I kept going, I was gonna hit them. And, and so it puts you in positions that you've never. Been in experience that you've ever been in before. And so you've gotta figure it out on the fly and, and that's probably the first 25 miles. My biggest handicap in that first 25 miles is I was like, now, what do I do? I, you know, usually I can just swing right. Swing left. I could stop. I could go. I could, I had so much more freedom in my other races. This one you were sometimes just stuck. I mean, you were just stuck with what you were. [00:24:58] Craig Dalton: Yep. Yeah. And I think having the patience, cuz oftentimes when you're impatient, you make a bad decision. Like, oh, I think I can float over those Flint rocks and that's never gonna end well for you. [00:25:08] Mark Allen: Yeah. And a lot of people did. And I was like you know, Nathan kept telling me your native knowledge of writing all these roads or is gonna pay off. And after a while I was like, stop writing over that folks. I was telling people don't do that. Come here. [00:25:20] Craig Dalton: Local knowledge. I love it. One of the other things, you know, in talking to a bunch of people who have participated in Unbound this year was, was the mud. And I've spoken more towards people who were doing the 200. And I know the professional athletes given their pace, experienced something different than the mid pack athletes did along the way. Did the mud come into play in the hunter mile race for. [00:25:43] Mark Allen: Oh, it did. There was, I think two miles of it was unbelievable mud. The bigger, the bigger. Issue was the thunderstorm previous to that. So I'm gonna answer your question about the mud, but I definitely wanna talk about the thunderstorm because that was unbelievable. Yet I had been in one other race on the Flint Hills gravel ride, where they had about two miles of mud and it was. Probably the second race I'd ever been in. And of course I ride into it and my bike becomes stuck. I become stuck. I'm completely coated in mud. My bike's coated in mud and, and then it dawns on me and I was like, oh, that paint stick that that guy had in his Jersey. That's what this is for because I was like, why does this guy have a paint stick? Why does he have a paint stick? And I'm like, now I know why. So, I was able to get out of the mud and. Worked my way through the mud. And, and it really hurt my time because I spent, I don't know how much time trying to get the mud off my bike with my fingers and tearing blue stem grass out of the Prairie to, and using that of sticks. And so, not a lot of experience, but I knew better to then to ride into it. So when I got to the mud, I stopped and I watched what everybody was doing. I was just looking to see. Who was writing, who was not writing, where were they walking? And I was like, a lot of people were walking out of the road in the grass and that's to me a Nono because you now have mud and you now have grass and it just will continue to build up. And I started watching where the water was running down the street or down the road in the minimum maintenance road. And if water is running downhill, it's running on the Flint rocks. And so you're not in the mud and. A great thing. Being as big as me is that I could pick a carbon fiber bike up with one hand, like it's nothing. And I literally picked it up and I put it on my helmet. I literally straddled my bike on my helmet. I found where the water was running down the road where it's just Flint rock. And I walked it and I walked that two miles with the bike on with my bike on my helmet and my holding it in my right arm and using my left arm to keep my balance. While a lot of people were walking in the mud and trying to ride the bike in the. Ruts. And, and so what I was very, I was tired. I mean, I was absolutely tired carrying a bike two miles, but when it was time to get out of that, I set my bike down and I looked up my cleats and I kind of clicked my cleats a couple times and jumped on my bike and was gone. So, again, some of the native, native knowledge of what to do in mud helped but it was, it was It slowed me down. I mean, my first 64, my first 64 miles were five hours. My next 40 miles were four hours. So, the mud really put a damper on I wanted to finish in eight hours and I finished in nine and, and I would, the mud did definitely contributed to that. [00:28:32] Craig Dalton: Yeah. It's such a shame when you've got an ambitious goal to have forward progress halted in the way that that two miles of mud did for y'all. Yeah. [00:28:40] Mark Allen: It did it did, but it's part, it is part of it. It's it's awesome. It's just part of it, you know, [00:28:46] Craig Dalton: Yeah. You, yeah. 20, 22 is just gonna be another one of these kind of unique adventures that Unbound offers riders. [00:28:54] Mark Allen: yes. [00:28:55] Craig Dalton: So tell me about that thunderstorm. [00:28:57] Mark Allen: I had been watching the weather all week and I was like, wow, I think we're gonna get outta this thing without, without rain. And as we were approaching Madison, as I knew I was gonna make it to Madison, I was just so happy. I was just like, man, I'm going, I now know I'm gonna finish this thing. And then it started raining. I'd have to say five miles out of Madison, four or five miles out of Madison and really raining. And then it turned into a full on. Kansas thunderstorm where the rain comes from all directions. I'm not just not down. I'm saying from the east, the north, the west, the south it was coming from all directions and my glasses are fogging up. The rain's dripping from my helmet into the back of my glasses. So it's rolling right into my eyes. The roads aren't bad going into Madison, they've been pretty dry and they're still not bad going into Madison, but by the time we hit Madison, it. Madison was soaked. The roads had a couple feet of water you know, where the, the goalies were going across road and it was pouring. I mean, it was all my nutrition and my saddle bag was soaked. So like my my, my peanut butter my Uncrustables, I love reading Uncrustables when I ride and, and my. all that was just soaked. So I had water log nutrition. In my kit, I had, you know, the goose and the, the honey stingers and all that stuff in my kit, but everything was soaked. I mean, just absolutely soaked. And I was hoping it would pass over pretty quickly and it did not pass over. I think for the next 20 miles outta ma outta Madison, it was raining in some function. I mean, you come outta Madison little bit of a ride. You get into the mud. The mud is even worse than what was probably planned because of the thunderstorm you get out of the mud. And you're still just absolutely inundated by this thunderstorm. So my back 40 was affected by the mud. But I think it was more affected by the thunderstorm, just due to the fact of it was just never, you can't train for that. You just never write in anything like that. So it was a. [00:30:58] Craig Dalton: It's just like 15% harder than you imagined all of a sudden. How did you, how was your, how was your spirit after Madison? I mean, you're, you're going slow. You're getting hammered by the rain. Are you still thinking like I got this or did, did, did doubt start to creep in. [00:31:12] Mark Allen: I got outta Madison. Well, as I was coming into Madison, I, my left calf, the front of my left calf started tightening up. It felt like it was tightening up. And I was like, okay I'm getting poured on. I've made good time. I'm happy. But then all of a sudden I've got this stinger going on below my left knee and I'm like, okay, I'll get to Madison. I'll stretch it. By the time I get to Madison, it is pouring so much. All I wanna do is switch my nutrition out, fill up my camel back and I wanna get on my bike and get out of this thing. And hopefully I can write out of this a little. Did I know I couldn't I stretched my calf for a little bit and, and so I I've got. Stinger in the front of my left calf. I've never had this before I go into the mud. I walk two miles. The Stinger's there. I get on my bike. I'm riding, I'm still getting poured poured on. Excuse me, I'm still getting poured on. And now I've cut this sore muscle to the left of my tibia basically. And I'm like, okay, this is now an issue, you know? So, Thunderstorm rain and a little bit of a stinger going on in my leg. And I'm rubbing and I'm rubbing, I'm pedaling with my right leg, you know, I'm rubbing it. Okay. And I just, all three things kind of came together and I'm like, I don't care how much this hurts. I'm finishing. I am finishing period. And I knew I was off my eight hour mark. I knew I was off that. There was no way I was gonna make it up and I just powered through it and it hurt. I mean, It hurt. I still don't know what it was. I don't know why it was but it hurt. So those three things together kind of, is there doubts? Yeah, there was doubts. There was like, why now? , you know why now? But I just made my mind up. I was like, I, this is, I've done this way too long. To deal with this. And, and I just powered my way through it, you know, and I there's a lot of people that said, Hey, hop on, hop on, you know, you know, come with us. And I was just like, Hey, I'm doing this at my pace. I'm, I'm a little bit hurt right now. And I'm just gonna keep going. And so put those three, the weather together, and with a little bit of an injury, I was like I still determined, but yeah, it, it bothered me. [00:33:28] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah, I imagine. And so, as you, as you approach the finish line, when you're in those closing miles, what kind of thoughts were going through your head? [00:33:36] Mark Allen: Oh, man. I think when I saw the Emporia water tower, it was just exhilaration, but I was at that point it's like 90 or 95 miles out. It was exhaustion. It was, it was. And. what was great, was all the people along the entire route, cheering you, and every time you came upon somebody cheering you, that gives you a little bit of that adrenaline. And you come in Emporia and they trick you with one last climb up the backside of Emporia state that, you know, Highland road, I believe it is pretty, and it's a significant climb. It is it's a street, but it's a significant climb and you're like, oh, one more. And you come across the. you come across the campus and you come into the shoot and you're like, everybody's cheering. It's just like, like you see on TV, you know, like you, you see on all the everybody's cheering and you're just like, wow. Wow. I made it. So it's it's amazing. It's I, I had. I just amazing it was, could not believe I did it crossed the finish line and stood [00:34:39] Craig Dalton: Yeah, no, it's phenomenal. I mean, what a journey to get there, what a journey that race given the weather provided for you that made it a little extra tough. And it was like asking the question, mark, do you really have this in you? [00:34:54] Mark Allen: Yeah. It's and I think that was a great thing back about it. Now I can look back and say I was in 2022. I was in the thunderstorm. I was in the mud. It's a, it was a unique setting a unique set of circumstances. I was able to overcome 'em, you know, typically when you ride in Kansas, you're always dealing with the win. And so, you're mentally prepared for win when you ride in Kansas. Just never encountered in anything in three years of thunderstorm of that magnitude everybody was safe. There was never an issue of safety. It was. A heck of a rainstorm. I mean, it made the roads outside of the mud, even, you know, not great. So, and I was eating soggy UN Uncrustables so it was, that was not great either. so, so. [00:35:43] Craig Dalton: amazing. Well, this is great. I mean, I really enjoyed learning about your journey to the start line and even more excited to hear the journey to the finish line. Cause I, I do think it's a huge accomplishment and I'm always super stoked to meet people who set a big challenge for themselves and realize like, it really is just about continuing to turn the pedals. And if you. Belief in yourself and you put a little time into your training and energy. Many of us are capable of much more than we think we are. [00:36:11] Mark Allen: I, I completely agree. Where I was, was a successful entrepreneur, had an in, you know, incredible home life kind of looking at now what, you know, what what's next, you know, kids are moving out. Again, like I said, a little bit of medical issues trying to deal with those and, and it was cool finding my inner self, finding my true identity, finding you know, A lot about myself, even at 53 to be able to go, yeah, I still can do things. I still, you know, I'm more than just a husband. I'm more than just an entrepreneur. I'm mark, you know, and trying to understand who mark is and what mark is capable of. And it was, that was really the big journey and you know, the bike was the, the instrument along the way. So it was, it, it was really cool. [00:36:57] Craig Dalton: I love it. Will the bike continue to be part of your life? [00:37:01] Mark Allen: Oh yes. It's It absolutely is I've, I've taken about two weeks off and my body needed it. My brain needed it. I'm getting ready to get back on it again. Nathan has talked me into doing the 78 mile gravel worlds. So in August so, I'm going to attempt that next. But how in the future competitive wise, we'll see, I'll continue to do some races. The big thing is for me, is continuing getting on the bike, you know, you know, three, four times a week getting on the bike and riding because it's such a. It's great medicine, riding a bike is great medicine and that's really why I started. And I'm gonna con definitely continue with my medicine, which is riding a bike. And then we'll see, it takes me from there, you know, bike across Kansas interests me, which is going on right now. That interests me gravel worlds interest me. So, we'll see. But what I do know, I am getting on the bike pretty much every day because it is medicine. It's true. [00:38:01] Craig Dalton: I love it. And that's a great place to us for us, for us to end bikes, our medicine, mark. Thanks again for the time. Truly appreciate it. And congrats again on your journey. [00:38:11] Mark Allen: Thank you very much. [00:38:12] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Big, thanks to Mark Allen for sharing his story and huge congratulations to them. I think everybody listening can understand that was quite a journey. And it's quite a feat for anyone finishing one of these hundred mile plus. Gravel events. So kudos to mark. And thanks for the time. Thank you also to bike index for supporting the show. Remember go visit bike index.org to register your bike with this nonprofit, all their services are free. So there's no reason other than your time. To not jump on over there and register your bike. If you're able to support the show. Please visit, buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Separately ratings and reviews are hugely helpful. So very much appreciate anybody takes a moment out of their day to share their thoughts on the show. That's going to do it until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels.  

Scary Basement
The Babadook (2014)

Scary Basement

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 48:27


The manifestation of grief and the pressures of sudden single parenthood stalks Mikey and Roxy this week as The Babadook comes to stay in the Scary Basement. ----- The Babadook (2014) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2321549/ Stream on Shudder with a subscription https://www.shudder.com/play/3f4b2aab17cd0383 ----- Referenced This Episode Child's Play (1998) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0094862 This Is Us (2016-2022) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5555260 The Nightengale (2018) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4068576/ Mac Tonight Moonman Mac Tonight Commercial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5F64NuqO9o Ghostwriter (1992-1995) https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108787/ “Gooey Gus” Smucker's Uncrustables https://www.smuckersuncrustables.com/ ----- Hosted by Mikey McCollor and Roxy Polk Post-production and editing by Darryl Mott

This Is Rad!
Early 90s Live Action Disney Movies

This Is Rad!

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 124:03


This week Kyle and Matthew are joined by John Duarte for a chat about Disney's live action output from the early 90s. We only go mainline Disney so there are a few things missing but we go deep as we remember stuff we saw and vaguely remember along with things we've seen hundreds of times over the years. Some real nostalgia porn on this one. We also chat the proper way to eat an uncrushable and Burnside tries to explain TCGs.   Weekly Rads: Kyle – Stewart Lee albums on apple music Carpet Remnant World (comedy albums) Matthew – The promise of listening to The Smiles album (sense of yearning) John – Smucker's Uncrustables (food) and Gaspar Noe's Vortex (movie)   Send Us Stuff! We have a PO Box! This Is Rad! / Kyle Clark PO Box #198 2470 Stearns St Simi Valley, CA 93063   Tales from an Analog Future issue 1 (Early Access Edition) Get it HERE: https://gumroad.com/analogfuturecomic   Get Kyle's album "Absolute Terror" here: https://smarturl.it/absoluteterror     Go to www.Patreon.com/thisisrad and subscribe to send in questions for our Listener Questions episodes, to get exclusive bonus episodes, extra content, and access to the This Is Rad Discord server!   Check out our merch! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/this-is-rad      Also! Check out march for Kyle's record label Radland Records https://www.teepublic.com/t-shirt/4109261-radland-logo      Also! Laura started an online store for her art! Go buy all of her stuff!!! https://www.teepublic.com/stores/lmknight?utm_campaign=8178&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_source=lmknight   Follow us on social media or whatever! Instagram: @thisisradpodcast @kyleclarkisrad @lmknightart @8armedspidey (Frank Gillen TIR's social media!)  @thearcknight (techno lord Adam Cross)    Twitter: @ThisIsRadPod @kyleclarkisrad @MatthewBurnside @LMKnightArt   Tumblr: thisisradpod.tumblr.com http://www.thisisradpodcast.com Bonus Social Media! Kyle's Horror Podcast Everything is Scary with Jen Saunderson @podscary (Twitter) Kyle's Comic “Tales from an Analog Future” @analogfuturecomic (Instagram) Kyle's Record label Radland Records @radlandrecords (Instagram)    

Otakify Anime Podcast
Season 4 Episode 8: Uncrustables and How SAO Loses it's Focus

Otakify Anime Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 51:23


In this episode, we all catch up on all the current anime that we are watching...and uncrustables. If you guys are interested in contributing to a future podcast topic, make sure to contact us through IG or Twitter @otakify, or even feel free to email us a topic at otakifyreviews@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/otakify/support

Crisco, Dez & Ryan After Hours Podcast
Secrets: You swore you'd never turn into that person...

Crisco, Dez & Ryan After Hours Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 10:44


You swore you'd never turn into that person! "My mom was a yeller and I swore I'd never be a yeller, but they cycle continues!" "I turned into the lazy mom that serves UnCrustables' for lunch and have tablet time so I can get my stuff done." "Being a Minnesotan that's obsessed with weather talk. Never thought I'd be that person!"

Art Room on The Left
Burnout, Anxiety, & Uncrustables

Art Room on The Left

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 24:20


Thank you as always for listening. Please subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or Stitcher.Follow us on Instagram and Twitter at @ArtRoomOnLeft or email the show at ArtRoomOnLeft@gmail.comIntro and Outro music provided by the extremely talented Dana T, this song is titled 'NSA'.

Dilettante Ball
475 - Paranoid (Ty Dolla Sign song)

Dilettante Ball

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2022 22:01


What's crappening in this episode: Support us on Patreon (Now with Discord)! Pokemon Legends: Arceus, Boo Berry, Uncrustables, Grandma's Cookies, Let Sleeping Dogs Lie, Arnold Palmer, Nudetendo If you'd like to play along at home click here.

We Love No Other
S5 Ep15: Evaluating The Season Post-Michigan

We Love No Other

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 64:32


Robert, Tyler, and Carmen sit down in the kitchen to talk about the 13-3 (6-0) Illini, discuss how the Michigan State-Northwestern game might end, and eat Uncrustables.

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith
"We All Know Too Much About Nutrition."

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 36:47


“I think in general, we all know too much about nutrition. I say that as a dietitian. Even the most intuitive eating of kids will be a picky eater. And that’s fine. We don’t need to nutrition them out of that. There isn’t of a nutrient in broccoli or kale that they can’t get from something else, I promise.”Welcome to Burnt Toast! This is the podcast about about diet culture, fatphobia, parenting, and health. I’m Virginia Sole-Smith. I’m the author of The Eating Instinct and the forthcoming Fat Kid Phobia.Today’s guest is Amee Severson. Amee is co-author of How to Raise an Intuitive Eater with Sumner Brooks, RD. Amee is also a registered dietitian who specializes in eating disorder recovery, healing and preserving food/body relationships, and provides gender-inclusive and LGBTQ-affirming care.Amee joins us today to discuss their new book. We will be talking about feeding kids but also about doing your own work and why we need to forget everything we know about nutrition.If you enjoy this episode, please subscribe, rate and review us in your podcast player! And make sure you’re subscribed to the Burnt Toast newsletter for episode transcripts, reported essays, and so much more. (Here’s a 20% discount if you’d like to go paid!)Have a question or a topic you want us to tackle in a future episode? Post it as a comment on this episode of the newsletter or send it to virginiasolesmith@substack.com. Episode 26 TranscriptVirginiaI am so excited. I’ve interviewed you a few other times for articles and things, but it is always such a pleasure to chat with you.Today we are talking about your new book, How to Raise an Intuitive Eater. This is the book I’ve been dying to be able to hand to people. This is a resource we desperately need. I think a lot of people are expecting that they’re going to pick up this book and be told, “Step one to feed your child. Step two to feed your child.” Instead you spend the first 150 pages or so—really half the book—talking about parents. Why we as parents need to do our own work and how we can do that work. So, why start there? Especially because it is so hard, Amee. You’re making us do really hard work.AmeeI know. I wish I could make it easy and just have it be a complete step-by-step guide, but we would have been missing a lot.It’s not an uncommon question: Why make so much extra work in there? I remember when I was a kid, every woman in my family had super short hair. Over the age of like 35 or 40, everyone just cut their hair short. I had this assumption that you got old (because that was old to me when I was seven) and you cut your hair short. You didn’t have long hair when you were old. That’s ridiculous, you know? There’s just this assumption that this is what you do. And it was the same for dieting for my family. You reach teenage-hood and you joined Weight Watchers. You hated your body and you tried to lose weight. I just assumed that’s what you did as an adult. I know that I’m not alone because we see it everywhere. The way parents or caregivers talk about not just their body, but food in general. You don’t ever have to say anything explicitly to your child. You never have to say, “I think your body is wrong,” or “I think you’re eating wrong,” or “This is your fault.” If you are saying it to yourself, if you are living your life like that, your kids are tiny sponges who soak up all that and reflect it back in the world.VirginiaSomething I hear a lot from parents is, “My child is three or my child is thirteen and I’m now realizing I need to do this. And is it too late?” They’re wishing this was something they fixed about themselves before they became parents. Of course, we cannot go back to our pre-child selves and work on this. AmeeJust like with intuitive eating, it’s never too late to start working on it. I think at a certain point, it is probably more beneficial for your older teenage child to do their own work, as opposed to you having different rules or attitudes around food. It can feel so overwhelming to start, like, oh, I have to fix myself and master the first half of the book before I’m allowed to start trying to introduce these concepts to my kid. Especially when your kid is older, it can feel more urgent, too, like I need to do this now. I already screwed up so much. As a parent, I get that. You, as a parent or as a caregiver, are repairing your own relationship with food while continuing to foster your kids having a good relationship with food—those two things can happen concurrently. It can be very important, especially if your relationship with food isn’t what you want your kid to grow up with or if you get that sinking feeling that this is not what I want to see my kid doing in 20 years. Then doing it concurrently is important.VirginiaI think that’s reassuring, too, because it lets us know that we don’t have to fix it completely to do better for them. I hope people find that liberating. I know I do! I just think, okay, I don’t have to be getting an A+ on this, you know? I was trying to get dieting perfect for so long and now I have to get this perfect?AmeeYeah, there’s a lot of pressure to be the perfect parent all the time. Especially in this way I am so tired of, like “My kid eats kale, so they’re perfect.” My kid knows that kale goes to work with my husband. He puts it in a seafood case at work because it’s pretty, but we don’t eat it. And that’s totally fine! Because perfect parenting is a myth, I think. Sumner Brooks and I really emphasize throughout the book how faking it till you make it is totally okay. Having a lot of compassion for yourself for not having it all figured out and not being perfect is fine.VirginiaLet’s talk about your Three Keys concept. This is what you see as the building blocks of the feeding relationship. The first key is providing unconditional love and support for your child’s body. Am I right that this is often one of the hardest parts for folks?AmeeYeah, it definitely is. Partly because I think that it can be hard to recognize that we aren’t providing unconditional love and support for our kids. If someone is picking up this book, if someone’s listening to this podcast, if someone is looking up any sort of parenting advice online, they’re probably trying their damnedest to help their kid as much as possible. It’s not malicious, it’s none of that. They’re trying their best and hearing that we can be harming, for lack of a better word, our kids through setting expectations on their bodies or even praising bodies—any of that can be hard to hear. Like, oh crap I’m doing something wrong. We live in a society that has put conditional love and support on bodies and we want to change that, because one of the least important things about a person is what their body looks like or even what their body can do.VirginiaWhat is an example of when someone may think they’re providing that support, but they really aren’t? AmeeI think praise is a big one. Like, “You’re so pretty,” or “You’re so strong,” or “You’re so handsome.” It also can be subtle things. Something like, “are you sure you really want to wear that? You look really pretty. But are you sure you want to wear that?” It’s a lot of the buts, the “You’re doing really well at this thing, but your body is taking away from it.” And those are those unintentional jabs that build up over time.VirginiaI was just interviewing someone for my book and we were talking about athletics. Kids get told way, way, way too young that they don’t have “the body” for a particular sport, even if they love a sport. You might love running, but you don’t have a “runner’s body” or “You’re not tall enough to play basketball.” Even if you’re still putting your kid on the team or encouraging them to love that sport, you’re letting them know that they won’t be the best at it, and so that it’s somehow not worthwhile because of their body.Key number two is to implement a flexible and reliable feeding routine. This is something that you all articulated so well in the book that was really helpful for me. Often, we can either be very structured about meals or have zero structure and both can be really problematic. You said that what kids really need is to know they’re going to get enough food. The point of structure is to let them know that this is a need that will be met. I was like, oh, it’s not about trying to get the kid to eat on a certain schedule. It’s about reassuring that they are going to be fed. How did you come to that realization and why that is so important for parents to realize?AmeeOne of the reasons why it felt so important to talk about enough-ness is because of the central importance of enough-ness in all of nutrition. It’s not about what you’re eating or the timing of it, or anything. It’s just enough-ness, overall. It can feel really uncomfortable to say no, because that’s often how we’re told to do it as an adult for ourselves is if you want something, you eat it, regardless of when you want it, regardless of how you want it. That’s totally fine. Absolutely encourage that. Kids have very one track brains. They’re not quite as prefrontal cortex-developed as we are as adults. It can be harder for them to recognize, like truly recognize, that if I’m hungry and I don’t eat now, I will get enough food later. Especially if there has been a time where they were maybe presented with food, like a dinner for example, that they didn’t want to eat. It’s a lot of food, maybe on a plate, that they don’t enjoy. They’re going to probably leave the table hungry. And the same with snacks, the same with lunches, breakfast, all of it. If they’re not given enough and given the option to have enough, they develop the sense of okay, I need to get it when I can. And we want to make sure that they know that if you don’t eat all your lunch, that’s fine. And you can have more when you get home. I have an elementary school kid. And elementary school lunches are a whole thing where they only get like 10 minutes to eat food. My kid is a very slow eater. So I know she never finishes her whole meal. So she comes home hungry. We’ve fallen into the routine that she gets  another lunch when she comes home from school. Because otherwise she’s hungry. We want her to know that like, okay, you don’t have to feel sad or upset that you didn’t finish your lunch. You don’t need to feel chaotic when you come home and just go for whatever food is available. You can make yourself some mac and cheese, or we can. She’s figured out the microwave and it’s beautiful. So she can do more.VirginiaWe love that. Yeah, my eight year old has the toaster and the microwave down now.AmeeSame! It’s beautiful. It’s a lovely day as a parent when that happens.One other thing that comes up in that space is if we’re about to have dinner and she’s hungry, I will say “No, we’re not gonna have a snack right now because I want you to eat dinner. It will come and it’s food that you like. There will always be one part of it that you will eat. So I want you to be hungry for that.” It’s normal to be hungry leading up to a meal and there will be enough food for you to eat. My seven year old does not understand that whole sentence, but her brain will conceptualize and understand if we do it again and again. And that’s the goal.VirginiaYes, that’s helpful. I think you’ve just articulated this thing that parents struggle with. There are times when kids want to eat a lot of food and it’s not, in our brains, a time to eat. We think you had lunch at school but now you’re coming home starving. But you’re compensating for a lack, where she’s not getting enough time to eat her lunch at school. Versus, it’s 20 minutes to dinner and I’m not creating a lack by saying no at this point. Your enough-ness will be achieved very shortly, I’m just helping you understand 20 minutes. When you’re saying no, are you saying no in a way that’s restrictive or supportive? AmeeThat phrase right there—restrictive or supportive—is a conversation Sumner and I had a lot as we wrote this book. How can we phrase this in a way that is supportive and not restrictive? VirginiaYes. That’s a helpful phrase for us all to keep in our hearts and come back to in those moments when there’s a request for food that’s catching you off guard. And then the third key is to develop and use your intuitive eating voice. What is my Intuitive Eating voice, Amee? AmeeIt’s the voice that tells us we are hungry, we want food, that we don’t really want to eat this food tonight, but we want to eat that one. It’s I want to move my body today because I feel like I’ve got energy. It’s I don’t have energy and I think I need to take a nap. We are all born with that voice, all of us are, and sometimes we shut it down. Sometimes we’re just raised and in this culture that is not allowing us to foster that, not allowing us to hold on to that and to trust it. So, by developing and using that intuitive eating voice, we get the chance to pull it out of hiding and keep it from being lost. By doing that as a caregiver, as a parent, we show how safe it is, how okay it is to do that. We get to be the home base forever, for these kids. Like, this is what my my family did and it was fine. This is what I learned is safe and okay. We can really allow that space to be held for ourselves. For our kids, it looks like not letting this thing that is really cool and really important fade away and be locked in a deep dark corner of our brain. Because it’s a really cool space where we get to trust our bodies.VirginiaI’m almost tearing up as you talk about that because it’s really such an honor to be able to do that for our kids. It’s a privilege that we can be that space for our kids. So, you take us through these three keys and then we start to talk about nutrition. I love how late in the book nutrition comes because all too often this is where the conversation starts and stops, right? Why do you think it’s so important to shift the focus off nutrition? When is there a place for nutrition in the conversation?AmeeI think in general, we all know too much about nutrition. I say that as a dietician. 90% of the work that I do is un-teaching nutrition to people because there’s so much that’s contradicting itself or so overblown. How the heck are you supposed to navigate all of that? The last thing Sumner and I want to do is throw on even more rules. The rules are not the point. We didn’t want to make it the main focus of the book because it’s not the main focus of intuitive eating. It’s not the main focus of raising kids. If you are shoving vegetables on your kid, they’re not gonna eat it. My kid ate a bite of a carrot last night. That was it. Her vegetable for the day was a single bite of a carrot. And that was fine. I was glad she ate a bite of the carrot because they were good. Because when we obsess about nutrition—did you eat enough vegetables, did you eat enough fruit, protein, fat—we take away from that intuitive eating voice. We take away from that instinct that it’s okay to eat food. It’s okay to to not like things. It’s normal to have a picky kid. It’s not a screw up on parents part. it’s not a broken thing within your kid. Even the most intuitive eating of kids will be a picky eater, and that’s fine. We don’t need to nutrition them out of that. There isn’t of a nutrient in broccoli or kale that they can’t get from something else, I promise. We can expose our kids to these things, expose them to us as parents, normally eating food andtaking the pressure off of ourselves and off of them to find the most important thing that we could possibly eat on our plate is the brussel sprout. It’s just a piece of food, same as this chicken, same as this french fry. I don’t need to fight with you about this one. I’m allowed to not like this and I’m allowed to try it. That comes up, too, how many exposures it takes for a kid to be willing to try a food, to be willing to accept a food. It’s a lot, like 18 to 20 exposures, which is just looking at the food existing.VirginiaRight, without pressure to eat it. I think so often people hear that exposure number and think that means they have to push it on their kid 18 to 20 times. They just need to be in a room with it.AmeeYeah, It’s like sparkling water, like if the essence of it exists in a room with you.VirginiaIt’s the Lacroix of vegetables. Just a waft. Check, we got another exposure down. The hyper focus on nutrition and the anxiety parents have about nutrition so often gets in the way of the meal being relaxed, fun, maybe you have a conversation you enjoy with your child. All of that gets lost, right? We’re not getting that opportunity for food as connection and food as comfort. AmeeYeah, when it turns into a food fight at the table, like just eat this food, it takes takes the focus away from a time where we can hang out or just be together. My daughter, she’s almost eight and she goes in and out of more picky periods, but she’s also a kid and her tastes do not line up with that of mine and my husband’s. I like really spicy curry. She does not, to my great disappointment, like really spicy curry. So if I’m going to make curry, I don’t expect her to eat it. I don’t even really expect to present it to her because she knows what it is. She isn’t gonna touch it. But I know she’ll eat some of the dino nuggets I keep in the freezer. So she can have that and some white rice and she’ll eat one of those things.The other night we had fish tacos, again spicy and fish, two big no-no’s. So, we made her a quesadilla because we figured she would eat a quesadilla. It did not land that night. I don’t know why, could not figure it out. But it was not the ticket. And she was visibly really sad. She ate a couple bites and was like, “I’m full.” And we were like, “No, you’re not, like, we know you’re not full. What’s wrong?” Just very quietly, she was like, “I just don’t like this tonight.” And we’re like, “Oh, just go get something else then. You can make yourself a sandwich or have some mac and cheese.” Like, “Eat food, please.” She got up and made herself an easy mac. It was beautiful.VirginiaYes, that’s awesome. It does get easier when they can use the microwave themselves so you’re not the one having to get up and make the whole second meal. That’s the tension, right? Is all the labor that goes into that. AmeeThe food she can make herself, she can switch out a dinner for. That’s the rule.VirginiaThat’s a great rule. That’s a great way to put it.AmeeAnd we always, always have some foods that–well, there’s a really weird Uncrustables shortage right now. It’s very sad, actually, because it makes lunches a lot harder to pack. But, even before she could use a microwave, we would have Uncrustables in the freezer, and she would just pull those out and eat those. Or a bowl of cereal, which is totally fine, too.VirginiaI think folks are gonna find this deeply reassuring. I want to talk a little more about the nutrition piece. I liked how you said that you do a lot of un-teaching in your work because I think a big problem is we’ve absorbed so much of this nutrition knowledge and accumulated it so intensively over the years. Is there a way to incorporate nutrition in a more useful way into your life? Or is it a matter of just letting a lot of that information go? AmeeYeah. I think there is a little bit of case-by-case for that because there is some nutrition information out there that is really valuable for some people, given their circumstances in life or what’s happening for them. And some of that same information is really not useful for anyone else. For example, my partner is diabetic. He needs to count carbs because he needs to dose insulin. If he doesn’t, It could be bad. I however, don’t need to count carbs. Neither does my kid. The only reason my kid is learning any carb ratios at all is for “Daddy has low blood sugar. Can you please go get him a soda?” She did absolutely bring him a Diet Coke one time.VirginiaLove the effort but…AmeeSo, we’re learning this one has carbs so we need you to bring this one to Daddy. But so many of those little specific nutrition like tidbits can be really important for one person but really unimportant for another. We are in such like a black and white society that if this thing is important for one, we assume it’s important for all. If this thing is unhealthy for one person, we assume it’s unhealthy for all, but that’s not true. We can pick and choose what is important and for the most part, we also get to pick and choose that forever. For example, I like to use my husband’s example. He doesn’t drink sugar sodas, for example, because he didn’t drink them growing up and he doesn’t think it’s worth his insulin. But Fritos and queso, like Fritos scoops and the crappy Fritos queso, is his jam. He will eat an entire bag in 30 minutes. That’s one of his Christmas presents every year. That’s worth his insulin.There are a few exceptions to that, like allergies is one. But for the most part, we get to pick and choose when it’s important and when it’s not. We don’t have to cut anything out ever. If it will kill you, then maybe. But for the most part, we don’t have to. If we are interested in or willing to do the work to unpack our own internal diet culture beliefs, internal fatphobia, and the way we externalize that as well, then we really get to pick it apart, which is a lot of work and sometimes not the most fun work. But that’s what leads to having a better relationship with all of this. I find most of the work we do around nutrition is unpacking what’s not important.VirginiaThat’s a really empowering way to frame it. I think people think they don’t get to choose. Nutrition is given to them as the set of cardinal rules they have to follow instead of something you can filter through your own life and your own context.I really love that you call the last chapter of the book “what to do when this feels harder than you thought.” I do not want to give away the ending of the book. There’s so much more in this book than Amee and I have talked about—you need to read the whole thing. But I do think when people are working on divesting from diet culture and fatphobia it just feels so hard some days. You hit these brick walls and you don’t know where to go. Then you end up worrying that what you did caused more harm because you’re trying to reduce harm. So what do we do when we hit those brick walls? AmeeI think accepting, believing, expecting that we will hit a wall at some point. There’s always a wall, whether it’s exhaustion or just confusion or frustration because we all have limits. We don’t have to be ready for every circumstance that’s gonna come our way. And we can have a lot of compassion for ourself in that space. I expect it to be hard. I haven’t met a single person that’s like, “Oh, my God, that was the easiest thing I’ve ever done.” Most people come to me, as a clinician, and are like, this is so much harder than I thought it would be. It is challenging. And it is for our kids, too. The longer we’ve been stuck in our own diet culture mindset, the harder it can be to encourage our kids to re-trust this space. It can feel really frustrating and hard and that’s okay. I think self compassion is probably the most important thing we can hold.In our house we have a lot of conversations about how we’re not going to have any more candy right now. We’re gonna save this candy for later and you can have more tomorrow. Or no, you don’t get to eat more Halloween candy before bed because you just brushed your teeth and I’m tired. You’re going to bed and you can have more tomorrow.VirginiaI had a cool moment with my four year old recently. We had popcorn and we hadn’t had popcorn in the house for a while because my kids are really messy with popcorn so I stopped buying it for a few months. Then I was like, Oh, they love popcorn, I should get popcorn again. And the first day we had it, my four year old wanted only popcorn. At dinner she was having a plate of popcorn. And then she wanted another plate of popcorn and another plate of popcorn and I could see Dan, my husband, getting a little tense. Like, are we gonna watch her eat a whole bag of popcorn? Is that okay? I knew that it was just because it was new and we hadn’t had popcorn for a while and she loves it and she was really happy to have it. I said to her, “Just so you know, I want you to have as much as you want with dinner. We can also, if you’re getting full, save your plate and have this popcorn with breakfast tomorrow.” Immediately her posture changed and she was like, “Oh, oh yeah, I’m full.” and gave me the plate and we put it aside for breakfast and she ate it for breakfast the next morning. And it was clearly that she was just like, “I better eat all the popcorn right now because I don’t know when I’ll have it again.” As soon as I explained that it’s here in the house now and we’ll have it again, she was like, “Oh, Okay, got it.” That was very cool to watch happen  in real time with her.AmeeYeah, once you see your kids start to do it, it’s really cool. We had a similar experience with a chocolate orange, those ones you whack on the table and they break apart. That fun, interactive food is really exciting for my kid right now. We found one at Trader Joe’s and she was so excited about it, and we bought it. She ate that first one within a few days. Then we went back to Trader Joe’s a couple days later and there was another one. So we got it. It’s been like a week and a half and it’s still sitting in the cupboard and she keeps forgetting it exists because it’s just not exciting anymore.Butter For Your Burnt ToastAmeeWe are currently watching—we’re late to the game—Succession. That is what we spend our nights doing. I’m very invested in all these people that I really hate so if you want to hate watch something…VirginiaIf you have not read it yet, the New Yorker profile of Jeremy Strong is a fascinating and hilarious read. Definitely check it out.It turns out he is just as horrible as Kendall Roy is. He’s not actually acting at all. At times I even found it a little triggering because I find all the men on Succession a little triggering. I was like, “Oh, God, he’s like so many like, boys I had crushes on in high school who turned out to be these theater jerks.”AmeeThat’s the whole reason we stopped watching House of Cards after one season. We’re like, this is too close to home. We have to stop.VirginiaExactly. Okay, my recommendation is also something to watch. It is a movie I watched recently. As folks know, I do a monthly movie club with my siblings. My siblings are significantly younger and cooler than me, so we each take turns picking movies and my movie is always a terrible pick and then they all pick these amazing things. This was my brother-in-law’s pick, actually, it’s called The Sound of Metal. It is a really moving film about a musician. He’s a drummer in a heavy metal band and he loses his hearing overnight. He goes completely deaf and you never really find out why he loses it. But you watch him coming to terms with being deaf. It’s also a powerful story about addiction. He’s in recovery and you see his quest to get his hearing back almost as like a form of relapsing. It’s just a beautiful movie, it takes you into the deaf community. It’s very thought-provoking about addiction, mental health, and disability and it’s beautifully shot and acted. So Amy, thank you so much for joining us. This was such a great conversation. The book is How to Raise an Intuitive Eater. Tell folks where they can find more of your work.AmeeMy website for my professional work is Prosper Nutrition Wellness. I’m based in Washington State. You can find me on Instagram or Twitter at Amee Severson. Thanks so much for listening to Burnt Toast! If you’d like to support the show, please subscribe for free in your podcast player and tell a friend about this episode. Or consider a paid subscription to the Burnt Toast Newsletter. It’s on sale this month for just $4 per month or $40 for the year. You get a ton of cool perks and you keep this an ad- and sponsor-free space. The Burnt Toast Podcast is produced and hosted by me, Virginia Sole-Smith. You can follow me on Instagram or Twitter.Burnt Toast transcripts and essays are edited and formatted by Corinne Fay, who runs @SellTradePlus, an Instagram account where you can buy and sell plus size clothing.The Burnt Toast logo is by Deanna Lowe.Our theme music is by Jeff Bailey and Chris Maxwell.Tommy Harron is our audio engineer.Thanks for listening and for supporting independent anti diet journalism! This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit virginiasolesmith.substack.com/subscribe

Let's Talk About Snacks
Unfindables

Let's Talk About Snacks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 33:26


This week the gang gabs about goo, learns about a new cereal, and has some concerns about an edgy new line of chips! Support this podcast at https://www.patreon.com/LetsTalkAboutSnacks  -- Snack News: J.M. Smucker investing $1.1 billion in new Uncrustables plan: https://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/20080-jm-smucker-investing-11-billion-in-new-uncrustables-plant General Mills Introduces New CinnaGraham Toast Crunch: https://www.chewboom.com/2021/11/17/general-mills-introduces-new-cinnagraham-toast-crunch/  Are The New 'Illegal' Chips Actually Made With Illegal Ingredients?: https://www.mashed.com/662515/are-the-new-illegal-chips-actually-made-with-illegal-ingredients/  Locate Lauren on Twitter (@rawrglicious) and check out her Onlyfans! Find Conrad on Twitter (@ConradZimmerman) and peruse his other projects on this Linktree thing. Linda can be located on Twitter (@guzzlinseltzer) and Instagram (@shoresofpluto). You can find her poetry journal at Impostor Lit. Logo by Cosmignon! See more of her cool art at https://www.cosmignon.info/ Music by Michael "Skitch" Schiciano. Hear more of his work at https://skitch.bandcamp.com/

Not To Be Technical
24: Thanksgiving, Hypothetical Car Issues & Insane Black Friday Data

Not To Be Technical

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 76:32


The guys are finally all back together, just in time for Thanksgiving. We go through some trending tech and some interesting stats for Thanksgiving and Black Friday, but firstCharlie is back from vacation and we find out how the hell he is (1:00)The Uber of Car Rentals, Turo, is discussed, which includes a hypothetical, disastrous use case with a Lamborghini (2:35)Nafis shares a hypothetical story where he damaged a car he rented in the parking lot of a Starbucks (14:15)Poll results from people who sit vs stand when wiping (17:12)Fat Charlie Content?!?!?!?  (21:40)Shopping Organic vs Non Organic Products (we find out Charlie and Gary hate organic peanut butter with a passion) (26:25)With the chip shortages going on, Samsung will announce building a massive ~$17 billion chipmaking plant in Taylor, TX, today potentially (29:48)Apple's aggressive new timeline for Project Titan, their fully driverless electric vehicle they want to release by 2025. (32:55)JPMorgan's $162m lawsuit against Tesla, and Elon Musk threatened to give them a one-star review on Yelp if they go through with it. (38:53)Discussing if we ever leave Yelp/Google Reviews and how we suggest analyzing reviews online (41:00)YouTube's removal of the dislike functionality & count and we try to understand the unique way Gary finds the right videos on YouTube based only on like to dislike ratio (45:17)J.M. Smucker building a $1.1B plant to produce more Uncrustables, since they did $365m in sales this year (55:15)Gary gives us a peek into his list of pet peeves, including fitted bedsheet issues (57:39)The guys have the most exciting, impressive, latest data and projections on  Thanksgiving, Black Friday and Cyber Monday shopping this year from the least surprising article ever (1:00:39)A lil bidet talk with the boys (1:10:30)What we're grateful for (1:14:02)Support The Podcast:Instagram - Follow UsTwitter - Follow UsApple Podcasts - Listen,  Subscribe and RateSpotify - Listen & Follow

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #481 - Sons of Steel Magnolias

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 173:58


Trick or Treat Radio, podcast and men of peace, are trapped by a fascist government and accidentally transported into the future to witness the results of nuclear devastation. Their grim discovery that they are directly responsible leads them to travel back from the future to save mankind from destruction. On Episode 481 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss the Ozploitation cult classic film Sons of Steel from director Gary L. Keady! We also talk about the upcoming 2 hour Veggie Masher commercial, some of our favorite cult classic films, musicals?! So grab your leather pants, avoid nuclear destruction, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: RIP Rock and Shock, MonstahXpo, that's not a city that's a marina, hanging and banging, Rough House Publishing, MZ and his “friends”, Ravenshadow's superstitions, Penny Dreadful, defrosting Uncrustables, Steel Magnolias, Conor Sweeney, Veggie Masher, Astron-6, In The Earth, Talk Without Rhythm, FriGay the 13th, Swearwolves, Pick Me Podcast, New Guest November, Radio Silence, Scream franchise, Ready or Not, living in a movie, VoyeurDorm, Ravenshadow getting a new doctor, boutique releases, Code Red, Vinegar Syndrome, Synapse, Severin, Grindhouse Releasing, Miami Connection, John Carpenter, Ozploitation, Black Alice, AC/DC, Lobo, Jim Van Bebber, My Sweet Satan, Fire and Ice, Heavy Metal Yahoo Serious, Lucker the Necrophagus, Post Apocalyptic setting, Rocky Horror Picture Show, Cabaret, Sweeney Todd, Repo! The Genetic Opera, 90 minute long music videos, Motley Crue, Krokus, Road Warrior, LOL out loud, Paul Bettany, mini me, Max Headroom, Lawnmower Man, Gary L. Keady, Stanley Kubrick, 80s style being recycled, wearing a bandana to hide your hairline, Tammy and the T-Rex, Australian Linnea Quigley, Oscar, Sylvester Stallone, Tim Curry, Quentin Tarantino, rissole and vegemite, tasty pasty, a strong hit of nostalgia, looks cheap and feels cheap, Nothing But A Good Time, balding Bret Michaels, Brother Eye, Trick or Treat Radio Pantheon, Manborg, Gun Woman, Raiders of Atlantis, Morgan Freeman Masturbation Sessions, Forbidden Zone, Richard Elfman, Future Kill, Danny Elfman, H.R. Giger, Shutter, Shudder, The Medium, V/H/S/94, Help with Odin's Medical Bills, Psycho Patrick, Sugar Hill, opinions are like…, Creepshow, Resident Evil Village, Frankenstein' Army, The Last Broadcast, smelling toast, and evacuated or evicted?Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/ETE79ZkSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradio)

Let's Talk About Snacks
The Edge of Salmonella Danger

Let's Talk About Snacks

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 46:08


This week the gang bakes some cookies, discusses several uses for dehydrated marshmallows, and wonders if the kids on TikTok are alright! Support this podcast at https://www.patreon.com/LetsTalkAboutSnacks  -- Snack News: Workers at all of Kellogg's U.S. cereal plants go on strike: https://apnews.com/article/kelloggs-cereal-plants-strike-d9185eb8fa9054d34a078063c3db6c33  Hey Tampa Bay, where are our Uncrustables? And other snacks gone AWOL: https://www.tampabay.com/news/business/2021/10/06/but-where-are-my-uncrustables-and-other-snacks-gone-awol-in-the-pandemic/?outputType=amp TikTok's new favorite snack food is ... dipping raw onions in pasta sauce?: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/tiktoks-favorite-snack-food-dipping-195822625.html  Thin Mint chocolate covered pretzels are a craze thing now: https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/people-freaking-over-girl-scouts-162300879.html  Frozen honey is TikTok's trendiest summer treat — but can it make you sick?: https://www.today.com/food/how-make-frozen-honey-viral-tiktok-trend-today-t226803  Wendy's Made Their Chocolate Frosty into a Cereal: https://www.foodandwine.com/news/wendys-frosty-cereal Burger King Is Testing Out Plant-Based Nuggets And We Can't Wait To Try: https://www.delish.com/food-news/a37884043/burger-king-plant-based-nuggets/ Locate Lauren on Twitter (@rawrglicious) and check out her Onlyfans! Find Conrad on Twitter (@ConradZimmerman) and peruse his other projects on this Linktree thing. Linda can be located on Twitter (@guzzlinseltzer) and Instagram (@shoresofpluto). You can find her poetry journal at Impostor Lit. Logo by Cosmignon! See more of her cool art at https://www.cosmignon.info/ Music by Michael "Skitch" Schiciano. Hear more of his work at https://skitch.bandcamp.com/

The Bestie Breakdown
S2 EP 13: Breaking Down Birth

The Bestie Breakdown

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 59:51


Buckle up for another fun episode from the Besties! This week, they are breaking down all things BIRTH! Erika and Shay are sharing their experiences with infertility, miscarriage, morning sickness, exercising, postpartum recovery, delivery, doctors, cravings (Uncrustables and Cheetos, anyone!?), mental health, breastfeeding and so much more! They're getting specific about vaginal deliveries and c-sections too. Every awkward moment is covered in today's episode. Grab some coffee and settle in with this girlfriend chat that just proves how each and every birth and pregnancy journey is different and that no one way is the right way! The two books Shay references that she loved to read while pregnant: Belly Laughs The Girlfriends Guide' to Pregnancy

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #472 - Maid in Thailand

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 154:57


Ares is the new resident angry old man of the show, whose previous angry old man disappeared under mysterious circumstances and is now haunting and terrorizing the hosts. Ares works to uncover the reason behind the former angry old man's disappearance. On Episode 472 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss the Thai horror film, The Maid from director Lee Thongkham! We also talk about lots of new media from The Suicide Squad to Masters of the Universe: Revelation, have some 80s toy talk and find out what actually constitutes a sequel! So grab a supernatural onion, take a whiff of your new air freshener, and don't cry for me, Eternia because we're about to strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Friday the 13th, Jason Vorhees, SickBad, Aldo Montoya, MZ returns, Vinegar Syndrome care package, Raw Force, EF Contentment's roast, air fresheners, Suicide Squad, James Gunn, what constitutes a sequel, Sylvester Stallone, John Cena, Godzilla vs. Kong, Kaiju, Starro the Conqueror, too much glowing, Bram Stoking the fire, “I like geists”, what's in Ravenshadow's brain?, convoluted emojis, The Crazies, George A. Romero, Takashi Miike, Quentin Tarantino, Dario Argento, Oscar Winning film Parasite, name that film, Christopher Reeve, duality of acting, ghost stories, twist endings, the three act film structure, Bone Tomahawk, From Dusk Till Dawn, Wellington Paranormal, Physical, Ted Lasso, Masters of the Universe, He-Man-Man, Voltron, Mark Hamill, Skeletor, Foundation, Schmigadoon!, Key and Peele, Henry Rollins, Ram-Man, Bi-Klops, Kenner gives no f*cks, Tunisian cinema, Dachra, kryptonite bullets, I love lamp and Linus, Demonic, Neill Blomkamp, Uncrustables, and the Voyage of Sickbad.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/ETE79ZkSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradio)

AboutBeverages.com - Podcast
Give It A Shot - Bistro Grande Grape PB&J Berliner Weisse from Energy City Brewing

AboutBeverages.com - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021


For several years both of our families were fortunate to be able to visit Disneyland in October. Disneyland is a magical place anytime of the year, but during the weeks leading up to Halloween it is transformed into a spookier version of the “Happiest Place on Earth.” In a few of those years, our families' visits to the park overlapped and we all were able to hang out together. Those were some great times with so many wonderful memories! One of the things that is crucial to success when visiting a theme park is to have continued sustenance. Since it can get expensive relying only on theme park food, Smucker's Uncrustables became a staple snack. Packed frozen in the backpack at the beginning of the day, they are perfectly thawed just in time to quell that first hunger pang. We mention all of this because the label of the beverage we are featuring on this show evoked thoughts of Uncrustables, and of course a desire to visit Disneyland. For this episode we will be trying the Bistro Grande PB&J Berliner Weisse from Energy City Brewing. Andrew picked this up at our local Tap and Bottle and the fact that it might taste like a PB&J has us excited to Give It a Shot! What did we think? What do you think? Let us know in the comments below or join us live on Thursday nights to give us your feedback while we are live streaming on Twitch.

Let's Talk About Snacks
There is No Ethical Jelly Under Capitalism

Let's Talk About Snacks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2021 29:31


This week the gang cools down with some floats, crunches on a bunch of KitKats, and learns a bit about Smucker's! Support this podcast at https://www.patreon.com/LetsTalkAboutSnacks  -- Snack News: The Monster Cereals Are Getting Fruit Snacks This Year Too: https://comicbook.com/irl/news/monster-mash-fruit-snacks-monster-cereals-general-mills/  New products from Land O'Frost, Veroni, 4505 Meats: https://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/19223-slideshow-new-products-from-land-ofrost-veroni-4505-meats  JM Smucker introduces new Uncrustables pepperoni snacks: https://www.foodbev.com/news/jm-smucker-introduces-new-uncrustables-pepperoni-snacks/  ast.com/2021/7/dunkaroos-chocolate-icing-flavor-returns Locate Lauren on Twitter (@rawrglicious) and check out her Onlyfans! Find Conrad on Twitter (@ConradZimmerman) and peruse his other projects on this Linktree thing. Linda can be located on Twitter (@guzzlinseltzer) and Instagram (@shoresofpluto). You can find her poetry journal at Impostor Lit. Logo by Cosmignon! See more of her cool art at https://www.cosmignon.info/ Music by Michael "Skitch" Schiciano. Hear more of his work at https://skitch.bandcamp.com/

Girls, Beer, Sports
Elustriousity

Girls, Beer, Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 80:02


Tons of Olympics talk in this episode, including our thoughts on the opening ceremonies, weather esports will ever be a thing and sports we love learning more about every four years. Join us also in this episode for as the College Football World Turns as we try to make sense of Oklahoma and Texas leaving the Big12 for the SEC. Tortoise on the run in News of the Weird and a new MLB team name, making a million dollars before even playing, a new MNF crew in the booth and a new flavor of Uncrustables round out Take It or Leave It.

WTAW - InfoMiniChats
Watch Out for the Vinegaroons

WTAW - InfoMiniChats

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 44:12


Woman receives 5th degree black belt at the spry age of 83. Texas and OU want to join the SEC - what happens now? Special Midnight Yell Practice. Chochi Day! Extreme family drama. Olympic Report. The longest curly fry. Fast food facts. Redundant phrases in the English language. Genius baby names and miscellaneous information. Uncrustables have a new product. A story that will make your Monday seem a little better. Vinegaroons, coming to a park near you. School lunch food shortage. Summer camp nightmare.

WTAW - Infomaniacs
The Infomaniacs: July 26, 2021 (8:00am)

WTAW - Infomaniacs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 39:13


The postal service is getting pricier and slower. Uncrustables have a new product. Quiet ears for dogs are not a great idea. Journalist apologizes for faking the shot. A story that will make your Monday seem a little better. Vinegaroons, coming to a park near you. School lunch food shortage. Summer camp nightmare. Royal News.

Richard Dixon
07/20 Richard Dixon Hour 2: Food Talk, the #BSQotD, the Sew Nice Embroidery, Printing, and Promtions' Feel Good Story of the Week, and More!

Richard Dixon

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 35:32


Richard Dixon talks about new Cinnamon Toast Crunch Popcorn, new Uncrustables, new Taco Bell menu items, Applebee's latest deal, asks the #BSQotD, gives you the Sew Nice Embroidery, Printing, and Promotions' Feel Good Story of the Week, and more! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Cover Price Podcast
The J.M. Smucker Co. v. Omar

Cover Price Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 102:02


Issue 27: Omar presents his case on the Uncrustables dilemma. Lauren and Omar's first theatre experience in over a year is tarnished by a Karen. Alan and Marco were about to fight some teenagers during Black Widow. Ed Sheeran has terrible tattoos and has the BTS fandom coming for him.

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith
Talking to Marquisele Mercedes: "That's unethical as hell."

Burnt Toast by Virginia Sole-Smith

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2021 52:40


Hello and welcome to another audio version of Burnt Toast! This is a newsletter where we explore questions, and some answers, about fatphobia, diet culture, parenting and health. I’m Virginia Sole-Smith. I’m a journalist who covers weight stigma and diet culture, and the author of The Eating Instinct and the forthcoming Fat Kid Phobia. I’m so excited today to introduce my guest, Marquisele Mercedes, or Mikey. She is a writer and doctoral student from the Bronx who is completing her PhD at Brown University School of Public Health, specializing in weight stigma, racism and critical public health studies. And oh my goodness, we need her work so much. I’m putting Mikey’s Patreon right here at the top of the transcript, because I hope everyone reading/listening will check it out and support her work. Welcome, Mikey. Thank you for being here.Mikey Thank you for having me!VirginiaThe first thing we have to talk about is the piece you did a couple weeks ago, a brilliant, searing takedown of Wegovy, the newest FDA-approved weight loss drug. Honestly, anyone who hasn’t read it yet, go read Mikey’s piece. One of the things that really jumped out to me is how the diet industry finances these drugs, because whenever we see these headlines, it’s presented as unequivocally good news. People may sort of know that scientists are required to disclose whether they have a financial stake in the research they’re doing, but—I have been reporting on this stuff for a really long time and I don’t even totally understand all the ways that the financial disclosure on a study does not tell the whole story. So why don’t you walk us through that a little bit.What does a financial disclosure do? And what does it tell us? What does it not tell us? And why, in the case of Wegovy, is there just so much more money at stake?Mikey The first thing to know is that to publish in most journals—especially those that have biomedical research—any journal that you try to publish in, if it’s peer reviewed, will ask if you have any financial conflicts of interest. But people who aren’t familiar with that process usually don’t understand that there isn’t a point at which the journal editors will say, “Oh, you have too much of a vested interest. We’re not going to take this article.” That doesn’t really happen. So, for example, there are three different authors on that Wegovy study that are employees of Novo Nordisk and then there’s also two that additionally hold stock, and that was not enough to not have this paper published.VirginiaSo it’s like: We’ll disclose it, but we’ll go right ahead and report this as unbiased science.Mikey Honestly, with a lot of areas of research, especially pharma or biomedical tech or whatever, having corporate ties is not a thing people really question. It’s definitely not a thing that journal editors question because it’s normal. So people are like, oh, okay, you’re a stock-owning employee of this of this pharmaceutical company. And you also receive fees from whatever and you invest actively in these companies, okay, we’ll note it at the bottom of this article. But it’s not like we’re not going to take your research, especially when it’s something like this. So there’s a lot of publication bias at work here too where, the medication had such distinct results, you know, an average of 15% loss of weight from participants’ initial weights, and a lot of people lost a third of their initial weight. When you have a result like that, it’s almost impossible for that to not get published, even in a journal like the New England Journal of Medicine, which is one of the most prestigious journals in the world.So you have publication bias on your side, because you got positive results, and no one in this area is really going to question whether or not to publish this on the basis of your financial conflicts of interest, they’re just going to note the conflicts of interest, and then go on and publish it anyway. On top of that, you have this culture within medicine, especially in biomedical sciences, where, you know, there are just certain forms of research where corporate influence is seen as okay. And a lot of the time, pharmaceutical companies are part of that culture. And definitely when it comes to weight loss.I’ve said this before: In science, there are some things that we get outraged about in terms of corporate influence, and others not. Like with tobacco. If a tobacco company tries to start an organization or a research foundation and do studies on the health outcomes related to smoking that may portray cigarettes in a less negative light, then people in public health especially are going to be pissed off about that. And they’re going to raise the alarm. But when it comes to Nestle funding research foundations, everyone’s like, oh, cool, private-public partnership, when it’s really private influence over what should be public work.VirginiaWhy that double standard? Why are we outraged that a tobacco company would do science to try to make their products seem safer, but not outraged that a pharmaceutical company will do science to make a drug they can sell and profit off of?Mikey Fatphobia. It’s literally just fatphobia. Public health is very proud of how it’s solved tobacco. It’s weird. They’re like, yeah, like, we managed to cut the smoking rate and blah, blah, blah. It’s one of the main examples that people use in health communication classes or science communication classes, when we’re talking about how to encourage or discourage people from doing certain things. Tobacco is the main example, as well as that health communication campaign, “Verb: It’s what you do.” Which actually wasn’t that effective, but that’s a whole other conversation.It mostly boils down to fatphobia. And I’ve found that’s amplified by the way that corporations have always been part of, the “obesity prevention” area. So it’s less jarring when something like this happens because it’s like, oh well, this is the way it’s always been done.VirginiaRight, you don’t question this whole system. It feels very radical to say pharmaceutical research should only be government-sponsored or that there shouldn’t be a capitalist stake in this. When I say it out loud, it seems quite logical yet also anathema to the way we are programmed.Mikey If you were to say that in a room full of like, researchers, I think people would be like, whoa, hold up. That’s a bit much.Virginia These corporations do have huge amounts of money, they do directly impact people’s health. If we could get them to put that money towards useful things like that could be a good thing. The problem is, they’re only putting it towards—Mikey Profit-making.VirginiaRight profit-making, and in this case, creating a drug that you and I both feel strongly is going to be more harmful than it could ever be good.Mikey Exactly. This is all aside from the fact that these corporations should not have the money they have anyway. So that’s a whole other thing, that we might not have enough time to get into.VirginiaYeah, that’s a whole separate conversation. But definitely worth noting.So let’s talk a little bit more about the drug itself. I mean, as you said, it’s had these “positive results” and people are reporting more weight loss while on the drug then you usually see in these studies, but you also talked in your piece about our short-term memory when it comes to this industry, and specifically weight loss drugs. So tell us a little bit about what we’ve forgotten about this drug’s predecessors that’s clouding our ability to assess this drug?Mikey If the diet industry was held accountable for all of its past failures, and not-delivered products, then it wouldn’t exist. Let’s be clear about that. The diet industry—and when I say the diet industry, obviously, I’m talking about manufacturers of weight loss drugs, but also like, companies like Weight Watchers, or individuals who actively profit off of selling weight loss, not necessarily as a thing that happens, but as a dream.VirginiaRight, a very important distinction.Mikey And that’s the distinction that I think is really core to this cycle. Somehow we are so drawn to the promise of weight loss, that we choose to forget that if you’re a fat person living in this country, you have probably tried more than one, more than multiple forms of weight loss, dieting, some kind of weird cleansing program. You’ve probably tried some of those things, if you haven’t, I think you would be in the minority of fat people.VirginiaMinority of all people but especially fat people.Mikey And I think the normalization of that activity, engaging in this collective fat hate, paired with the fact that like, there are tangible benefits to being smaller—and then also the fact that this industry has so many resources to make sure that we never forget that weight loss is a good idea—obviously, we’re sort of slowly seduced into forgetting the fact that most of us have definitely tried to lose weight and it hasn’t happened or it’s sent us off into spirals of disordered eating, or has had other kinds of negative implications on our lives. I think it’s really hard to remember that these things don’t usually work the way that we’re told they work because all those other things are happening.We’re constantly being reminded that fat is bad, constantly reminded that weight loss is good. And then we see that reified by all of this media explosion when something like this comes out. It’s being talked about as a game changer: “This is gonna change people’s lives.” There’s always, always, always, always a steady supply of people waiting in the wings to advocate for something like this on a large scale. Which, honestly, the application of a weight-loss recommendation or technique for community-level or population-level health, that’s f*****g unethical. That’s unethical as hell.We know that encouraging weight loss, encouraging body comparison, encouraging body dissatisfaction, does all kinds of messed up things to our health. And we also know that it’s incredibly rare that people lose weight and then sustain that weight. And we also know that the consequences of putting people into a cycle of weight gain and weight loss has serious implications on our metabolic health. And yet, it is completely acceptable to recommend those things on a community level, on a population level. And there are people in the medical community who will absolutely advocate for that. And there are lots of reasons why. And sometimes those reasons boil down to dollars, and it’s a really uncomfortable thing to sit with. Regardless of how much we complain about how bad healthcare is in this country, I think that a lot of us still hold on to the hope that the people who give us healthcare services have our best interests in mind. And being confronted with information that suggests the opposite, or suggests that the story might be a little bit more complicated, is incredibly uncomfortable.I strongly believe that people are the best experts of their own bodies. We live in these bodies every every damn day. We know when things don’t feel right. We know when we’re content. And when we’re at ease. The fact is that most doctors don’t know what to do with fat bodies. There are plenty of studies that suggest that doctors do not feel equipped to deal with patients that are “obese.” [Virginia Note: I summarized a lot of that research in this article.]They don’t know how to do nutrition education, they spend less time giving health education to people who are fat. A lot of the restrictions that fat people face, especially when they’re looking to get life-saving surgical procedures or transplants—there’s this idea that at a certain weight you are less able to get through that procedure. That is also something that I’m very sure is born from doctors just straight up not knowing how to deal with fat bodies. In medical school, a lot of cadavers when they’re fat, people are just like, “Oh, I have to, like, cut through all of this. Oh, my God.”Virginia So dehumanizing.Mikey And it also just turns treating fat patients into a burden from the get go. So, yes, people are absolutely, probably the best experts on their own bodies. But also, a lot of doctors don’t know what the f**k they’re doing when it comes to fat patients.VirginiaIt’s so important to highlight that. With this drug in particular, it had this initial 15 percent weight loss or up to a third weight loss, which sounds like some brand new achievement. But let’s talk briefly about what are the concerns about Wegovy?Mikey Someone who engaged in the study and was receiving Wegovy, is quoted in multiple articles about the medication, saying that she ended up gaining back most of the weight that she lost while she was on the medication, and then also lost some of it and then also gained some of it back. That’s the textbook definition of weight cycling. The fact that this medication is being heralded as this game changing diet drug—there’s nothing game changing about it. When you’re on it, it f***s with your pancreas enough that you are sent into a process of losing weight that probably is not healthy or organic or makes sense for your body. And then once you’re off the drug, you gain it back.Novo Nordisk has sort of perfected the playbook of taking one drug and finding that it has a side effect of weight loss and then just like, selling it in bigger dosages so that weight loss happens more quickly.They did this with another drug, Saxenda is just Victoza at a higher dosage. The only difference between them is the dosage and Saxenda is also specifically marketed as a weight loss drug whereas Victoza is not.VirginiaRight, it’s a diabetes medication.Mikey Right, it’s a type two diabetes medication, and it is very effective at doing that. But it’s not meant for weight loss. And then you have Ozempic which is the drug that they amplified the dosage of, to get Wegovy.So Victoza was the subject of a major 2017 federal case against Novo Nordisk. Novo Nordisk was ordered to pay $58.65 million to the federal government and state Medicaid programs for intentionally minimizing the risks of developing a rare form of cancer to physicians who would be prescribing this medication to their patients.I’m not saying that what happened with Victoza is what’s going to happen with Wegovy, that doesn’t even need to be the case for this to be just a failure and hazard to everybody’s health. The point is that if a company has a history of doing things for profit that intentionally did endanger people’s lives, maybe that company should not still be making things that people will ingest. Moving on from that, if we know that a medication has risks, like serious risks, even in small doses, and then you rebrand that medication into a weight loss medication…like, why, how was that allowed to happen?It’s really hard to find out if people from the FDA have taken corporate money. I’ve tried to figure that out, because I really didn’t see any other way for Wegovy to have been approved. It’s been a few years since a drug has been approved for weight loss by the FDA. So this is a big deal and I don’t know. I’m not sure if the FDA has ever approved a potentially risky medication, especially after a corporation has been found to have intentionally mislead physicians. I don’t know if that’s something that has happened before in history. But clearly, this is something that we should be worried about.VirginiaThere’s so many red flags, except none of them were being reported in any of the mainstream media.Mikey I’m sure you saw how the American Academy of Pediatrics like came out supporting bariatric surgery for tweens, and it’s the same thing. I was like, damn, NPR should be ashamed of itself, because—VirginiaThat story was a travesty.Mikey Like, how is it that the only risks focused on in that piece were like, trisks of promiscuity following weight loss? They were like, she’ll be socially relevant. Are you f*****g kidding me? VirginiaThe girl’s mom was against her getting it, but not because she was worried about the risks of the surgery, but because she thought she hadn’t tried hard enough to lose weight. And that was completely unexamined.Mikey Portraying that doctor that helped her get the surgery as a kind of savior, especially since that particular doctor is like, honestly, I want to I want to start like, I don’t know, I want to gamble basically on the chance that this specific doctor shows up in an article about weight stigma, because she’s always always always around. And she’s heralded by medicine as this crusader for dismantling weight sigma. And I’m like, what the f**k is so different about her from the people who are just more obvious about hating my body? I honestly find it more dangerous, that someone would hide their disgust for fatness in like, not genuine concern for my well being.VirginiaThe tell is always when they come around and say we’re helping these kids lose weight to avoid weight stigma. It’s like, that’s not how you fight stigma. You don’t fight stigma by taking the marginalized person and making them assimilate. That’s the opposite of fighting the stigma, that’s reinforcing the stigma.Mikey And then we can’t really rely on most journalists, at least to give us the the real on what is happening with these. I mean, a colleague of mine tried to write something about Wegovy, they really tried to get something published. And they were told that it was just too controversial. And I’ve pitched this to no less than 15 places and no one will get back to me. It’s ridiculous. I think that with how pervasive weight stigma is, it makes it seem like there’s no one that gives a s**t about it at all. But there are people like you, like me, like my colleagues, like fat activists, people that really do this every single day. They’re constantly thinking about weight stigma, how to dismantle it, constantly working to do that, but they get shut down at every single angle. And, it’s exhausting. VirginiaI often run into this attitude of “yes, we’re very worried about weight stigma, I guess it’s this terrible problem, but oh my God, ob*sity equals death. And that’s the real danger.” It’s almost like we have to sacrifice people’s mental health to fight this public health war. And I think that discourse comes out of the public health world. And it really is about how the diet industry has infiltrated public health discourse. So talk a little bit about that, how you see diet culture and fatphobia showing up in public health and how these two things got so enmeshed?MikeyIn terms of public health, I mean, I don’t see an area of research that is not impacted in some way by diet culture, by the diet industry. I’m doing my PhD in a behavioral science department. I’m surrounded by people who do behavioral interventions on obesity, and it’s just the most whacked s**t ever. A lot of people are completely disconnected from how certain areas of science really come to be, how certain areas of public health really come to be. And so when you try to say like, “Oh, hey, maybe what we’re doing in public health is shitty. Like to a lot of people.” When you bring that up, they’re just like, what are you talking about?This is research that I’m currently doing now for my own book proposal. Like, how deep do obesity prevention initiatives really go? A year ago I was reading Fit to Be Citizens? by Natalia Molina, who talks about Mexican Chinese and Japanese immigrants in the 19th century, late 19th century, early 20th century, and their experiences being actively marginalized by the Los Angeles county and city public health departments. And it’s a really good read, I recommend that people pick it up. It’s very accessible language. Molina is a really, really good writer. But even in those health interventions that they would target towards Mexican moms in the early 1900s, late 1800s, a lot of that was critiquing their diet, and the way they ate. So even that falls into the parameters of an obesity prevention initiative. And that’s something wouldn’t necessarily be classified as one because it falls into the realm of maternal and child health, which is honestly one of the most fatphobic areas of research I’ve ever seen in my life. But I mean, it’s the same reason why that survey returned that ob-gyn is one of the most fatphobic areas of medicine. These things are not a coincidence. VirginiaWe like to police women’s bodies, mothers’ bodies, mothers of color’s bodies. It all needs to be policed and controlled as much as possible.Mikey We have to understand that critiquing people’s diets—especially people from other cultures—critiquing people’s diets, critiquing the way they feed their kids, critiquing their cultural foods, really became bolstered by public health initiatives justified by the faulty science that they put out to justify their bigotry. And now it’s a whole area of research. Now, that’s not just critiquing immigrant mothers, that’s obesity prevention research. Like that’s a thing like that has journals, that has grants, that has clout. So it goes really, really deep. And it's not just relegated to the areas of research that look at eating, it’s also about physical activity research. And also people who do research on racial health disparities often fall back on like fatphobic racist logic for why some people are healthy and why others are not.Virginia Say more about that. Mikey I mean, so first of all, there's the enduring, long-lived fallacy that race is biological, which it is not. But when you make race biological, and you essentially make culture something inherent to an individual, then you can make the case that their way of eating and their way of cooking is an inherent pathology. And some people don’t even bring race into the picture, they’re just like, oh, you know, some cultures are just so unhealthy, and we need to help them. And all of its b******t, because of how malleable and subjective it is, like, now quinoa and avocado are seen as super foods like, now it's okay that people of color were the ones who like, really eat them.VirginiaAnd collard greens..Mikey And kale and collard greens. Yeah, like, f**k off, like, whenever I see something like that, I'm just like, this is how I know that none of this is really rooted in anything but our internal hatred for certain kinds of people. When you start to look at things through that lens, it’s a really depressing lens. I don’t recommend doing it all the time. But it’s often the perspective that I use when I’m thinking of things like Wegovy, because I’m like, who is benefiting from this drug being approved? Who is benefiting from what it does in the meantime, and also, who was benefiting from what happens afterwards? Because I remember, someone made such a wonderful comment when I first put out my article, and they were just like, this is going to lead to a whole generation of diabetics, the way that this messes with people’s insulin production. That’s a consequence that I think will happen. Even if a few years from now the FDA is like, this is not a thing that should have ever been approved, by that point, the damage is already done. And since it’s fat people that are going to be prescribed this drug, right, that just feeds into the idea that fatness is inherently inherently pathological. Thus the cycle begins again.VirginiaThe last thing I want to talk to you about is the how all of this stuff plays out in food culture. A lot of my listeners are parents, so I get a lot of questions around kids and processed foods, and there’s a lot of fears around processed foods. I want to hold space for the fact that parents are under a huge amount of pressure to feed our kids perfectly. But I think it’s very useful to unpack how much the anti-processed food argument is rooted in fatphobia and racism and classism. There are a bunch of new studies that came out this week looking at processed food and kids’ diets and then immediately linking them to health problems. There’s this never ending onslaught of research in that area, much like with the weight loss drugs, and we see these headlines and we think, Okay, well, there it is, salt, sugar and fat is so bad for us. You know, processed foods, the ultra processed foods are so bad for us...Mikey This is more of a new thought, but I wonder about the utility of making certain kinds of foods that are more widely available to people of color, especially Black people, low-income black people, I think about the utility of marketing those foods as something health conscious, respectable people shouldn’t be eating. Who benefits from that? A lot of the discourse that demonizes certain foods over others is honestly some form of marketing ploy to push some kind of new form of eating, whether that's clean eating or, or being like, oh, we all have to be vegan, or we all have to eat clean, or we all have to buy organic foods, you know, whatever that means. The way I see it, the more we impose hierarchies on food, there will always be certain foods that we have a fixation on, because those are the foods that we shouldn’t be eating. In terms of parenting, I feel like that is so relevant.When I was younger, my fixation on eating more and more, first originally stemmed from hunger, because like, I was restricted, you know, in terms of my diet. I have always lived in a fat body at any age. And so when it came to the point where restriction was an enforceable thing, that was when I became most fixated with food. I didn’t become fixated with, you know, ultra processed food, or like, that wasn’t the thing that I really even gave a s**t about. When I was a kid, I was like, I want to eat more of the food that I had for dinner, because I was still hungry. And I live in this body, and my body is telling me that it needs food. And eventually, that fixation moved away from being something that I physically felt was necessary, and more a compulsion that I had to fulfill. Because if I didn’t have it, it meant that I had let some kind of need go unfulfilled. And that caused me a lot of distress. So when we talk about ultra processed foods, I feel like especially in areas of parenting, we’re just like, how do we make kids less fixated on these foods? How do we make kids like these foods less, you know, like, marketing for these foods is all bright and colorful and draws people in. And kids are always told not to eat them. So you know, they might like them more, but I honestly tell people to start with their relationship with the food they eat on a regular basis. The idea that food abuse starts with foods that are, you know, “unhealthy” I feel is misinformed and incorrect. But it’s something that so many of us feed into. And it’s extremely prominent in literature that is targeted towards parents, because just because of the way that a lot of these foods are age-coded. Is there a reason why Lunchables and other forms of prepackaged ultra-processed foods are so bad? I think that’s a conversation worth having. But I also think that a lot of the time, it’s a distraction.VirginiaI think you’re articulating a key tension I think about a lot which is: The processed food industry, much like the diet industry, could certainly use more oversight, could certainly stand to have someone coming in and saying hey, stop with the predatory marketing tactics, stop disproportionately marketing communities of color, stop disproportionally marketing to kids. All of that would be super, and is really important. But we often lose that nuance, and it becomes: these foods are bad. You are bad if you feed them to your child. And it’s so much more complicated than that, these foods in and of themselves are not terrible, it’s the excessive marketing and the way that’s done in this disproportionate way that is the problem. Mikey It’s the way that these foods give in to the fixation we already have about eating. Like, if I'm a child, and I am already thinking about food, and then I am suddenly bombarded by food marketing, those are things that feed into each other. It’s not like food marketing started my issues with food.VirginiaBecause if you hadn’t been restricted, you could have navigated the marketing much easier.Mikey Do not restrict kids. I hear things like, Oh, well, if I don’t restrict my kid, then they’ll eat whatever they want, until they’re sick. And, you know, sometimes we need to have that experience. You need to have that outcome in order to be able to learn from that experience.VirginiaIt’s part of learning how to navigate these foods. And if you restrict your kid around them, they will have that experience at a friend’s house on a play date or something, you know, they will, it’ll happen one way or the other. Mikey And we have to think about how the fixation that we have on ultra processed foods in general, and the insistence that we eat a certain way that’s cleaner, healthier, blah, blah, blah. All of those things just demonize other people.VirginiaRight.Mikey That’s where a lot of that comes from, it comes from the inherent distaste that we have for poor people, for fat people, for Black people, who are often more often than not forced into a position to buy foods that fall into the category of processed or ultra processed, because of the fact that they have restricted access to resources to buy other kinds of foods.This is literally just another way to push bigotry and enforce hierarchies. And the more we think about it like that, then the next time, you know, it’s easier for us to be like, well, this thing is telling me that unless I have this prepackaged meal, that will help me lose weight, then I’m a bad person, it becomes easier to unpack that and point out why that’s b******t when we understand that these are not fueled by health promoting goals. They’re promoted, they’re fueled by profit seeking goals that are also amplified by division and bigotry.VirginiaSomething I often think about when parents are articulating these anxieties to me is: How much of this is honestly about your concern for your child’s health, and how much of this is about your concern for your perception as a parent? I’m thinking about kids lunches, and the standards for kids lunches have gotten just, you know, there’s supposed to be like four types of produce and a rainbow and you know, it’s insane. And it’s all white ladies on Instagram, performing their parenting in this way and performing their white savior lady thing, right?MikeyPerformance is a crucial social tool, right? But it’s not a thing to base your lifestyle on. Like, it’s okay to be like, oh my god, I made this really cute lunch for my kids. This sandwich looks like a face and it’s smiling. And I can’t wait to talk about this with like, the other parents that I know. That’s totally cool. The thing that’s not okay is taking those values that you have around that sandwich and applying it to how you’re treating your human child.VirginiaAnd that you’re then judging the other parents such as myself who are packing Uncrustables for our kids lunch, right?MikeyI have Uncrustables because as a semi-functioning adult, If I don’t have them, I might not eat anything. They’re amazing. I also want to say that just because you’re a parent doesn’t mean that you’ve resolved your own issues with food, so unpack that s**t. Figure out your hangups around food and how you might be projecting those onto your child. Because, you know, a lot of the times, we’re guided by these conventional nuggets of wisdom, but those conventional nuggets of wisdom are just trauma that we’re still holding onto.VirginiaSuch a good point. Mikey, thank you so much. This was an amazing conversation.Mikey Thank you for having me. I don’t usually talk about this kind of stuff.VirginiaTell us all of the ways that people can follow you and support your work. MikeyOn Twitter, which I spend way too much time on, I’m @marquisele. On Instagram I’m @fatmarquisele. I'm also on Patreon: patreon.com/marquisele. I’m currently working on a fat studies public health syllabus. So if that’s of interest to anyone, I break down a lot of what we’re talking about right now, in terms of how fatphobia became a thing, especially in the sciences. And if there are some concerns or questions that you have around fatphobia, I’m always always always taking questions through my website. And those are the subject of my semi bi-weekly newsletter I put out through Patreon as well. This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit virginiasolesmith.substack.com/subscribe

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #465 - Who Censors the Censors?

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2021 172:09


After viewing a strangely familiar video nasty, Monsterzero, a film censor, sets out to solve the past mystery of his mind's disappearance, embarking on a quest that dissolves the line between fiction and reality. On Episode 465 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss the film Censor from director Prano Bailey-Bond! We also have a deep discussion about censorship in the 80s as it relates to Video Nasties, The Filthy 15, the PMRC, and we discuss how fit censors are to be deciding who can consume what! Of course there is the typical skulduggery you'd expect-- what god-like powers Ravenshadow would want, why would MZ consume a hot jelly bean, and learn all about our Dependence Day Celebration! So grab your favorite forbidden VHS tape, try out your newfound stretching powers, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Joe Bob Briggs, Ares: handyman extraordinaire, God-like abilities, what god would you want to be?, Lucky Bamboo, Saskatchewan Seal Skin Shirts, X-Rated Vision, duck boats, Excalibur, Micromax, Purple Clad Bowman, Elongated Man, Ralph Dibney, George Burns, 18 Again, Made for TV's Michael Dudikoff, body swap movies, Cad Bane, Dream a Little Dream, the velvet shirt, Bean Boozled, Carolina Reaper Jelly Beans, Uncrustables, Mara Jade, Timothy Zahn, Grand Admiral Thrawn, MZ's 50th Birthday Roast, B-Hole talk, Dependence Day Celebration Blackout Tapes, Prime Day, artful nudes, Censor, Video Nasties, Prano Bailey-Bond, Mary Whitehouse, BBFC, Niamh Algar, Michael Smiley, Unhinged, Eyeball, video rental stores, Adrian Schiller, Video Nasties: The Definitive Guide, Bloody Moon, The Beyond, Shock! Horror!, Man of Violence, Mardi Gras Massacre, Jack Valenti, MPAA, blood flowing like water, Last House on the Left, Straw Dogs, Clockwork Orange, Dee Snider, John Denver, Frank Zappa, Tipper Gore, Filthy 15, wearing a codpiece, 2 Live Crew, censorship in the 80s, Faces of Death, Cannibal Holocaust, IMDB plot keywords, self-censoring, Used Cars, Benny Hill, nudity on TV, Blues Brothers, 80 VHS recreations, Berberian Sound Studio, Joe Versus the Volcano, Camille Keaton, I Spit on Your Grave, Heroes Shed No Tears, Dead or Alive Trilogy, Takashi Miike, Darth Vader, IG-88, Shakma, Caveat, Skull: The Mask, Shudder, Spare Parts, unrealistic bar fights, Halloween Kills, Evilspeak, Clint Howard, Dan Cortes, Demolition Man, MTV Sports, Two Guys One Crypt, Gun Woman, Kurando Mitsutake, the middle coast, Highway to the Time Zone, and Saskatchewan Seal Skin Shirts.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/ETE79ZkSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradio)

That Reload Life Podcast
Ep.90- The Rub Down with Ryan Lane

That Reload Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 84:29


The debate you've all been waiting for is here: are Uncrustables absolutely horrible or are they a fine delicacy. Ryan Lane from @lanesbbq joins the pod to discuss the biggest rub drop of the entire year! Ryan also gives us a step by step guide to selling bbq illegally. Producer Matt has a BIG announcement.

Jim and Them
Good 4 U - #683 Part 2

Jim and Them

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 98:17


Snackman Cometh: Jim and Them realize they are fancy boys and they should have a snack inventory in the studio! LET'S GO!PROMOTION: Mike has great career news as he is moving on up at his job, BIG THINGS HAPPENING. Also is this Uber hero secretly a villain!?Olivia Rodrigo: Keep calm everyone, the kids are all right, Olivia Rodrigo is bringing back ROCK music for a new generation.DICK BRONZED!, EDDIE MURPHY!, 48 HRS!, STILL!, GETO BOYS!, FAT BOYS!, CONFUSED!, G FUNK!, CRUISE DOGG!, CRUISING FOR DICK!, MAN I'M GOING TO MARRY!, DO YOU KNOW WHO THIS IS?!, THE CUM IS READY!, GAY BABU FRICK JIM!, REMEMBER!?, RISE OF SKYWALKER!, STAR WARS!, DROID IS READY!, K2-SO!, BABU FRICK VAPE!, JJ ABRAMS!, PLAN!, LAND BEFORE TIME!, SNACK BOIS!, SNACK ATTACK!, FRITOS!, SNACKMAN!, SUBSCRIPTION BOX!, STOCK!, LIST!, CHIPS!, SWEETS!, DORITOS!, BASELINE!, NACHO CHEESE!, SWEDISH CANDY!, SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES!, KIT KAT!, COOKIES!, AIRHEADS!, UNCRUSTABLES!, DONUTS!, COSTCO!, DOLLAR STORE!, TOKYO!, BLACK HISTORY MONTH!, PEANUT BUTTER!, SNACKS ON SNACKS!, NON DISCLOSURE AGREEMENT!, SOLD CAR!, PT CRUZER!, 97 HONDA ACCORD!, CAR PERSON!, HOBBY!, RICED OUT!, ANIME CAR!, ESKIMO!, INUIT!, YUPIK!, QUALITY OF LIFE!, GROCERY STORE!, REMOTE WORK!, OFFICE!, UBER!, SHOOTING!, GOOD SAMARITAN!, HOSPITAL!, MICHAEL BUSSAN!, FAMILY!, MEDICAL BILLS!, HERO!, VILLAIN!, DARK HISTORY!, HALLOWEED!, WRITER!, SIMON REX!, DIRT NASTY!, HIGH TIMES!, OLIVIA RODRIGO!, SNL!, POP PUNK!, 17 YEARS OLD!, DISNEY!, GOOD 4 U!, PARAMORE!, BILLIE EILISH!, SAVING ROCK!, CRUST PUNK!, MGK!, POST MALONE1, BRINGING ROCK BACK!, SPOKEN!, BOWLING FOR SOUP!, 100 GECS!, MUMBLE RAP!, THE LINDA LINDAS!, RACIST SEXIST BOY!, AUNTIE!, GRANDMA!, DOJA CAT!, CARLY RAE JEPSEN!, DASHBOARD!, BECK!, REACTIONS!, MILLENIALS!, HTHAZE!, MEME!, VIBES!, DEECE!, OVER IT!You can find the videos from this episode at our Discord RIGHT HERE!

Research Rank Repeat
Uncrustables: Bread Mouth

Research Rank Repeat

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 37:19


How much bread is too much bread? Find out this week as we taste all of what Uncrustables has to offer.

VONTE NYC
EPISODE 35: FREEDOM LIES ONLY WITHIN

VONTE NYC

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2021 57:55


On Today’s episode, we sit down with music artist, and Superman for our people, F.L.O.W. Remembering DMX (1:01). Welcome to our guest! (5:30). #standwithjennifer (06:26). Following a life altering experience (11:00). Uncrustables, cut the check! (12:45). Behind the acronym F.L.O.W. (15:35). Getting inspired by Lauryn Hill, and behind the music. (17:10). Why I have beef w. Lauryn Hill (21:30). The new project is 98% done! (25:30). Being an artist and if concept albums are his niche (29:00). We discuss clubhouse, and Flow Nightly Network (33:00). BUY BLACC and how community outreach and participation is important. (42:50). & Please tell Ash her hive name is horrible! Lol (53:00) Make sure to stream “I learned from Lauryn” and the rest of F.L.O.W.‘s music streaming everywhere! Be sure to follow Flow Nightly Network on clubhouse! Follow us on social media! Instagram.com/flow349 Twitter.com/flow349 Instagram.com/vontenyc Instagram.com/ashDollas_ Mix by Selecta Sha Instagram.com/selectasha98 This podcast is sponsored by Essentials From Earth! Instagram.com/essentialsfromearthbk Get 15% off your first order by using promo code ‘VONTENYCPOD’ https://essentials-from-earth-bk.myshopify.com

Deadbeats Podcast
Episode 32 - Siblings Or Dating?

Deadbeats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2021 52:50


We're sponsored by Instincts Eyewear! Use code DEADBEATS20 at www.shopinstincts.com for 20% off your order! Keshav gets kidnapped. Zack reviews Uncrustables. A toddler thinks Keshav is their dad. Zack almost pisses his pants. Keshav gets roasted by Kenny Beats. Zack and Keshav make fun of British royalty and play "Siblings or Dating" on Instagram. Recorded in March 2021. taplink.cc/deadbeatspod

Show & Vern
04/12 - 10 am - Royals Get a Big Win

Show & Vern

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 45:56


The Royals managed to get one game away from the White Sox on Sunday in a really big early season win. They've really struggled against the White Sox so this was a huge showing after the rain out on Saturday. The Royals bullpen is showing up outside of the issues of Jesse Hahn. The NFLPA is really pushing for virtual OTA's again and Hunter Dozier has to get a pinch hitter because he's still dealing with an injury. Also, we try Uncrustables.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #454 - Flying High at Area 54

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2021 146:27


When a young podcaster contracts a mysterious illness, his mother must decide how far she will drive to bring him the supplies he needs to stay alive. On Episode 454 of Trick or Treat Radio we discuss the film, Son from Writer/Director Ivan Kavanagh! We also talk about the proper way to get your COVID vaccination, cursed puppet shows, and the hottest place to party, Area 54! So grab your favorite pair of sequined hot pants, try not to spit up too much blood, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast! Stuff we talk about: Shudder, Fangoria Chainsaw Awards, Castle Graybeard, Adams Family, Arachnaphobia, MZ vaccination report, eye of the beholder, what does MRI mean?, Ravenshadow’s triumphant appearance on the Movie Massacre podcast, smoking helmet dome, the COVID life cycle, Three’s Company, The Secret of Skinwalker Ranch, Studio 51 or Area 54, Xenomorph, Wes Borland, the MZ infomercial of the week, Teeel, Tom Wilson, cameo, Jim Smith, Barry Horowitz, Superman: Red Son, Speed Racer, Emile Hirsch, Andi Matichak, Bad News Bears, Gods giving birth to children, ballin’ on a budget, Uncrustables and Cigarettes, Resident Evil, Parliament Funkadelic, medium sized Big Show, bad blood fx, annoying kids, opinions, The Canal, Quarantine Titans, free shots, Double D, Kobayashi Maru, primo gange, pot delivery, Rosemary’s Baby, Son of Rosemary, The Autopsy of Jane Doe, puppet shows in Tiny’s basement, MZ eating ants, eclairs covered in ants, choking on the chicken, Brood X, “gypsy mawths”, Gangrel and The Brood, shrunken head, stairway snake, Beetlejuice, John Cicada, ribbed ankle cuffs, Cavity Colors, Hydrocodone, “make me get that happen”, and Creepshow.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: https://discord.gg/ETE79ZkSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradio)