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Interpretation of science intended for a general audience

  • 370PODCASTS
  • 668EPISODES
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  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 23, 2022LATEST
Popular science

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Best podcasts about Popular science

Latest podcast episodes about Popular science

Emerging Form
Episode 69: How Rachel Feltman Wrote "Been There, Done That: A Rousing History of Sex"

Emerging Form

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 33:28


How does a book come together? We speak with Rachel Feltman, author of Been There, Done That: A Rousing History of Sex, about the evolution of her book, from first inklings to years of research to organization to completion. She explains how she answered the burning question, “How do I make this a book and not just a pile of words?” Her secrets include A 500-mile ride on a tandem bike, a morning routine, a great agent and editor, the willingness to turn in her “hottest garbage,” and a three-word mantra that will help jumpstart every creative process. Rachel Feltman’s first paying gig was organizing a bookshelf full of textbooks on vulvar disease at the age of seven, and she never looked back. She’s the Executive Editor of Popular Science and hosts PopSci’s podcast The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week. In 2014, Feltman founded the Washington Post’s Speaking of Science blog, known for headlines such as “You probably have herpes, but that’s really okay,” and “Uranus might be full of surprises.” Feltman studied environmental science at Simon’s Rock and has a master’s in science reporting from NYU. She’s a musician, an actress, and the stepmom of a very spry 14-year-old cat.Rachel’s website https://www.boldtypebooks.com/titles/rachel-feltman/been-there-done-that/9781668605042/ This is a public episode. If you’d like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

Can't Make This Up
They Are Already Here with Sarah Scoles

Can't Make This Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 48:36


Today I speak with Sarah Scoles about her new book They Are Already Here: UFO Culture and Why We See Saucers. "An anthropological look at the UFO community, told through first-person experiences with researchers in their element as they pursue what they see as a solvable mystery—both terrestrial and cosmic. More than half a century since Roswell, UFOs have been making headlines once again. On December 17, 2017, the New York Times ran a front-page story about an approximately five-year Pentagon program called the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. The article hinted, and its sources clearly said in subsequent television interviews, that some of the ships in question couldn't be linked to any country. The implication, of course, was that they might be linked to other solar systems. The UFO community—those who had been thinking about, seeing, and analyzing supposed flying saucers (or triangles or chevrons) for years—was surprisingly skeptical of the revelation. Their incredulity and doubt rippled across the internet. Many of the people most invested in UFO reality weren't really buying it. And as Scoles did her own digging, she ventured to dark, conspiracy-filled corners of the internet, to a former paranormal research center in Utah, and to the hallways of the Pentagon. In They Are Already Here we meet the bigwigs, the scrappy upstarts, the field investigators, the rational people, and the unhinged kooks of this sprawling community. How do they interact with each other? How do they interact with “anomalous phenomena”? And how do they (as any group must) reflect the politics and culture of the larger world around them? We will travel along the Extraterrestrial Highway (next to Area 51) and visit the UFO Watchtower, where seeking lights in the sky is more of a spiritual quest than a “gotcha” one. We meet someone who, for a while, believes they may have communicated with aliens. Where do these alleged encounters stem from? What are the emotional effects on the experiencers? Funny and colorful, and told in a way that doesn't require one to believe, Scoles brings humanity to an often derided and misunderstood community. After all, the truth is out there . . ." Sarah Scoles is a science writer whose work has appeared in The Atlantic, Slate, Smithsonian, the Washington Post, Scientific American, Popular Science, Discover, New Scientist, Aeon, and Wired. A former editor at Astronomy magazine, Scoles worked at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, the location of the first-ever SETI project. She lives in Denver, Colorado. Want to listen to new episodes a week earlier and get exclusive bonus content? Consider becoming a supporter of the podcast on Patreon! Like the podcast? Please subscribe and leave a review! Follow @CMTUHistory on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram & TikTok --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

ACM ByteCast
Shyam Gollakota - Episode 26

ACM ByteCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 43:02


In this episode of ACM ByteCast, Rashmi Mohan hosts 2020 ACM Grace Murray Hopper Award recipient Shyam Gollakota. He is a Torode Professor and leads the Networks and Mobile Systems Lab at the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering. Shyam is the recipient of many awards and recognitions, including a SIGMOBILE Rockstar award, 2021 Moore Inventor Fellowship, MIT Technology Review's 35 Innovators Under 35, Popular Science ‘brilliant 10,' and the Forbes' 30 Under 30 list (twice). His group's research has earned Best Paper awards at many top conferences, appeared in interdisciplinary journals like Nature, Nature Communications, Science Translational Medicine, and Science Robotics, and was named as an MIT Technology Review Breakthrough Technology of 2016 as well as Popular Science top innovations in 2015. Shyam's research covers a variety of topics, including mobile machine learning, networking, human-computer interaction, battery-free computing, and mobile health. He works across multiple disciplines including computer science, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, biology, and medicine. His work has been licensed by ResMed Inc, led to three startups (Jeeva Wireless, Sound Life Sciences, and Wavely Diagnostics), and is in use by millions of users. Shyam, who didn't know how to type on a keyboard until the age of 16, relates how he got into CS and discovered that more than just programming, it's also a toolkit people can use to build systems like an artist and solve some of the world's most pressing problems. He describes his work around the ambient backscatter, which uses existing radio frequency signals to power devices, and wind dispersal powered devices (and how the common dandelion provided inspiration for this research). Shyam and Rashmi also talk about his work on devices used for sleep apnea and tracking and the broader promise of ubiquitous computing in healthcare, such as democratizing medical attention to areas that don't have the same resources as the Western world. Finally, Shyam gives some insights into the entrepreneurial journey and looks toward the future of healthcare technology.

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S37E9 - The Best Way for a Tech Company to Demonstrate Thought Leadership, with Matthew Stibbe

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 39:31


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover talks with Matthew Stibbe about the best way for a tech company to demonstrate thought leadership. See the video here: https://youtu.be/gGEsMtKufGw. Matthew Stibbe (https://www.linkedin.com/in/matthewstibbe/) is a serial entrepreneur, marketing maven, writer, pilot, and wine enthusiast. But not necessarily in that order. He created marketing strategies, content and campaigns for clients including Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn and HP and contributed to Wired, Forbes and Popular Science. Currently, he is CEO at Articulate Marketing, a UK marketing agency specialising in the technology sector. Also, his geek credentials are strong. Previously, he was founder and CEO at Intelligent Games, a 70-person computer games company where he designed games for LEGO and produced two games based on Dune. Please leave a review wherever you listen to your podcasts! Check out the Ready for Takeoff podcast at Wix.com/readyfortakeoff. Check out Zapier.com/HCI to explore their business automations! Go to Swag.com/HCI and use promo code HCI10. Check out the HCI Academy: Courses, Micro-Credentials, and Certificates to Upskill and Reskill for the Future of Work! Check out the LinkedIn Alchemizing Human Capital Newsletter. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Future Leader. Check out Dr. Westover's book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine. Ranked #5 Workplace Podcast Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast Ranked #7 HR Podcast Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts Each HCI Podcast episode (Program, ID No. 592296) has been approved for 0.50 HR (General) recertification credit hours toward aPHR™, aPHRi™, PHR®, PHRca®, SPHR®, GPHR®, PHRi™ and SPHRi™ recertification through HR Certification Institute® (HRCI®). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Trumpcast
The Waves: The Truth About “Normal” Sex

Trumpcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 27:39


On this week's episode of The Waves, Slate science writer and editor Shannon Palus is joined by Popular Science executive editor and author Rachel Feltman to talk about sex, baby. Rachel's new book, “Been There, Done That” explores the quirky, wild, and often queer side of the history of sex. Shannon and Rachel talk about why animal sex is so relevant to human sex, the “loop-de-loop” of sexual evolution, and they ponder the age old question, “Why are even men?”  In Slate Plus, Rachel talks about why Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) may in some cases not be as terrible as you think.  Recommendations: Shannon: Spindrift seltzer  Rachel: The horror anthology, Your Body is Not Your Body   Podcast production by Cheyna Roth with editorial oversight by Shannon Palus and Alicia Montgomery. Send your comments and recommendations on what to cover to thewaves@slate.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Culture Gabfest
The Waves: The Truth About “Normal” Sex

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 27:39


On this week's episode of The Waves, Slate science writer and editor Shannon Palus is joined by Popular Science executive editor and author Rachel Feltman to talk about sex, baby. Rachel's new book, “Been There, Done That” explores the quirky, wild, and often queer side of the history of sex. Shannon and Rachel talk about why animal sex is so relevant to human sex, the “loop-de-loop” of sexual evolution, and they ponder the age old question, “Why are even men?”  In Slate Plus, Rachel talks about why Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) may in some cases not be as terrible as you think.  Recommendations: Shannon: Spindrift seltzer  Rachel: The horror anthology, Your Body is Not Your Body   Podcast production by Cheyna Roth with editorial oversight by Shannon Palus and Alicia Montgomery. Send your comments and recommendations on what to cover to thewaves@slate.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Waves: Gender, Relationships, Feminism
The Truth About “Normal” Sex

The Waves: Gender, Relationships, Feminism

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 27:39


On this week's episode of The Waves, Slate science writer and editor Shannon Palus is joined by Popular Science executive editor and author Rachel Feltman to talk about sex, baby. Rachel's new book, “Been There, Done That” explores the quirky, wild, and often queer side of the history of sex. Shannon and Rachel talk about why animal sex is so relevant to human sex, the “loop-de-loop” of sexual evolution, and they ponder the age old question, “Why are even men?”  In Slate Plus, Rachel talks about why Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) may in some cases not be as terrible as you think.  Recommendations: Shannon: Spindrift seltzer  Rachel: The horror anthology, Your Body is Not Your Body   Podcast production by Cheyna Roth with editorial oversight by Shannon Palus and Alicia Montgomery. Send your comments and recommendations on what to cover to thewaves@slate.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Slate Daily Feed
The Waves: The Truth About “Normal” Sex

Slate Daily Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 27:39


On this week's episode of The Waves, Slate science writer and editor Shannon Palus is joined by Popular Science executive editor and author Rachel Feltman to talk about sex, baby. Rachel's new book, “Been There, Done That” explores the quirky, wild, and often queer side of the history of sex. Shannon and Rachel talk about why animal sex is so relevant to human sex, the “loop-de-loop” of sexual evolution, and they ponder the age old question, “Why are even men?”  In Slate Plus, Rachel talks about why Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) may in some cases not be as terrible as you think.  Recommendations: Shannon: Spindrift seltzer  Rachel: The horror anthology, Your Body is Not Your Body   Podcast production by Cheyna Roth with editorial oversight by Shannon Palus and Alicia Montgomery. Send your comments and recommendations on what to cover to thewaves@slate.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Audio Book Club
The Waves: Been There, Done That

Audio Book Club

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 27:39


On this week's episode of The Waves, Slate science writer and editor Shannon Palus is joined by Popular Science executive editor and author Rachel Feltman to talk about sex, baby. Rachel's new book, “Been There, Done That” explores the quirky, wild, and often queer side of the history of sex. Shannon and Rachel talk about why animal sex is so relevant to human sex, the “loop-de-loop” of sexual evolution, and they ponder the age old question, “Why are even men?”  In Slate Plus, Rachel talks about why Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) may in some cases not be as terrible as you think.  Recommendations: Shannon: Spindrift seltzer  Rachel: The horror anthology, Your Body is Not Your Body   Podcast production by Cheyna Roth with editorial oversight by Shannon Palus and Alicia Montgomery. Send your comments and recommendations on what to cover to thewaves@slate.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Science Friday
Race And Medicine, Salmon Recovery, Emergency Mushroom ID. June 10, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 48:21


Americans' Knowledge Of Reproductive Health Is Limited As the nation awaits a momentous Supreme Court decision that could overturn or severely limit the 1973 Roe V. Wade opinion on abortion, a new poll released by the Kaiser Family Foundation found serious gaps in Americans' understanding of certain scientific aspects of reproductive health. For instance, the poll found that while medication abortion now accounts for more than half of all abortions in the U.S., fewer than three in ten U.S. adults (27%) say they have heard of the medication abortion pill known as mifepristone—though that number is up slightly from a 2019 poll, which found that 21% of adults had heard of the medication. And even among those who had heard of it, poll respondents were unsure over when and how it was used, or how to obtain the drug. Rachel Feltman, executive editor at Popular Science, joins John Dankosky to talk about the poll findings and other stories from the week in science—including an experimental drug for rectal cancer, an ancient jawbone of a polar bear, an EU ruling regarding charging ports for electronic devices, and a micrometeorite ding on the shiny mirror of the recently-launched JWST.   Some Doctors Want To Change How Race Is Used In Medicine Several months ago, a lab technologist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital mixed the blood components of two people: Alphonso Harried, who needed a kidney, and Pat Holterman-Hommes, who hoped to give him one. The goal was to see whether Harried's body would instantly see Holterman-Hommes' organ as a major threat and attack it before surgeons could finish a transplant. To do that, the technologist mixed in fluorescent tags that would glow if Harried's immune defense forces would latch onto the donor's cells in preparation for an attack. If, after a few hours, the machine found lots of glowing, it meant the kidney transplant would be doomed. It stayed dark: They were a match.“I was floored,” said Harried. Both recipient and donor were a little surprised. Harried is Black. Holterman-Hommes is white. Could a white person donate a kidney to a Black person? Would race get in the way of their plans? Both families admitted those kinds of questions were flitting around in their heads, even though they know, deep down, that “it's more about your blood type—and all of our blood is red,” as Holterman-Hommes put it. Read more at sciencefriday.com.   How A $2 Billion U.S. Plan To Save Salmon In The Northwest Is Failing CARSON, Wash.—The fish were on their way to be executed. One minute, they were swimming around a concrete pond. The next, they were being dumped onto a stainless steel table set on an incline. Hook-nosed and wide-eyed, they thrashed and thumped their way down the table toward an air-powered guillotine. Hoses hanging from steel girders flushed blood through the grated metal floor. Hatchery workers in splattered chest waders gutted globs of bright orange eggs from the dead females and dropped them into buckets, then doused them first with a stream of sperm taken from the dead males and then with an iodine disinfectant. The fertilized eggs were trucked around the corner to an incubation building where over 200 stacked plastic trays held more than a million salmon eggs. Once hatched, they would fatten and mature in rectangular concrete tanks sunk into the ground, safe from the perils of the wild, until it was time to make their journey to the ocean.   Read more at sciencefriday.com.   How A Facebook Group Helps People Identify Mysterious Mushrooms Mushroom season has begun. A wide variety of fungi are sprouting up in forests and yards, especially after a heavy rainstorm. While wild mushrooms are generally safe to touch, eating mysterious fungi is a terrible idea. But, sometimes a child or a dog gobbles up an unknown species. In order to determine if it's poisonous or not, you'll need an expert opinion—quickly. That's why Kerry Woodfield helped start a Facebook group to help people correctly identify poisonous mushrooms and plants. She recruited over 200 botanists and mycologists from all over the world to volunteer their time. In the past few years, the group has mushroomed to over 130,000 members. Guest host John Dankosky talks with Woodfield, co-founder of the Facebook group, Poisons Help; Emergency Identification For Mushrooms & Plants and foraging instructor at Wild Food UK. She discusses why she decided to start the group, its role within the poison control system, and how to talk to the kids in your life about poisonous plants and mushrooms.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.

Science Friday
History Of Sex, Plastic Battery, Mosquito Smell, Postpartum Art. June 3, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 48:11


Scientists Found The Biggest Known Plant On Earth This week, an underwater seagrass meadow claimed the title for the world's largest plant. This organism sprawls across 77 square miles of shallow ocean and has survived 4,500 years. To accomplish this, it kept cloning itself and created identical offshoots to spread along the sand. The ocean has changed wildly over the last 4,500 years, yet this plant has survived. Researchers believe that cloning itself may have helped the plant adapt to a changing ocean, offering hope that seagrass meadows may be more resilient than expected in the face of climate change. Sophie Bushwick, a technology editor at Scientific American, joins Ira to talk about how this mighty meadow persisted for millennia and what it tells scientists about climate change. Sophie and Ira also discuss other stories from this week in science, including what countries are most responsible for fueling the extinction of wildlife, what a well-preserved fossil tell us about the sex lives of ancient trilobites, why male mice are terrified of bananas, the creation of a flea-sized robot that walks like a crab, and how scientists developed an algorithm to pinpoint the whereabouts of unknown asteroids.   Building A Better Battery… Using Plastic? The lithium-ion battery in your cell phone, laptop, or electric car is a crucial component of the modern world. These batteries can charge quickly, and pack a lot of power into a small space. But they're also expensive, require mining scarce lithium, and need to be handled carefully. Other battery technologies have issues as well. For example, the heavy lead-acid battery that starts your car is quite reliable—but lead has its own environmental and health costs. That's why PolyJoule, a startup company based near Boston, is trying to create a new kind of battery, somewhere on the performance curve between those old lead-acid batteries and lithium-ion cells. Their technology relies not on a metal, but on polymer plastics. Read more at sciencefriday.com.   Bug Off: Why Mosquitoes Have An Annoyingly Amazing Sense Of Smell Mosquitoes use their sense of smell to find their next meal: us. So what would happen if you tweaked their smell so that humans smell really gross to them? That's what Dr. Chris Potter and his lab recently tried to do—they changed the neurons responsible for the insect's smell detection, so that in the presence of animal odors, their olfactory systems would be overwhelmed. Instead of smelling like a nice meal, mosquitoes would be repelled by the scent of humans, like if you were stuck in a small room with someone wearing too much cologne. This method worked in Drosophila, the common fruit fly, so Potter and his team were hopeful that would also be the case for mosquitoes. Instead, the experiment didn't go as planned. Because finding a blood meal is so important for mosquitoes, those little buggers evolved backups for their backup receptors. When Potter turned one pathway off, another one kicked in. Ira talks with Dr. Chris Potter, an associate professor of neuroscience in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, based in Baltimore, Maryland, about his findings, and why we can never quite get mosquitoes to bug off.   So You Think You Know About Sex When it comes to sex, there's really no such thing as normal. What was once considered taboo, sometimes goes mainstream. And some things considered new have been around as long as sex itself, like birth control, abortion, and sexually transmitted infections. All that and more is contained in the new book, Been There, Done That: A Rousing History of Sex, by Rachel Feltman, executive editor of Popular Science, based in New York City. Radio producer Shoshannah Buxbaum talks with author Rachel Feltman about queer animals, crocodile dung contraception, ancient STIs, what led to the United States' original abortion ban, and more.   Processing Postpartum With AI And Synthetic Breast Milk Art One of Ani Liu's strengths as an artist is her ability to process emotion through different scientific mediums: machine learning, chemistry, 3D-printing. The result is often visceral: she's used organic chemistry to concoct perfumes that smell like people emotionally close to her and engineered a device that enables the wearer to control the direction of swimming sperm with their mind. And at her new exhibition—next to a 3D-printed sculpture of a pig's uterus—lies 328 feet of clear tubing with a milky-white substance pumped through it, a commentary on pumping breast milk as a new parent. “I wanted to use my own breast milk, but it wouldn't be stable for the duration of the show,” she said. Liu became a parent shortly before the pandemic, and she channeled that experience into a new show called “Ecologies of Care,” to process her postpartum period and the communities in her life that helped her through that time. “I hope that this can allow new parents to bond and maybe feel less lonely,” she said. “In making it, I was questioning how do we create better communities of care? I made all of this work before the formula shortage, before our reproductive rights were even more under threat. When I look at this, I'm hoping that you see this particular slice of love and labor.”   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.  

The Hydrogen Podcast
The United States Puts Its Political Differences Aside To Take Advantage Of Hydrogen Investments And Caterpillar Is Going Big With A Major Hydrogen Announcement.

The Hydrogen Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 10:15


Welcome to The Hydrogen Podcast!In episode 119, Popular Science highlights the difference between red and blue state hydrogen politics. And Caterpillar announces a new demonstration project in Minnesota. All of this on today's hydrogen podcast. Thank you for listening and I hope you enjoy the podcast. Please feel free to email me at info@thehydrogenpodcast.com with any questions. Also, if you wouldn't mind subscribing to my podcast using your preferred platform... I would greatly appreciate it. Respectfully,Paul RoddenVISIT THE HYDROGEN PODCAST WEBSITEhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.comCHECK OUT OUR BLOGhttps://thehydrogenpodcast.com/blog/WANT TO SPONSOR THE PODCAST? Send us an email to: info@thehydrogenpodcast.comNEW TO HYDROGEN AND NEED A QUICK INTRODUCTION?Start Here: The 6 Main Colors of Hydrogen

American Birding Podcast
06-21: This Month in Birding - May 2022

American Birding Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 49:53


It is the end of the month, and with it, comes the This Month in Birding panel. Because May is arguably the best month of the year for birding in the US and Canada we have a panel this month that attempts to meet those expectations. Mollee Brown of the Life List Podcast, Gabriel Foley of the Maryland/DC Bird Atlas, and Purbita Saha of Popular Science.  Also, wanna travel to Panama with Nate?  Topics discussed in this episode include: Language Barriers in Local Bird Conservation Broken Wing Tactic More Widespread Than Thought Songbirds More Colorful the Closer They Live to the Equator Subscribe to the podcast at Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, and Google Podcasts, and please leave a rating or a review if you are so inclined! We appreciate it!

Apple News Today
A landmark study on abortion contains surprises

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 10:22


Oklahoma lawmakers have passed a bill that would be the strictest anti-abortion law in the nation. The Wall Street Journal has details. And NPR looks at a landmark study tracking the lasting effect of having an abortion, or being denied one. Politico explains Biden’s five big challenges on his first trip to Asia as president. The Washington Post introduces us to parents who refuse to give their kids smartphones. Popular Science looks at the facts behind common misconceptions about metals in the kitchen.

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week
150 Years of Moon Crabs, Blowing Things Up, and Asbestos Obsession

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 54:34


Enjoy this super special bonus episode celebrating Popular Science's 150th birthday! The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science. Share your weirdest facts and stories with us in our Facebook group or tweet at us! Click here to learn more about all of our stories!  Click here to follow our sibling podcast, Ask Us Anything!  -- Follow our team on Twitter Rachel Feltman: www.twitter.com/RachelFeltman Popular Science: www.twitter.com/PopSci Produced by Jess Boddy: www.twitter.com/JessicaBoddy Theme music by Billy Cadden: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6LqT4DCuAXlBzX8XlNy4Wq?si=5VF2r2XiQoGepRsMTBsDAQ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Pinball Network
Silverball Chronicles Ep 23: Down The Rabbit Hole With John Popaduik

The Pinball Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 129:24


Silverball Chronicles with David and Ron Episode 23 – Down the Rabbit Hole with John Popaduik     Visit Our Silverball Swag Store https://silverballswag.com/collections/silverball-chronicles   Topic Starts at 6:45   Episode Summary   John Popadiuk, also known as J-Pop, created some of the most interesting and whimsical playfield designs of the 1990s. He went from a god tier Bally-Williams designer to a start-up pinball company owner and finally to a pinball pariah.  John once described his journey as “a long tale of woe in some cases, but also tales of glory in others.”   His name was once included with other Pinball Legends but in 2022 J-Pop had been reduced to a pinball leper. People would often say 'What could J-Pop have done with Bally-Williams had never closed'? Now the question most likely heard is 'Where did it all go wrong?' Does J-Pop deserve all the criticism and abuse, which has sullied his legacy?   This month, we go Down the Rabbit Hole With John Popadiuk      Sources: Wikipedia. John Popadiuk. Here. Here. YouTube. NWPAS 2012 Seminar #08 - John Popadiuk. Here. Pinball Mag, Nick _O. John Popadiuk – Pinball Designer. Here. Pinball Shenaigans. Alice in Wonderland Prototype. Here. Pinball Profile. Episode 326: Michael Hanley and Shane Jackson. Here. Coast 2 Coast Pinball. An Evening with John Popadiuk. Wayback Machine. Here. Dan Cowles and Kristi Highum. Zombies, Yetis & Pinball. Dec 2014. Here. Greet, Kayla. Skill Shot – Zombie Yeti Artist Profile. Here. Pinball Super Nova. John Popadiuk: Another One Bites the Dust. Here. Pinball News. American Pinball Goes Public. Sept 2016 Here. Horacze, Stan. Popular Science. The curious story of Magic Girl. Apr 2017. Here The Pinside Stuff: Here. Here. Here.  

The Planet Today
Section 3 of the IPCC's 2022 report: Mitigation of Climate Change!

The Planet Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 25:58


Matt and Nick talk about the latest section of this year's report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.The IPCC website describes this section by saying “The Working Group III report provides an updated global assessment of climate change mitigation progress and pledges, and examines the sources of global emissions. It explains developments in emission reduction and mitigation efforts, assessing the impact of national climate pledges in relation to long-term emissions goals.”Matt and Nick break down some of the highlights from this report, discuss what other experts are saying, and talk about how they're honestly feeling about this report and what it means moving forward.Check out the entire report, the summary for policymakers, or the technical summary here: Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change (ipcc.ch)Additional source material for this week's show:UN calls for ‘substantial reduction' in fossil fuels to limit climate change | The HillMajor climate report zeroes in on individual choice | Popular Science (popsci.com)Opinion | What You Really Need to Know About the Latest IPCC Climate Report | Kaisa Kosonen (commondreams.org)We have the tools to slow warming - The New York Times (nytimes.com)Climate change: Key UN finding widely misinterpreted - BBC News

I AM Healthy & Fit
Raise Your Standards with Fitness Maverick Neal Spruce

I AM Healthy & Fit

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 55:31


Neal Spruce, a former champion bodybuilder, through the strategic alignment of resources has founded, owned, operated, and partnered to build some of the largest and most successful fitness brands in the business such as Gold's Gym, Apex Fitness, National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM), the bodybugg (winner in 2005 of “Best of What's New in Personal Health in the U.S.” awarded by Popular Science), and 24Hour Fitness, among others. Most recently, Neal developed the evidence-based fitness programming company, dotFIT Worldwide, joined the NASM advisory board, and became an investment partner for fibr, the one-stop-shop for everything the fitness industry needs. His vision and deep understanding of creating resources for club operators and fitness professionals have led him to be one of the most respected entrepreneurs in the industry.Spruce delivers more than 100 lectures annually on sports and fitness topics. He has been a featured speaker on more than 300 radio and television talk shows and hosted his own television fitness show in San FranciscoWebsite:https://www.dotfit.comLinkedin:https://www.linkedin.com/in/neal-spruce-319243a9?original_referer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.com%2FInstagram:https://www.instagram.com/nealspruce/?hl=en

Book Dreams
Ep. 105 - A Libertarian Walks into a Bear, with Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 36:04


What do wild bears and libertarians have in common? Turns out, more than you might think. In 2004 a group of libertarians founded the Free Town Project, a movement to take over a town and turn it into a libertarian utopia. After some research, the Free Towners decided that Grafton, New Hampshire, a town with a history of resistance to taxation that goes back to the American Revolution, seemed like the perfect place for their experiment. Enter investigative reporter Matt Hongoltz-Hetling. Matt was in Grafton working on an unrelated story when he discovered, quite by chance, that the bears in the area were acting very strangely. He dug deeper and discovered surprising reasons for their behavior connected to the Free Town movement, a journey he details in his book, A Libertarian Walks Into a Bear: The Utopian Plot to Liberate an American Town (And Some Bears). Now, Julie and Eve talk to Matt about what happens when a group of outsiders undertakes “the boldest social experiment in modern American history,” why Grafton's bears were eating its cats and attacking its people, and whether an insidious parasite may be contributing to the mayhem. Matthew Hongoltz-Hetling is a freelance journalist specializing in narrative features and investigative reporting, and the author of A Libertarian Walks Into a Bear: The Utopian Plot to Liberate an American Town (And Some Bears). He has been named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, won a George Polk Award, and been voted Journalist of the Year by the Maine Press association, among numerous other honors. Matt's work has appeared in Foreign Policy, USA Today, Popular Science, Atavist Magazine, The Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, The Associated Press, and elsewhere. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Art of Making Things Happen (Bluefishing)  Steve Sims

Internet pioneer Will Pemble built and sold Web, one of the largest web hosts on earth. As a Top 100 Domain Name Millionaire and serial entrepreneur, Will has been building and growing businesses of all shapes and sizes for over 25 years. In addition to Web.com, Will built and sold a national technical training company, and one of the first Internet Service Providers in San Francisco. Through his executive and personal consulting and coaching, Will brings his passion for giving back to millions of people in person and online. Will's success extends well beyond the business world. Known worldwide as "CoasterDad," Will and his kids have built several backyard roller coasters which have been featured on Good Morning America, Discovery Channel, CBS News, NBC News, ABC News, and dozens of television shows worldwide. Will has been featured in hundreds of online media outlets, including AOL.com, Hackaday.com, Popular Science, Popular Mechanics, Make Magazine, Edutopia, to name a few.

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week
A special announcement from Weirdest Thing!

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 3:23


The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science. Share your weirdest facts and stories with us in our Facebook group or tweet at us! You can buy Rachel's book here, and find out more on her website! Click here to learn more about all of our stories!  Click here to follow our sibling podcast, Ask Us Anything!  -- Follow our team on Twitter Rachel Feltman: www.twitter.com/RachelFeltman Popular Science: www.twitter.com/PopSci Produced by Jess Boddy: www.twitter.com/JessicaBoddy Theme music by Billy Cadden: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6LqT4DCuAXlBzX8XlNy4Wq?si=5VF2r2XiQoGepRsMTBsDAQ

Software Process and Measurement Cast
SPaMCAST 702 - Geek Boss and Leadership, A Conversation With Matthew Stibbe

Software Process and Measurement Cast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2022 42:44


In SPaMCAST 702, Matthew Stibbe and I talk about the impact of leadership when building a technology-driven business. Mathew shared stories about learning to type, how he has reinvented himself numerous times, and why he blogs at https://geekboss.com/.  Note: I have not edited out the parts of the interview just before I welcome Matthew to the podcast.  Mr. Stibbe told a couple of very endearing stories that help set the tone for the entire interview. He agreed to allow me to share them.   MATTHEW STIBBE is a serial entrepreneur, marketing maven, writer, pilot, and wine enthusiast. But not necessarily in that order.  He created marketing strategies, content, and campaigns for clients including Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, and HP and contributed to Wired, Forbes, and Popular Science.  Currently, he is CEO at Articulate Marketing, a UK marketing agency specializing in the technology sector. Also, his geek credentials are strong. Previously, he was founder and CEO at Intelligent Games, a 70-person computer games company where he designed games for LEGO and produced two games based on Dune.  Matthew also has his commercial pilots license and an advanced wine diploma. (Have you seen the film Somm? Like that!) At some point in the previous millennium, he studied history at Oxford University. These days, he blogs about modern management at www.geekboss. com, about marketing at www. articulatemarketing.com and wine at www.vincarta.com Re-read Saturday  News This week, we talk about Healthy Constraints in Why Limit WIP: We Are Drowning In Work. Many years (think decades) ago a friend of mine, Danny Bailus, had a cool mini-bike. He rode it around our neighborhood in Howland, Ohio all summer. It was the third coolest (text me the first two) thing that held my attention that summer. That was until Danny decided that it did not go fast enough and removed the governor from the small engine. He removed the constraint from the system and the engine burned out. His father was not very happy, Danny was not very happy, and I was very happy I was not riding it when it happened.  In this chapter, Mr. Benson discusses the difference between healthy and unhealthy constraints. Remember to buy a copy and read along.  Amazon Affiliate LInk:  https://amzn.to/36Rq3p5  Previous Entries Week 1: Preface, Foreword, Introduction, and Logistics – https://bit.ly/3iDezbp Week 2: Processing and Memory – https://bit.ly/3qYR4yg  Week 3: Completion - https://bit.ly/3usMiLm Week 4: Multitasking - https://bit.ly/37hUh5z  Week 5: Context Switching - https://bit.ly/3K8KADF  Week 6: Creating An Economy -  https://bit.ly/3F1XKkZ  Week 7: Healthy Constraints - https://bit.ly/3kM8xqh  Next SPaMCAST  We continue on the basics with an essay on Teams and team design.  We will also have a visit from Jon M Quigley who will regale us with tales of the Alpha and Omega of Product Development. 

Go潮生活
#416 Go潮生活 (粵語)美國《大眾科學》2021年度創新:汽車、娛樂產品類別上榜產品和技術

Go潮生活

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 22:48


美國《大眾科學》(Popular Science)每年都會評選全球最佳科技創新大獎,這一評選已經堅持了30餘年。其選擇趨勢從以前的優秀技術成果,已經轉向那些會引領未來的科研創新。 2021年,汽車行業試圖戰勝一些極其艱難的挑戰,其中最重要的是令人窒息的供應鏈。因此,這一年的成果是真正革命性的,且令人驚訝。 2021年,許多大片在影院上映的同時,也在HBO Max和Netflix等流媒體服務上首次亮相。這些大預算電影讓我們渴望新的電視技術。 本期內容和大家介紹汽車和娛樂產品有哪些產品和技術上榜。 謝謝收聽。 如果你也喜歡我們的節目,請幫忙按讚或五星好評並分享給你的朋友,如果還沒有訂閱,歡迎免費訂閱(Follow)我們在Podcast和YouTube的頻道:go潮生活,每次更新你都會第一時間收到通知。 YouTube頻道: go潮生活 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTIHAxGvS-a1_-9FbrAEyww Podcast播客: go潮生活 Anchor: https://anchor.fm/gofreshfashion Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/gochao-sheng-huo Pocket Casts: https://pca.st/pip6qwsv Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1x9cWijAsecL7ZywPV38yn Radio Public: https://radiopublic.com/go-6r3q1k Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8zMGM4NTI4Yy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== 聯繫我們:gofreshfashionus@gmail.com 追蹤我的 Instagram: radio_host_vic 追蹤我的小紅書 http://www.xiaohongshu.com/user/profile/606b8cd5000000000100132d?xhsshare=CopyLink&appuid=606b8cd5000000000100132d&apptime=1646789932 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gofreshfashion/support

Upreneur
Water on Demand with Riggs Eckelberry

Upreneur

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 44:26


The Upreneur podcast has partnered up with SCORE, hosted by Jeremy Straub, to help bring engaging conversations with today's top leaders and business owners. In today's episode, we spoke with Riggs Eckelberry, founder and CEO of OriginClear Inc., to discuss how you shouldn't compete with your natural partners, how Riggs went from being a #2 to CEO, and how finding the right people can turn your dreams into a reality.  Riggs Eckelberry, founder and CEO of OriginClear Inc. (OTC Pink: OCLN) and a pioneer in the battle against our global water crisis. The idea for OriginClear, a Florida-based company with manufacturing in Texas, came to light when Eckelberry discovered that the method his company invented for removing algae was also useful for extracting waste from water. The pivot became OriginClear as we know it today, on a mission to help businesses seamlessly take over their own water treatment. He is media-friendly climate and water crisis expert and has recently been featured on NewsMax, Newsy, Newsweek, and Popular Science.Websitehttps://www.originclear.com/Thank you for listening, and don't forget to share, rate, and subscribe!If you enjoyed today's episode and want to stay up to date with new upcoming episodes, subscribe to our podcast. Please rate and comment on what your favorite moments from the podcast were, or who you would like for us to how on our show. If you found value from these podcasts, consider sharing this with your friend and family! Don't forget to Like, Subscribe and Rate our podcast!You can also follow us on our social media.Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/u_preneur/Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/upreneurpodcast/Website:https://upreneur.com

Go潮生活
#414 Go潮生活 (粵語)美國《大眾科學》2021年度創新:安全、電子產品類別上榜產品和技術

Go潮生活

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 21:16


美國《大眾科學》(Popular Science)每年都會評選全球最佳科技創新大獎,這一評選已經堅持了30餘年。其選擇趨勢從以前的優秀技術成果,已經轉向那些會引領未來的科研創新。 2021年獲獎名單分為幾個類別:醫療、電子產品、汽車、個人護理、航空航天、工程設計、娛樂、家居、安全、體育和戶外活動,本期內容和大家介紹安全和電子產品有哪些產品和技術上榜。 謝謝收聽。 如果你也喜歡我們的節目,請幫忙按讚或五星好評並分享給你的朋友,如果還沒有訂閱,歡迎免費訂閱(Follow)我們在Podcast和YouTube的頻道:go潮生活,每次更新你都會第一時間收到通知。 YouTube頻道: go潮生活 https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTIHAxGvS-a1_-9FbrAEyww Podcast播客: go潮生活 Anchor: https://anchor.fm/gofreshfashion Breaker: https://www.breaker.audio/gochao-sheng-huo Pocket Casts: https://pca.st/pip6qwsv Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/1x9cWijAsecL7ZywPV38yn Radio Public: https://radiopublic.com/go-6r3q1k Google Podcasts: https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy8zMGM4NTI4Yy9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw== 聯繫我們:gofreshfashionus@gmail.com 追蹤我的 Instagram: radio_host_vic 追蹤我的小紅書 http://www.xiaohongshu.com/user/profile/606b8cd5000000000100132d?xhsshare=CopyLink&appuid=606b8cd5000000000100132d&apptime=1646789932 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gofreshfashion/support

Late Night Health
Nows The Time For Trees -Arbor Day

Late Night Health

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 4:54


Joining us today is the author Dan Lambe – who is also the CEO of the arbor day foundation.Under dan's leadership – the foundation has become the largest nonprofit dedicated to planting trees.The foundation is also celebrating its 50th anniversary in 20-22. Since its inception, the arbor day foundation has helped to plant almost 500 million trees in more than 50 countries. To learn more about the book “Now Is The Time For Trees” visit: arborday.org/timefortreesbook. For more on how to get involved with planting trees and the Arbor Day Foundation, visit ArborDay.org.Dan Lambe is the President of the Arbor Day Foundation, an organization founded in 1972. Under Dan's leadership, the Foundation has grown to become the largest nonprofit membership organization dedicated to planting trees. During his 16 years with the Foundation, he has led the development of innovative programs that expand the organization's global reach, including international forest restoration efforts and the most recent Tree Cities of the World program. In addition, Dan spearheads the Arbor Day Foundation's Evergreen Alliance — a strategic group of corporate leaders dedicated to helping the organization meet its Time for Trees initiative to plant 100 million trees and inspire 5 million tree planters by 2022. Over the course of his tenure, Dan has become a trusted resource for corporate sustainability leaders and the media alike. He has become influential in the sustainability and forestry space, regularly featured as a speaker at conferences hosted by the United Nations, Sustainable Brands, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 3BL and others. He a member of the World Economic Forum 1t.org Stakeholder Council, serves as a board member for the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, sits on the steering committee for the Sustainable Urban Forests Coalition and is a recipient of the Chief's Honor Award — the U.S. Forest Service's highest award. Dan is also a frequent resource for publications such as CNN, NPR, Popular Science, Fast Company. When not educating and empowering people to plant, nurture, and celebrate trees, Dan is often training and struggling to complete triathlons or searching for another unique restaurant to explore. He finds any chance possible to travel for fun and adventure with his wife and two fantastic kids.

Late Night Health Radio
Nows The Time For Trees -Arbor Day

Late Night Health Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 4:54


Joining us today is the author Dan Lambe – who is also the CEO of the arbor day foundation.Under dan's leadership – the foundation has become the largest nonprofit dedicated to planting trees.The foundation is also celebrating its 50th anniversary in 20-22. Since its inception, the arbor day foundation has helped to plant almost 500 million trees in more than 50 countries. To learn more about the book “Now Is The Time For Trees” visit: arborday.org/timefortreesbook. For more on how to get involved with planting trees and the Arbor Day Foundation, visit ArborDay.org.Dan Lambe is the President of the Arbor Day Foundation, an organization founded in 1972. Under Dan's leadership, the Foundation has grown to become the largest nonprofit membership organization dedicated to planting trees. During his 16 years with the Foundation, he has led the development of innovative programs that expand the organization's global reach, including international forest restoration efforts and the most recent Tree Cities of the World program. In addition, Dan spearheads the Arbor Day Foundation's Evergreen Alliance — a strategic group of corporate leaders dedicated to helping the organization meet its Time for Trees initiative to plant 100 million trees and inspire 5 million tree planters by 2022. Over the course of his tenure, Dan has become a trusted resource for corporate sustainability leaders and the media alike. He has become influential in the sustainability and forestry space, regularly featured as a speaker at conferences hosted by the United Nations, Sustainable Brands, U.S. Chamber of Commerce, 3BL and others. He a member of the World Economic Forum 1t.org Stakeholder Council, serves as a board member for the Sustainable Forestry Initiative, sits on the steering committee for the Sustainable Urban Forests Coalition and is a recipient of the Chief's Honor Award — the U.S. Forest Service's highest award. Dan is also a frequent resource for publications such as CNN, NPR, Popular Science, Fast Company. When not educating and empowering people to plant, nurture, and celebrate trees, Dan is often training and struggling to complete triathlons or searching for another unique restaurant to explore. He finds any chance possible to travel for fun and adventure with his wife and two fantastic kids.

Science Friday
Carbon Removal Technology, IPCC And Policy, Sustainability News, Listening To A River. April 22, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 47:10


Celebrating Earth Day With Sustainable Action Today is Earth Day, when many people around the world are taking time to think about their relationship with the planet and to focus on activities helping to mitigate the existential problems our environment faces. And we will be doing the same: devoting our program to Earth Day stories, ideas, and issues. Sara Kiley Watson, assistant editor at Popular Science in charge of their sustainability coverage, joins Ira to talk about some challenges facing our planet—from air pollution in megacities to the tension between ethanol biofuels and food supplies. She also offers some tips for actions individuals can take to make a small difference on their own, such as improving home energy efficiency even if you're a renter, reducing the impact of your takeout order, or considering a neighborhood microgrid.   Can The Latest IPCC Report Pave The Way To Better Climate Policy? One of the best resources to understand the state of our climate crisis is the report developed by the United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), every six to seven years. The most recent installment of the IPCC report, compiled by Working Group III, was released earlier this month. It outlined ambitious steps needed to mitigate some of the worst possible climate futures. It's increasingly unlikely that we'll be able to keep the planet from warming by an average of 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. Yet, the report optimistically focuses on achieving that 1.5 degree benchmark. The report's recommendations include things like phasing out coal entirely, slashing methane emissions by a third, reducing our carbon output among all sectors of the global economy, and developing new technologies to help us do it. But how do governments make laws to reach these goals? That's not addressed in the IPCC report. Ira is joined by David Victor, professor of innovation and public policy in the School of Global Policy and Strategy at UC San Diego to discuss the difficulty in developing climate policy solutions and some that seem promising.   Can Carbon Removal Actually Make A Difference In Reducing Emissions? One of the technologies highlighted in the latest IPCC report is carbon removal. Not to be confused with carbon capture, CO2 removal is a process that absorbs CO2 already in the atmosphere and stores it elsewhere. Carbon capture, on the other hand, is removing CO2 from smokestacks, for example, before it gets into the air. CO2 removal technology has some climate scientists worried about pouring money into this new technology, in lieu of cutting back on our reliance on fossil fuels. Joining Ira is Amar Bhardwaj, energy technology policy fellow at the International Energy Agency, to talk about the pros and cons of carbon removal.   Composing A Sound Map Of An Ever-Changing River Annea Lockwood thinks of rivers as “live phenomena” that are constantly changing and shifting. She's been drawn to the energy that rivers create, and the sound that energy makes, since she first started working with environmental recordings in the 1960s. One of her projects has been to create detailed “river maps” of the Hudson, Danube, and Housatonic rivers. Using stereo microphones and underwater hydrophones, she captures the gentle, powerful sounds of the water, along with the noises of insects, birds, and occasional humans she finds along the way. Lockwood's composition, “A Sound Map of the Housatonic River”—a decade old, this year—takes listeners on a 150-mile tour, from the headwaters in the Berkshire Mountains of Massachusetts, past sites of toxic PCB contamination, to the Connecticut Audubon sanctuary, where the river spills into Long Island Sound.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.      

Online Success Journey
#342: Matthew Stibbe

Online Success Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 34:26


Matthew Stibbe is a serial entrepreneur, marketing maven, writer, pilot, and wine enthusiast. But not necessarily in that order. He created marketing strategies, content and campaigns for clients including Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn and HP and contributed to Wired, Forbes and Popular Science. Currently, he is CEO at Articulate Marketing, a UK marketing agency specializing in the technology sector. Also, his geek credentials are strong. Previously, he was founder and CEO at Intelligent Games, a 70-person computer games company where he designed games for LEGO and produced two games based on Dune. Matthew also has his commercial pilots license and an advanced wine diploma. (Have you seen the film Somm? Like that!) At some point in the previous millennium, he studied history at Oxford University. These days, he blogs about modern management at www.geekboss.com, about marketing at www.articulatemarketing.com and wine at www.vincarta.com.

The Daily Dive
Ukrainian Refugees Are Showing Up at the Southern Border as More Migrants Seeking Asylum Are Also Expected

The Daily Dive

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 22:38


As the war in Ukraine continues we are seeing a new surge of refugees at the border. More than 2,000 Ukrainians have reached the U.S. border with Mexico and more migrants from other countries are expected to seek asylum as the coronavirus public health order known as Title 42 will be lifted soon. Ukrainians have also been frustrated as there hasn't been official guidance on how they can enter the U.S. Miriam Jordan, national immigration correspondent at the NY Times, joins us for more. Next, drone deliveries are now a thing in Texas. ‘Wing' is a division of Alphabet, Google's parent company and just launched the first commercial service in the Dallas-Fort Worth metro area. People will be able to order things like small items from Walgreens, pet medication and even ice cream and have it delivered straight to their door in a matter of minutes. Harry Guinness, contributor to Popular Science, joins us for how it works and whether it will catch on beyond a novelty. Finally, we have a jobs alert! Walmart is raising the starting salary of its truck drivers to at least $95,000 and up to $110,000 for their first year. Walmart will also start a training program to help people earn their commercial driver's license. As consumer buying habits have changed, Walmart needs to beef up its supply chain workers to make sure stores are stocked. Melissa Repko, retail and consumer reporter at CNBC, joins us for what to know. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Alabama's Morning News with JT
HOW STRESS IMPACTS YOUR MEMORY: WHY CAN'T I CONCENTRATE?

Alabama's Morning News with JT

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 7:10


Ever walk into a room and forget why? You go to call your mom, but can't remember her number. Maybe you're clicking back and forth from app to app unable to focus. Popular Science reports that stress and anxiety can wear down your brain, causing a constant mental fog that keeps you distracted and unable to focus or pay attention. How does stress and anxiety erode our ability to concentrate? And in turn, how does this diminished mental capacity impact our relationships and overall mental health? Can this damage be reversed? How? How do you reduce your stress and anxiety levels during uncertain times such as these? What are other long-term effects of this chronic, mass anxiety America has had during the pandemic?Psychologist // specializes in anxiety, depression and addiction care // bestselling author of numerous books, including the latest The Anxiety Reset: a Life-Changing Approach to Overcoming Fear, Stress, Worry, Panic Attacks, OCD DR. GREGORY JANTZ PHD joins JT on Alabama's Morning News.

Out Of The Blank
#1064 - Dan Tynan

Out Of The Blank

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 71:34


Dan Tynan is an American journalist, television and radio commentator who specializes in technology, humor, and humorous takes on technology. Former editor in chief of Yahoo Tech, he has also served as an Executive Editor and later contributing editor for PC World, InfoWorld.com, Family Circle and other publications that have gone on to the great magazine Valhalla in the sky. His work has appeared in more than 75 publications, including Newsweek, Family Circle, Popular Science, Wired, and Playboy.com. He has appeared on CNN, CBS, NPR, Discovery, and Fox News, as well as dozens of regional television and radio programs. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/out-of-the-blank-podcast/support

Big Deep - An Ocean Podcast
A Being of Wonder - Ocean and Science Journalist Erik Olsen on a life driven by exploration, curiosity, and otherworldly cephalopods in the Lembeh Strait

Big Deep - An Ocean Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 17:17


In today's episode, I speak with journalist and filmmaker Erik Olsen.  Erik's video journalism has taken him around the world, but his passion most always lies underwater in our world's oceans. His career has spanned ABC News, The Atlantic, Popular Science, and The New York Times.And earlier this year he had a big spread in the Times Science section where he explored the world of backwater photography where underwater photographers shoot the strange creatures that rise to the surface in the open ocean at night.I met with Erik just as covid was begging to rocket around the world and we recorded days before the world went into lockdown. And yet, even with the anxiety that the world felt as everything shut down, we had a remarkable interview where Erik discussed why he felt such a personal connection to octopuses,  why cephalopods are like beings from another world, and a breathtaking experience he had with a cuttlefish in the Lembeh Strait.Scuba Diving, Free Diving, Ocean Environmentalism, Surfing, and Marine Science.Please give us ★★★★★, leave a review, and tell your friends about us as each share and like makes a difference.

Around the House with Eric G
Emmy Award Winning Katie Linendoll and Home Tech for your family

Around the House with Eric G

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 26, 2022 40:09


We talk with Emmy Award-winning TV personality, consumer technology expert, and one of the leading women in the field of technology about technology in your home. You might be wondering how to manage your kids access to the internet or what is the future of technology in your home. She also brings up some great data from the 2021 Wifi Trends Report that gives us some insight of where we are now and where we are headed with home tech. About Katie: As one of the most in-demand technology experts worldwide, Linendoll is recognized by a wide-range of audiences for her reporting and frequent appearances as a regular expert contributor for major media outlets including The Rachael Ray Show, Hallmark's Home & Family, and numerous other outlets including The Weather Channel, CBS Sports Radio, Robert Irvine Magazine, and more. In addition to frequent live, in-studio media appearances, Linendoll runs her own production company which allows her to shoot, produce, and edit her own tech news stories in some of the most exotic and extreme locations—ranging from a remote community in the Philippines in the wake of Super Typhoon Haiyan to NASA's zero-gravity training lab 63-feet underwater off the coast of the Florida Keys. Linendoll's cutting-edge technology stories have been featured as TV and digital segments and series on The Weather Channel, Popular Science, and Sports Illustrated to name a few.   Linendoll is one of the first women in tech to make significant contributions to the industry, starting her career at the age of 12 when she began coding and earning networking certifications before graduating from high school. Linendoll went on to receive a degree in Information Technology New Media from the Rochester Institute of Technology. Following graduation, she began working behind-the-scenes in production for ESPN where she won an Emmy Award for her work on SportsCenter and later contributed more than 60 written and digital pieces as a sports tech expert. Following her work at ESPN, Linendoll was nominated for a second Emmy Award for her work as a co-host on A&E's We Mean Business, a reality show designed to help revamp small businesses across the country.  During her career, Linendoll has hosted more than a dozen shows and series focused on technology and innovation and has also been named a special correspondent at major tech conferences including Comic-Con, CES, E3, Toy Fair, and Maker Faire. Linendoll is a Silicon Valley Visionary Award Recipient, which celebrates Silicon Valley leaders in technology, education, venture capital, and entrepreneurship. Alongside her two Emmy nominations, and one win, Linendoll also holds a Guinness World Record for the “Most High Fives in One Minute”. Linendoll calls Boston home. She leads an active, faith-filled lifestyle as a runner, fitness enthusiast, musician, and avid traveler. She also devotes a large percentage of her time to select philanthropic causes in healthcare and technology notably the Batcole Foundation, Adolescent and Young Adult Survivorship Fund, Brooke's Blossoming Hope and Bugles Across America. For more about Katie: https://katielinendoll.com/ (https://katielinendoll.com/) Thanks for listening to Around the house if you want to hear more please subscribe so you get notified of the latest episode as it posts at https://around-the-house-with-e.captivate.fm/listen (https://around-the-house-with-e.captivate.fm/listen) We love comments and we would love reviews on how this information has helped you on your house! Thanks for listening! For more information about the show head to https://aroundthehouseonline.com/ (https://aroundthehouseonline.com/)

Crashing the War Party
Kelsey Atherton on the fog of war and discerning science from sci-fi in Ukraine

Crashing the War Party

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 45:12


As the mainstream media pumps out report after report on military developments in Ukraine, Washington lawmakers use those headlines to call for more weapons and assistance to Kyiv. Military technology journalist Kelsey Atherton breaks down some of the mythology surrounding no-fly zones, drones, and other popular "magic bullets" that people think could save the day in Ukraine. In the first segment, Kelley & Dan dish on the Top 4 Outrageous Hawk Talkers in the news this week.More from Kelsey Atherton:Everything to know about Switchblades, the attack drones the US is giving Ukraine -- Popular Science -- 3/22/22What a no-fly zone over Ukraine would actually mean -- Popular Science -- 3/18/22These are the weapons in the Ukrainian arsenal -- Popular Science -- 3/3/22 Subscribe at crashingthewarparty.substack.com

The Digital Agency Growth Podcast
Matthew Stibbe on Scaling an Agency through Focus, Smarts, and Team Happiness

The Digital Agency Growth Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 49:52


Really curious people usually have a way of telling incredible stories, having experiences and life lessons worth discussing, and genuinely caring about others. Matthew Stibbe is just that, and today you can go back in history or stay right where you are as we dive into his entrepreneurship journey. That's why episode 123 of The Digital Agency Growth Podcast is about the interrelationships you can create within your agency, with Matthew Stibbe! Watch our new recorded video training: Relationship-Driven New Business At-ScaleIn this episode of The Digital Agency Growth Podcast, Matthew shares the importance of understanding your worth, as well as that of your employees, in relation to work and time in the office and actionable steps you can take right now to get curious and make opportunities through experiences. Matthew Stibbe is an entrepreneur, manager, marketer, writer, pilot, wine lover and geek. He is also a history professor at Sheffield Hallam University's Humanities Research Centre.In this episode, Dan and Matthew discuss the following:How Matthew went from being a private pilot and journalist to an agency owner, and why he decided to pivot in that fashion to a B-corp business.The interrelationships between how we handle our internal projects and how we communicate project management to clients.Why Matthew thinks that time tracking for employee wages isn't the answer, and how you can either pay for the thought in the shower or the years of experience that created that thought; it's up to you.How Matthew utilized opportunities in everything he did to gain experience, connections, and how he created a unique lifestyle and agency just by being a very curious person.Matthew Stibbe is a serial entrepreneur, marketing maven, writer, pilot, and wine enthusiast. But not necessarily in that order. He created marketing strategies, content, and campaigns for clients including Microsoft, Google, LinkedIn, and HP and contributed to Wired, Forbes, and Popular Science. Currently, he is CEO at Articulate Marketing, a UK marketing agency specializing in the technology sector.  Also, his geek credentials are strong. Previously, he was founder and CEO at Intelligent Games, a 70-person computer games company where he designed games for LEGO and produced two games based online. Matthew also has his commercial pilots license and an advanced wine diploma. At some point in the previous millennium, he studied history at Oxford University.  These days, he blogs about modern management atwww.geekboss.com,  about marketing at www.articulatemarketing.com and wine at www.vincarta.comThank you for listening! If you enjoyed this episode, please take a moment to follow, rate and review the podcast and tell me your key takeaways!CONNECT WITH MATTHEW STIBBE:Read his blogLinkedInCONNECT WITH DAN ENGLANDER:LinkedInSales SchemaLINKS MENTIONED: Double Digit Growth Book

The PolicyViz Podcast
Episode #214: Karla Starr

The PolicyViz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 28:13


Karla Starr is a columnist for Medium and write the newsletter The Starr Report on Substack. She has appeared on NPR and CBS Sunday Morning and has written for The Atlantic, Slate, Popular Science, and The Guardian. She won an award for the Best Science/Health story from the Society of... The post Episode #214: Karla Starr appeared first on PolicyViz.

Conversations for Yoga Teachers
Meet Rachele Pojednic (EP.175)

Conversations for Yoga Teachers

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 49:38


Rachele Pojednic, Ph.D., Ed.M is an assistant professor and program director of exercise science in Norwich University's Health and Human Performance Department and a research associate at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine at Harvard Medical School. Rachele's work examines nutrition and physical activity education for health care and fitness professionals as well as overall diet, supplementation and physical activity interventions on muscle physiology, chronic disease and healthy aging. She received her doctorate from the Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition and Exercise Physiology. She also holds a Master of Education in Physical Education from Boston University and a Bachelor of Science in Cardiopulmonary and Exercise Science from Northeastern University. Her research at Tufts was completed in the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology and Sarcopenia laboratory at the U.S. Department of Argiculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, where she received the Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. In 2022, she received a ($24,939) Vermont Biomedical Research Network Pilot Award for her project “The Perceived Effect versus Biomarkers of Cannabidiol on Muscle Recovery in Active Adult Women.” Rachele has a passion for science communication and has been a consultant and writer for several organizations. Her work has appeared in Time, Popular Science, Self, Shape, Women's Health, Forbes, Runner's World and Boston magazines. You can find her on Instagram at @rachelepojednic and register for her course on nutrition using this link:  https://strong-process.teachable.com/p/nutrition-for-health-coaches-and-fitness-professionals

Science Friday
James Webb Focused Image, Decarbonize Your Home, Wildlife Crime. March 18, 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2022 47:28


The James Webb Telescope Releases Its First Focused Image This week eager astronomers got an update on the progress of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), which launched last December. After a long period of tweaking and alignment, all 18 mirrors of the massive orbiting scope are now in focus.  In a briefing this week, Marshall Perrin, the Webb deputy telescope scientist, said that the team had achieved diffraction limited alignment of the telescope. “The images are focused as finely as the laws of physics allow,” he said. “This is as sharp an image as you can get from a telescope of this size.”  Although actual scientific images from the scope are still months away, the initial test images had astronomers buzzing. Rachel Feltman, executive editor at Popular Science, joins Ira to talk about the progress on JWST, and other stories from the week in science, including plans to launch a quantum entanglement experiment to the International Space Station, an update on the COVID-19 epidemic, and a new report looking at the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. They'll also tackle the habits of spiders that hunt in packs, and the finding that a galloping gait may have started beneath the ocean's waves.    The Climate Crisis Is Driving New Home Improvements A lot of the changes that need to happen to keep global warming under 1.5 degrees Celsius need to happen at a huge, international level. But nearly a fifth of carbon emissions in the U.S. come from our homes. Are there things we can do at home to help the climate crisis? And how effective are individual actions? Threshold is a podcast telling stories about our changing environment. And as their fourth season explores what it will take for the world to keep global warming under the crucial 1.5 benchmark, reporter Nick Mott explores what individuals can do to decarbonize their homes. Mott talks to Ira Flatow about his own home improvement project, in a preview of Threshold's next episode.   From Succulents To Bugs: Exploring Wildlife Crime The world of science is surprisingly ripe with true crime stories. Consider case number one: Deep in South Africa's Northern Cape, a rare and tiny succulent grows: the Conophytum. Demand for succulents skyrocketed during the pandemic, as more and more people got into the plant keeping hobby. But these succulents only grow in very specific conditions, and poachers will go to great lengths to nab them. The story is the subject of a recent investigation published in National Geographic. Or case two: It's 2018, and a theft has occurred at the Philadelphia Insectarium, a bug museum and education center. In a daring daylight raid, thousands of creatures were taken from the insectarium—right under the nose of the CEO. No one has ever been charged with a crime. This bizarre big story quickly made the rounds of local and national news, which left out the most interesting details, including a surprise ending. The new documentary series “Bug Out” takes us through the twists and turns of this story, from retracing the events of the day of the heist, to a deep look at the illegal international insect trade. The four episodes of “Bug Out” are available to watch now on IMDB TV and Prime Video.   Joining Ira to chat about these wildlife true crime stories are Dina Fine Maron, senior wildlife crime reporter for National Geographic and Ben Feldman, director and executive producer of “Bug Out.”  

Doing It! with Hannah Witton
Measuring Your Orgasms and Being a Woman Engineer In Sex Tech with Anna Lee

Doing It! with Hannah Witton

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2022 54:16


In this episode, Hannah is joined by Anna Lee (aka Anna the Average), who is the co-founder and head of engineering at Lioness, the women-led sexual health startup. Anna discusses her journey as a Korean American women in the sex tech world, how she overcame the conservatism of her family to found her own sex tech company, and how working in sex tech helped her reclaim ownership of her own body after trauma. She and Hannah talk about why Anna is feeling positive that the landscape of the sex tech industry is becoming more diverse despite having to navigate a lot of stereotypes and uncomfortable situations. Finally, Anna shares more about her motivation behind creating the Lioness, why she believes being able to measure your orgasms allows people to better understand how their bodies work, and gives advice on introducing using toys in partnered sex as well how to get into the sex tech industry!CW: mention of sexual assault✨ MORE ABOUT ANNA LEE ✨Anna Lee is a technical co-founder of Lioness, the women-led sexual health startup that built the world's first and only smart vibrator that improves understanding of sexual pleasure and body through biofeedback data. She is a Forbes 30 Under 30 alum and has been covered in numerous publications like Fast Company, Glamour, and Popular Science, as well as Paper Magazine's Asian Women Creators You Need to Know and Buzzfeed's 14 Sex Tech Founders Who Are Changing The Way The World Thinks About Sex. Anna is a prominent creator on TikTok with nearly 400,000 followers.Anna was previously a mechanical engineer at Amazon, launching the Amazon Dash Button's original concept and the Kindle Voyage Page Press Technology. She has spoken at top universities like UC Berkeley and Chalmers University, SXSW, and CYFY India. Lioness was featured at CES 2020, a finalist at Last Gadget Standing, Engadget Best of CES 2020, and Refinery29 Best of CES SexTech. She is a big advocate in Lioness' mission to expand understanding and research in sexual health, and destigmatize female sexuality.Lioness: https://lioness.io/Instagram: https://instagram.com/annaisaverageTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@annatheaverage

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week
Why Pain Hurts So Good, Growing Mutant Gardens, Emo Teen Puppies

The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 49:55


Leigh Cowart, science reporter and author of Hurts So Good: The Science and Culture of Pain on Purpose, joins Weirdest Thing for the season finale! The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science. Share your weirdest facts and stories with us in our Facebook group or tweet at us! Click here to learn more about all of our stories! Click here to follow our sibling podcast, Ask Us Anything! -- Follow our team on Twitter Rachel Feltman: www.twitter.com/RachelFeltman Sara Kiley Watson: www.twitter.com/SaraKileyWatson Popular Science: www.twitter.com/PopSci Produced by Jess Boddy: www.twitter.com/JessicaBoddy Theme music by Billy Cadden: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6LqT4DCuAXlBzX8XlNy4Wq?si=5VF2r2XiQoGepRsMTBsDAQ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/support

The Happy Warrior Podcast
Why Dungeons & Dragons isn't racist. Interview with Dr. Christopher Ferguson & Why Popular Science is Always Wrong!

The Happy Warrior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 49:52


Orcs aren't' racist, Dungeon's and Dragons never radicalized anyone, and playing video games does not make you racist. These are general statements cited over the years as basic facts in the news media, yet they are almost universally wrong. We interview Stetson University Psychologist Dr. Christopher J. Ferguson, who published more against bad pop-science fads than almost anyone. Ferguson is the premier expert in the United States on video game violence and has written extensively at Psychology Today and other outlets. We go with Dr. Ferguson into these false narratives, especially when they orbit politics and nerd culture. Even the scientific establishment, like the American Psychological Association, will feature junk science in gussied up papers. Why politics is de-railing good science and how Ferguson would hope to solve the problem. Ferguson is into the science of video gaming. Ferguson's Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/CJFerguson1111 Psychology Today: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/contributors/christopher-j-ferguson-phd Ours: The Happy Warrior Podcast is a conservatarian interview podcast deep-diving into the most important stories of the day. Happy Warrior Subtack: https://happywarrior.substack.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/HappyWarriorP Youtube: https://bit.ly/2ItbgBY Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/happywarriorpete Description From Psychology Today: Christopher J. Ferguson, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology at Stetson University. He is interested in media violence and, in particular, video games. He has been invited to speak at Vice President Biden's task force and a 2013 Institute of Medicine/CDC panel on the subject. In summer 2018, I testified at the School Safety Commission. His research has generally indicated that exposure to media violence has little effect on societal violence. Ferguson has emphasized that media effects must be studied independently rather than taking a "one size fits all" approach. Thus, advertising may get us to switch from one product to another even if video games don't turn kids into mass killers. Dr. Ferguson is also interested in the sociology of media research itself...how political pressure, social, moral panics, and culture war can distort media effects research into "opinions with numbers." Dr. Ferguson is a consummate geek, interested in everything from science fiction to Dungeons and Dragons in his spare time. He and his son are fans of the Lego series of video games. Dr. Ferguson also likes strategy games such as Europa Universalis. His career proves to parents once and for all, yes, your child CAN make a career out of video games... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/happywarrior/message

Losing your mind with Chris Cosentino
Chef Alex Talbot, Ideas in Food & Curiosity Doughnuts

Losing your mind with Chris Cosentino

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022


Aki Kamozawa & H. Alexander Talbot are Ideas in Food, a blog, a book, and a culinary consulting business based in Plumstead, PA. They also co-own Curiosity Doughnuts, a small, artisan doughnut shop, open weekends only, in the Stockton Market across the river in Stockton, NJ. The two met in the kitchen at Clio in Boston in 1997 and have been cooking together ever since. Aki and Alex specialize in sharing techniques for creativity with chefs, cooks, restaurants, food service companies, and home cooks based on the premise that a solid understanding of science and technique coupled with high quality ingredients, modern equipment, and innovative approaches to cooking makes anything possible. They specialize in helping other chefs express their own cuisine more clearly and effectively. In addition to their work with individual chefs and restaurants, they have consulted with companies including the Art Institutes, the Institute of Culinary Education, Marks & Spencer, and Unilever.Their first book, Ideas in Food, Great Recipes and Why They Work, was published in December of 2010 by Clarkson Potter. It is a handbook for cooks and chefs, teaching them how to unleash their creativity, intensify flavors, improve efficiency, and have fun in the kitchen. Ideas in Food is a blend of stories, science and recipes based on their experience and experiments in the kitchen. Their second book, Maximum Flavor, Recipes That Will Change the Way You Cook, was published by Clarkson Potter in October of 2013. It's a workbook with practical and delicious recipes to cook every day at home. It includes a plethora of tips and techniques for the getting the most flavor out of your food and making every dish your own. Their third book,Gluten Free Flour Power, Bringing Your Favorite Foods Back To The Table, was published by Norton in March 2015. It is an exploration of family favorites made possible by creating gluten free all purpose flour blends at home.Aki and Alex began the blog Ideas in Food in December 2004. It began as a digital notebook to record their work in their restaurant kitchen. It has morphed into a clearinghouse for ideas gleaned from various mediums: restaurants, blogs, books, people and everyday life; all of it relating back to their kitchen. Over the past six years the website's popularity has grown from a cult following of professional chefs into a benchmark for culinary blogs. It is a favorite for its combination of solid information, creative ideas, and illustrative photography. The focus is on sharing ways to make delicious and beautiful food. That is what draws readers back time and again. Ideas in Food was voted Best Culinary Science Blog in the 2013 Saveur Best Food Blog Awards.Aki and Alex won an IACP Award for Instructional Culinary Writing with Recipes for participating in a series of articles written for Gilt Taste in 2011. They co-wrote a series of articles for Serious Eats in 2014. Aki and Alex contributed an essay to The Kitchen as Laboratory, published by Columbia University Press in January 2012. They are interviewed in the book, Cooking for Geeks, by Jeff Potter, published by O'Reilly in August 2010. They contributed an essay to the anthology Food and Philosophy, which was published by Wiley-Blackwell in November 2007. Alex and Aki wrote a column titled Kitchen Alchemy for Popular Science online based on scientific explorations in the kitchen. They wrote an article about garlic for Santé Magazine in March of 2009. In addition to this they have been featured in articles for many publications including the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Philadelphia Inquirer, Food and Wine, Bon Appetit, Saveur, Santé Magazine, and Gourmet, and their work can occasionally be found on other blogs and websites around the Web.Aki and Alex have been honored to speak and teach at professional conferences around the world: The World Pastry Forum, Star Chefs International Chefs Congress, International Association of Culinary Professionals, Women Chefs and Restaurateurs, the Experimental Cuisine Collective, The Flemish Primitives and the International Association of Culinary Professionals. The pair were invited to speak at Harvard in November 2010 and participated in a culinary round table at Cornell University in 2008. They have appeared as guest chefs for four Holland America cruises, leading demonstrations and teaching classes for groups from 12-150 people. Aki and Alex travel the United States and beyond cooking guest chef dinners and teaching culinary workshops.Aki and Alex appear in two episodes of Foodography on the Cooking Channel in 2010. Their consulting business was featured on an episode of Friday Night Arts on their local PBS station, WHYY, in June 2010. In 2008 they appeared in an episode of The Food Detectives on the Food Network demonstrating the uses of liquid nitrogen. In May 2009, Aki and Alex discussed food science with Michael Colameco for his radio program Food Talk on WOR in New York City.

The Happy Warrior Podcast
VIDEO: Why Dungeons & Dragons isn't racist. Interview with Dr. Christopher Ferguson & Why Popular Science is Always Wrong!

The Happy Warrior Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2022 49:52


VIDEO EPISODE: Orcs aren't' racist, Dungeon's and Dragons never radicalized anyone, and playing video games does not make you racist. These are general statements cited over the years as basic facts in the news media, yet they are almost universally wrong. We interview Stetson University Psychologist Dr. Christopher J. Ferguson, who published more against bad pop-science fads than almost anyone. Ferguson is the premier expert in the United States on video game violence and has written extensively at Psychology Today and other outlets. We go with Dr. Ferguson into these false narratives, especially when they orbit politics and nerd culture. Even the scientific establishment, like the American Psychological Association, will feature junk science in gussied up papers. Why politics is de-railing good science and how Ferguson would hope to solve the problem. Ferguson is into the science of video gaming. Ferguson's Social Media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/CJFerguson1111 Psychology Today: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/contributors/christopher-j-ferguson-phd Ours: The Happy Warrior Podcast is a conservatarian interview podcast deep-diving into the most important stories of the day. Happy Warrior Subtack: https://happywarrior.substack.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/HappyWarriorP Youtube: https://bit.ly/2ItbgBY Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/happywarriorpete Description From Psychology Today: Christopher J. Ferguson, Ph.D., is a professor of psychology at Stetson University. He is interested in media violence and, in particular, video games. He has been invited to speak at Vice President Biden's task force and a 2013 Institute of Medicine/CDC panel on the subject. In summer 2018, I testified at the School Safety Commission. His research has generally indicated that exposure to media violence has little effect on societal violence. Ferguson has emphasized that media effects must be studied independently rather than taking a "one size fits all" approach. Thus, advertising may get us to switch from one product to another even if video games don't turn kids into mass killers. Dr. Ferguson is also interested in the sociology of media research itself...how political pressure, social, moral panics, and culture war can distort media effects research into "opinions with numbers." Dr. Ferguson is a consummate geek, interested in everything from science fiction to Dungeons and Dragons in his spare time. He and his son are fans of the Lego series of video games. Dr. Ferguson also likes strategy games such as Europa Universalis. His career proves to parents once and for all, yes, your child CAN make a career out of video games... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/happywarrior/message

Hunting Matters
David M. Wirth

Hunting Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2022 39:53


David Wirth is an inventor and entrepreneur who holds two degrees in Aerospace Engineering from UCLA and is currently pursuing his PhD in nanoengineering of materials. Before beginning his doctoral studies, he served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force and co-founded a metal 3D printing company, Fabric8Labs, which was recently funded by Intel ventures. In 2016 he was personally invited to the White House to discuss topics related to additive manufacturing with industry and academic leaders. In 2017 he left Fabric8Labs to partner with Jason Murray and founded Arcflash Labs, LLC with the goal of advancing electromagnetic propulsion technologies.Together they developed a new type of high-density power inverter and offered a number of coilgun and gauss rifle prototypes for sale, including the GR-1 "Anvil" which was recently featured on Forgotten Weapons. David has been featured on the Forbes' 30 under 30 list in the area of manufacturing, and his projects have been featured on the Discovery Channel, Popular Mechanics, New Scientist, The Drive, and Popular Science.

Write Away with Natalie Lockett
Science Meets Storytelling with Shannon Palus

Write Away with Natalie Lockett

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 1, 2022 56:53


If you've ever been curious about the newsroom and how to write nonfiction stories that sell, you won't want to miss our conversation with Senior Editor Shannon Palus at Slate, a progressive online magazine that covers current affairs, politics, and culture. Shannon covers health, wellness, science and more for Slate, and her work has appeared appeared many other places including Popular Science, Scientific American, the Atlantic, and Wirecutter.   You'll hear about all this and more:   Ways to break into news writing Where to look for work Where to find science ideas and how to pitch them How to write accessible nonfiction stories about science And more!

Family Health with Dr. Lex
Sjogren's, Autoimmune Disease & Approaching Invisible Illness with Allergy / Immunologist Dr. Kara Wada

Family Health with Dr. Lex

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2022 40:50


The incidence of autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, psoriasis, thyroid disease and even diabetes has skyrocketed.  They can present with a wide constellation of symptoms, both vague and specific, but can be difficult to diagnose.  While we have made tremendous strides in the treatment of autoimmune disease, there are many important considerations that can affect the course of illness and quality of life.  In this episode, Dr. Kara Wada and I discuss Sjogren's, Autoimmune Disease and Approaches to Invisible Illness including answers to the following questions:- What is autoimmune disease and how does it develop?- Why is it so important to see a specialist for an autoimmune disease workup?- Why has there been an increase in the incidence of autoimmune disease?- How much of a role does genetics play in disease?- What is Sjogren's and how was Dr. Wada's diagnosis made?- How does gut health impact autoimmune disease?- Can autoimmune disease be diagnosed with labs?- What happens when all your labs are normal but you know something is wrong?- How can symptom tracking be helpful?- How did Dr. Wada heal herself?- Why is it important to discuss all your supplements with your physician?- Are "natural" supplements safe?- What are some lifestyle changes autoimmune patients should make?- How do diet, stress management and sleep hygiene affect autoimmune disease?- What is the difference between a physician and coach and which one you should choose?- How do your thoughts inform your feelings, actions and results?- What is some advice for approaching invisible illness or having a challenging condition?***************Kara Wada, MD is a Sjogren's spoonie, quadruple board-certified allergy/immunology and lifestyle medicine physician, coach, medical educator and mom. Dr. Wada sees her work as a balance builder. She focuses on the unique challenges pertaining to those struggling with misbehaving immune systems including autoimmune, allergic and immune deficiency related conditions. She works tirelessly with her patients and coaching clients using her naturally-minded and scientifically-grounded approach to health and healing.Dr. Wada earned her medical degree at The University of Illinois College of Medicine. She completed Internal Medicine-Pediatrics residency, Allergy/Immunology and Medical Education fellowships at The Ohio State University and Nationwide Children's Hospital. She currently serves as Assistant Fellowship Director and Assistant Clinical Professor at The Ohio State University.Dr. Wada has been featured on NPR, US News & World Reports, Popular Science and Reader's Digest as well as multiple podcasts. Dr. Wada lives in Columbus, Ohio with her husband, Dr. Akira Wada, and 3 children.***************For more from Dr. Wada check out:www.crunchyallergist.comInstagram: @crunchyallergistFacebook: www.facebook.com/crunchyallergistTwitter: @crunchyallergySuccess with Sjogren's Podcast***************Thanks so much for listening!  If you enjoyed the show and want to hear more, please leave a review, subscribe and share!You can always find more information on my website:www.drlexlifestylemedicine.comand....If you love the music, you can find more at:www.therealmichaelvm.com/music*****************All my love & gratitude to:my guests: Dr.  Kara Wada & Oliver,my inspiration: my patients,my idea guy: Edward,my intro crew: Izzy, Lance & Lucia,my tech & equipment guy: Pop,my angel: Susie,my music & sound guy: Mike VM,my mascot: Jules, my creative director & cheerleader: Emily,my love, Michael.

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul
High, Noon for Tuesday December 7th 2021

Be Reasonable: with Your Moderator, Chris Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2022 76:18


In today's episode:Popular Science tries (and fails) to convince child-brains that their sweat-soaked and snot-soaked cloth masks still prevent the spread of covidMore on Michael Gableman's amazing work uncovering election fraud in WisconsinNew York City is nearing approval for a plan to let non-citizens vote in local elections, increasing its potential voter base by 800,000 non-citizensFederal courts strike down another element of Joe Biden's totally unlawful vaccine mandates, this time for federal contract workersMore evidence of the illegitimate administration's bureaucracy working with Big Tech to censor ideas they don't likeCongressman Devin Nunes announces he's leaving Congress to become CEO of Trump's social media companyTrump's media company announces a distribution deal with YouTube competitor, Rumble.Listen and subscribe: anchor.fm/imyourmoderatorMerch site: www.cancelcouture.com or shop.spreadshirt.com/cancel-coutureWriting at: imyourmoderator.substack.comFollow the podcast info stream: t.me/imyourmoderatorTo support directly:btc via coinbase: 3MEh9J5sRvMfkWd4EWczrFr1iP3DBMcKk5Support the show (https://www.ko-fi.com/imyourmoderator) See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/be-reasonable-with-your-moderator-chris-paul.

Power Lunch Live
Rhett Power with Ariel Garten on Power Lunch Live

Power Lunch Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 30:18


On Power Lunch Live I have Ariel Garten who is probably one of the most interesting people you will ever meet. She is a Neuroscientist, mom, former psychotherapist, former fashion designer, and the co- founder and visionary of an amazing and highly successful tech startup Muse. Muse tracks your brain during meditation to give you real-time feedback on your meditation, guiding you into the “zone” and solving the problem most of us have when starting a meditation practice. Muse lets you know when you are doing it right. With no formal business background, Ariel personally raised $18M to found Muse from Silicon Valley investors (as well as Ashton Kutcher). Muse is now used by hundreds of thousands of people to start or deepen their meditation practice, including by Mayo clinic. The latest Muse S also uses advanced EEG technology to track how well you focus, sleep and recharge, so you can sleep better at night and refocus during the day. Ariel and Muse have been featured in over 1000 articles, including CNN (3x), Forbes, Fortune, Popular Science, NYT, WSJ, GQ, Men's Health, O Magazine, Wired, and more. Ariel's mission in life is to help people understand how their brain and mind work - both the nuts and bolts and neurons, and how that plays out in the messy and beautiful human experience of living. She inspires people to understand that they can accomplish anything they want by understanding what actually goes on in their own mind. Ariel is also the co-host of the Untangle Podcast. #powerlunchlive www.powerlunch.live

NextGen Radio
Isometric Training for Pain Management and Strength Gains

NextGen Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 45:39


Episode NotesPublished on October 11, 2021Our Hosts:Mike Ercolano's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/mike_ercolano/Kelly Krauss' Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/kkrauss76/John Espodito's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/john_esposito15/Next Generation Training Center: https://nextgenerationtrainingcenter.com/NextGen Radio Podcast: https://nextgenerationtrainingcenter.com/nextgenradio/Mike Ercolano (00:00):What's up, everybody. Thank you for listening to NextGen Radio. This is a podcast for those of you who want the truth and nothing but the truth when it comes to diet, exercise, and all things health. This is episode number 35 and I'm Mike Ercolano. I'm here with my co-hosts Kelly Krauss and John Esposito, and we are about to fill the next 30 minutes or so of your time with some super exciting health and fitness stuff. So, if that's what you're interested in, welcome.Transcript and Show Notes:Mike Ercolano (00:34):I don't know, I'm trying to extend the intro to keep the listener's attention, but I don't know. It's not working.Kelly Krauss (00:41):All right. We're here, we're here.John Esposito (00:42): We're all here.Mike Ercolano (00:43):I don't think I have either one of yours attention either because you're looking down at your phone and...Kelly Krauss (00:48):I was just trying to find something.John Esposito (00:48):I'm trying to find good quality information.Kelly Krauss (00:50): Yeah, I was too.Mike Ercolano (00:50): Ah, cramming last minute.John Esposito (00:52):Yeah, of course. That's how I got through college. Last-minute cramming.Mike Ercolano (00:55): Yeah, I understand that.Kelly Krauss (00:57):I'm a planner, so I've let myself down with today.Mike Ercolano (01:00):You didn't plan beforehand?Kelly Krauss (01:02): Not really.John Esposito (01:03):But you were saying you were trying to.Kelly Krauss (01:04):I put thought into it, but I came up with nothing. That's not acceptable. I have to come up with something.Mike Ercolano (01:10):You're right. Yeah, that was not acceptable.Kelly Krauss (01:12): Right.Mike Ercolano (01:14):No. That's right, I didn't plan anything either, but I never do. I mean, that's not true. Sometimes I do.John Esposito (01:20): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (01:21):Yeah, we just got to get better with that.John Esposito (01:23): Yeah, we do.Kelly Krauss (01:24):Because you need time to think about it. You need time to research.John Esposito (01:28):Absolutely. Mike, you did queue a little interest in some topics I was reading on when you were asking about how our workouts are going.Mike Ercolano (01:33): Yeah?John Esposito (01:33):Yeah. So, I was reading up on a new training... I guess, science behind some training. It's the idea of 90 degree eccentric training. I don't know if you've ever heard of that, but it's just-Mike Ercolano (01:46):No, I don't think so. 90 degree eccentric training? Is that what you said?John Esposito (01:50):Yep. 90 degree eccentric isometrics is the full name.Mike Ercolano (01:54): Okay.John Esposito (01:54):So, there is a good amount of new research out and a lot by one specific, I guess, performance coach, but he's also a doctorate. He's a physical therapist, doctor in kinesiology as well as everything else.Mike Ercolano (02:10):Remix. Sorry. That didn't help either.John Esposito (02:13):For the life of me can't remember his name, but a lot of his research and lot of the research that he based his training off of is about joint angles and about how musculature affects those joint angles and vice versa. How the joint affects... My God. English. How joint angles affect musculature. There's been a lot of research in the past couple of years saying that that 90 degree angle, which we normally say is a baseline to get to, I would say, with a squat or most movements is actually the ideal positioning for most joints muscles and actually for majority of the body, for spinal alignment as well.John Esposito (02:50):Now, a lot of his training with high-end athletes... He trains a lot of quarterbacks, he trains a lot of sprinters, even bodybuilders. So, he's got a lot of variety going into there. Are finding huge results just by real simple movements. Like a goblet squat, going down into a 90 degree angles, setting that in position, keeping constant tension throughout that, and then exploding out of that movement. But you get after isometric, which it allows the muscles to secure the joint, getting into that isometric at the bottom, after the eccentric. Which we know it's forcing your muscles to squeeze, it keeps everything in position. But that is also helping to relieve injury, to treat injury, and to also prevent injury. So, there's now about 250 studies included in his website.Mike Ercolano (03:40):Hm. What's this guy's name?John Esposito (03:42):It's something Seedman. Or Joel Seedman, I believe. And a lot of his training has been going off of that, and he's been finding results that have been supporting all the research as well. It's not just lab-based, it was practice-based as well.Mike Ercolano (03:58):Right.John Esposito (03:59):These athletes that you're seeing are some of the best of the best. You have, I can't remember who thequarterback was. Is it Heinicke or Heinky?Mike Ercolano (04:11): I don't know.John Esposito (04:12):He just had a good week, put up three touchdowns.Kelly Krauss (04:16): Who is he with?Mike Ercolano (04:16):Oh, a current quarterback?John Esposito (04:17): Yeah, current quarterbacks.Kelly Krauss (04:18): Okay. So-Mike Ercolano (04:20): So, bodybuilders-Kelly Krauss (04:21):... these are the people he's trained and this is part of his study.John Esposito (04:22): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (04:22): Okay.John Esposito (04:23):So, this is all part of his practice and-Mike Ercolano (04:26): I'll look him up later.John Esposito (04:26):... I was looking into it and it's proven. Actually those angles support the right muscle activation of both glutes, quads, hamstrings, and a squat. Works the same for upper body movements as well. So, doing overhead press is coming down to a 90 degree, locking in that form, locking in that positioning, exploding out of that will work the same way. Prevents the joints from going past their quote-unquote end range of their limit, but you also still work into those end ranges. But getting to that 90 degree angle allows the muscles to secure the joint, building around that, and then you can actually bulletproof the joints to work better in bigger ranges after that.Mike Ercolano (05:04): Hm.John Esposito (05:06):I don't know if I'm explaining it right, but-Kelly Krauss (05:07): Oh, yeah.Mike Ercolano (05:08):Yeah, no, I'm following you. So, now I've never heard of this guy. And so, I'd like to look into a lot more of it.Kelly Krauss (05:15): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (05:16):It's interesting, because I use a lot of isometric stuff with either during stability work with athletes or with people who have pain.Mike Ercolano (05:25):So, for example, Vinny. You just stretched Vinny, he just walked out of here. He's got two torn ACLs MCLs. Both his knees are banged up, but he obviously continues to train hard. So, a lot of stuff we do, especially when we're not in a camp right now like we are... When he's just general training, we do a lot of isometric work and we do a lot of isometric work during his warmup and during his, excuse me, prep and prime work, and it helps alleviate his knee pain.Mike Ercolano (05:55):And I found that isometric, I mean, without any studies or anything, just by doing it and anecdotally. So, it's cool to hear that there's some studies that back that up because I've just done it because we'd do it for a little while and he says his knee feels better and we trained.John Esposito (06:10):And it was just about... I think it was 250 plus articles that he has included on his website that support this idea of 90 degree eccentric isometrics. So, lowering phase of about four or five seconds, really getting the most muscular feel out of that, coming down to that 90 degree angle, and then supporting that trains those joints into their best position, trains those joints to stay secure in those positions, but it also translates to going past those positions as well when you go into less loaded-Mike Ercolano (06:40):Interesting. And I guess maybe once you go past those it's more into the mobility training side of things,right?John Esposito (06:46): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (06:47):Well, we could talk about the kid you had in sports performance this week with his squat. That was trulyass to grass, right?Mike Ercolano (06:53): Yeah, it was terrible though.Kelly Krauss (06:54): It was so, so low.Mike Ercolano (06:55):Not terrible. And because, he didn't really know what he was doing, it was just terrible that it was actually better than what most people would be able to do naturally. Because that's closer to what we're naturally supposed to be doing than how we are now.Mike Ercolano (07:12):But the problem is, he, along with many of us, lack the stability to go that far down. He was going that far down, but his ankles were rolling in and his hip flexors. His knees were folding. He didn't have the hip strength, the stability through his hips and the mobility in his feet and ankles to be able to go that low.Mike Ercolano (07:31):But naturally we should be able to sit in that position. In fact, we should be able to... That's like if you goto third world countries, that's how they-Kelly Krauss (07:40): How they hang out.Mike Ercolano (07:41):How they hang out, how they shit, how they take a break. They sit into that position.John Esposito (07:47):It's actually, speaking of that you're saying that's how they shit, that's actually the body's naturalpositioning for-Kelly Krauss (07:52):Like the-Mike Ercolano (07:52): The Squatty Potty.John Esposito (07:53): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (07:53):The Squatty Potty. Exactly.John Esposito (07:55):I mean, about five or six years ago before I even saw the Squatty Potty, I used to be putting somethingunderneath my feet when I would go-Kelly Krauss (08:00):Well, it helps. It supposed to help the flow.John Esposito (08:03):Yeah, I had no clue about it and I was just like, "You know what?"Mike Ercolano (08:06):That's how I get my calf work in.John Esposito (08:08): Yeah?Kelly Krauss (08:08): Really?Mike Ercolano (08:08):When I'm sitting on the john, yeah.Kelly Krauss (08:10): Ah, interesting.John Esposito (08:10): Push it up there?Mike Ercolano (08:11):No, I don't do reps. No. I'm not sitting there doing calf raises while... I do read a book though.John Esposito (08:19):Yeah?Kelly Krauss (08:19): That's good.John Esposito (08:21):It is good. Yeah. It's good that you [crosstalk 00:08:22]Kelly Krauss (08:22):I have all kinds of reading the bathroom too. In fact-John Esposito (08:23): Absolutely.Kelly Krauss (08:24):... I've invoked the rule no more phones in the bathroom.John Esposito (08:26):Mm-hmm (affirmative). You get sucked in.Kelly Krauss (08:26):Because they're in there forever.Mike Ercolano (08:29): Yeah, you get sucked in.John Esposito (08:31): Oh, absolutely.Kelly Krauss (08:31): It's not okay.Mike Ercolano (08:31): No.John Esposito (08:31): You get sucked in.Kelly Krauss (08:31):Reader's Digest is the perfect thing to have in your bathroom because their articles [crosstalk 00:08:35]John Esposito (08:34):Yeah, it's just interesting enough, but then it gets boring after a while.Mike Ercolano (08:37): They still make that?John Esposito (08:37): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (08:37): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (08:37): Really? I had idea.Kelly Krauss (08:37):I love Reader's Digest.John Esposito (08:39): Oh, yeah.Kelly Krauss (08:40): I'm a big fan.John Esposito (08:40): See-Mike Ercolano (08:41):I'm surprised it's not just a virtual one now.John Esposito (08:42):My issue is I have Popular Science, a couple of the car ones in the bathroom. So, even if I don't have myphone, I'll be sitting there for hours.Kelly Krauss (08:50):Yeah, I have nutrition magazines in there.John Esposito (08:51): Yep.Mike Ercolano (08:52):I use my... Remember when I used to use that Pomodoro for doing work? That little timer thing. Is thatwhat it's called? The little Italian tomato timer thing.Kelly Krauss (08:59):Oh, yeah. Yes, yes, yes.Mike Ercolano (09:00):Yeah, I use that in the bathroom when I'm reading.Kelly Krauss (09:05): A tomato timer?Mike Ercolano (09:05):Mm-hmm (affirmative). Or else I'll be there forever.John Esposito (09:08): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (09:09):It depends on what I'm reading or especially if I'm on my phone, but I'm very, I don't know, regimented right now. So, I'm in a pretty good routine that I'm in there for 10 minutes. Set it for 10 minutes. Boom. I get my 10 minutes of reading done every morning.Kelly Krauss (09:23):Thank you. Maybe I'll get a tomato timer for my bathroom at home.John Esposito (09:25): Yeah, pop it in there.Mike Ercolano (09:26): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (09:26): This is all you got.John Esposito (09:28):You see one of them walk in, give it a little twist real quick.Kelly Krauss (09:30):And I'll keep it outside the bathroom so they can't adjust it.John Esposito (09:32): I like that.Mike Ercolano (09:33): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (09:33):Right?John Esposito (09:34):Yeah, because you can always push those things five minutes.Kelly Krauss (09:36): Uh, yeah.Mike Ercolano (09:37):Oh, yeah. I mean, it comes along with the discipline of not doing that.John Esposito (09:42): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (09:42): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (09:44):But that's why I like that instead of my phone, because if I'm on my phone I... Besides having the normal amount of ADD that we all have now with our phones, I think I have even worse ADHD. Well, I know I do because I'm taking freaking medication for it.Mike Ercolano (09:59):But I'll go in and I'm like, "No, I'm doing one task." And then all of a sudden two minutes later, I'm in a rabbit hole of something else. I'm like, "Fuck. I just told myself I wouldn't." Literally. So, if I have a timer on my phone, I'm screwed because I'll snooze it and then I'll just start Googling something or whatever. So, the little old school kitchen timer works perfectly.Kelly Krauss (10:25): I like that idea.Mike Ercolano (10:26):And there's something about the ticking.Kelly Krauss (10:29):It's soothing? Like white noise?Mike Ercolano (10:32):It's more... I mean, I guess you have meditative. It gets you more in the zone, especially when I'm reading or doing work. Well, I haven't done it doing work. But reading, it gets you in the zone, it blanks out any outside noise. Even though it's not very loud, it gives you that tempo to follow. So, I like it. Yeah.Mike Ercolano (10:50):So, if you are walking by my house at... Usually it's about 5:00 AM, 4:45 AM, and you hear a little ticking coming from the bathroom.Kelly Krauss (11:00): That's what's happening.Mike Ercolano (11:01): That's me in there reading.Kelly Krauss (11:02): Okay.John Esposito (11:03): All right.Mike Ercolano (11:03): That's me in there reading.John Esposito (11:04):Good to know next time we pass by Mike's house.Kelly Krauss (11:06): That's right.Mike Ercolano (11:07): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (11:09):We can't get in. We can't get past your gate.Mike Ercolano (11:11):You can't, you can't. So, you have to tell me if you do, because if not, I'm pulling my gun out if somebodycoming through my door at 4:00 AM.Kelly Krauss (11:16): Yeah, right?Mike Ercolano (11:17):That's for sure. But yeah. So, going back to squatting, right?Kelly Krauss (11:22): Yes.Mike Ercolano (11:22):That's where this all came from?Kelly Krauss (11:23):This was all from John's article.John Esposito (11:23): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (11:26):Or actually, isometric holds. Yeah. So, I mean, I said anecdotally. But yes, I have read, maybe not studies, but other performance coaches and trainers talk about using isometric holds and physical therapists using isometric holds to help with injury. So, that's where... I didn't just come up with a one [inaudible 00:11:49]. So, it's interesting that someone's actually taking that even further and doing a ton of studies into it.Kelly Krauss (11:54):I think we should incorporate it.John Esposito (11:55):He's going full force. I mean, most of his training that I've seen on his page, on his website, is solely 90degree eccentric isometrics. And the occasional full range of motion movement.Mike Ercolano (12:07): Right.John Esposito (12:08):But it's just to keep them secure, because high-end athletes are very injury prone, even though they aretrained not to be.Mike Ercolano (12:15): Right.Kelly Krauss (12:16):Well, one of my favorites, the one and a half of a hold.John Esposito (12:19): Yeah?Kelly Krauss (12:19): A squat, yeah.John Esposito (12:20):Oh, yeah.Kelly Krauss (12:21):I really enjoy them. And you have to watch the clock. You can't count by yourself, because if you countby yourself it's one, two, three.Mike Ercolano (12:26): Right.John Esposito (12:27):Now, a lot of the benefit comes from both the amount of blood flow that goes into the muscles with those isometrics, with the eccentrics. That was one big part of his research that the blood flow increases significantly, which one-Mike Ercolano (12:38):More blood flow, more oxygen, more nutrients.John Esposito (12:40):Yep, less injury in there because-Mike Ercolano (12:41): More recovery.John Esposito (12:42):... everything's a little bit more pliable. But also at the same time, the nervous system fires up a little bitharder as well.Mike Ercolano (12:46): Nice. Right.John Esposito (12:47):To get into those eccentric, get into that isometric specifically, fires the nervous system 10 fold.Mike Ercolano (12:52):And I'm sure, I mean, I don't know if it was part of the study, but I'm sure it fires up the cardiovascularsystem too.John Esposito (12:58): Oh, absolutely.Mike Ercolano (12:59):How many times do we have an isometric hold in our programming and it doesn't look that-John Esposito (13:04):Difficult.Mike Ercolano (13:04):... hard. People don't really think until they're halfway through-John Esposito (13:07): I mean, today.Mike Ercolano (13:07):... and their heart rate's up and they're... So, I like that. Isometric holds.John Esposito (13:12): Yeah [crosstalk 00:13:13].Kelly Krauss (13:12):I think it should be in our next program.Mike Ercolano (13:14): Send it over, yeah.Kelly Krauss (13:15): Yeah, let's do it.John Esposito (13:15): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (13:15):I'd like to follow him. I'd like to look more into him too. That's pretty cool. And look, even just the basic principles of strength training, putting on muscle and muscle mass, time under tension is one of the key, if not the most important factor, for it. So-John Esposito (13:32):Absolutely. It's a very-well rounded system.Mike Ercolano (13:33):... that isometric hold adds right into that. So, cool. Good stuff. What was his name again?John Esposito (13:39): Joel Seedman.Mike Ercolano (13:40): Joel Seedman.Kelly Krauss (13:43):Joel Olsteen.Mike Ercolano (13:44): Joel Olsteen.John Esposito (13:44):He's going to start preaching to us.Mike Ercolano (13:45):Yeah. Well, he could maybe isometrically hold his body off the ground, floating a foot off the ground.And then I'll believe all the shit he talks about and may get very, very rich off of.Kelly Krauss (14:00):Haven't we learned from all of those guys when they live in their mansions and they drive these cars?People are still following him and listening to him and believing in it?Mike Ercolano (14:09):Obviously enough to support that lifestyle.Kelly Krauss (14:11):And how... That's not worth talking about, but it just amazes me.Mike Ercolano (14:15):We can't get enough people to support us to live that lifestyle. We got to do something. Let's start lyingto people. All we have to do is manipulate people and take their money. That's what they do, right?John Esposito (14:27): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (14:27): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (14:27):That's what all these rich people do.John Esposito (14:29):That's a new business [inaudible 00:14:31].Mike Ercolano (14:31): Yeah.John Esposito (14:32):Yeah.Mike Ercolano (14:32):All right. We guarantee everyone's going to have a six pack abs and ass like J-Lo, if you're a female. Andass like John, if you're a guy.John Esposito (14:42): I was going to say...Kelly Krauss (14:45): Both of you. Or Vinny?John Esposito (14:46): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (14:46): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (14:46): Yeah, Vinny.Kelly Krauss (14:47): We could sell that one.John Esposito (14:48):I got told I can't complain about my ass anymore because Vinny's got a bigger one, so...Kelly Krauss (14:51):Well, we definitely can't put him in a lineup. He's in a league of his own.Mike Ercolano (14:54): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (14:54): Between you two-Mike Ercolano (14:56): He's pretty ridiculous.John Esposito (14:57): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (15:00):I don't know. Where were we going? Oh, we're lying about what we're going to provide people. We'regoing to do all that for you in a week, but you got to pay 50 grand up front.Kelly Krauss (15:07): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (15:08): I think it's fair.John Esposito (15:09): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (15:09): I think that's fair.Mike Ercolano (15:10):I mean, it's life-changing.Kelly Krauss (15:11): Of course.Mike Ercolano (15:12): Legit life-changing.Kelly Krauss (15:13): You'll never go back.Mike Ercolano (15:13): You'll get relieved.John Esposito (15:14):You'll never be the same afterwards.Kelly Krauss (15:15):Right. You don't want to be.John Esposito (15:17): No.Mike Ercolano (15:18): All right. So...John Esposito (15:19):Sold.Mike Ercolano (15:20):Joel Olsteen, make some room next door because we're moving in.Kelly Krauss (15:23): Yeah, we're coming by.Mike Ercolano (15:25):No, but I'd like to follow that guy Joel. Maybe if he's not too big for us, we can have him on the showand talk a little bit about it.John Esposito (15:32):That'd be interesting. That'd be a good time to do.Mike Ercolano (15:33):All right, John, you're on it. Reach out to him.John Esposito (15:35):All right. I'm going to give it a try. Ain't direct enough on the page.Mike Ercolano (15:38):Speaking of big enough, have you guys seen the average weight gain of Americans during COVID?Kelly Krauss (15:45): No, tell me.Mike Ercolano (15:46):Because it's actually been all over the place a little bit. But-John Esposito (15:48): Really?Mike Ercolano (15:48):No, no. I'm just trying to segue into what I've read, but it's not working. It's actually not all over the placebecause the news will probably not cover that because they'll just say, "Take a shot."Mike Ercolano (15:59):But anyway, so the average American gained 29 pounds over the pandemic. I guess it's still going on or whatever, but so 29 pounds. So, figure over 18 months, right? So, how many pounds is that per month? 1.6 pounds per month.Kelly Krauss (16:22): Okay.Mike Ercolano (16:23):All right. If we're looking at 18 months. Now, the average normal rate for weight gain, because theaverage American does gain weight every single year, is between 1.1 and 2.2 pounds per year.Mike Ercolano (16:38):So, during the pandemic... If it's over yet, I don't think it's over. I don't know if there's going to-Kelly Krauss (16:46):They don't want it to be over.Mike Ercolano (16:46):No, but I don't know what-Kelly Krauss (16:46): So, yes but no.Mike Ercolano (16:48):... constitutes a pandemic starting and ending. When is it over? Is it just when they're like, "All right, it's done." Or does it have to fall below a certain amount of case numbers? Anyway, that's for a different conversation. So, the average person, an American. An American. A-N. The average American. The average American.Kelly Krauss (17:13):You really worked that out.Mike Ercolano (17:14):I had to get it right. I had to get it right. It's only fair.Mike Ercolano (17:20):The average American gained a year's worth of weight, essentially, every month during the pandemic. So, just put that in... I mean, if we already had an obesity factor beforehand or an obesity issue beforehand, you imagine where we're going to be at now or five years from now, or 10 years from now, if things don't change? If the culture and the message and the society and the focus on health doesn't change...Mike Ercolano (17:52):Just look at how fast the obesity rates have grown. I mean, in the past, I don't know, 30 years, 40 years, they've quadrupled and probably more than that. Then what's going on is not a natural progression, right? It's all lifestyle. It's a lifestyle change. It's pretty clear. It's very clear. It's science, right? You got to follow the science. It's a lifestyle change that's causing this issue.Mike Ercolano (18:17):So, think about how much that has just been accelerated over the past 18 months now, right? Of how many people fall into that category. And that's the average. So, obviously there's a lot higher and a lot lower. I think median is usually a better way to look at it, to get a more fair perspective of what the middle looks like. But still, that's a number that we could go off of. So, I don't know. That's just a staggering number, and it's a sad number and a scary number because-John Esposito (18:51):A year's worth in a month.Mike Ercolano (18:51):Yeah, essentially. So, I mean, what is the... I got this little BMI calculator thing, which I used to carry around with me all the time thinking I would use it, but I never used it. But it was from a... What is this? From a vagina doctor? What are they called?Kelly Krauss (19:09): What? A gyno?Mike Ercolano (19:10): It's from a gyno, yeah.Kelly Krauss (19:12): Why do you have that?Mike Ercolano (19:14):I took it from my former business partner years ago. Yeah.Kelly Krauss (19:18):Oh, he could have used that.Mike Ercolano (19:18): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (19:21):Was he using it for himself?Mike Ercolano (19:21):But I would assume maybe there was a client of his or something that had these. He had them in theoffice, so I took one to use. But anyway, so-John Esposito (19:30):What is the average BMI? Between 25 and 30? Or is that the healthy range is 25 and 30.Kelly Krauss (19:35): Ah, yeah. Well, you got to talk women or male.Mike Ercolano (19:36): Let's go.John Esposito (19:36): I believe male is-Mike Ercolano (19:37):Let's go on here. A healthy range, according to this, is, I guess, between 20-Kelly Krauss (19:47): 18.5 to 25.Mike Ercolano (19:47): 18.5 to 25.John Esposito (19:48): Oh, wow. Okay.Mike Ercolano (19:49):Or 20 to 25. Yeah, 18.5 To 25.John Esposito (19:51):So, I mean, the average is probably between 25 and 35.Kelly Krauss (19:54): Yeah. Oh, yeah. Easy.John Esposito (19:56): At least.Mike Ercolano (19:56):Right. So, let's just take the average female. Average American female. Female height and weight.John Esposito (20:18): Let's say 5'6".Mike Ercolano (20:21):Sorry. This is all really good airtime right now while I Google this. All right, well this is as of 2016, but whatever. Close enough. A woman 20 years old and up, just under 5'4" and 170. So, that's the average female.Kelly Krauss (20:38):5'4", 170? Above 20?Mike Ercolano (20:40):That's what healthline.com says.Kelly Krauss (20:43): Wow, okay.Mike Ercolano (20:44): The average female-John Esposito (20:45): Surprised about that number.Mike Ercolano (20:46):Yeah. The average female weighs-Kelly Krauss (20:48): 5'4" is little.John Esposito (20:49): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (20:49): I'm 5'6".Mike Ercolano (20:52):This is a... Oh, that's the same website.John Esposito (20:57):170 was where I was at when I started with NextGen.Mike Ercolano (20:59):Women are generally considered tall in the United States. Yeah.John Esposito (21:01): I was-Mike Ercolano (21:01):Women are generally considered tall in the United States at 5'7", and the average height for women inthe United States is 5'4". It's another website saying that.35 (Final) - Isometric Training for Pain Managem... (Completed 10/07/21) Page 23 of 44 Transcript by Rev.comThis transcript was exported on Oct 10, 2021 - view latest version here. Kelly Krauss (21:06):Okay.Mike Ercolano (21:07):All right. So, 5'4", 170. Let's see if I can figure this thing out. Let's go to 170 and-Kelly Krauss (21:16):And the height's 5'4". This is exciting.Mike Ercolano (21:23): 5'4". It's right here.John Esposito (21:27):What, is that going to be 33, 34?Kelly Krauss (21:30):It's going to be up there.Mike Ercolano (21:30):It's in between, yeah. It's about 30. So-John Esposito (21:33): Oh, 30. Okay, yeah.Mike Ercolano (21:34):I mean, I guess I could just have Googled the average BMI of...Kelly Krauss (21:38):No, it's more to fun to watch you use this thing.Mike Ercolano (21:40):No, but my point of viewing this was because... So, the average, right, is right here. 5'4", 170. Boom.John Esposito (21:48): Yep.Mike Ercolano (21:48):All right, so now if every year it just creeps up by one pound. Bum, bum, bum, bum, bum. Whatever. Allright, but the average person gained 29 pounds. So, that brings it up close to 190.John Esposito (22:01): [crosstalk 00:22:01] 190.Mike Ercolano (22:02):Boom, boom, boom, boom, boom. All the way to 190, which now puts them close to the obese range. All right, so the average female, the average American female, was already on the borderline of being overweight and was probably going to get there according to the statistics.Kelly Krauss (22:19): Right.Mike Ercolano (22:21):But they accelerated how many? 29, 28 times or whatever it is in one year, right? In one year. And the issue with that is, and we've talked about it a gazillion times and we're going to continue to talk about it until things change, is that that right there is probably the biggest concern and cause, or the biggest concern we should have in this country, right? In terms of health, anyway. Because that is going to... If we look at economically, that's going to put the biggest strain on our system, which is also starting to wane because nurses are quitting and being fired. But that's a different topic.Mike Ercolano (23:08):But how many... If the average person is now going to be obese or close to obese after this pandemic, what's going to happen when the next generation catches up to this and, essentially, 80% of the country is obese? 70% of the country is obese. What's going to happen then? Where are we going to be at as a society, right?Mike Ercolano (23:34):And, I mean, in my opinion, that's where they want us to be. They want us to be reliant on drugs and healthcare and that's where the money's at. But what's going to change? If this past year didn't change your mind about your health, what's going to change?Kelly Krauss (23:52):Well, that's what I've said. If this didn't scare the shit out of you to get you thinking about your healthand being more serious about it nothing-John Esposito (24:00): Nothing's going to.Kelly Krauss (24:01): ... nothing will.Mike Ercolano (24:02): No.Kelly Krauss (24:03):I think, and then when people started hearing that even healthy people... Because you assume those people on ventilators were people who were heavy, who smoked, who didn't exercise, who didn't eatright. But then you were also hearing about those that were physically fit and stuff. That was like, "Oh,crap."John Esposito (24:20): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (24:20):But even more so... You definitely heard more so of the ones who were unhealthy.John Esposito (24:27): Yeah.Mike Ercolano (24:27):Of course. And those are just sensationalized cases that unfortunately do happen. And it doesn't... Thathappens with every disease and virus and issue. Yes, it happens, and it's sad. And I'm sorry it happens.Mike Ercolano (24:43):A friend of mine's friend... A friend of mine's good friend who I met died from a heart issue. He was probably late thirties, early forties. He got COVID, went to the hospital, came home, then died of a heart issue. They called it a widowmaker. They said that it was due to COVID.Mike Ercolano (25:00):Now, he already had that issue. It's not like he had a healthy heart and COVID came in and killed him. He had that heart issue that COVID exposed and probably accelerated it. That would have happened when he was maybe 65 or 60 or... Yes, that sucks. It's really, really sad. It's really... But the fact is, the average person who, or the person who died of COVID, was overweight, obese. 80%.Kelly Krauss (25:29):Or had other underlying conditions.Mike Ercolano (25:31):Almost three. Or I think it's over three now. I think they pushed it up over three. I'm trying to find... I'mon the... The CDC's website is very a pain in the ass.John Esposito (25:42): To navigate? Yeah.Mike Ercolano (25:44):Yeah. But anyway, I think it's over three the last time I saw. So, the average person who died of COVID ordied with COVID was 80 years old and had three-John Esposito (25:59): Underlying health condition?Mike Ercolano (26:01):Comorbidities. These issues that will kill them. So, we got to understand the numbers that we're looking at. And we got to understand the facts and the statistics. And I only say this because I know I have to say this right now. This is not an anti-vax rant. I'm not trying to say don't take the vaccine. If you feel like it's going to make you safe, then take it. If you don't feel like it's going to make you safe, then don't take it. That is your choice. And you don't have to tell me, I don't want to know. I don't care.Mike Ercolano (26:30):All right, this is not about that. All right? This is about the fact that this is an issue that is completely in our control, right? This is a lifestyle issue. It's completely in our control as a society. And no matter how you look at it, like I've started to say before, whether it's economically, it's going to put a huge strain on it. Whether it's socially, think about the amount of depression, the amount of...Mike Ercolano (26:52):I mean, we see suicides going up every year. That's not changing, that's not ending. We see drug use going up every year. That's not changing, that's not ending. These are all symptoms of a failing society, or of a dying society, and these are all symptoms that could be cured through a little bit of exercise and a little bit of-John Esposito (27:20): Proper nutrition?Mike Ercolano (27:21):Well... Right. I mean, that's not even that hard, right? I wasn't even going to say proper nutrition, I wasjust going to say paying a little bit closer attention to what you eat. Not eating the super-size meal.Kelly Krauss (27:33): Right.John Esposito (27:33): Yeah, go for the small.Mike Ercolano (27:35):One of my clients who has Asperger's. He's a functioning, great adult. He's a great guy. He's got Asperger's and so sometimes you have to talk to him on a different level and keep it more simple. And so, we're talking about his diet and he goes to a sandwich shop every day at lunch and gets his extra large sandwich. So we said, "Let's cut it down to the medium sandwich."Mike Ercolano (28:06):Go every day, I don't care. They have that medium sandwich. I talked to his mom the other day and his mom said he was going three days a week. He's on his own, and now he's eating protein and veggies only at night with his meal. This is not anything I talked to him about, but it-Kelly Krauss (28:24):That's so great.Mike Ercolano (28:24):Just because we kept it simple. We kept it simple, and it doesn't have to be complicated, right? It doesn't have to be this scary thing. Weight loss doesn't have to be a scary thing, getting healthier. But the solution isn't in whatever drug comes out next to fix whatever the next problem is. That is not the solution.Mike Ercolano (28:44):I know we go there almost all the time on the show, but I think it's our duty to do that because there's not enough real information being spewed. And I say spewed because it's all garbage. It's all propaganda bullshit. There's not enough people talking about the real truth about how to be healthy and how to not die from COVID, statistically speaking.John Esposito (29:11):It's just a whole bunch of small steps. Not really... Just you don't have to make any big leaps, no bigstrides.Kelly Krauss (29:16):Right, right, right. Right, exactly.John Esposito (29:16):It's just one little tiny thing at a time. Go out for a walk more than you would a week.Kelly Krauss (29:21):And also pay attention to yourself. Why are you overeating? You have to address those issues because they're not going to go away. You can take a magic pill, sure. But once you stop taking that magic pill, you haven't addressed the issue as to why you have the habits you have.Kelly Krauss (29:35):And, sure, it's uncomfortable, it's scary. But I think you feel better about yourself once you start making these changes and start identifying with yourself and saying, "Hey, I had a stressful day at work. Let me go for a walk instead of sit down and eat dinner right away." Or...Mike Ercolano (29:49):Well, it's proven. I mean, it's a fact that it changes your chemistry. Your depression is lessened, anxiety is lessened. It never goes away, especially if you're someone who's diagnosed with it who actually has a chemical thing, it doesn't go away. But exercise does lessen all of that.Kelly Krauss (30:08): Absolutely.Mike Ercolano (30:09):Exercise makes you a more productive human being in life. If you want to talk about protecting the people around you... All right, no, you can't spread fat to somebody else, of course, but you could absolutely spread your unhealthy lifestyle around to other people. You could definitely spread your own depression and your own-Kelly Krauss (30:34): Negativity.Mike Ercolano (30:34):... negativity to other people. You could be a burden in people's lives. And as blunt as that is, we could allbe that. We could all fall into that. You're either a burden or you're...Mike Ercolano (30:50):I don't know what the opposite of burden is. You're helping somebody or-Kelly Krauss (30:53): Part of the solution?Mike Ercolano (30:53):Part of their life. We all have those people. They're either negative energy or positive energy in our life. And unfortunately, sometimes those negative energies are family. We can't do anything about that, but I know I'm doing everything I can to cut out negative energy in my life that I can, that I could choose to cut out.John Esposito (31:13): Of course.Mike Ercolano (31:14):I have people who are drains on me I'm not necessarily associating with any more. And it's not because I dislike them as people, but they're a drain on me.John Esposito (31:26): It's for your own sake.Mike Ercolano (31:27):And someone who doesn't take care of their health and someone who doesn't pay attention to what their role is as a human being and actually puts themselves or puts their health as a precedent, doesn't really have the same values as I do.Mike Ercolano (31:45):And again, I have people who I'm really good friends with who are overweight, but they're trying really hard, right? They're working. It's not like I'm fat shaming anybody here, I'm just trying to draw a conclusion to... How many people who are miserable would be helped if they put exercise in their life?Kelly Krauss (32:10):Absolutely.Mike Ercolano (32:11): And healthy eating.John Esposito (32:13):And it's proven scientifically and practically.Mike Ercolano (32:16):Right. You want to follow the science? There's the science. The science is there. The science has beenthere for a long time, all right.John Esposito (32:22):Research has proven it time and time again, that it lowers symptoms of depression, lowers symptoms ofanxiety.Kelly Krauss (32:27):Right, so follow the science, right? Hasn't that been the saying over the past 18 months? Well, there it is.Mike Ercolano (32:32):Right, well that's become a cult thing.Kelly Krauss (32:34): Too lazy.Mike Ercolano (32:35):That's become a cult thing now in my opinion. Follow the science. That's like an identity almost. A lot of people who like to use that, it's almost like their whole being has been bought into that image. Or that it's like a religion in my view, as science is now religion. Science is... Not science itself, but the concept of science is used as religion now. And I think it's become very politicized, and science can't be really trusted anymore either. But that's neither here nor there, I guess. I don't know.Kelly Krauss (33:16): Mm-hmm (affirmative).John Esposito (33:22):I agree. There's too many benefits to not include some fitness into your life, whether it's something simple like a walk, or whether it's getting into a gym once a week. It's better than nothing. It's better than not moving. It's better than not going out and doing something. Even just getting sunlight helps with all those mental symptoms. And that's proven as well. That's proven through practice.Mike Ercolano (33:44):Well, yeah. I mean, that's, again, another proven way to lessen the symptoms of COVID is D3, right? Orat least they tie together, vitamin D3 and the symptoms of COVID.Mike Ercolano (34:02):So, I don't know. I don't know how I got off that rant again, talking about this shit. It's just frustrating. It's frustrating because there's a lot of fingers being pointed in a lot of directions that they shouldn't be pointed at. And in the past, I don't think they would have.Mike Ercolano (34:24):Just think back to 2018, 2019. Just think if in 2018 or '19 places were stopping people from eating at their restaurant because they didn't have a certain vaccine? In the name of health, right? That would never be going on back then. It would never be going on back then. Never. Right? We would think it's crazy. If another country was doing that?Kelly Krauss (34:50): Right.Mike Ercolano (34:53):We don't even see the shit that's happening in Australia and Canada right now. That shit's crazy. But if in 2018, if another country was banning people from eating at their restaurants because they didn't have a vaccine... Anyway, they'd be holding fucking rallies and having GoFundMes for the people with vaccine discrimination in Australia or something like that. Right? It would be completely different thing. But anyway.Kelly Krauss (35:27):It'd be a different time for sure.John Esposito (35:28): Absolutely.Mike Ercolano (35:29):Anyway. One thing you can control is, obviously, your health and that's where we were going with this,so...John Esposito (35:37):Yeah, take control of your health. Get some ownership of it. Make a change, even if it's a small change.One step at a time.Kelly Krauss (35:43): Yep.John Esposito (35:44):And it's just only going to better you, not worsen your life.Kelly Krauss (35:48):And nobody's ever said I've regretted doing that workout or that walk. Nobody's ever said that, so force yourself to go outside and go for that walk. It'll be worth it.John Esposito (35:58):Mm-hmm (affirmative). If you can commit to it and you keep yourself consistent with it, there's notgoing to be any regrets. It's going to be all benefit.Mike Ercolano (36:04): Yeah.Kelly Krauss (36:06):Mike, you're going to get your flu shot?Mike Ercolano (36:07):No. I have never gotten it. I've never gotten it before, and I don't see why I'll get it now.John Esposito (36:14):I haven't gotten it the past few years. I don't know if that's fitness-related, but I've just been feelinghealthier.Kelly Krauss (36:21):Oh, you haven't gotten the flu?Mike Ercolano (36:22): Oh, the flu.John Esposito (36:22):Yeah, I haven't gotten the flu shot either a few years.Kelly Krauss (36:24): Oh, yeah?John Esposito (36:24):Yeah, just because I haven't had any flu symptoms past couple of years.Mike Ercolano (36:28):Yeah, I got sick last year. I think it was COVID though. It was last-Kelly Krauss (36:31):That was February, I think. Right?Mike Ercolano (36:32):February. It was right before everything. So, I think that was COVID. But I don't know, I just...Kelly Krauss (36:39):But let me ask you this. Have you guys had the flu?John Esposito (36:42): Yeah in the past.Kelly Krauss (36:43): So, how bad was it?Mike Ercolano (36:44):I had it once in the past five year.John Esposito (36:47):I mean, I had the flu for four day spanned. It wasn't terrible. Obviously, it didn't feel good. My body feltlike it was achy, but it wasn't anything past that.Kelly Krauss (36:57): Right.Mike Ercolano (36:58):Yeah. From what I can remember, the flu kicked my ass last time, but-Kelly Krauss (37:00): Oh, it sucks.John Esposito (37:01): Oh, absolutely.Mike Ercolano (37:02): I didn't die.John Esposito (37:03): No.Mike Ercolano (37:03): I'm still here.Kelly Krauss (37:03):But it's putting your body through that, I think, is a win on the side of immunity and the side of health.Mike Ercolano (37:11):Well, I mean, here's the thing about immunity is that there's... Once you're ex