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Latest podcast episodes about Zillow

Elevate with Tyler Chesser
E218 Elevate Exclusive with Tyler Chesser - How to Make Wise, Long-Term Real Estate Investing Decisions Through Due Diligence

Elevate with Tyler Chesser

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 18:48


In this solo episode, Tyler shared how real estate investors can make sound and wise due diligence decisions once a deal is under contract. Topics included lessons learned from Zillow's algorithmic failures; why you need a due diligence checklist; and best practices, including identifying trends, understanding lease file audits, on-site maintenance, physical inspections, practical aspects of the property, how to make go or no-go decisions, and more! Listen to more in the Elevate Exclusive with Tyler series: E208 Elevate Exclusive with Tyler Chesser - How to Get Clear on Your Real Estate Investing Goals E198 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler - The Number One Enemy to Prosperity in Modern Society and its Antidote E177 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler Chesser - The Power of Compounding Interest E166 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler - How Multidisciplinary Learning Propels the Most Elite Investors' Performance E157 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler - How to Use Fear to Catapult You Towards Your Dreams E148 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler - The Resourcefulness Mindset E137 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler - Transformational Leadership  E129 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler - Freeing Yourself Through Discomfort E118 - Elevate Exclusive with Tyler - Creating Conscious Habits Download Raising The Bar Are you a real estate investor looking to elevate your income, freedom & lifestyle? If so, optimize your daily performance by downloading our free guide, Raising the Bar - 5 Steps to Elevate Your Habits, at elevatepod.com. In this guide, created by your host Tyler Chesser, you'll learn why you do what you do, how to easily institute cues in your environment to trigger desired behavior, directly applicable steps to create a fulfilling future and much more. Get your free copy at elevatepod.com and kick-start your new habits today. Your future self will thank you! Brought to You By CF Capital This episode of Elevate is brought to you by CF Capital, a national real estate investment firm. CF Capital's mission is to provide property investment and asset management solutions to help investors like you maximize their returns by investing in high-value multifamily communities. If you are looking for risk-adjusted alternative investments in quality apartment communities, and are seeking tax optimized cash flow with appreciation upside without all the hassle of management, you might benefit from learning more about investing alongside our team. You're invited to reach out and learn how you can invest with us by visiting cfcapllc.com. We're also currently offering a free ebook called The Bottom Line - 10 Ways to Increase Cash Flow in an Apartment Complex. Whether you're a new or an experienced investor, we're confident you'll find massive value in this resource. Get your free copy today at cfcapllc.com.  

Deconstruct
The Zillow Fiasco

Deconstruct

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 16:12


Earlier this month, Zillow quit the iBuying business. The firm would no longer buy and sell homes. TRD reporter Erin Hudson discusses what happened and why Zillow's exit from the iBuying industry is so significant. You'll hear from Trulia co-founder Sean Black, who sold his firm to Zillow in 2015, as well as Rick Palacios Jr., who leads research at John Burns Real Estate Consulting.

Real Estate Marketing Dude
Appreciation Is Attraction with Cole Slate

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 33:48


Happy Thanksgiving everyone! First of all, there's a lot of things that we're thankful here for, but one of the things we are thankful for and what we're going to be chatting about on this episode, is how to be thankful for all the frickin referrals that you're receiving and how to be thankful for all of the different business that we attract versus chase. I'm telling you in 2022 is the year the personal brand and the reason why that is is because let's face it, you guys are all selling the exact same shit. Everyone's got access to the MLS, if you're a lender everyone has access to the same program, so what is really the difference between you and everybody else? Ultimately, the answer to that is going to rely on the relationship you have with the person you serve, or the brand that you have that attracts them to want to be served by you. Today we welcome Cole Slate onto the episode. As broker and owner of Slate Realty, he does everything 100% referral base. A lot of brokerage team leaders instantly shift into lead generation mode where they have to give their agents leads and do this and that, but what if you just taught your agents how to fish instead for referrals, and it didn't cost you anything out of pocket? How much more would that add to your bottom line if you're a broker owner, so if you're a broker owner, if you're a team lead, I think you're gonna appreciate this episode today.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeHow to make your business 100% referral basedWhat marketing yourself as hyper community meansMistakes to avoid when first starting out ResourcesLearn more about Cole SlateReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike Cuevas to real estate marketing. And this podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know, like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember, it is not their job to remember what you do for a living.It's your job to remind them. Let's get started What's up ladies and gentlemen, welcome to another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast.It is Happy Thanksgiving. First of all, there's a lot of things that we're thankful here for. But one of the things we are thankful for our for our guests, and in the spirit of being thankful what we're going to be chatting about on this episode is how to be thankful for all the frickin referrals that you're receiving and how to be thankful for all of the different business that we attract versus Chase, because I'm telling you in 2022 is the year the personal brand, I've been saying the shift last five fucking years before Tom Ferry every set of damn thing about it. And the reason why that is is because let's face it, you guys are all selling the exact same shit. Everyone's got access to the MLS if your lender ever has access to the same program, so what is really the difference between you and everybody else? And ultimately, the answer to that is going to rely on the relationship you have with the person you serve, or the brand that you have that attracts them to want to be served by you. So what we're going to chat about today, I've been seeing this dude on Facebook, hosting events. He's always doing shit and I like indirectly know you from Facebook, and he just opened up. Another brokerage is growing rapidly, but he does everything 100% referral base, a lot of brokerages team leaders instantly shift into like the lead generation mode where they have to give their agents leads and do this and that. But what if you just taught your agents how to fish instead for referrals, and it didn't cost you anything out of pocket? How much more would that add to your bottom line if you're a broker owner, so if you're a broker owner, if you're a team lead, I think you're gonna appreciate this episode today. And without further ado, we're gonna introduce our friend Mr. Cole, slate to the show. What's up. Cool,Mike, thanks for having me. I really appreciate it. Big fan of the podcast and it's cool being on the zoom with you and hear your voice on the interview not coming through my truck speakersto tell tell us tell everybody who you are, where you're located. What you guys got going on down there. And then I got a bunch of questions for you in regards to how you're attracting all this business and attention in your local community.Yeah, absolutely. Like Mike said, my name is Cole slate, I'm from the Northeast Florida area, particularly St. Johns County. You know, your statistics and research nationally, it's one of the hottest markets in the country. Every stat that you look at has St John's in Northeast Florida and the top 10 And yeah, most liberal all referral base really a lot of people talk about you know, their, their hyperlocal Well, I market myself as being hyper community. So you know, building the brand, for doing stuff the right way. And you know, for the right reasons and you know, giving back to the neighborhood first responders to charities and things like that.I love that hyper community write that down, folks. Um, yeah, let's get right into it. So first off, when did you get licensed? And when do you start in real estate?So I got my license in September of 2012. I started I was blessed to be to earn a buyer's agent position all the top teams in the area, the Welch team with Keller Williams, and after being on that team for a year decided to try it on my own. And it's been a it's been a nine year blur, you know, ever sinceso one of the things that you like, glad you did, but you'd never do it again. Right? So like every every every career of a realtor would Did you ever buy leads, like in 2012 when you join a team, you're probably you know, getting fed a little bit maybe through open houses and or whatnot. But when you went off on your own, have you always been more referral based? Did you ever go down the Zillow lead buying platform or any of those things?So you know, I did it I bought, I got into Zillow leads one time and it was because our zip code that I'm actually from born and raised no a opportunity opened up and it goes so quickly that I kind of viewed it as a calling shotgun and I'm like, let me go and it was like the smallest increment available I think was something like 10% share, you know, five or 10% share something like that. So I did just to say that, you know, I swooped in there, and the whole my spot is a premier agent. But you know, I was so busy I talk about horrible follow up you know, I never did it because I was busy with the the family friends of referrals, you know?Yep. And a lot of times people just buy leads just to say that they have something inbound, but very seldom do they even call them back. That's why Zillow went to referral model Why realtor.com went through referral model guys, you guys don't call back the lead you're given and you start hurting their brands. So they said, Fuck it, I'm gonna bring it in house and I'll convert them for these lazy sons of bitches. And then I'll give it to him and then I'll charge them triple the amount in the form of a referral fee because I'm selling them an appointment versus a frickin name and a number. Alright guys, so let's get I want to get into this how big the community first cuz I want to break I want to paint the picture how many people would you say are in your immediate area? If you were to give me a number on the population?Oh man. I think in our county alone, it's close to 300,000 people, you know, we're very suburbia, you know, there's no there's some country, suburbs, things like that. I heard um, you know, take it with a grain of salt. It was on a commercial, but I heard the Jacksonville area population, we're looking at around one and a half million.That's a big market,it's not gonna remember to that landmass wise, Jacksonville is the biggest city in the country. So that's 1.5 million over I think everyone by definition, like five counties.So does that mean like everything's filling in right now? Building and because a lot of land,there's land for a developer to step up. They're doing everything in their power to to do so.And let's get into this. You're running the brokerage? Are you still in production yourself?Right now? Those are refer out? My wife is my business partner. And we we procure business, but we refer to our agents good and compete, or do you wanna?So what I know you have some sort of system in office, you have to have something that your agents are implementing that are generate the referrals, probably something that stemmed off your own success?What are they doing? How are you doing this? Let's start at the agent level, let's take it to the brokerage level. Andthen how I'm sure you guys have like company sponsored events, agents ship enough of that, and all that stuff. It's a team effort. But let's start at the beginning. What are the agents doing? And what did you do to consistently generate those referrals? Because it's not like that's not a small population. If you're in a town of like, 20,000 people, then yeah, you might see John dick and Mary in the fucking grocery store every other weekend, and say hello to him. And that's how you're staying in touch with people. So there's like the local realtor, but when you're in a busy area like this, you have to do more than now you have to build a brand and you can't build a brand without consistently communicating or appearing for people. So what are the agents doing? What did you do in the past that built your brand to stay in front of people?Yeah, so the first thing that agents are really buying into is my style of farming, you know, you have your stereotypical farming from two decades ago, or it's a bunch of random mailers and everyone's sets, everyone's sending the same stuff. And you know, that, you know, more, let's call them season agents thing to that's sufficient, because they're seeing their their face and their contact information from the mailbox at the end of the driveway till they get to the trash cans, and garage. So we do mailers, for example, but we provide, we provide value, you know, my my neighborhood that I live in, for example, we send out two meal two meals per month, okay? One of them is statistics broken down, not just just sold or anything like that, we send out a average price point for the most for the three most recent sold for each 1000 square foot increments. So under 1999 square feet, the top three average was x 2000 to 2999 heated and cooled square foot, the average per foot was x and just keep going on. So people have some type of idea, you know, my neighborhood, for example, still being built right now but it's going to be approximately 5000 rooftops. So that's just an idea of you know, what's one area the next is, you know, like I said, I'm from the area so I have a lot of relationships with local businesses. So I'm teaming up with these businesses like let's talk about a coffee shop for example. Go to the coffee shop I said hey, you know, I'm I'm going to design mailers I'm going to pay for the distribution the mailing I'm gonna send them out would you be down for a save 10% off of $20 tab at a you know what you're paying for them? I mean, for a coffee shop that's nothing right that's that's a free introduction and I'm handling all the distribution so you know talk about a value add you know, everyone everyone in my neighborhood comes up to me on a weekly basis just thanking me for everything not only providing the you know, the valuation statistics for the property but as well as a coupon for a free cup of coffee you know, ifthere's one piece is one piece market driven then and then one piece is just more community Correct? Awesome. All right. So this is really good guys. Here's what I I don't know why I honestly cannot stand this about the industry is that every time we fucking communicate, we feel like we have to be selling something or getting something in return and you don't understand guys like for any of you that have faith like there's a constant like, it's very simple, you give and you get in return, right? There's a reason why people tie in, they set a certain certain things. And if you truly believe your use, what's the word he saw you see, or whatever it is, what you get, you'll get back in return. And you cannot like if you're just always selling, selling, and you're always like, just so just this or all of your content has to deal with how many listings you sold, your broker sold, instead of like caring about the damn community and actually being a servant of it. You don't ever obtain anything other than that you're just a salesperson chasing your next check in the eyes of most people. But when you start creating content, events, or anything that gives you the excuse to have a conversation with people, that's how you build a brand. I would bet that I could see why those two pieces would serve each other best. I guarantee you that people enjoy the information and the statistics, but the ones that they remember that are the personal ones. And then it Re and it sort of triggers them to be like, oh, yeah, by the way, I did get that one thing like your your sales should is better received because you're creating value.Well, it's everything compounding together like that what I was saying this day and age farming is so much different than it was two decades ago, you know, so you have those mailers. And on top of that, you know, one examples we had, with all the COVID crap going on everything we had a vendor fair but suited to all being at the neighborhood beauty center, it was a tour of people's driveways on them. I'm not gonna sell a house out of my driveway. So what did I do, I threw a big old block party, I got a food truck, the time I got out houses, got a video game truck to come down a guy playing live music, you know, that's what people are gonna remember. Now, as a part of, you know, what's going on, I got more people reached out to me than the freakin president of the HOA, yet all having to do with, you know, coming in all these different ways in regards to farming the you know, the community.And I like how you're outsourcing the cost to so like, you're not just I'm sure these businesses are giving you a couple bucks, and that's paying for the distribution. You're just the guy started organizing it, but it's your brand your face all over it. So what is your out of pocket on the mailers? And how many advertisers? Are you getting to actually cover the nut?Yeah, I mean, it's, it's not much I want to say it's something like 50 cents apiece, or something like that. And we're like I said, you know, we're going out of 1500 houses, you know, so we don't we don't put actual sponsors on the mailers. But what these businesses do in regards to cross promotion, as I said, it's all about scratching the back, right? So where it might be 750 bucks coming out of my pocket for this month, you know, these pencils, drawings, and these coffee shops and everything, you know, they they give back so much to my business. You know, for example, you know, the grand opening that we had on on Thursday, we had, I think seven different restaurants involved and I didn't spend a penny they're all giving back to me for helping them promote their business and really, you know, give back to the community in them by providing, you know, sushi boats and case studies and a cornbread bar and you know, stuff like that. And it's all like he said earlier, it's all about the giving back and the back scratching, and you know, things like that.Let's even pencil this out, though. So it's just this as far as direct mail pieces and you're sending to a month you're seeing your out of pocket costs is about $700 a month on that. Yeah. Alright, so this comes out to be at $400 a year. Okay, so just as just one channel, you guys, that's why you guys ever, what's your ROI? What's your ROI? All right, let's go fucking talk about the ROI Right Now. All right, $8,400, what's your average sales price in your market? 400. Okay, so he needs to sell three quarters of a house to break even over the course of the year, three quarters of a house, this is a full house three because it was a full house $400,000 would be $10,000 commission. So you need a quarter of a house you need 84% of a house is what he needs to sell two and a percent to break even. Okay, so, but here's the thing that everyone's gonna say. How can you trace back that ROI? Oh, my God, there's not a direct thing when you're building a brand, you never will. That's the power of a brand. Because I bet I guarantee he gets people that just call him from wherever. And it's the result of a combination of all the multiple forms of communication over time. That individual single one guys look atyou look at what the mailers doing to not only am I providing the value to my neighborhood of 5000 houses, but the business that I'm promoting. Yeah. Do you think they're the for Who do you think the first firm is that they're going to call when they have a new employee moving in or someone leaving or you know, whatever the case may be. So it's about scratching as many bags as possible and creating an excuse to appreciate and promote everyone else.When people ask us all the time when we do a obviously you guys don't know yet we script and distribute videos, people and people do a lot of different strategy but a lot of times people would say, Oh, why am I gonna do a business owner strategy? Well, it's a different your YouTube channel will never blow up doing business owner interviews, I'm sorry, no one's gonna go to your YouTube channel, like, this guy's the best business owner views ever, and you're just gonna become the next YouTube celebrity, doesn't mean it's a bad business video to create. So it's just a different strategy. And why I love that strategies, because when you start scratching the back of business owners, those are the largest referral sources you're ever going to come across. Because they all share a mindset, which is very entrepreneurial, you're more likely to get a referral from a business owner that a fucking liberal, put it that way. Alright, that's just the way it is. Sorry, but that's true business owners have a mentality mindset where they know how hard it is, and they will scratch your back. And that's what happens. Business owners always give more referrals than non business owners. I don't know why that is. I think it's just the way they're all wired. They're wired to serve, they're wired to give them their natural referral numbers. So when you create a community of these business owners, you're creating a community of referral sources. And every person's referral source, no one's a client. And it's a mindset thing, like everyone has the ability to refer you. Right, everyone lives somewhere. And everyone knows someone who's moving at least two or three years if you track but a certain percentage of those people and those business owners are going to be moving this year to and they don't even know it yet. Some of them are gonna get pregnant, some of them are gonna get divorced. But there's a move that's going to happen. And when you're thought of first 80% of people closing the first one they meet with, that's why attention matters. I love the mailers what else you're doing. You're not just doing mailers in the community, though.Oh, yeah, for sure.Let's go on to channel number two, because that's just one chat on your you're crushing it. I love it.Yeah, it's doing the events in the neighborhood. You know, every time there's a vendor fair or garage sale or all the above, find a way to get involved, you know, in my neighborhood and being sticklers about, who was able to be involved with the vendor fair that they had two weeks ago. So one of our raving fans that lives in the neighborhood is a she does she owns a little in house bakery that she you know, she takes out of her home does baked goods, cookies, cupcakes and things like that? Well, when I told her what happened that they wouldn't let you know, realtors insurance people, they wouldn't let services like that evolve, she goes cold. Why don't you just throw me a couple of bucks. And I'll put your logos on half of my on all these cookies that I make? And I'll just give out your business card and cookies for free to everyone there. Yeah, that's awesome. So you know, things like that. But you know,how many events are you guys do an A in? Are you at an all your agents are inviting their friends, their families and all that, right? So you're duplicating your efforts? Like youdo probably eight to eight to 10 events a year? No, that's not necessarily just in my neighborhood. Right? That's cute. That's period. You know, we do a crossing guard appreciation, Teacher Appreciation, first responder appreciation. We do. We used to call it a customer appreciation party. But I took the customer out of it and just left it appreciation because I'm wanting to throw, you know, a one big appreciation picnic and water to happy hours for not only the people who have close business with us, but who is referred to as our top preferred partners when it comes to you know, mortgages inspectors, you know, who's who's creating excuses to appreciate them. Everyone else in our industry just expects to take them while I'm going to send you a home inspection. Where's my lead? You know, we need to appreciate them to the site agents that's in the building industry. 30% of our buyers are new construction. Not a lot of people can say that. So who's appreciate who's appreciating appreciating the site agents? You know, it's finding excuse to appreciate all the people, especially those who aren't always appreciated.Yeah. And so I always get like, how does one of my top blog posts honestly, on my website is client appreciation events. And it's about a couple of different agents doing different things in their markets. And people in agents too, would always say, Hey, dude, I don't want to do an event that's going to cost me like $2,000. So I want everyone to change their mindset. If you were to buy in, if I said I'm going to give you 100 leads a month, most agents eyes would light up, we agree that 100 leads a month, but let's just break down what you're buying a lead for. What you're really doing is you're just buying a conversation, and you're buying a conversation that happens to be about real estate, which is why the conversion rates only going to be one to 3% Some people are looky loos some people are actually serious. 80% of them already have an agent and trust me, and then that small bit that actually transacts always reserved. So that one to 3% I don't care how many autoresponders or how good your follow up is. If you converted 4% God bless you. But those guys and gals are really doing well. They have all kinds of technology hidden from every which way to do that the average person isn't going to have that advantage. But when you're having a client party, and you're running into like 400 people at a time or 150 people time, you're still having conversations now, ever. So what do you mean like? Well, let's just do statistical because none of this stuff is theory, this is mathematical science, all of the conversations you're having, regardless if you're buying them, or if you're doing them naturally 10 to 15% of those people are moving, and 100% of those people have a referral for you. So we would have a lot of these client parties, we didn't do eight a year. I love that we do two a year six months. And we would just have mega bashes is like when I was like a total party animal. And I was like literally running out nightclubs, because I didn't have a kitchen. So I got it cheap. I dropped like 15k on a frickin club event like DJs, like lights, ice sculptures and shit. People would be talking about these events, and we'd had 700 at once was our highest was 800 700 people. But they would roll in and it was just a party. Four years down the road, I was still getting business from these parties because no other real estate guy ever threw like a rave, I guess if you want to call it that, but whatever it was, it was cool at the time would have been my script now. My point is, is that when you get to those, it's the conversations you have you guys in this whole business is about conversations, I'm gonna always says this is really simple. You got to get appointments, close appointments, get appointments, close appointments, that is horrible advice, have conversations, close conversations, and then add them to your database and then stay in front of them forever, because that's what it's not a matter of if they're gonna move. It's a matter of whenfolks one of the things you said Man, I know like you and I share so much the same, you know, point of view and outlook and all that is, you know, going back to the Zillow of life or whether it's Zillow, whatever these online leads are that people were lucky to convert 3%. And how much on average, do you think per month, people are putting into leads like that? Do you have any type of idea? Lots. Alright,so let's see, let's even call it didn't say1500 bucks. Okay, talk about ROI, where's your ROI going to go further 1500 bucks a month towards these vs cold leads of people you've never met before. Or put that same 1500 bucks into your warm sphere, the people you haven't met before the people who have already closed or referrals, you know that that ROI is easy, or you should be spending your money?Well, people try to because they're chasing transactions instead of referrals. That's why there's a major difference if I'm chasing transactions, and I'm going back to that 10 to 15% game, but when I'm chasing referrals, everybody's referral source it might not be today, but it might be tomorrow or might be in three months. I don't care when the referrals come in. I know it's coming though.100% 100% And like so many people in our business don't have this you know, this big picture view you know, even if you're working with a buyer right now and they decided they want to chill out and wait a couple years. Look whether they're closing with me tomorrow, or they're closing with us three years from now. I have enough confidence and you know us and what we do and our relationships and things like that I'm not worried about when the closings happening. Yeah, what I mean it's it's keeping the relationship Yep.Three to five houses man that's what people buy over the course of their lifetime. It doesn't include any people they can refer you to so yeah, you got to play the long game with us. Let's take this to social What do you guys do in stand in front of people on social I see the events I love the in person I love the direct mail what's happening on the social side are you guys doing content guys creating content and create any media and video stuff are you guys running campaigns ads, any any of that?So I actually just in the past few weeks, got into paying for Facebook ads, I've never done it before. And what we are doing is you know my favorite my favorite button to clip whenever you're filling out your your audience is the targeting your your friends and friends of friends. Because with us being all word of mouth and having such an awesome reputation in the community. Chances are if your friends have followers of our business page you've heard of us so all we're doing is giving you that value to like our page or to click on our website or call our office. Right that makes the most sense over again that's a warm lead to me versus cold you know paying for lights or you know this these random introductions or whatever. We have an awesome social media following on Facebook. Our Facebook business page has a process Really 9300 likes. And again, same type of thing is my mindset, you know, we do a lot, you know, testimonial Tuesday new listings, open house, you know, the stereotypical stuff that you have to do. But the other half of our strategy is giving spotlights to the businesses that support our business, you know, go check out this restaurant, this is our top lender, give them a call, give them an opportunity. This is our top inspector. So if you go through our social media, I would say probably 1/3, to half of our content is, you know, throwing referrals and throwing spotlights and throw in appreciation to all the companies and businesses that we work with, not only within, but outside the industry as well.So you're telling me if you start selling every other people's stuff for them, they're start selling your stuff for you.That's for me, it's all about showing appreciation, whether it's the parties with social media content, whatever it is,I'm gonna title this podcast appreciation. Someone then in that name? Yeah, that's awesome. Do you guys have a Facebook group yet? of all your friends and family?Of course, we have these late real estate community. And how engaging is that? Oh, that's fantastic. You know, my whole mindset behind that was to not only be a resource for all of our past customers past refers everyone you know, we want to we have over 900 members of it, but we wanted to still give it a sense of exclusivity. Yep. But I also want to take a step further and say, hey, you know, y'all are 900 Something people that we have past business and relationships with? Well, what can we do for dollars to work together and cross promote and network and things like that?Great. Yeah, I love that. If you notice, like, there's a theme here and it's not about us I don't think cola said I want on the show here. He's always said you are them. us if it was I reference. And that's just a lot of this mindset, you guys that you if you if you really want to build your brand, you can't fake it. You have to actually be compassionate about your own community and compassionate about what you do and all this stuff like that. I think that's half the reason a lot of people are you know, have commission breath. And they're just looking for the, they're looking for the next transaction. But, you know, at the end of the day, what we're saying here guys, is that you'll end up with plenty of transactions if you just started serving and stop selling. serve your community and most of your business is going to come from people right in front of you. It's gonna come from your Facebook friends or Instagram followers and people will follow you on Tik Tok nowadays, it's not going to come from a bunch of strangers. So I'm gonna come from people you don't know you're going to burn out how many agents have you seen burnout just start chasing lead chasing business as a broker and MC trained some of them that didn't want to invest in themselves? How many of them have you seen just going out of business?On a there's so many because I mean all all that these agency and the especially with the market, right and particular market in the Northeast Florida Association of Realtors get approximately 11,000 realtors, okay. Think about that versus 3300 listings active on the MLS those are insane numbers. And all they see is you know the hot market social media and frickin HGTV and all this stuff and they think it's just something you just go get in and easy money easy paychecks you know, they don't understand that you don't treat it like a nine to five you don't put in you know, I laugh at 40 hours. You don't put in full time hours. You're not going to get full time.Yeah. Yeah. Do you even have listing presentation you just show up inside paperwork?So show us on paperwork? Yeah, you know, we have you know, over my time you know, I've created our presentation based off of just experiences right? And so I have stuff that I will take with me and when the you know you read you read the seller right? So if their mindset is very detail oriented Well hey, you know I brought this packet with you I'm happy to go over it with you word by word. If they just want to hang out have a drink and have a conversation show me what the house looks like they're just gonna lead the way hey, you know if you can't get to sleep tonight you need some light reading then read what's on this folder? Yeah, you know but at this point with you know, our reputation and community and things like that it is Hey Cole something came up we're getting to transfer come over to paperwork real quick. And I'll keep those done.Yeah, it's actually work man. Well, dude, this is awesome show. appreciate you sharing anything anything else you want to addon? I'm not necessarily I think you and I could go all day long. You know, such such a similar mindset and and all that. You know, one thing that we are doing actually happened today I have a really close relationship with the Sheriff of St. Johns County, the county I live in he came to our ribbon cutting and everything. One of his community community relations deputies reached out to me said hey, you know when you donate 500 bucks for families? I think it was for families that need a meal on Thursday. By the time I had the time to say yes, he had already got someone else to say yes. So I was like, You know what, I wonder what the deputies are doing on Thursday. You know, the ones that have to work instead of being with their families. So you know, we're putting together this is literally two or three hours ago I'm getting off with you and taking it down to the sheriff's office we're putting together 39 tumblers koozies a $20 Visa gift card for the deputies to go grab lunch and they can be with their families you know that all an investment is $780 It ended up being okay but when these 39 deputies get you know something something like this you know for for the holiday when it can be with their families and just like a surprise token of appreciation you know, all that stuff adds up and do you have now wellhere's what we're talking about guys that's mindset he could have easily said oh shit, fine. Could have hung up the phone. You could have stopped but then Cole here says no sports quarter got to find out another way to spend that $800 Because he didn't care about the costs he cared about the impact well done.My my buddy that's the community affairs liaison or whatever. I texted them I said man, you hit me up for 500 bucks. You spent 800That's great. That's good. People support others who care man and serve it's just you know it's just a wired Yeah, it's what we're wired and if you give you're gonna get and if you continue to do the right thing by people it'll eventually pay off for you you know that surely firm believer net? Why don't you go ahead and tell everybody where they can find you on social if they want to follow you anything if they want you got your website or any of that and then we'll get the strap?Yeah, absolutely. Again, my name is Cole slate. My personal Facebook account is called slate. Our Facebook business page is slate real estate. That username is slate real estate 904 Instagram called slate My email address is cold at Slate dot real estate and our firm's website is www dot slate dot real estate.Appreciate it man awesome show and appreciate you guys listen other episodes of real estate marketing dude podcasts anything we could help you with script that distribute this video if you liked this concept of attracting business versus chasing it give us a call. I can't stand chasing business and I know you can't either and we'd love to help you start attracting it and be just like coal out here can't build your heart and I can build the attention around your brand and make sure no one forgets about who the hell you are what you do by creating content keeping that in front of people all done for you so you can visit us a real estate marketing do.com real estate marketing comm check out some of our other products listing advocate calm and if you're a broker owner check out our software all in one transaction management at Sweet assist.com We appreciate you guys have a good one. Thanks for the follows reviews and connect with us on social media you guys next week. Peace Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training, and then schedule a time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

The Realty Classroom Podcast by Danny Griffin
What Zillow's Setback Means!

The Realty Classroom Podcast by Danny Griffin

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 20:23


Zillow has suffered its first major setback which is no real surprise to professional real estate agents. They have announced the termination of their home acquisition business and a Wall Street analyst concluded they have thousands of properties that they own that are now worth less than the purchase price. The key point is not that they made a terrible business move, rather whether or not this is the first indication of a major setback in the real estate market which has experienced worrisome price inflation.  Learn more: https://therealtyclassroom.com/podcast/what-zillows-setback-means/ ACCESS THE SIMPLE SECRET PLAN OF THE WORLD'S HIGHEST PAID REAL ESTATE AGENTS! ➡ Free Agent Course - http://freeagentgift.com SUBSCRIBE TO THE PODCAST ➡ iTunes: https://apple.co/2CkWYB8 ➡ Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2pVPPQj ➡ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ng9Aa1OHCpo&list=PLZr1oCBuChAKeo8iLeOiuku87SVhtWEKn ➡Web: https://therealtyclassroom.com/podcast        

Behind the Studs: Your Home Improvement and Remodeling Podcast
S4 E17 - Thanksgiving | Excavation Stories | Zillow's Home Buying Debacle

Behind the Studs: Your Home Improvement and Remodeling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 26:45


This podcast is an MP3 version.

Motley Fool Money
Stocks for Thanksgiving and the Power of Habit

Motley Fool Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 38:37


It's our Thanksgiving Special! Host Chris Hill and Motley Fool analysts Ron Gross and Jason Moser explain why they're thankful for The Trade Desk, Costco, Home Depot, and Lowe's. We discuss why investors might want to avoid Peloton, Zillow, and Avis Budget Group. And since no Thanksgiving is complete without dessert, we dig into a few slices of humble pie and talk Under Armour, Verizon, and Macy's. Ron and Jason share why the Energy Select Sector SPDR and Roblox are on their radar, as well as investing resources for anyone hoping to learn more about finance. Plus, we talk Procter & Gamble, Target, and toothpaste when we revisit our conversation with Charles Duhigg, bestselling author of The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business.

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast
Finding & Funding Real Estate Deals with Anson Young | EP80

Working Capital The Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 36:53


Anson Young is a Real Estate Agent and Investor with Hundreds of Transactions Completed in Each Category of Real Estate. Anson and his team Specialize in Marketing directly to Sellers for Off-market Deals, Using Many of the Methods that can be Found in his Book Finding & Funding Great Deals. When not Working, Anson can be Found Exploring the Wilds of Colorado's Rocky Mountains with his family, Reading Favourite Books to his Son, and Attending Loud Rock Concerts. In this episode we talked about:  • Anson's Bio & Background  • Anson's First Steps in Real Estate Business  • Becoming a Real Estate Agent   • Anson's Main Focus in Real Estate  • Raising capital   • Private Landing  • Sourcing Deals   • Building an Off-Market List  • Prospecting and finding  Opportunities  • Anson's Thoughts on Inflation and Interest Rates  • Mentorship, Resources and Lessons Learned   Useful links: https://www.instagram.com/younganson/?hl=en https://www.youtube.com/c/ansonyoung Transcriptions: Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in real estate or business that you wish you knew when you started out.   Anson (31m 43s): So I kind of, I definitely always traded just short-term money for, you know, not worrying about long-term things and, you know, it's like, oh, you're in your twenties. You know, you don't really care too much about it, but once you get up into your forties and you're kind of still doing the same thing, it's probably not the best idea. And so I would, I would go back and tell myself for sure, just like, Hey, keep like even a third of the amount of houses that you're doing, and then you won't have to work when you're 40.   So   Jesse (32m 17s): There you go. That's a, that's a good point. Okay. In, in terms of, for that person, that's getting into our industry, what do you tell them in terms of your view on mentorship?   Anson (32m 32s): Yeah, that's a really, really good question. I'm a big fan of mentors, whether it's kind of formal mentors and informal mentors, you know, people who were willing to help you up. And I would say, just find somebody who aligns with your values and then see how you can provide value to them so that they can help you get to where you want to go. And then once you're at a place where, you know, a few years along the line, I think that mentorship works both ways where you should have a hand up and a hand down.   So you're, you know, you'll graduate through mentors that you're working with and every step along the way, you should be helping bring people up as well. And that teaches you a lot of things too, as you're teaching and working through things with other investors as well. So you've kind of learned by teaching and then obviously you learn by learning from somebody who's where you want to be.   Jesse (33m 31s): Yeah. That's great. Great answer as well. Okay. In terms of, let's put a pin in rich dad, poor dad. So put that one aside, but what is a book that you find yourself just recommending over and over again?   Anson (33m 45s): Yeah. So my, that is, it was a book that I also give about the most as well. And it's obstacle is the way by Ryan holiday and it's a book on stoicism and it's, it's really helped me in my personal life and also through business as well. And so it's just an, and an outlook on life and on business and situations that I wasn't exposed to until I kind of started getting into it. And that book definitely hammered it home for me.   So   Jesse (34m 19s): That's cool. I don't think we've ever had that book recommended on the show, but I've, I've definitely had people say it's a, it's a killer book. Yep. Okay. Last question. First car, make and model.   Anson (34m 32s): I had a 1979 tan VW rabbit. That is   Jesse (34m 38s): Unreal.   Anson (34m 39s): Two door.   Jesse (34m 40s): Yeah. That's pretty good, man. Like 79. I just looking at you. I would've, I would've assumed it'd be the eighties or nineties, but that's, that's quite the car.   Anson (34m 50s): That's the same year I was born. It just happened to be, my dad's always worked on VWs my whole life. And so my step-mom drove like a Cabriolet and my dad's had like dozens and dozens of bugs and, and yeah, when it came time to me, for me to start driving, you know, he bought this 79 tan rabbit that he's like, this is yours. If you get your grades up. And it took me a little while, but finally got my grades up enough to, to drive it. So   Jesse (35m 20s): I love how they're bringing back the seventies and eighties, the retro stitching for a, for a lot of their, their new models. So it got kind of that vintage look.   Anson (35m 29s): I'd love to see it. I'd love to see a new rabbit. Yeah.   Jesse (35m 32s): Oh yeah. Bring it back. Awesome. All right. Answered for those of you that want to connect or reach out or have any questions. I know you're doing work with bigger pockets. Maybe you could tell, tell listeners where they can go on the Google machine.   Anson (35m 47s): Yeah. If you go to the Google machine and if you want to connect with me bigger pockets, this is probably the easiest way to do it. It's just, if you just search my name on the site, you'll find my, my, my profile. Think I'm the only answer on the young, on there still. So that's good. Yeah. And then yeah, if you want to find me on Instagram at young Anson, and if you want to find me on YouTube, I do do videos for bigger pockets and starting to do more videos for myself as well. And so you can find me there.   Jesse (36m 16s): My guest today has been aunts and young aunts and thanks for being part of working capital.   Anson (36m 21s): Thanks, Jesse. Thanks so much.   Jesse (36m 31s): Thank you so much for listening to working capital the real estate podcast. I'm your host, Jesse for galley. If you liked the episode, head on to iTunes and leave us a five star review and share on social media, it really helps us out. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me on Instagram, Jesse for galley, F R a G a L E, have a good one. Take care.Jesse (0s): Welcome to the working capital real estate podcast. My name is Jesper galley. And on this show, we discuss all things real estate with investors and experts in a variety of industries that impact real estate. Whether you're looking at your first investment or raising your first fund, join me and let's build that portfolio one square foot at a time. Right? Ladies and gentlemen, my name's Jessica galleon. You're listening to working capital the real estate podcast. Our special guest today is aunts and young Anson is a real estate agent and investor with hundreds of transactions completed in each category, real estate Anson, and his team specialize in marketing directly to sellers for off-market deals, using many methods that can be found in his book, finding and funding great deals when not working ants and can be found exploring the wilds of Colorado with his family and tending loud rock concerts.   And I can see you got a twig behind you there, and son, how you doing?   Anson (54s): I'm good. I'm good. Thanks for having me, Jesse.   Jesse (56s): Yeah, my pleasure having you on, what do you got there? Is that a base? It's hard to tell because   Anson (1m 1s): That one's a five string bass.   Jesse (1m 4s): I like it. Fantastic, man. Well, thanks for coming on. We were just chatting before the show, like a few of the most recent guests you were speaking at BP con this year, what was, what was your topic?   Anson (1m 17s): So my topic this year was finding the deals in any market and it focused on kind of out of state investing or long distance real estate investing, building a team, you know, how basically how to go ahead and find those deals, whether it's networking or off market. And, and yeah, that's seems to be a hot topic. Everybody's market is too expensive. So they're looking at other markets and I figured I'd hit on that since that's what I'm doing too. So   Jesse (1m 47s): Yeah, absolutely. It's certainly topical right now. It's we kind of joke around about the inverse relationship between, you know, the, the lower interest rates are, the cheaper money is the harder it is to find deals.   Anson (1m 59s): Oh yeah, for   Jesse (1m 60s): Sure. So in terms of a little bit of your background for listeners that aren't familiar with you, maybe you could kind of take us back to how you got into real estate. I know you just mentioned on the outset, you're also an agent. Maybe you could take us back to the beginning of how that journey started.   Anson (2m 17s): Yeah, sure. So back in 2003 or so I was working in it, I got laid off like everybody did, it feels like kind of boat, post.com, bubble burst. And so I was just looking around of what to do next. Do I go back into it? Do I double down in that arena or do I do something else? And at the same time, my wife and I were going to move down to Phoenix from Denver to be closer to family, my brother had just moved there.   They were having their first kid. So I was like, you know what? I don't have a corporate job anymore. I could kind of move wherever I want. And right before I left a friend of mine handed me rich dad, poor dad, which is, I think just the basic origin story of all real estate investors these days. But, but literally read that book on the way down to Arizona and changed my entire mindset about what I could do, what I should do and why going back into a corporate environment, probably wasn't the best idea.   And so landed in Phoenix and decided new city, a new me, and kind of jumped in and tried to learn as much as I could about anything that I could about real estate. And at the same time I was bartending. And so nights were spent working and days were spent trying to figure out real estate. So that's kind of a, that's kind of where I got started.   Jesse (3m 48s): That's great. So in terms of kind of getting into that mindset, I mean, not, not a dissimilar from a lot of people that come on the podcast or just talking in general, rich dad, poor dad just seems to be a cornerstone for a lot of, at least the beginning of real estate education, because I think ultimately the quadrants of that book for, you know, for anybody that hasn't read it, you definitely have to go check that book by Robert Kiyosaki. But I think it is ultimately when you get to that fourth quadrant where it's passive or, you know, quotations passive investments, I think real estate is just, it kind of lends itself to that, to that type of investment or that type of income.   Anson (4m 28s): Yeah, absolutely. And I had no idea that any of that existed, I mean, the guy who gave me the book, Paul, we were, I remember talking in this parking lot late at night and, and, and, and I couldn't even wrap my brain around getting a second mortgage. Like you have one mortgage who's going to give you money for a second house. You know, like that, that's how small my mindset was until that book helped me unlock and unpack what's possible.   So it, there's a reason why it's so such an origin story for many of us is because we weren't really taught that. And, and then this, this book just showed us kind of a different way of how things could work. Yeah,   Jesse (5m 10s): Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's funny cause you know, that book, it really, it hits people in totally different, different jobs and different times in their life. And it still seems to be one of the ones that keeps coming up. So you, you read rich dad, poor, poor dad, you're you get laid off from your job where once, once that clicks for you and that light bulb goes off, what was, what was your process after that?   Anson (5m 35s): So I'm like, like many people starting off. I had no clue what I was doing. So I basically attended every single meetup that I could find from kind of Rhea meetups, real estate investment associations, to like cashflow one-on-one games. So, you know, tied in with the, the rich poor dad, it's basically a board game that people get together and play that kind of go through the principles of financial freedom and stuff.   And so anywhere that I could latch on to people who were doing real estate, I was there and I, I kind of made that my full-time job of, of doing that I've formed relationships. And in that I just started doing, trying to provide as much value as possible. So I'd go do all kinds of odds and end tasks for them for a couple of investors and a couple of agents. And in return, you know, all I asked for was just information. Like I would go run contracts, you know, for a long time for an agent.   And then I would ask for, Hey, can you teach me how to value properties on ML MLS? And so trying to provide that value first and then asking for something in return later on. And so I, I ran contracts, I punched signs in yards. I knocked on doors for a foreclosure investor. Feel like I did all these different things to try to learn as much as possible. And about after nine months to a year, one of the agents reciprocated with a deal.   And she was like, Hey, one of my clients has a property that they want to sell. I think that it would be great for you guys kind of sent over the numbers, helped me run through it and ended up to be our first deal. And it was a live in flip that we spent the next year fixing up and, and, you know, figuring out what's next. But we, we sold it after a year and ended up moving back to Denver. And so it was perfect timing because that was right at the end of 2005. And I think the Phoenix market crashed the next week.   So, so we got out just in time, but I learned a lot on that first deal and then went ahead and just appended and moved markets, which felt like starting over that's that's, that's kinda how that deal went. So   Jesse (7m 58s): Kind of started on that deal. Similar to a lot of individuals were, I guess, somewhat of a, you know, some people call it house hacking where you were living in at the time, but also renting out a, would that be fair to say it was kind of that, that type of arrangement for the first one?   Anson (8m 13s): No, we did. We did kind of a, it needed a lot of work. And so we just decided to move in and fix it while we were living there. We were fixing up stuff, you know, as time and money permitted and by the end of it, you know, it was fixed up and ready to go. And actually my agent w I, I had sent her an email, you know, we had gone to Vegas for our anniversary decided right then that we were kind of just done with Phoenix.   I sent her an email saying, Hey, I think we're going to sell. And she's like, I'll buy it. Like my parents will buy this. Like, she had very much faith that the market was going to keep and she was a little bit wrong on that, but that's okay. Yeah. So she gave us a really good price on it. We ended up making, I think $60,000 on it after a year, which isn't too bad and, you know, had some money to go back to Denver and continue the journey   Jesse (9m 11s): Right on. So was the journey continuing on that kind of operational level where it was value add deals or did you, did you pivot?   Anson (9m 22s): I think I, yeah, it was definitely a value add deals. When I got back, I felt like it was starting over because I didn't have a lot of real estate contacts I didn't have, I didn't know the market. And so, no, I kind of just went back to basics. I started working with investors and agents. I actually got hired on to a real estate agent team and was doing broker price opinions for banks. And right then I just, I figured out this whole thing of bank owned foreclosures and that this could be, you know, a really big thing.   And so, so from then on, probably for the next two years, pretty much everything that I bought was a bank owned foreclosure. So they were all distressed value, add properties that, that had almost no emotion into them because the banks don't care if you low ball them, they just care if it meets their kind of pricing matrix. So that was a fun time to be in real estate for sure. But I got my license maybe a year after I moved back and just kind of did both. I was an agent investor just kind of juggling both things.   Hm.   Jesse (10m 29s): So in terms of the kind of becoming an agent, because you get lots of people that are like, should I get my license as an investor, if you're going to make that switch, did you find it was something that was kind of critical or a nice to have type of type of thing where you still had to develop relationships with host of different agents?   Anson (10m 50s): Yeah. I found it to be absolutely critical to all the real estate that I was doing. Just, just from a, you know, obviously if I'm buying Oreos and my entire existence of finding deals is on MLS. I don't want to be one step removed from that process. I want to be, you know, like a direct actor in that process. And so right in front of MLS on a daily basis to try to find, you know, the deals that I'm looking for, rather than relying on an agent to send them to me, or, you know, go around the back door and give me their log-in or something like that, I could shoot off offers immediately, you know, set showings, do the things that I needed to do to go lock up these deals.   And so for me, it was absolutely pivotal   Jesse (11m 41s): In terms of kind of where you've developed your business today. So you kind of, you go through this process, there's the light bulb moment. You, you see that it's, there's proof of concept when you, you know, in one year you make 60 grand catch us up to today. What, where are you focusing? Not on, not just from a, from a geographical standpoint, but even from a type of asset or type of real estate that maybe you focus on or areas that you focus on.   Anson (12m 7s): Yeah. So, you know, it's kind of ebbed and flowed over the years between wholesales fix and flip. What I'm pivoting towards this year is more longterm buy and hold properties, single family, a small multifamily, those kinds of properties. And so that's a little bit different for me. I'm, I'm used to doing this transactional turn and burn, and now I'm trying to slow down and think for the longterm so that I can, you know, actually have something to show for my effort rather than just, you know, larger pay check, so to speak.   And so, so Ben pivoting in that direction as, as a business and Ben geographically in three different markets this year, just testing things out and getting the ball rolling on long-term cashflow. So that's kind of where we're at.   Jesse (13m 3s): So answered for the actual capital raising side of the business for you or where you source capital has that changed over the, the last few years? And if so, how, how has that evolved for, for yourself?   Anson (13m 16s): It hasn't changed too much once I kind of discovered private money lending before the sec kind of changed their rules, we would kind of just cold call for private lenders, developed relationships with them, had a good track record over time. And so after a while, you know, we would get referred to their friends who were looking to, you know, make, you know, a 10 to 14% return on their investment. And, and so, so yeah, so it hasn't changed too much because we're still using short-term even on these long-term projects we're using short-term funds to, to acquire them and then refinance it now to a more portfolio or, or bank loan style financing.   So I guess that side's new, but when we go into purchase, we're still using like our same private money lenders. They know that they're going to hang on for, you know, three to six months until we refinance out, but that's not too different from a flip where we would hold onto it for three to six months and they would get paid out at the end of that. So, so the, you know, the initial buy is the same. It's just that long-term piece of now it's going to convert into something long-term. So can you,   Jesse (14m 34s): You talked to, to that a little bit for listeners, you know, for that type of approach where you are, you know, getting short term finance, when you have a project going on and then stabilizing after that, maybe you could to kind of run through how that works. And, and, you know, on top of that private lending, I think is a bit of a black box for a lot of people. So, you know, maybe, maybe get your thoughts on that as well.   Anson (14m 59s): What do you mean by black box?   Jesse (15m 0s): Well, I, I feel that a lot of people that aren't in our industry, they hear private money and it sounds like they're meeting somebody in an alleyway and they're handing them a bag of cash. So I think, I think from like, I think for a lot of people, they don't realize how many private lenders there are out there, how many more options you have than just walking up to the bank that you've known for years, or are you, you know, you know, the brand,   Anson (15m 25s): Right? Yeah. So in, you know, I wish it was like an alleyway with a sack full of cat. That'd be kind of fun actually. But typically private lending is just lending from an individual rather than a bank. And so a sophisticated, private lender will operate somewhat like a bank where they, you know, they kind of vet deals. They've vet you, they vet the process. Some even want like a loan application and stuff. Others are very much more relational.   I mean, your next private lender could be your rich uncle or something who really believes in you and wants you to succeed. So it kinda runs the gamut from usually it's, you know, older people who are using the retirement funds. Some people who came into some money one way or the other, it seems like two or three of my guys who I lend or who I borrow from. They all sold a business in their sixties and now have kind of more money than they know what to do with, they see a return of 12% PR and that's very exciting to them.   And so they will lend that to the right person. And so it's kind of, I wouldn't call it a beginner strategy at all, because usually you have to have a kind of a track record. You have to have a reputation for what you're doing for somebody who just is sitting on, you know, even if it's a million dollars, you know, that's two projects in Denver. And so they, you know, lending out their entire million dollars. It has to be to the right person, the right projects with the right track record so that they are secure that bill, you know, end up getting that back.   And so it's kind of private lending in a nutshell. And to your other question for kind of stabilizing an asset, typically we're, we're purchasing with private money, which is for us, it's a hundred percent loan and fix. And so we're, we're into the deal with no money and we go ahead and we get the property fixed up rented, and our next lender wants to see it for at least three months.   We're, we're, we're collecting rent. Everything is stable. Everything's looking good before we can transition that into kind of a, it's a refinance into either a portfolio or, or a conventional style loan. I prefer portfolio, cause it seems just a little easier, but then they, they close on it and they'll pay off the private lender. And so now instead of owing, you know, this individual money, now we own, now we owe this credit union or this bank money and, and pay them.   And it's a long-term note, whereas our short-term private money lender is only like a six month note. So now we have a 30 year note and a smaller payment, so we can actually cash flow.   Jesse (18m 29s): Nice. Yeah, yeah. Obviously the goal there, if we switched to sourcing deals, like we talked about at the outset, it's a, it's a challenging thing to do right now. So it was topical, I guess, that that was in new Orleans. That was your kind of discussion topic, maybe as a comparison, if, if there has been things that are different than when you were starting out, how you were sourcing deals, then as opposed to strategies you've, you've learned and are using now, how has that evolved?   And, and you know, what, what approach are you using given the fact that it just seems like there is so little supply out there.   Anson (19m 7s): Yeah. That evolution has been pretty huge. So like I S like I said earlier, starting off, we did a lot of, we just bought bank owned, foreclosures right off of MLS. And we got really good at that to the point where we also sold REO, but we would buy from other REO brokers. And so we kind of knew the inside process of how asset managers think what different banks did, what, when they did their price reductions, you know, could we get in one day before a price reduction and then get under that price reduction and lock up a property before everybody else saw it.   We got pretty good at that kind of stuff. Once the foreclosure crisis started resolving itself, bailouts and everything else, there was just less foreclosures coming. And I saw the writing on the wall when, on the REO sourcing side, it's kind of the, you know, the, the, the source of the river started drying up and we were both benefiting from that source of the river plus way downstream, when we would pick up deals. It's like, oh man, I kind of see the writing writing on the wall here.   We're not going to be able to find as many deals as we used to. And so at the same time, we were also doing some short sales and looking around there was still, you know, a huge, you know, huge chunk of people who were underwater on their mortgages. And so we just aggressively attacked short sales that were listed and short sales that weren't listed. So we were just going straight after foreclosures basically. And so for about a year or two, we did mainly short sales. Was it, we got really good at that as well of going from the wild west or short sales to when it kinda got standardized and institutionalized.   We saw, you know, everything in that whole window. And then, and then the same thing happened where I started seeing that the market was rising, the prices were rising and not everybody would be underwater forever. And so what do I do next? And from there, we went off market. We, we, we did a little bit more MLS deals we would find, but those really just started getting few and far between, and we needed a bigger source of deals we were doing mainly wholesaling right then.   And so the better source of deals was just to go directly to the seller. And so ever since probably 2014, 15 up until now has been all off market direct to seller. I haven't bought an MLS deal probably three or four years. They just, I don't know. It's just not, not scary   Jesse (21m 54s): Now. Yeah,   Anson (21m 56s): Exactly. So all, you know, basically all off market right now, just going directly to those sellers and seeing if we can help them.   Jesse (22m 4s): So on that, on that note, in terms of the approach that you use with, you know, is it the, of, in the vein of direct mailers, are you kind of going to the secretary of state? Are you going through different software? How are you, how are you reaching out to those? Those would be sellers.   Anson (22m 22s): Yeah. So our main, our main way to reach out and touch them is direct mail. We have just this year started adding in, or I shouldn't say just this year, it was probably 2019, just started stacking in more ways to reach sellers, kind of this, the same lists and in different ways. So if they did respond to the direct mail, we also called them. We also text them. We also emailed them if we could, you know, find them on Facebook, knock on their door, whatever it took to really get in front of the right sellers.   You know, there was a time where you can just send out postcards and, you know, get a 2% response rate, just pick from the best ones. But that just started kind of getting less and less as there was more competition. So now we're reaching out in multiple ways, but direct mail is still our number one.   Jesse (23m 16s): Yeah. You know, it, it's interesting because it comes, I guess, depending on who the sellers are. Like, for instance, if you, if you're really reaching out to predominantly mom and pop, or like you said, small, multi, multi Juarez, you know, I found that the responses are usually better. However, if there's that one layer of say a corporate structure, LLC, partnership, whatever that is, do you, is that also part of the pool that you reach out to? And I guess from there, if it is, you probably have to do that one extra step of, you know, who's the principal who's, you know, who's the signing officer.   Anson (23m 49s): Yep. Yeah. So in Colorado, our, our secretary of state is pretty transparent. So we can go on and search LLCs and find out who, you know, who's the owner where their register addresses all that stuff. So our, oh, I wish I had the number of, of LLCs that we've mailed to, but I have given that over to a VA to go ahead and look those up and just make sure that we're hitting the right people and getting in front of them instead of just setting, you know, XYZ LLC, you know, it's like Paul Jones or something.   So,   Jesse (24m 25s): Yeah, yeah. In terms of the, so for those that are just kind of getting into real estate in terms of finding off market deals, they're coming into an environment that, you know, we we've seen prior to supply constraints, a different approach. Whereas now, because there's so few real estate opportunities out there properties, they were coming into a market where they probably have to start with direct, direct to seller or trying to find off market deals. How would you go about telling somebody who's getting into the industry? How does start building that list?   Anson (24m 58s): I mean, even today, it sounds very, very old school, but I think that are driving for dollars lists are still some of our Mo you know, highest producing lists. And if you want to keep the cost down and you have more time than you have money, I would say, drive for dollars and then cold column, just, you know, skip, trace them or look them up on white pages.com. Yup. And then, you know, send out phone calls. You'll probably, you know, get 50 to a hundred driving for dollars leads a day.   And then, you know, cold column the same day or the day after you'll, you'll keep yourself busy for sure. But it, you know, bang for buck time for payoff, it's definitely the best use of your time to try to find deals.   Jesse (25m 48s): Yeah. A hundred percent, all it really takes is, you know, you do it for a week. If you can hit one, then you know, there's your, there's your week's work right there. Exactly.   Anson (25m 57s): And pretty good ROI.   Jesse (25m 59s): Yeah. A hundred percent. And in terms of your stock, you know, your stock mailer, is it typically, like you said, you know, Hey, you know, Hey Doug Smith and then w what's the typical pitch that you, that you guys employ.   Anson (26m 14s): Yeah. So we definitely try to speak, you know, the ethos or the, you know, the, the makeup of our direct mail is, you know, handcrafted and handwritten. So we want to make sure that we're, we're talking to them down at like a normal level of like, Hey, we're here to help. So it's like, you know, using names, using addresses, using, you know, subdivisions, if we really want to like, like, Hey, you know, Hey, Jesse, we're, you know, we're wondering if you wanted to sell 1, 2, 3 main street, if you've ever thought about selling hassle-free please give us a call.   You know, we don't have any commissions or inspections or appraisals, you know, call us for a no obligation fair offer. And that that's enough of the core of the message to get across of like, Hey, we're here to help. You know, sometimes we'll add in that we're local, you know, we're, we're, we're definitely, you know, not an eye buyer or somebody who's a Zillow or something coming in that we're here to work with them and we have, you know, multiple ways to help them.   So,   Jesse (27m 28s): Yeah. Fantastic. At the end of the day, it's really just getting that phone call. You're not expecting it to get the sale, which it's nice, but not expecting to get the sale on the first touchpoint.   Anson (27m 37s): Right. Yeah, exactly. It's definitely a long game of multiple touches and, and yeah. Building on each other. So,   Jesse (27m 47s): So handsome, we're in a crazy time right now, recording this, you know, coming into the end of, of 20, 21. I don't think anybody could have predicted the last year and a half. How has your business, or how do you see your business evolving as a result of kind of the environment that we've been in, if at all, and, and maybe just prospectively, where do you see opportunities, you know, coming in the new year?   Anson (28m 15s): Yeah. So we're going to continue doing what we're doing for this year, which is, you know, more out of state looking at a state for markets that are conducive to cash flow. Short term rental opportunities is, is pretty big focus right now as well. And then locally, we've been partnering more with other investors because we've had a lot of time spent on the other side, kind of looking at a state. And, and so, you know, looking forward to next year, you know, I think the market's going to just be doing more of the same, can't foresee anything crazy that's going to happen.   And so, you know, we're just kind of to focus on long-term projects and, and even if we're wrong, you know, we still have, long-term more passive, passive things going, so   Jesse (29m 12s): Right on. All right. And so we ask a four questions, every guest before we wrap up. So before I get there, I'm just curious, I've been trying to, you know, for the last month or two kind of taking a poll of, of different real estate professionals I talked to, and I'm just curious your thoughts on number one, inflation, and number two interest rates. And, and I'm not expecting you to have a crystal ball, but I just, I find it funny because, you know, you have asked people, you get four opinions on these topics, right?   Anson (29m 46s): Yeah. So inflation's obviously going to be an issue. I think that Brian, who's the economist who spoke at BiggerPockets convention, had a lot of really good things to say. And pretty much everything that I would kind of repeat of, you know, inflation's a problem. It's not going to be a problem today or next year, but in the next, you know, four years or so, it will probably pop and become an issue.   And as far as interest rates, it's like, I think that they just voted that they're not, they're not going to change at all. And so as long as interest rates stay down and buying, and money is easy, it's just gonna turn, turn the market and keep it going. So buyers will keep buying. Investors will keep investing money right now is probably the easiest thing to get, whether it's hard money or otherwise, and so easy money, hard deals.   So it's going to probably just keep fueling that and, and yeah, just, it, it's kinda hard to say, but I think Brian had a really good kind of outlook on it where, you know, 20, 24 or 2026 is kind of when things will start changing and creeping up a little bit on, on interest rates. And I, I don't know enough about it to disagree. So   Jesse (31m 13s): Yeah, we had a, we had Brian on the show, you can check that episode out. I think it was in the sixties, but he was, he was great if especially if you, if you geek out on, on economics, that's definitely the one that listened to. I love it. Okay. Sweet. If you're ready, we'll fire off these final four questions to ya.   Anson (31m 32s): All right. I'm ready. Right on.   Jesse (31m 34s): What's something, you know, now in your career Anson, whether that's in

The Home Pros Radio Show |The Home Improvement and Repair Podcast
Ep233 - Blowtorching Cobwebs, Zillow Offers, and Expensive Tiny Homes!

The Home Pros Radio Show |The Home Improvement and Repair Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 14:58


In this episode of The Home Pros Radio Show, a Colorado man attempts to "remove cobwebs" with a blowtorch, Zillow stops buying houses, and a tiny home in Massachusetts sells for over $1,000.00 per square foot!    Visit Closing Contractor at https://closingcontractor.com   To reach out to RIC Home Inspections, visit them online at https://richomeinspections.com Catch the Home Pros Radio Show online at https://homeprosradio.com

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast
Finding Deals From Older MLS Listings - The REI Secrets Series

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 54:44


A lot of realtors tend to slow down or get discouraged when the home buying season is over, but I'm here to tell you that there are still plenty of great deals to find out there.And you're in luck because on today's show, I'm going to show you step by step how to find deals on the MLS from older listings using Propstream. Using Little Rock, Arkansas as an example, I show you how to pull the lists, find the deals, and then research those deals on Zillow and Redfin.Then, once you've narrowed in on the properties you want to make moves on, I show you how to use Freedomsoft to easily automate your marketing. You can set personalized greetings, voicemails that send automatically if you miss a call, and so much more.To get your hands on the special Joe McCall Signature edition of Freedomsoft, be sure to go to freedomsoftJoe.com. And to check out my brand new webinar with Rob Swanson, the owner of Freedomsoft, where we get in-depth about how to use its great features, go to HundredsOfLeads.com.What's Inside:—Home buying season is over, but there are still deals.—How to use Propstream to find deals.—Using Redfin and Zillow to research properties and find discounts.—Automate your workflow using Freedomsoft.

Will and Lee Show
#29 Dan Chan: The Magical Story of the Millionaires' Mentalist

Will and Lee Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 56:21


Dan Chan, has been called the “Millionaires' Mentalist" and the "Billionaire's magician" by Business Insider. He's  Silicon Valley's Favorite Magician and his client list is literally an A to Z of the world's most recognizable companies from Amazon to Zillow. He's performed for Tim Ferriss, Biz Stone, Ev Williams, and many tech founders & billionaires. We talk about growing up in San Francisco, evolving his show, teaching his son magic, crafting your own PR story, and much more.In this episode we discuss:How Dan set and achieved the goal of performing for every Fortune 500 company, "starting with letters from A to Z"Magic and mentalismTactics to create and refine your storyHow to create a PR/marketing programWhen to sell and when to just keep people engagedLeaning into your own personality when creating a productHow Dan tailored his shows for digital distribution so he could perform globallyHow Dan creates distinct products and finds new marketsWhat Dan asks himself when deciding if he'll take a low paying or new jobThe best place to go to see the most world class magiciansLearn more about Dan and book his shows at:https://www.danchanmagic.com/https://millionairesmentalist.com/Read more about Dan:Meet Daniel ChanI was an early PayPal employee who missed out on becoming a millionaire because I sold my stock too soon after I leftA day in the life of a 'billionaire's magician,' who's hired to fly around the world and entertain the eliteSilicon Valley businesses who made their living from tech industry events are suddenly staring at blank calendars and layoffsSilicon Valley's favorite magician reimagines his act in the age of ZoomThese Airbnb hosts earned more than $15,000 on Thursday after the company let them buy IPO shares

You Rock! With Sherri Johnson
Finding and Converting Internet Leads With Bryan Clark of Be Known Advertising l Ep 80

You Rock! With Sherri Johnson

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 67:03


In this episode of "Rockstar Interview" with Sherri Johnson, we have Bryan Clark of Be Known University. Bryan is known for his expertise in Facebook Advertising. Today, we will talk about Zillow, and the real estate industry, where to find quality leads, and much more! So sit back, relax, and enjoy the show!Schedule a call with Bryan here -> https://bit.ly/3xjiYa8.Watch the video version of this on my Youtube page at www.Youtube.com/SherriJohnson.Try out my new online coaching platform Playbook™ for 30 days! Get access to 15 plus courses and a monthly group Q and A coaching session. Get your free trial here https://bit.ly/3hjHvEj.

Grumpy Old Geeks
532: Crypt Bros

Grumpy Old Geeks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 46:17


Happy Thanksgiving; spam season; Jason's pivoting; scooters back in the news; Zillow's AI disaster; Tesla app locked people out of their cars (except for their keys); Zipline; trolling NFT owners; the NFT Bay; Crypto.com Arena; Apple on right to repair; OpenAI GPT-3; the Orville; Star Trek: First Contact; Jagged, Alanis Morissette; Discovery; Foundation; Wheel of Time; Bored Ape Yacht Club; Buy Nothing Project; ear wax; AirPods are out; Super Agent cookie monster; Twitter Blue; smart dimmers.Show notes at https://gog.show/532/This week we're sponsored by Feals. Become a member today by going to Feals.com/gog and you'll get 50% off your first order with free shipping.FOLLOW UPThe PivoteerMiami votes to end electric scooter pilot programIN THE NEWSWhat Went Wrong With Zillow? A Real-Estate Algorithm Derailed Its Big BetTesla app outage locked some owners out of their carsZipline starts first commercial US drone deliveries with Walmart partnership in ArkansasHow to Troll an NFT Owner“The NFT Bay” Shares Multi-Terabyte Archive of ‘Pirated' NFTsCrypto park deal has winner's curseWhy Apple changed its mind on Right to RepairApple will let iPhone users repair their own devicesOpenAI makes GPT-3 generally available through its APIMEDIA CANDYJaggedStar Trek: Discovery Season 4Star Trek: Discovery Is Tearing the Streaming World Apart‘Scenes From a Marriage,' ‘Dopesick,' ‘Cowboy Bebop' Showrunners on Adapting Source Material for TVFoundationWheel of TimeA Choice of Weapons: Inspired by Gordon ParksUniversal Forms Metaverse Band Based on Bored Ape Yacht Club NFTsIt's just a pre-monitezed, not good Gorillaz... APPS & DOODADSThe Buy Nothing ProjectYes, you DO need a smart ear wax remover. And the Spade Mini is on sale for under $40Are AirPods Out? Why Cool Kids Are Wearing Wired HeadphonesSuper Agent - Automatic cookie consentIntroducing Twitter Blue - Twitter's first-ever subscription offeringAmazon Basics Single Pole Smart Switch, Works with Alexa, Neutral Wire Required - A Certified for Humans DeviceSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: 2022 Home Price Forecasts, Single-Family Rent Growth, Record Starts for BTR

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:11


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending November 20th, 2021... home price forecasts for next year, single-family rent growth, and a new record for build-to-rent home starts.Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week. The number of people applying for unemployment keeps dropping. Last week, just 268,000 people applied for state benefits. That's getting close to pre-pandemic levels which were in the low 200,000's. The number of people already getting state unemployment benefits is also lower. That number dropped to a total of 2.08 million. (1)Home starts were down slightly in October as builders struggled with supply chain issues and a labor shortage. They were down .7% from the previous month, but compared with October of last year, they were up slightly. Single-family starts were down the most, with a 3.9% decline. But there's a strong demand for housing, and builders are preparing for a much faster pace of construction. Permits rose for all types of buildings, with a 2.7% increase for single-families, an 8.2% increase for buildings with two to four units, and a 6.5% increase for larger multi-families. (2)Although builders are dealing with a lot of challenges, they are feeling confident about the market because there's such a huge demand. According to the National Association of Homebuilders, the level of confidence among builders is the highest it's been since last May. It's up three points for November to a reading of 83. (3) Mortgage RatesMortgage rates rose back above the 3% mark. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is up 12 points to 3.1%. The 15-year is also up 12 points to 2.39%. (4) Economists are blaming the increase on inflation, and are forecasting higher rates over the next few months. The National Association of Realtors senior economist, Nadia Evangelou, expects the housing market to slow down next year as more homes hit the market at higher prices with higher mortgage rates. (5)In other news making headlines…Where Are Home Prices Going?Zillow just published a new forecast for 2022 home prices. It is predicting that prices will rise 13.6% between October of this year and October of next year. In September, Zillow had predicted a 11.7% increase. Both those figures are lower than the rate of price growth for this year. They were up a record 19.9% between August of 2020 and August of this year. (6)Zillow researchers say: “The strong long-term outlook is driven by our expectations for tight market conditions to persist, with demand for housing exceeding the supply of available homes.”As Fortune reports, not everyone agrees with Zillow's forecast. Goldman Sachs expects 2022 prices to rise another 16%, while Fannie Mae is expecting a lower 7.9% growth rate. CoreLogic is only expecting a 1.9% overall increase in prices, and the Mortgage Banks Association says it'll be more like 2.5%. Single-Family Rents Move HigherAs you can see, home price forecasts are all over the map, but they all expect strong demand for housing to continue. And that's pushing rents higher for single-family homes.CoreLogic's single-family rental index for September shows that national rents are 10.2% higher year-over-year. Miami rents have gone up the most. Those rents are up 25.7% with rents for high-end homes rising the most. Phoenix is second on that list, followed by Las Vegas, Austin, San Diego, and Dallas. (7)John Burns Real Estate Consulting also tracks single-family rent growth. It shows that new lease effective rents were up 6% year-over-year in September. Phoenix was at the top of that list, at 14%. (8)Single-Family Build-to-Rent StartsThe housing shortage is motivating a lot of developers and investors to bring more build-to-rent homes to the market. According to the National Association of Homebuilders, housing starts for those homes hit the highest level ever in the third quarter. Construction has been ramping up, with 47,000 build-to-rent starts over the last year. (9)Builder.com says that's a 17.5% increase over the previous four quarters. It says: “With the onset of the Great Recession and declines in the homeownership rate, the share of build-to-rent homes increased in the years after the recession. And while the market share… is small, it has been trending higher.”That's it for today. Check the show notes for links and more info on these topics. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro-formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more. Thanks for listening. I'm Kathy Fettke.Links:1 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-drop-to-pandemic-low-of-268-000-as-labor-shortage-forces-businesses-to-avert-layoffs-11637242500?mod=economic-report2 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/new-home-construction-slows-as-builders-grapple-with-supply-chain-headaches-11637157193?mod=economic-report3 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/home-builders-are-growing-more-confident-as-americans-demand-more-housing-11637075714?mod=economic-report4 -http://www.freddiemac.com/pmms/5 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2021/11/19/inflation-drives-mortgage-rates-over-36 -https://fortune.com/2021/11/18/zillow-changes-2022-real-estate-outlook-what-to-expect-from-home-prices-next-year/7 -https://magazine.realtor/daily-news/2021/11/17/property-owners-see-big-opportunities-in-single-family-rentals8 -https://www.realestateconsulting.com/the-light-bsfri-new-lease-effective-rents-up/9 -https://www.builderonline.com/data-analysis/single-family-build-to-rent-starts-reach-highest-quarterly-volume_c

Financial Survival Network
Invest in Real Estate Inflation - Andrew Ragusa #5333

Financial Survival Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 17:42


Summary: If you're looking at investments that will keep up and stay ahead of inflation, you have to look at real estate and understand the market. Andrew Ragusa comes on the show to tell us about real estate in the Northeast and what's happening in the market. Properties are selling for around $30k higher than their asking price, which is a trend that will probably stick around for a bit. Tune in to hear about where the market is going, and what to expect in this industry in 2022. Highlights: -Andrew Ragusa unpacks what's happening with real estate in the Northeast -Houses are selling, on average, $30k over asking price -Some people are trying to list their houses at very high prices just to see what happens, but they end up just sitting on the market -Properties around the $400k price point go extremely fast -Zillow was relying on the zestimate model, which is no longer very accurate -There is not enough data to figure out the exact estimate for every property -Real estate will probably remain somewhat stabilized in terms of slightly higher asking prices -Some people are waiting because they think the market is going to crash -On a nationwide level, people are hesitant about where to go once they do sell their property -For 2022, more inventory will probably show up -Changes in representation in the Northeast will probably cause more people to leave and different people to come in—the political landscape is shifting -Interest rates are lower at the moment Useful Links: Financial Survival Network Real Estate Coming Back Down to Earth with Andrew Ragusa Flight From New York City Continues with Andrew Ragusa Real Estate Market Innovators

How to Buy a Home
Ep. 63 - FISBOs And Zillow Zestimates - Why They Both Suck For First Time Home Buyers

How to Buy a Home

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 30:17


First time home buying can be massively confusing, so trying to buy a home yourself from an owner in a for sale by owner (FSBO) situation has lots of dangerous potential for a buyer who's new to the game. And if you're thinking Zillow Zestimates will help you determine how much you should pay for a home, Zillow's own website tells you how inaccurate their own Zestimates truly are. In this episode, David Sidoni tells you why they are so often very wrong. Join in to learn some important dos and don'ts for first time home buyers!

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast
Can We Maintain Our HUMAN Touch As We Hurtle Towards a Virtual Future? w/Stefan Adika

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 64:38


All signs point to a virtual future, and the only way real estate pros will survive is by adapting to the new reality.    That being said, we're still dealing with human beings at the end of the day, so how do we strike the balance between building real connections and growing with the changes? How can we best equip ourselves for a cyber reality and stand out amongst a crowd of i-buyers?    In this episode, host of Coffee Talk With Adika Live, Stefan Adika returns to talk differentiation in the digital era.    Three Things You'll Learn in This Episode    What the developments at Zillow mean for agents hat the heck is going on at Zillow, and is it wise to take their latest developments as purely ‘coincidental'?   How to maintain great, human relationships with past clientsDo we really think contacting clients we haven't spoken to in a year, out of the blue, is a good idea?    How to levera All signs point to a virtual future, and the only way real estate pros will survive is by adapting to the new reality.    That being said, we're still dealing with human beings at the end of the day, so how do we strike the balance between building real connections and growing with the changes? How can we best equip ourselves for a cyber reality and stand out amongst a crowd of i-buyers?    In this episode, host of Coffee Talk With Adika Live, Stefan Adika returns to talk differentiation in the digital era.    Three Things You'll Learn in This Episode    What the developments at Zillow mean for agents What the heck is going on at Zillow, and is it wise to take their latest developments as purely ‘coincidental'?   How to maintain great, human relationships with past clients Do we really think contacting clients we haven't spoken to in a year, out of the blue, is a good idea?    How to leverage iBuyers  What's stopping us from using our industry knowledge to educate the consumer on iBuyers (and grow our own digital footprints in the process!)?    [COMPLETE SHOW VIDEO EMBED]   Resources + Links   Rockstar Agent Marketing Toolkit - Featuring our favorite scripts, tutorials and quickstart guides to marketing strategies like Facebook Live, door-knocking, remarketing advertising, open houses and referrals. Get actionable ideas and tactics you can use in your career right NOW.   Subscribe on YouTube   Guest Bio   Stefan Adika is a California Realtor and YouTuber. A former touring bassist with more than 20 years of experience, Stefan is passionate about helping his clients find their own piece of paradise, with tons of laughs along the way. Stefan also uses his YouTube shows, Coffee Talk with ADIKA LIVE! and Talking Wax with ADIKA LIVE! to put a smile on his viewers' faces - but he's also happy to be used as a source of annoyance if necessary, so be sure to share his content with your best friends and worst enemies alike.    To find out more, go to: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC67DCNf4oLIuJZmVq8aykdQ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpDurwXKpDiXuGBdsklxigg ge iBuyers  What's stopping us from using our industry knowledge to educate the consumer on iBuyers (and grow our own digital footprints in the process!)?    [COMPLETE SHOW VIDEO EMBED]   Resources + Links   Rockstar Agent Marketing Toolkit - Featuring our favorite scripts, tutorials and quickstart guides to marketing strategies like Facebook Live, door-knocking, remarketing advertising, open houses and referrals. Get actionable ideas and tactics you can use in your career right NOW.   Subscribe on YouTube   Guest Bio   Stefan Adika is a California Realtor and YouTuber. A former touring bassist with more than 20 years of experience, Stefan is passionate about helping his clients find their own piece of paradise, with tons of laughs along the way. Stefan also uses his YouTube shows, Coffee Talk with ADIKA LIVE! and Talking Wax with ADIKA LIVE! to put a smile on his viewers' faces - but he's also happy to be used as a source of annoyance if necessary, so be sure to share his content with your best friends and worst enemies alike.    To find out more, go to: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC67DCNf4oLIuJZmVq8aykdQ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpDurwXKpDiXuGBdsklxigg

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business
#42: Andela - How the engineering hiring platform is connecting companies with software developers in Africa & emerging markets

Afrobility: Africa Tech & Business

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 130:25


Overview: Today, we're going to talk about Andela - the software developer recruitment platform. We'll explore the Andela story across 6 areas: Labor markets in Africa context Andela's founding and early history Fundraising & Growth Product & monetization strategy Competitive positioning & potential exit options Overall outlook. This episode was co-hosted with Iyinoluwa "E" Aboyeji & recorded on Nov 7, 2021 Companies discussed: Andela, Spark Capital, CRE Ventures, SoftBank Vision Fund, Gebeya, Semicolon, Decagon, CRE Ventures, Spark Labs, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative & Generation Investment Management Business concepts discussed: Talent recruitment, Remote working, Outsourcing, Education Technology, Youth unemployment & Economic Development Conversation highlights: (01:00) - Andela context & Background (01:30) - Context on Africa's labor markets (21:20) - Bookneto, Fora & 2U (53:50) - Andela cofounders & early founding story (1:00:00) - Fundraising and investors (1:11:00) - Traction - Revenue, users, employees, margins (1:14:23) - Product and monetization strategy (1:25:22) - Competition and options for exit (1:48:46) - Olumide's overall thoughts and outlook (1:55:17) - Bankole's overall thoughts and outlook (2:01:00) - E's overall thoughts and outlook (2:09:01) - Recommendations and small wins Olumide's recommendations & small wins: Recommendation: Syncback Pro (works better than OneDrive & Google Drive clients for backing up stuff) & Money Talks Bloomberg article about how Zillow stopped selling houses: By Afrobility legend Matt Levine Small win: Got a new larger air fryer. It's awesome Bankole's recommendations & small wins: Recommendation: Tete Muo Bu Muo by Tony Tete Harbor & The Infinite Machine by Camila Russo Small win: Great birthday dinner :) E's recommendations & small wins: Recommendation: Prosperity paradox (by Efosa Ojomo) & Founders at work (Jessica Levingston) Small win: 3 companies I'm working with got into YC Winter 2022 batch Listeners: We'd love to hear from you. Email info@afrobility.com with feedback! Founders & Operators: We'd love to hear about what you're working on, email us at info@afrobility.com Investors: It would be great to link up with you to drive the ecosystem forward. Contact us at info@afrobility.com Join our insider mailing list where we get feedback on new episodes & find all episodes at Afrobility.com

Nerd Herd Podcast
Skewed Reviews

Nerd Herd Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 64:16


Nerd Herd Podcast #087 - Skewed Reviews Amy is out for kicks but Eddie, Greg, David and Josh are in Clubhouse this week to talk more smack about what really happened to Zillow, Apple's podcast app reviews, David test drives  a Ford Mach-E and a Tesla Model 3, Tesla suffers worldwide app server outage and someone made a Pirate Bay for NFTs.

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Challenges of Forecasting in Business and Investing | Zillow‘s Retreat From iBuying

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 54:48


In this episode, co-hosts Elliot Turner, Phil Ordway, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) the challenges of forecasting, faced by businesses and investors alike; and (ii) thoughts on Zillow's retreat from ibuying. Enjoy the conversation!   The primary purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. The views, information, or opinions expressed by hosts or guests are their own. Neither this show, nor any of its content should be construed as investment advice or as a recommendation to buy or sell any particular security. Security specific information shared on this podcast should not be relied upon as a basis for your own investment decisions -- be sure to do your own research. The podcast hosts and participants may have a position in the securities mentioned, personally, through sub accounts and/or through separate funds and may change their holdings at any time.   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
These are the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 24:25


As a real estate investor, you want to find properties where your investment dollar will go the furthest. To help you do that, we compiled a list of the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house in America in 2021. We analyzed data from several sources to find the least expensive states and the most affordable cities in each of them. In this episode, Tom, Michael, and Emil run through the top ten states. They highlight important metrics and discuss what this means for investors.  --- Transcript Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Emil: Hey everyone, welcome back for another episode of the remote real estate investor. My name is Emil Shour and today I'm joined by Tom Schneider and Michael Albaum. In today's episode, we're going to be covering the top 10 cheapest states to buy a house in 2021. So this is from an article off the roofstock blog that I wrote a while ago called the top 25 cheapest ways to buy a house in 2021. We're going to run through some of the numbers like median home value, one year price change five year price change and median rent to give you guys an idea of which markets may be good to target or at least do a deeper dive into So let's hop into this episode   Emil: Alright guys, so this is actually a blog post I helped create on the Roofstock blog, and it's covers the top 25 cheapest states to buy a house. We're going to cover the top 10 And just to give everyone some context, the data here is from Zillow for home values and historic price trends. And that is as of June 2021 So that data is a couple months old but still you know relatively easy for people to kind of compare the top 10 We also have the median rent data is coming from go banking rates and the median rent of a three bedroom place and I'm gonna just run through the top 10 But before I do Tom you look like you have something a burning question…   Tom: I do my mouth is like like half open alright a meal in writing this article states a pretty big area you know a big Is there a reason why it wasn't at like a metro just because like it I think of cheapest I mean you know California is a great example you know you can live in a very expensive area or you can live in a very less expensive area.   Emil: Yes   Tom: Curious. Go ahead.   Emil: Great point Tom. i We don't have an article around the best the cheapest cities I think just because there are so many unique city so look at that it would be very hard to compile the data. So we have cheapest states. I think it's just easier to get 52 data points rather than I don't know 1000s   Tom: Fair fair fair. I think there's I think there's I think there's a middle ground in there as well you know between from from city or whatever to state I dig I'm I'm picking you out a little bit I like I like this let's get into it. Let's get into it.   Emil: Tom just ruined the episode and we'll end it here. So thanks, Tom.   Michael: Timeout you said you said 52 So are we talking territories as well like Guam and Puerto Rico?   Emil: I Have not attended a geography class in quite a long time Michael so I don't even know if I'm correct in saying 52 Or if it's 50.   Michael: 50 states.   Emil: 50 states you know what? I'm just I'm done with this episode. guys. You guys take it from here   Michael: Emil's like enough of this so I don't get fired like enough of this. Just trying to help you out.   Emil: I'm doing you guys a favor. How about that? Alright, so let's let's get into this. I'm curious if you guys can get some states in the top 10 If you had to guess. Pick three each you guys…   Tom: Is Mississippi on the list.   Emil: Ding ding ding Tom one for one.   Tom: All right, Michael, your opportunity to take the lead. Do your two guesses…   Michael: Show me Alabama.   Emil: Alabama? Ding ding ding correct as well. All right, one one here.   Tom: Show me Louisiana.   Emil: Louisiana is a not in the top 10   Michael: Ah, man. All right.   Emil: First incorrect answer. Tom. What do you have?   Tom: I got two guesses here. We're tied one to one. Show me Arkansas.   Emil: Arkansas is ding ding ding in the top 10   Tom: All right. No looking at anything on your on your computer. Michael.   Michael: Keep your hands where I can see them   Tom: Show me Oklahoma.   Emil: Oklahoma in the top 10 Ding ding ding Tom is a liar. For three Mike. Michael you can you can take a consolation swing here and at least try to get two out of three. So   Tom: Earn your blue ribbon or purple.   Michael: That's right. That's right.   Tom: The one they give to the kids.   Michael: Show me, Ohio.   Emil: Ohio is in the top Ding ding ding.   Tom: There you go, Michael.   Emil: Alright, so Michael finishes two out of three. Tom three out of three. Stellar. Perfect.   Michael: Wow. That's what Tom's used to hearing.   Emil: Very impressed, guys.   Tom: That's kind of how I operate. I thrive on positive reinforcement. Thank you Emil.   Emil: You're welcome, alright, let's start at the let's, let's work our way backwards. So we'll, we'll start at 10. And then we'll go to number one and   Michael: Are these in order of pricing.   Emil: 10 being the least cheap. Exactly, yeah. So it's by median home value. So the cheapest will be number one in terms of median home value according to Zillow data. Alright, so number 10. We have well let's just keep this going. Thing number 10 is   Tom: Indiana   Emil: Jesus Tom, Have you have you read this article?   Michael: He memorized the last night before bed.   Tom: No, that's it that's great. That's good. I mean Michael said Ohio Michael said Ohio so I just figured you know someone who's kind of friends with Ohio   Emil: Tom you need to go make a lot of bets today because you're on it. So please just go like buy some alt coins and stocks and whatever today go buy a rental property till you can't miss today. Alright, so Indiana number 10 median home value comes in at 185,805. Our one year price change so looking at one year ago compared to today? Well this is as of June 2021 13.2% Five year price change 45.3% In the median rent on a three bedroom place I think this looks at apartment and a house from go bank rates $1,052   Tom: Some some gross yield there.   Emil: All right. So that's that's Indiana. All right, who's number nine Michael you get first shot.   Michael: And it's not one of the ones we've already named?   Emil: It is one of the ones you named?   Michael: Oh, shoot.   Emil: I'll give you one further, it's the one you it's one you named?   Michael: Oh, man. So I got a 50/50 shot. I'm gonna say Ohio.   Emil: Bing bing bang Ohio coming in at number nine. So our median home value in Ohio $181,756. Or one year price change 14.4%. And our five year price change coming at 45.3%. And median rents on that three bedroom place is $1,024.   Tom: A price change is so crazy. I mean, all those numbers   Michae: That's unbelievable.   Emil: Oh, actually, ooh, this this article has the cheapest lists like three or four cheapest cities within these states to buy a place. So I don't know where that was pulled. Exactly. Let me see if I can find it real quick from this article. So from Yahoo, cheapest place. So it was an article called The cheapest places to buy a home in every state. So that's where this looks at. All right, so Tom, maybe we get some of the stuff you're looking for. So I'll backtrack a little Indiana. The cheapest cities to buy a house are Gary Anderson, Muncie and Richmond. And then for Ohio. We have Youngstown, Warren, Dayton and Marion.   Emil: Alright, so number eight. I'll go ahead and just dive right in Kansas comes in at number eight. Our median home value is $176,898. Our one year price change not as high as number 10 or nine coming in at 11.3%. And our five year price change coming in at 33.8%. Our median rent comes in at $1,050 on a three bedroom place. Our cheapest cities within Kansas are Hutchinson Kansas City, Topeka and Salina.   Michael: Topeka, capital of Kansas.   Tom: You guys all invest pretty in that around that area. Do you guys have an exposure to Kansas? Or you're more of Missouri?   Emil: I'm Missouri.   Michael: I've invested in Kansas City, Kansas doing a flip out there so that's almost getting wrapped up?   Emil: Are you in the Kansas side or the Missouri side?   Michael: On the Kansas side? I'm like fairly certain I double check. Which sounds ridiculous as I'm saying those words.   Emil: Alright, moving on to number seven. I think you guys guessed this one as well. I don't remember who said it   Michael: Probably Tom because I mean he's flawless.   Emil: So it's Alabama who said Alabama?   Tom: I was gonna I was gonna say it I missed out I was gonna I was gonna guess that was the one.   Emil: Oh my god this guy is just he can't miss that.   Michael: That was me. That was me. Michael had Alabama. Yeah. With the second of my, one of two. Yeah.   Emil: All right. So Alabama median home value coming in at $170,184. Our one year price change 11.9%. Our five year price change. We have 34.6% and our median rent on a three bedroom place coming in at $1060 Cheaper cities within Alabama to buy a house are Gadsden Birmingham, Montgomery and Phoenix city or Phenix City   Tom: Another market Michael has some exposure to   Michael: Yep, yeah. Birmingham Alabama   Emil: Birmingham. Number six Michael is another place you invest in so go for it. What do you got here? What state   Michael: Oh,   Emil: We already covered Ohio so what else could it be? Other side of Ohio. Oh, other side of where you invest in Ohio,   Michael: Tennessee? Kentucky? Kentucky like South. I guess it kind of like like,   Emil: Yeah, Cincinnati right south of Cincinnati. Yeah. Toki See, I know what I'm talking about.   Michael: Geography is tough man.   Emil: Alright, Kentucky median home value we got $168,998 our one year price changes 10.8% or five year price change. We have 36.3% and our median rent on a three bedroom place comes in at $1,025. Our cheapest cities to buy a house within Kentucky are Hopkinsville Covington. Owensboro. And bowling green.   Michael: Oh, Convington made the list man. Covington that's where I heavily invest. Yeah, it's   awesome.   Tom: Kind of related talking about like, you know, West's of states are directional. There was this. I think it might have started on Tik Tok. This guy's like, he said, he's at a there's like a music playing in the background. He's like, Okay, here's the situation. And they're playing like, West Virginia. Take me home.   Michael: Country Road, right?   Tom: And he's like, here's the situation. This song is not about West Virginia. It's about the western part of Virginia. And that, like, closes and then opens them just like super hungover the next day. It's like, is there something like that's just like, so perfect about that. Here's the situation. I mean, I hope this stays in the episode because people who've seen this will be like, Yeah, that's   Michael: Really relatable.   Tom: But the western part of Virginia, not West Virginia. Anyways, continue.   Emil: I've seen tic tock videos I've ever actually been on tick tock. It just sounds like a black hole of silly videos.   Tom: Yeah,   Michael: I think that's a fair assessment.   Tom: Yeah, yes. Me too.   Emil: Is there other types of videos? Or is it just silly videos? It's only thing I've seen like silly tick tock video clips.   Tom: I think that's it. But it's funny all like a lot of it does ends up going on to other platforms too. So.   Emil: Right, right. I think I've seen them on YouTube. Anyway, moving on. Number five, we've got Iowa our median home value in Iowa we have $165,955 or one year price change coming in at 6.8%. Five year price change 23.1% And our median rent $1,021. Something interesting that I'm noticing as we climb up the list in cheapness is that the percentage price change so appreciation is getting lower and lower so far.   Tom: Huh? Interesting,   Michael: Seemingly, and also that the median rent is fairly consistent.   Emil: That too, yeah, median rent is hovering around 1000 bucks a little over 1000. All right, cheapest cities within Iowa to buy a house. We got Waterloo, Sioux City, Davenport and Council Bluffs.   Michael: Okay,   Emil: All right. Number four, Oklahoma, which I think you guys I think somebody mentioned   Michael: Tom mentioned   Michael: Tom!   Tom: Windy City, Mr. Three for three   Emil: Windy City. Man somebody is worse that geography than me. All right, Oklahoma. median home value $150,754. One year price change 10.4%. So stepping up a little bit from our Iowa numbers. Five year price change coming in at 29.1% in our median rent on a three bedroom place $1,015 Or cheapest cities to buy a house within Oklahoma or Muskogee, Muskogee Lawton Shawnee and Enid. I probably butchered every single one of those.   Michael: Yeah, if anybody knows the proper pronunciation, please feel free to leave us a comment.   Emil: Spell it phonetically for us. Alright, number number three we get into top three good stuff. All right. I think someone mentioned Arkansas as well or console comes in number   Michael: Tom again.   Tom: Mr. Three for three did.   Emil: Alright Arkansas.   Tom: T for T for short. TFT   Emil: Our median home value on Arkansas $149,120 our one year price change 10.4%. Our five year price change 30% And the median rent falling below $1,000 For the first time $926. Our cheapest cities within Arkansas to buy a house are Pine Bluff. Texarkana North Little Rock and Fort Smith.   Tom: I like Oh, I like all these areas anyways, just having like visited and I don't know,   Michael: Have you visited all those areas?   Tom: I pretty much most of them yeah.   Michael: Like every single one that a meal is listed so far or just physically in Arkansas,   Tom: I haven't I haven't visited a lot in Iowa but I mean, Alabama, I've visited lots of Alabama. I had that. I don't know that we mentioned a weird deal where I played football in college at UC Berkeley at Cal and then I got hurt my senior year and then found a weird loophole that I couldn't play D one because my eligibility was expired, but I found a loophole allow me to play D two. So in the best D two football is like in the south, so I lived in Muscle Shoals, Alabama and we like traveled around a bus and like went to tons of these like spots in Mississippi or Kansas. Arkansas. Yeah. Hello. Ours are in Texarkana. I That's just proving me as a you know, not as a novice if by calling it that anyways, go ahead. Pass the mic.   Emil: Such a west coast dude   Michael: This is the situation this is a podcast is not about Arkansas.   Michael: It's about the western part of Ar…   Emil: Alright, number two, I think you somebody mentioned Mississippi did someone mention Mississippi?   Michael: Yep. TFT did   Tom: TFT, yours truly.   Emil: Median median home value in Mississippi we've got $140,818 One year price change 8.4% Or five year price change 24.7% In our median rent coming in at $989   Tom: This just my last derailing on that on living out there. So I had like mentally prepared for the heat. I was just ready right dog days and it was hot. But I ready. I had mentally said I'm going to sweat a lot. There's going to be kind of hot but I honestly I honestly kind of enjoy it like you know give me a sauna give me whatever steamroom what I was not prepared for is come wintertime it snowed a little bit there. And I was not ready. Yeah, right. It snows there.   Emil: I had no idea it snowed there.   Tom: It's not like feet, but you know, you'll get dustings every once in a while and Alright, number one, go ahead and do it. Interrupting cow, mooo!   Emil: Before you before you come in, we gotta we got to talk about our cheapest place to buy a house within Mississippi. Okay, those are Jackson Greenville Meridian Gulfport, so now.   Michael: All right  All right. All right.   Emil: One. I don't think anyone guessed it. It was West Virginia.   Michael: This is a situation.   Tom: Wait  the western part of Virginia?   Emil: How ironic and perfect could that have been   Michael: That is so good.   Tom: TFT.   Emil: See, you can't miss today I'm telling you. Take every dollar you have and you'll make any investment that you possibly desire to get good day for you. That's West Virginia. Number one. median home value. We're dropping off a bit from number two. So 117,768 is our median home value one year price change at 7.1%. Five year price change 19.3% In our median rent for a three bedroom place, coming in at $912 our cheapest cities within West Virginia to buy a house Bluefield, Clarksburg, Beckley and Huntington. And there you go top 10 cheapest states to buy house in 2021.   Michael: So what are each of your biggest takeaways from this?   Emil: I think I already mentioned mine, I was surprised that the percentage change didn't like, I would think the cheaper the house is, you know, a $5,000 increase on 117,000 versus 160,000 is gonna be a higher percentage. I was expecting the percentage to be higher in price changes when it wasn't so that was surprising to me.   Tom: My surprising is in some of the states it's like they're like It's like bigger cities that are the least expensive one so like Arkansas, like Little Rock is I think might be the capital I love like in like capital cities and just in that there's like kind of like a natural draw for like economy and, and all that kind of stuff. So it's cool in some of these less expensive in some less expensive states like you can buy, you know in that whatever Capitol Corridor, whatnot city or like around the suburbs and still have less expensive so I thought that was an interesting tidbit.   Michael: Nice.   Emil: How about you, Michael?   Michael: MIne was just you could go to the 10 cheapest cities and over the last five years. Get A 20% increase on your value by doing literally nothing. And so it's crazy when we talk about the power of real estate and all of the great benefits that it has, like, if you bought a property there, for 100, grand five years ago, it'd be worth 120 grand today, like, that's unbelievable for the fact that you were getting paid probably that whole time, too, with a tenant in place. So like, it's just, it just speaks volumes to the power of real estate and how the multiple ways that it pays you even in like, less expensive markets is pretty profound   Emil: Ya true.   Tom: Yeah. I think also, Michael and I, we've done a bunch of webinars together, and one of them, we were going through some assumptions around building a passive income flow of $100,000. And within the assumptions, I think we had the purchase price, like somewhere north of $100,000. And like, someone had commented, like, Hey, you can't buy a house for 120,000 or 100 and whatever it is, like, yes, you can like that. You definitely can. And yeah, these are all 10 states in which that is very doable.   Michael: Yeah. And it was funny, I was like, I'm pretty sure I just bought two of them not to like shame that person. But I was like, guy, you just like incorrect with your facts, like I literally just bought two of them. So   Tom: I think it's a good exercise of like, kind of taking blinders off. Like perhaps that is your strategy only to buy in these really large cities. And that's great. And then you know, you can't buy $100,000 house or $150,000 house. But if you know, you're kind of open to moving around and shifting your strategy to meet specific goals, like there, there definitely are markets to do that.   Michael; I think even in some like in some of these bigger markets, and even capital cities, if the median home price is 100, you know, is $300,000, I'm sure you can still find properties for 150k. They just need a bunch of work. So depending on what your investment thesis is, and what you're prepared to do, I think that there are opportunities in every market, you just have to be willing to uncover them or be willing to do what it takes to then profit from those opportunities.   Emil: I've seen that a lot of like, like Midwest cities, like I invest in St. Louis, and there are their homes that sell for a million plus still even in St. Louis, and their homes that sell for 50k. Like there's a huge, huge, huge disparity. You know, one home was probably built 120 years ago and is fully dilapidated and needs need some love and the other one is like a mansion but still like there. You can same city, you can have a huge disparity.   Tom: Hey, guys, I think we're going full circle from the very beginning of the episode, when I was kind of teasing a meal about, Hey, why did you guys do states? Why don't you do like a little bit, you know, not like the largest possible, you know, where even within each city like there's just, you know, really dramatic range. I mean, here in the Bay Area where I live in Northern California, you know, there's much smaller cities like not smaller, but less expensive, right. You know, perhaps Richmond or Vallejo or like Stockton and then you have areas like Piedmont and Menlo Park and all of these spots. So you know, even at every, every level, there's just really dramatic range.   Emil: Yep. But in California there there is definitely no $100,000 properties, that's for sure. Maybe a shed in someone's backyard, but that's about it.   Tom: Working on one right now.   Emil: Are you doing a shed? Are you building an ADU?   Tom: Uh, it's in a level electrical. It won't have a bathroom in it.   Emil: It's made to be like your office like an office area   Tom: Exactly. Office gym 10 by 18 I kind of wish I did it a little bigger like man 12 by 20 would have been like kind of fun but 10 by 18 is still very good it's basically the equivalent of like two rooms in one room so and doing prefab I think I've talked about before but anyways, the long journey and getting it the concrete truck should be coming any any moment now to lay the piers for the foundation of it.   Emil: Alright guys, I'm gonna I'm gonna send this home before we meander as we always do. So if you've made it this far, thank you for watching. Thank you for listening, and we will catch you on the next episode. Happy investing.   Tom: Happy investing.   Michael: Happy investing.

The Greg Dickerson Show
Zillow stops buying houses. What does the mean for Housing Market

The Greg Dickerson Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 13:25


Whenever you're ready here's how I can help you… Courses https://www.dickersoninternational.com/courses One on one Coaching https://www.dickersoninternational.com/coaching Subscribe to my YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/agregdickerson/?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to my Podcast: https://www.dickersoninternational.com/podcast ----- Greg is a serial entrepreneur, real estate developer, coach, and mentor. He has bought, developed and sold over $250 million in real estate, built and renovated hundreds of custom homes and commercial buildings, developed residential and mixed-use subdivisions and started 12 different companies from the ground up. Greg currently mentors some of the top entrepreneurs, real estate investors and real estate developers in the country helping them grow and scale their business, raise more capital and do bigger deals. Greg's current clients have over $2 billion in AUM and deals in the process. ------ Follow and reach out to me on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thegregdickerson Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/thegregdickerson Twitter: https://twitter.com/agregdickerson LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/agregdickerson Website: https://www.dickersoninternational.com ------ #realestate #realestateinvesting #realestatedevelopment #houseflipping #biggerpockets #apartmentsyndication #realestatesyndication #entrepreneurship #realestatedeveloper #realestatedevelopervsinvestor #landdevelopment #howtobeanentrepreneur #howtobuyabusiness #howtostartabusiness #landflipping #howtoflipland #Commercialrealestateinvesting #BusinessCoaching #EntrepreneurshipCoaching #BusinessMentorship #Leadershipcoaching #businesscoach #businessaquisitons #businessbuying #cryptocurrency #bitcoin #dogecoin #ethereum #shiba #blockchain #crypto #investing #bitcoinprice #ethereumprice #dogecoinprice #ether ----- This channel is all about Entrepreneurship, Real Estate Investing, Real Estate Development and Cryptocurrency and Bitcoin Investing: How to invest in real estate, how to develop real estate, how to flip houses, how to flip land, how to develop land, how to become a real estate developer, how to wholesale houses, how to flip houses, how to invest in commercial property, how to invest in commercial real estate, how to buy apartment building, how to buy commercial property, real estate investing courses, real estate investing career, how to raise capital, how to find private investors, how to fund real estate deals, how to invest in cryptocurrency, how to invest in bitcoin, how to buy bitcoin, how to buy dogecoin, how to buy ethereum, what is blockchian --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/greg-dickerson/support

Real Estate Marketing Dude
Brand Vs.USP Which Do You Have?

Real Estate Marketing Dude

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 21:07


The end of the year is coming, and I know with the holidays it is very easy to get burnt out, but I implore you to go ahead and invest that time into your self and look at what you could be doing differently and purposefully. On this weeks episode, I'm going to share with you what I believe the future is for businesses. I mean, there's a reason why we started this podcast five years ago, we saw the writing on the wall. We're saying attract, attract, attract before everyone even heard it in their vocabulary. They're still saying Chase, Chase Chase. It's because consumers changed the way they look for information. What they want from their lender or their realtor has changed and nobody's hiring you anymore because of the company you're affiliated with. I don't care if you're at exp or REMAX or you're at Keller Williams, or if you're a broker and you're at lending tree or Bank of America, no one gives a crap, you're getting hired off of your personal brand period. And it's going to continue to work that way.Three Things You'll Learn in This EpisodeBranding vs. USPHow to provide a personal experienceHow to compete with companies spending billions of dollars going into the marketplace to create alternatives to the buying and selling or lending processResourcesReal Estate Marketing DudeThe Listing Advocate (Earn more listings!)REMD on YouTubeREMD on InstagramTranscript:So how do you attract new business? You constantly don't have to chase it. Hi, I'm Mike way Ambassador real estate marketing. This podcast is all about building a strong personal brand people have come to know like trust and most importantly, refer. But remember it is not their job to remember what you do for a living. It's your job to remind them let's get startedwhat is up ladies and gentlemen, welcome to their episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. Hey low, folks, it is getting to that time of year Thanksgivings coming up. And that usually this last two months, it's when you start planning for the next. I mean, let's be honest, I don't know about you. But I always get burnt out about this time of year, regardless of what I'm doing. And I was always when I was in real estate, even today, when we're doing a lot of video work for people and whatnot. But the end of the year, what I'm excited about is that it's a time that you actually go ahead and work on the business, decide what you're going to not be doing any more than what you're going to be doing and then just sort of strategize and take that time take the holiday time off with four days off next week. holidays come you know from that December 20 to the end of the year, it's you get two weeks where it's pretty laid back. But I implore you to go ahead and invest that time into your self and look at what you could be doing differently and purposeless. podcasters we don't have a guest on today, we're going to teach a little bit. And I'm going to share with you what I believe the future this entire businesses. I mean, there's a reason why we started this podcast five years ago, we saw the writing on the wall. We're saying attract, attract, attract before everyone even heard it in their vocabulary. They're still saying Chase, Chase Chase. And it's because consumers change the way consumers look for information is what's changed in the way consumers and what they want from their lender their realtor is has changed and nobody's hiring you anymore. Because of the company you're affiliated with. I don't care if you're at exp or REMAX or you're at Keller Williams, or if you're a broker and you're at lending tree or Bank of America, no one gives a crap, you're getting hired off of your personal brand period. And it's going to continue to work that way. So amazing. I was talking to someone the other day, as a matter of fact, I'm doing this podcast in my garage, and I'm running a company two days a week out of my garage. And honestly, people don't quite care if I do a demo with somebody. And I'm like, hey, guess what, I'm in my garage, right now. Because people, I feel like this whole COVID thing is even more so with social media, but like the whole professional thing is gone fucking way out the window. And what people are really looking for is that personable experience, they just want authenticity they want to be they want the person they're talking to the they could trust them, in other words, but you have to be thought of or brought to first. And that's what we're gonna be chatting about today. What is it that people want? And how do they go out and actually hire you first? Well, it's very simple. comes down to three separate things, of what people whether they're by hiring a real estate agent or looking for a lender or whether they're buying video services from me, or they're hiring us to do a website or something. It doesn't matter people break things down price. Are they looking for convenience? Are they looking for an experience or service, okay, and any business is going to have the exact same thing. So let's look into talking about convenience in the market. If you're a lender, there's things like Quicken Loans, Zillow, Home Loans, Rocket Mortgage, if you're a real estate agent, there's things like Zillow, there's ibuyers, there's flat fee brokerage offerings. So interruption is here. And the reason why it's here is because the consumers want it. I mean, these companies are spending billions of dollars going into the marketplace to create alternatives to the buying and selling or lending process. And if there wasn't an appetite for that information, or that type of service to exist, well, they wouldn't be putting billions of dollars into it, would they? So how do you really compete back against that as an individual? Because the truth is, is that all these companies are going to weigh outspend you they have way bigger bank accounts than you or your brokerage and they have way bigger bank accounts. And if all of you got together even they are funded very well. Now, it's not all doom and gloom, though. Because the truth is, the way that you're going to keep back is the one thing that these big conglomerate companies that have these offerings are these unique selling propositions. The one way you fight back is through your personal brand because brand will trump anything brand can't compete against or they can't compete against the personal relationship you have with yournetwork. past clients, right? These big companies are going to weigh more money, they're going to have different programs and incentives, they're going to have slick tack, they're gonna have better search better websites, it's gonna feel very threatening. But just like I told you a couple minutes ago, consumers are going to choose who they feel most comfortable with. And it's very important that you speak to them first, okay? Over 80% of people hire, the first person they meet with the truth is that these companies are trying to get their first. This is where your brand comes in your brand is what people remember about you. And no, they don't remember what you do for a living, including your best friends that they do remember, is how you do it. That's your personal brand. So what we're talking about here is, you know, the National Association of REALTORS had a conference out here a couple of weeks ago, and the topic of the conference was that everybody needs to be creating their own content. I 100% agree with that's the whole reason why we created real estate marketing Dude, we script edit and distribute video content for people that wanted us to do it for him. Now, why doesn't anyone else. And it's crazy how many agents are not creating their own content, but you cannot build a brand or stay on top of mind with people that you already know, or have used you in the past if you're constantly trying to sell your shit. That's where content comes in. There's a difference between marketing and advertising and an employer to go back and check out the podcast I did on that. So I also wrote a really in depth article on my website called advertising versus marketing, if you want to know more about it, but marketing is not advertising and advertising is not marketing folks. And when we're talking about why I'm saying you need to go all in on your brand this year, immediately is because that's what people remember. The problem is, though, that you probably haven't really viewed yourself as a brand and most people don't. So let's talk more about what it is. It's not. It's a mixture of your personality, the experience people have with you. But also, it's how you remain on top of mind. Okay. And when we're talking about separating ourselves from the herd, there's really only two ways you can do it. Now, one is you can attract business or separate yourself from all the other realtors and all this interruption through a unique selling proposition. This is why a company like Redfin could go into any market without a brand and start transacting immediately. They have a unique selling proposition in the form of a rebate rebate program that a certain percentage of the population is always going to transact with that's proven. So do you have a unique selling proposition? For you? How do you do that? Well, I can share with you how we're doing it. And this is another thing I implore you to check out. We're going to be implementing our listing advocate system, which is just a multiple offer multiple home seller Option Program. Now how we're offering that listed advocate system is we're saying hey, we don't just give you one way to sell your house, we give you five and let you decide you want to do a fixin list you want to cash offer? Do you want to do a sell in stage, you want to do a trade up option? And then let them decide to calculate all their net sheets and compare everything side by side? Because that's one unique selling proposition that no other agent in our market has? And none of the eye buyers even have yet? So but what do you do? If you don't have that? Well, maybe you start we have a couple of clients of ours that have a give back program where they sell or they donate five 10% of their Commission's or the proceeds from a closing back to a charity or foundation. That is a unique selling proposition. Right? You could have your own rebate program, or you could have your own flat fee offering Why couldn't you if I'm a real estate agent, we are going to do that I'm gonna have a flat fee program and I'm gonna have a full service and let them decide. See people want options. But if what you're doing is doing what everybody else is and what the hell are you doing differently to earn their attention to stand out and they remain on top of mind when people actually need your services?Think about that. Does the brokerage you're with have a unique selling proposition?Right? Do you have certain programs you're selling maybe you're a new construction specialist. Maybe you're a lender and you only do non warrantable condos or rehab type loans. But specializations are also a niche This is what separates yourself from other people. So think about that. What do you what is it that that you need? What's What do you do? That gets people to be like oh, that's different in your product and service what you're offering and don't say oh I have access to the MLS because so does everybody else or MLS is public accessible now. And people aren't hiring you because of your real estate license or hiring you because of how you do business and what you do with it. It's very, very important that we understand how minds work and what people really want to really focus on what options they want to feel like they're not getting ripped off. Now, the other way you can build your brand, if you don't have a unique selling proposition is going to be through your personal brand. And yes, you can do both. Right? You could? Well, there's no reason why couldn't you do both? We're going to do both. We're doing both I'm doing both right now do both on this podcast, my selling you in any of my products, or my just sort of telling you about them and telling you how we're going to use them and why they work. So now if you don't have a unique selling proposition, your personal brand becomes your unique selling proposition. Right? You have to remember that 80% of people still use the first person they meet with, which means this is still a popularity contest. And yes, you have a personal brand. But the key is that you can't build a brand or a personal brand without creating content. This means yes, you need a Facebook account. Yes, you need an IG account. As you need to be active on social media. It is impossible to build any brand without consistent communication to an audience. There's no way I built real estate marketing dude, Brandon, we got a million downloads on our podcast, by simply showing up sporadically over a three month period of time. We did it by showing up every freakin weekend with a new episode, and kept publishing that episode to the same audience. And over time, we were rewarded with lots of downloads, and the more constant we have the more podcasts I do like this, some of you guys are gonna call me and be like, Hey, I like what you said, Dude, I want you to hire us. I want to hire the marketing dude, so that you guys could turn me into a local celebrity? And I'll say, okay, great. Let's do it. Am I selling you? Absolutely not. I'm serving you. There's a difference between how we communicate. And that's what a personal brand is. So if you're looking at how do I build a personal brand? Well, you do it by creating content, you could do it by creating video content, which we believe in is the number one way to do it. That's why we have real estate marketing dude. But you don't have to do video content. Let's just be honest, not everybody's going to get on video. I wish everyone would I believe you have to but doesn't mean if you don't, you're going to be out of business either. But you are going to have to do something that creates content, or what I previously was talking about create a unique selling proposition. What is it that you do differently is what people want? You can't attract anything without being the same. Do you think I could pick out? Let's just take there's 100 sheep in a field? Do you think I could pick and they all have different names? Do you think I could pick out which ones Larry? No, that's exactly what consumers think about real estate agents. today. We're all selling the same thing. Now if I have 100 sheep in the same corral, or whatever the hell you call it in the field, and one of them's a black sheep, well, he sort of sticks out that black sheep has my attention. If I was gonna go cut any of those sheep's wool, I'd probably start with the black one first, just because it's a little different. See what I mean? So like, we are in the business of content creation, you have a brand, but you'll never build a brand without either without creating content. How can you do this a lot of different ways. You could communicate with people through other ways other than video. There's a reason why every single real estate agent or lender that you see very active on social media, whether they're doing real stories, constantly posting on IG and Facebook, there's a reason why those people are also selling or doing a lot of business. It's because they have attention. Like do you know anyone, I want you to go ahead and look at your Facebook feed. Look at anyone who's active on social media right now. I want you to see if any of them are not doing business, let's flip the script. And then the question is going to be well, they're all doing a lot of business. How well because they're creating content, that every content every piece of content has to be aboutyour loan program or your the house you sold, you could create content with your kids being a human, the freakin pumpkin patch. It doesn't matter. But you have to remain present. If you stop talking to your network if you stop talking to your social reach if you stop talking your email list. If you stop talking to other people who've given you referrals, I've done business with you in the past. It's very tough to build a brand because the truth is they forget who you are and you're not that important. The key to all this if you're going to build a brand is how do you do it in your way. That's the key. One option is you hire real estate marketing Dude, come on. But the other option is you sit down during this holiday season. If you actually think about who the hell am I? What makes me different? Let me look at the last 10 clients that I had, and what do they all have in common? See, it's people, birds of a feather flock together, chances are the last 10 People you served, you guys had something in common. And there's a reason why we all become friends with the clients that we work with. It's because we attract like people, there's no shortage of people in your occupation, whether you're investor, a real estate agent or lender, there's a million of you out there. And to be honest with you, most of you are all selling the same shit. I can't differentiate any of you, except the look of your face. But we honestly if you're not creating content, I don't know what you look like, either. I just know you're just another lender, you're just another sheep in the field. So what can you do this year? That makes you different? Can you host open houses instead of open houses, have Taco parties that are posting on social media and start doing everything you do with tacos? Because you love eating tacos? Fuck yeah, you can? If you have a beard, can you create a show called beard budget? Yes, you can do that, too. If you have eight kids, can you create content with your kids and all of them and talk about real estate? Absolutely. You can do whatever the hell you want. That's the beauty of this is that everyone has a brand. I've seen people that most of us think have no business of getting on video do very well with video, not because they worked with us. But because we figured out what their brand strategy was before they got started. You see, you don't have a career in content creation, or long living life and content creation without first identified how you should be creating that. And the truth is, that's going to be different for every single person. Because just like God only made one of you and you have a fingerprint. Well, you do have a brand and there's not going to be any single one alike. And that's pretty fucking cool. So I come back to you. And I say, hey, implore this back to you, like you have a couple options, this coming up, winter, and as are what are you going to do next year? I'm telling you, what's happening. This is all I do. The writing's on the wall. You have companies like us that will help you do that. And there's others if it's not us, I don't care if you choose us or not, we might not even like each other. But you have to work on building your personal brand. And that's a requirement. If you're gonna listen to the show, start building your fucking brand. I get messages from people on like Instagram and Facebook a little bit. Hey, thanks for your advice. I've been following you for two years, I implemented everything you say, and we're fucking crushing it. And I'm like, I love that. And the stuff I'm talking about isn't rocket science. This is a giant popularity contest. I'm just showing you people how to not be forgotten about by doing things that are authentic, consistent, and generate attention. So don't overthink it. Focus on what you're going to be doing each month that generates attention around your brand. What can you do on a monthly basis, consistently that people will notice? Can it be direct mail, it could be video email, it could be a bunch of social media. You could send people clumpy mail, you can do business owner interviews, you could do neighborhood tours, if you're going on video. You can do client events, monthly events, you could do giveaways, you can do toy drives. I don't care what it is you do but you have to do something that generates attention. That reminds people of what you do for a living. That's it. It is the simplicity behind building a brand.It's not hard and it's probably right beneath your nose. So take the tips I have today. Want to keep it short. Hopefully resonate with this. Because of any additional questions. Visit us at real estate marketing to check out the blog and check out some of our podcasts and leave us some reviews. Share this shit on social media for me, let me get the word out there. If you enjoy what we're doing here at marketing, dude, the more people that share this, the more people we get to serve more people we get to serve, the more we get the help. We're brands we blow up and it's a beautiful marriage. So we appreciate guys listen, the show for the last five years and this holiday. Take the time with your family. And while you're sitting around at that Thanksgiving Day table. I want you to think about and be like Hey, what the hell am I doing this year? What am I really thankful for? Be thankful for your business, your clients, thankful for the opportunity. But those who don't work on their business hit their own glass ceiling. Oh, just be thankful. Be grateful. And then stop. Thank about what you want to do and then take fucking action. Hope you guys enjoyed this episode of real estate marketing dude. If you want to visit us at our website is the American to do.com and make sure you follow our social channels all over the place. Look us up real estate American radio.com or real estate marketing dude, you'll find us follow us subscribe, and we hope to hear from you soon. Appreciate you guys this in the show. We'll see you guys next week. Bye. Thank you for watching another episode of the real estate marketing dude podcast. If you need help with video or finding out what your brand is, visit our website at WWW dot real estate marketing dude.com We make branding and video content creation simple and do everything for you. So if you have any additional questions, visit the site, download the training and then schedule a time to speak with the dude and get you rolling in your local marketplace. Thanks for watching another episode of the podcast. We'll see you next time.

Real Estate Coaching Radio
2022 Housing Market Predictions - Teams and Brick and Mortar Offices [Real Estate Training]

Real Estate Coaching Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 34:10


Today's show is part 3, 2022 Housing Predictions.  Be sure to share your predictions in the comments.  2022 Housing Prediction #11: The era of buying buyer leads has passed.  Most recently, Zillow (and many others) has come under fire for the quantity and quality of lead flow to agents. The cost has increased at the same time the quality of the lead has decreased. The bottom line is, don't BUY leads! Learn how to be a PROACTIVE lead genertor. Buying leads leaves you beholden. Being a proactive lead generator gives you freedom.  2022 Housing Prediction #12: Teams no longer offer much value. Question why you want to join a team let alone start one. The constant complaint from agents about teams is that they don't get the support they need, don't feel there's much value or direction, and they're still having to create their own leads. Agents, if you are going to JOIN a team or start one, do the math first. If your goal is to produce the highest net profit and have the most freedom is a team really for you? Question? Are you ready to join EXP Realty and you are looking for a sponsor who will be proactive in your success? Tim and Julie Harris are formally applying to be your EXP Realty sponsor. Please text TIM directly if you are interested in EXP Realty and would like to have Tim and Julie Harris as your sponsor. 512-758-0206. (Text only please) 2022 Housing Prediction #13: Brick and mortar are no longer necessary and certainly not required.  We all can thank Covid for making it clear we can function perfectly well at our virtual offices.  Brokers everywhere are realizing that their costly overhead doesn't really offer much value anymore, destroys their profit margin, and is no longer seen as a necessity to agents.  Agents don't need office computers, copiers, or conference rooms anymore. Matter of fact, most top-producing agents leverage their OWN systems and tech.  Questions for brokers. If the economy (and housing) DO slow down do you want to have that expensive office lease and other expenses? Do you want to be left holding the bag? Is it time for you to create a graceful exit from your existing brokerage model into what's next? Tim and Julie Harris are ready to help you. Text Tim and Julie directly for a confidential coaching session. 512-758-0206 Important: 2022 top agent success secrets [Revealed]: New FREE Real Estate Coaching web event, revealing 17 surprising secrets of the top 100 $$ millionaire agents. Get your FREE spot for the 2022 Real Estate Coaching webinar now. After you have attended this event you will have a huge feeling of relief knowing you will FINALLY laugh at your money worries – You will have your own personalized 2022 Step-By-Step Real Estate Business Plan. Learn now how to generate 100's of motivated leads for FREE, without coming off as a pushy salesperson and losing your soul. You will soon know how to become one of the 1000s of agents making HUGE money who never thought they could. https://timandjulieharris.com/webinar-reservation.html Resources: https://cdn.nar.realtor/sites/default/files/documents/2021-highlights-from-the-profile-of-home-buyers-and-sellers-11-11-2021.pdf https://www.noradarealestate.com/blog/housing-market-predictions/ https://www.corelogic.com/find/housing-trends/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth
Turkeys of the year: A review of marketing flops

The No Normal Show by ReviveHealth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 37:26


TakeawaysThe word "turkey" is a broadway term that describes a show with a lot of previews but later underperforms based on quality. Historically this had to do with increased tourism around the holiday period, making it lucrative to have more shows at the end of the year.Our team applies the term "turkey" to marketing in this episode, reviewing this year's most significant marketing flops. We asked our agency for their opinions, and the following campaigns were submitted.Notable mentionsBalenciaga released sweatpants that had boxers sewn into the inside that made them look like sagging pants. The United States' history of police shooting black men with saggy pants brings to question the ethics of the wealthy capitalizing on this style.That's why we need to take more time to research the history of the products we develop. So much time goes into product development already; this additional step would be a drop in the bucket comparatively.From a more lighthearted perspective, the oatly SuperBowl ad polarized audiences – some loved it, and some hated it.Bud light has been chasing the seltzer craze and now has taken it a step or two too far with eggnog flavored seltzer.The not-so-fresh turkeySubway has lost popularity amongst consumers and released a new campaign to increase sales. The "Eat Fresh, Refresh" campaign boasted a refreshed menu but offered little information on the changes and availability of new products across locations.The issue is that the definition of fresh has changed over the past ten years. Their current menu – which has the same ingredients as before – no longer meets modern standards for freshness. They have, however, reported increased sales which could be attributed to the campaign or a pandemic rebound.The tweet you can't take backOn International Women's Day, Burger King UK announced a program to address gender disparities in the restaurant industry by building a scholarship program for female employees. The idea itself was great, but the execution was not thoughtful (and cringeworthy).They announced the scholarship by tweeting "women belong in the kitchen," providing context only in the tweet's thread, which obscured critical context for the tweet.Our team expressed that Burger King UK should have chosen a different platform than Twitter to offer audiences more immediate context for the jarring statement.To avoid this sort of mishap, marketers need to present campaigns to stakeholders in the same way their audience will experience the campaign. For example, a conference room audience may experience concepts differently if presented in a pitch deck. The algorithm gone wrongChris helped his dad sell his townhome this summer using Zillow's Offer tool. The tool gives an estimate for how much the house was worth pending inspection. Zillow purchased the home for the Zestimate price, but the listing price had been cut by close to $50,000 a few months later.Chris' experience is symptomatic of Zillow's inaccurate Zestimate tool. The business made a significant bet on the power of its data and the ability of an algorithm to predict which homes are worth buying and flipping to sell for profit.Zillow, after significant losses over the past few years, ended this house-buying initiative.The future is AI and algorithm-driven, but the technology isn't where it needs to be quite yet. Placing that much money on an algorithm is very risky given the lacking maturity of current technology.

Office Hours with Spencer Rascoff
The Future of Mobile Gaming, A Conversation with Josh Yguado, co-founder of Jam City

Office Hours with Spencer Rascoff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 21:30


In this fireside chat with dot.LA and Pacaso co-founder and chair Spencer Rascoff, Jam City President and co-founder Josh Yguado explores what the acquisition of Ludia means for the future of Jam City and mobile gaming. The discussion covers what it means to sit at the intersection of traditional entertainment and mobile gaming and why L.A. is the perfect place for this work.  Jam City is reimagining the future of mobile gaming. Already an award-winning company behind the world's most enduring mobile games, the company's recent acquisition of Ludia bolsters its global portfolio of top studios that develop and publish top-grossing games.

The Remote Real Estate Investor
How Nick Haraden went from single family rentals to multi-unit syndications

The Remote Real Estate Investor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 36:38


Nick Haraden and his wife started investing in real estate in early 2020. They quickly acquired multiple homes and hopped directly into a on a 24-unit apartment syndication, all while continuing to add to their single-family portfolio.  In this episode, Nick tells us about his journey, from starting out to where he is now.  Learn more about Nick's company on his website: www.hudsonhallproperties.com   --- Transcript   Before we jump into the episode, here's a quick disclaimer about our content. The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast is for informational purposes only, and is not intended as investment advice. The views, opinions and strategies of both the hosts and the guests are their own and should not be considered as guidance from Roofstock. Make sure to always run your own numbers, make your own independent decisions and seek investment advice from licensed professionals.   Michael: What's up everyone? Welcome to another episode of The Remote Real Estate Investor. I'm Michael Albaum and today I'm joined by an actual old high school buddy of mine, Nick Haraden. And Nick got his start investing in single family homes with Roofstock and is now grown to do some pretty incredible things that he's going to share with all of us today. So without further ado, let's jump into it.   Nick Haraden, man, thank you so much for taking the time and hanging out with me today. I really appreciate it.   Nick: Yeah, absolutely. I'm really happy to be here. I'm really excited.   Michael: I'm, dude me too. And for anyone that doesn't know, and I'm sure most people don't know, Nick and I are actually old buddies from high school. That went our own separate ways for about a decade and now are reconvening talking about real estate.   Nick: Yeah, it's pretty crazy. You know, it's quite a story. So happy to jump into it soon here.   Michael: Yeah, yeah. So So tell everyone cuz I know a little bit more about your background. I think most of our listeners do. So give everybody listening a little bit of idea of what it is that you're doing in real estate now, but also how you got your start?   Nick: Yeah. Well, I'll start kind of from not from the very beginning, but from, you know, a couple years ago,   Michael: I graduated Agora High School.   Nick: Yeah, well, Michael and I, we go back to high school, like Michael said, and super random, we got reconnected through Roofstock, which, you know, we saw we started, you know, our real estate journey about, you know, just right at the start of the pandemic, so two years ago almost and…   Michael: Perfect time to get into real estate.   Nick: Yeah, really. Yeah, it really was, we've grown, you know, so much, which is, you know, just, I'll get to that later. But, you know, my, my wife and I, Molly, you know, we have two kids, Hudson and Dakota, and we work and, you know, we, you know, my wife's a nurse, and you know, I work for Northrop Grumman, and I do contracts for them. And, you know, we didn't want to work our whole lives, right?   We wanted more time with our family, and, you know, everybody that we kind of knew growing up, and, you know, even my family, and everybody's always been in real estate, and, you know, never really clicked in my head, I was just like, Oh, I'm just gonna keep getting promoted, you know, just gonna keep on working harder and working more. And it's like, yeah, well, you know, I don't want to work more I want more time with with my family and travel and go to, you know, plays and sporting events with with my kids. And you know, so it kind of kind of started with that.   And we randomly Molly found Roofstock, through like a friend at work. And she's in there, like, Hey, have you ever looked at Roofstock? And we were like, No, we don't even know what that is, you know, like, well, you know, we bought a property on there. It's really great. They have like, a ton of listings, and you can look at different areas. And she's like, Hey, Nick, you know, we should look into this. I'm like, oh, yeah, this is this is awesome. Like, I could just slide through this and like, try to figure out like, what I like the different areas and like, you know, what the rent potential is and neighborhood ratings and everything like that. And I remember jumping on a call with first time, and we're like, oh, we're scheduling a call with someone to learn more about real estate. And that it's Michael.   It's like, I'm like, Oh, my God, this is Michael from high school. Like, I've no idea. She's like, Okay, I'm just like, do you understand this crazy?   Michael: Wht don't you get it? It's wild.   Nick: Yeah, it's wild. And then, you know, then it clicked in her head, like, Oh, okay. Well, but you know, she doesn't know she didn't. She went to she grew up in San Luis Obispo, which I know,   Michael: Right, right, right.   Nick: Anyways, so, you know, randomly to how we got to like right now. But, you know, I looked through our notes the other day, like randomly, and it was from our first call, and it's like, you should look into bigger pockets. And I'm like, Oh, my God. We really were at day one. And, and then that's how I had to send you a note saying, Oh, my God, you wouldn't even believe like where we're at now.   Michael: I know it's amazing.   Nick: Yeah, it really is crazy. But you know, I was telling you earlier, when we talked last week, I was like, you know, roofstock really made it so we can have our jump off point. I mean, we bought our first two properties on roofstock. And now we have six, six single family rentals. And we have a 24 unit apartment complex, which we syndicated and it's just crazy the steps that we took to get from that point to now. And you know, you were our first contact in that space.   Michael: For better for worse.   Nick: No, it really was for better, I mean, it's like, you know, you're like, This is your rent potential. This is your, you know, you're like explaining, you know, the every step, and it was like, the note the notes were just so funny, and then, you know, we expanded on that and, you know, really, really grew, you know, our business point, you know, I made my own spreadsheet, I, you know, found we, you know, we did a ton of research on different markets, and we use the Roofstock really to kind of get going, because we'd said, oh, yeah, you know, this is the neighborhood rating, this is why it's rated that way. You know, this is the class a little area.   So, you know, we use, like, a lot of people's data, essentially, to make better decisions for ourselves, you know, at one point we're looking at, where's the next Whole Foods going? You know, you know, we were researching all these different, like big companies saying, Oh, where are people moving? where are people going?   And we had, you know, access to some capital at the time from, you know, savings and, you know, different, you know, different vehicles or investing through stock markets that were able to diversify. So we were like saying, Well, do we want to do one one house and just do a big downpayment? Or do we want to spread it around? And at the time, we were like, Oh, we don't really know. But now it's like, yeah, well, you definitely want to, you know, get as many as you can.   So that's kind of like how we started, that's how that's how we ended, you know, today, and the kind of like, the basics of how we started. But, yeah, I mean, it really came down to, you know, finding Roofstock and kind of gone with it, which was, which was awesome. And we still recommend it to the day that people Hey, you want to buy your first property, go on Roofstock see what they got. Do some research that way, you know, just learn the areas and then and then get into more research, you know, but it's, it's, you know, it's so funny how it all kind of comes full circle. So   Michael: It really has, and I definitely remember that conversation too. And I was chatting with Molly and she goes, Oh, my husband's from Agora. And I said, Oh, cool. Where in Agora?. And like, Canaan, I was like, oh, cool, did you go to Agora High. Yeah, when you graduate 2008. I was like, Holy crap, me too! like, it's Michael Albaum I'm like, it's Nick Haraden! It's such a funny throwback.   But talk to me about what that mindset shift was from pre finding roofstock to post, you know, post knowing about rootstock and then to buying that first property. Because I think so many people have the tools, but never end up making the jump. So what allowed you to make that leap?   Nick: Yeah, I think, you know, so like, it's not rocket science, right? You just got to know, you got to know your numbers, you got to have you got to build a little bit of a network, you know, you got to, you got to reach out to people like I, the biggest thing for me was, yes, the mindset was, like, hey, we could do this, it's not that hard. A house isn't scary, you know, like, there's it you know, you have your inspection reports you have, you have all these contingencies that help you, you know, later on the road, you know, you can get more creative, but at the start, I mean, you have a lot of things that protect you.   So, the mindset is really just to get out of your comfort level. And for us, we were very comfortable, you know, we had, we had a, you know, W2 jobs, which I still have, and so she, you know, we're getting or, you know, pay stubs, and but it wasn't enough, you know, you we want to get to the point where we were stopped working, and we can have more time. So, the biggest mindset was saying, you know, let's, let's grow out of this mindset of just saying, you know, next paycheck next paycheck, and get into the fact of saying, you know, let's let's put our money to work and put it to work the best way possible, which we felt was was real estate, you know, the stock market, you have, which has been doing great, but you know, you can't really control it.   Real Estate, you can really control there's so many benefits, but taxes, you know, rental income, someone paying your mortgage leverage, I mean, is on unlimited things that you can do with with real estate, and there's so many outs. And to get to our first one, it was a little scary, because we didn't know we had we hadn't done it yet. But the second that we did the first one, it was like all downhill. I mean, we're just going okay, let's get the next one. Let's get the next one. But we did it in a smart way, you know, like we, you know, the first I think the first one we use the Roofstock calculator, which is great. I then kind of transformed it into something a little bit bigger on my own Excel sheet Excel sheet that could I really used to like dig into, you know, hey, take out you know, first month's rent for your your PM, you know, the different you know, all different types of things, depending on what the house you know, was and how much repairs or whatever it needed.   So the mindset was really just being prepared and being able to, like take that next step and not be too scared to do it. So, you know, we talked to people you know, I talk to people every day because I I'm always trying to help people I'm on these like Facebook boards and messengers and all this stuff saying, you know, people saying like, how did you get, you know, five, six properties in two years and apartment? Well, it just was taking that first step and knowing your numbers, you know, running your numbers, and then taking the time to learn your market and You know, we weren't spread out too too wide, you know, we really focused on, we're focused on St. Louis, Missouri is where all our properties are. Now, we did do like a ton of research on different markets, and I'm open to going to different markets. But now we know our market. And the second something comes up and like a good deal or, you know, we get off market deals. And you know, it just pays so much to just be in one market and be an expert in that that area.   So yes, to go on your first deal. Long story short, was just yeah, you got to just take the leap and have faith and the different processes that are built in for for someone buying a home, it's all you're all there to be protected. You know, you just got to you got to take that next step.   Michael: Yeah, not so good. And if you could think back, turn back the clock, two years to that first property, Nick and Molly, did you have a roadmap that led you to then syndicate apartments? Or were you just like, You know what, let's figure it out. Let's get this one done. And just figure it out as we go.   Michael: Yeah. No, syndications was not even close to my mind. I mean, syndications is brand new to us to be honest, like six months, and at the time, you know, there's so many different podcasts, you know, I listened to The Remote Real Estate Investor podcast, I listened to, you know, bigger pockets, a lot of these other ones that I found, and anytime syndications came up at the beginning, I was like, ah, you know, Skip, wait till the next one. Yeah, it's just like it was it was so complex to me, right, I'll just like, I'm just focused on single family right now. And then you kind of learn that, you know, the bigger the place, the more the more you have protections in place, you have more tenants paying your rent, you have built in vacancies, you have, you know, less roofs, less, HVACs, less front, you know, everything is kind of makes more sense as you grow, which we figured out down the road. And,   Michael: Of course,   Nick: You know, our first property, you know, we were just, you know, the second I remember, you know, sitting outside in my backyard saying, and we did like a little cheers for buying your first property, or, like, you know, this is for, at the time, we only had one kid, we're like, this is gonna be Hudson's either choice to go to college, or he can, you know, I have this property when he gets to that point. So we're, like, you know, this is for this is properties for him,essentially, you know, as we get the cash flow as we go, you know.   So it's, that's kind of how we started with that. And then we grew pretty fast. Because we, you know, I took the time to really just call so many different people in St. Louis, and we met so many awesome people right off the bat. I mean, the property management, property manager that we met was off of Roofstock is one of your guys recommendations. And he's been, they have been awesome, you know, we, the the first person we called was was him. And I went right to the, the guy that owns the company. And he was like, he took the time to talk to us for like, a half hour and without even without even meeting us, you know, like, never met us before anything, and just like, hey, this is what we're doing. You know, we probably asked like, the most basic questions, and he just had so much like, you know, he just gave us the time of day.   And then from that point, we talked to like insurance brokers, we talked to people that were on the ground there that we met through different people, different contractors, and we just like, you know, we learned the area so well, but it just came from just talking to people and picking up the phone and calling you know, it can't descend an email, you can't just send a text, you got to like, actually connect video chat with people as much as I could, to just get like that, that connection going a little bit more. And then from that point, we met a rockstar agent to move after Roofstock We acquired some properties on the MLS and some off off market stuff, but we really found an awesome agent who was able to just, you know, go into these different homes and do video calls with us. He's an investor as well.   So it was really the, you know, the perfect combo with that he's extremely busy, but oh, he's kind of gave us the time. Now, you know, I bought him a golf club. And, you know, like, we're, you know, I know his kids names. He's like, he wants to come out to you know, California and go play 18 holes. You know, and he he gets a ton of off market stuff and he and he brings it to us first he's like, you know, here I have a package which we funny stories I you know, he brought us the package or like 15 homes, which we were like this close to closing on, probably about six months ago.   Michael: Okay.   Nick: And at the last second, the the owners pulled out and there's three owners and they had to all agree and one didn't. But anyways, like the more people we met, the more like opportunities we have, or like off market deals and all this stuff and then to get the syndications finally now, so our newest and greatest baby Dakota, she was born in May and that's that's pretty much the time that we were like, hey, I need another mindset change is I need to I want to be able to grow to the point where you know, we don't have to put in you know, so much money to keep growing you know, we want to syndicate right so we want to raise Capital. We want to find these awesome deals we want to be very active in it on on general partner side. And it's like what can we do to get more creative? Right? We felt like we really had a handle on the single family stuff. I really wanted to get into multifamily, but I couldn't find any decent deals like it's just crazy everywhere for multifamily, you know, duplex, it tries quads. So we found a 24 unit.   And I met a awesome partner, my business partner, his name is Michael as well. And he's from San Diego. Great name a news gray at the time I met him right. We actually met on on Facebook randomly were part of the a couple of like syndication groups, I really want to learn like everything I could about it's like, bought a few books, Joe Fairless, his book, a couple raising capital books, we had never done it.   Michael: Did you go back and listen to all those syndication podcasts?   Nick: I did. Yeah. I went back to all of them. And I was like, oh my god, now I gotta go listen to him. But the thing is, like when when I find something I really want to do I just dive in. And it it really just went really fast. I mean, we start we did our on a website, we started talking to investors, we met our business partner, talk to syndication lawyers, attorneys like everything. And then we found the deal. I mean, we found us and we found an apartment complex that was just it made the most sense, because I already knew the market. It's in St. Louis, we already had people on the ground that we built over two years. And it has some awesome points to this to this apartment complex that I knew would be a great buy for St. Louis because it was very special. It had their own basements, I mean, stuff that you don't really see in a lot of apartments that if you live in St. Louis and Missouri, you know, people love their basements there for storage, extra extra sleeping space. That's not technically legal.   But you know, people use their stores for a lot of different things. And that's what their basement is for. But this this had it it was like the perfect property. And it we found the property so fast. We just we just had the run so hard. I mean, I was up till 2am most nights like cranking away while we have a newborn while Molly just like wants to kill me come down and help with the kids. I'm like, I'm trying I want to you know, try to do this work, kids, syndications. I'm like, trust me, this is gonna be good for us.   Michael: A couple years from now,   Nick: Yeah, I had to I had to treat her to like a nice massage after that. But we really just like dove in, and we raised our capital. And like we did a webinar, we talked to all these investors, we had like 40 people on the call or something. And we raised the capital and under, like, 30 minutes after the call, and people were like, on board, I had friends, family investors, because you know, a lot of people, they just don't they, they want to invest, but they don't know how right? I mean, that's the whole point of Roofstock and your pockets. Like there's so many people out there that just don't know how to do it. And sometimes you need that person that can be like, Hey, I have this awesome deal is a great return for you. Which you know, in apartment complexes, you get the pretty, pretty awesome returns.   And, you know, we had so many people that were like, okay, like, I trust you guys, you know, you guys are seeing like, you know, awesome people, people that already knew already knew that. But you know, it just, it just went from there. And then yeah, we closed on that syndication literally four weeks ago. So yeah, so that's, that's the long long story. Kind of a long story there. That kind of leads us to where we are today with that.   Michael: So and and so did your business partner Michael have any syndication experience?   Nick: Yeah, he did. Definitely more than I did, I was coming from you know, zero. But I was bringing all the contacts all the you know, people on the ground that contractors, the property manager, so he was bringing the business more of the business background so he had a few he went through a few like cycle not cycle the syndication but through, went through a few things with a couple operators that didn't end up closing on the deal. But he went out and like did due diligence and like underwrote a bunch of deals for a couple of different operators. So he had a lot of the background like this is how we do syndication. You know, we need to do a syndication lawyer, we need to, you know, we need to, you know, these are the steps to get the syndication done. And then I had the contacts in St. Louis, that was actually pretty much like a perfect marriage. In that sense.   You know, we we connected I reached out to him and saying, hey, you know, it looks like you know a lot about syndications. I'd love to actually learn more at the time. I was just trying to learn a little bit more about it. And he said, Yeah, well this is the deal where I'm currently working on I can send you the OM for I'm like, Okay, awesome. And then like literally a week later, It's just like stuck in my head. I'm like, oh my god, I could do this. Like, I know I can do it. I love real estate. I love working out issues. I love working out problems. I already know that my market so well, I just sent a message like, hey, if I can find something in St. Louis, like, can we team up? And let's see what we can do.   And he's like, yeah, absolutely. The person I'm working with isn't responding and all this stuff, right? So it was like, it's just our paths crossed at the perfect time, I was on paternity leave. So I was like, I have a little bit more time, but I still have a newborn. So like, kind of not really more time. But, you know, so luckily, it was our second kid and not our first. So you know, we went through the motions a little bit more.   So it just like we crossed paths at the perfect time. And we just it just went so fast. Like I said before, like over the course of literally like two months, we were in the process of like, flying out the St. Louis doing walkthroughs and are like, Oh my God, here we go.   Michael: Off to the races.   Nick: Off to the races. Man.   Michael: That's so cool. So for recommendations for people who are looking to get started syndicating, would you say that they should wait till they have some maternity leave it to take advantage of the opportunity?   Nick: Man, Yeah, it probably is. There's so much work involved is is you really, I mean, I don't think I'd be able to do it if I was working in the office, because right now I'm working remotely, I'm able to flex my time to where I can get more stuff done. I mean, I can, you know, I can do my work, you know, crunch my workout, get that done, and then jump on and do do real estate and fill in meetings as I go. And like my downtimes, I can jump on and do more real estate in this, like, when I'm in the office, I don't think that I could have that time. And I'd probably be still kind of stuck in the rat race.   And I think the pandemic has really, you know, showed us that, hey, first of all, you can work remotely, and you can still do a good job and do everything you want with your regular job and still have time to be with your family or, you know, start a business like we did. And you know, I'm doing better at my, my W2 job than I ever have. Because I know I need to get that done to do real estate.   Michael: Gotta eat your vegetables before you can have dessert.   Nick: Yeah, exactly. And, you know, our goal is to, you know, we want to we want to stop working, you know, stop stop with our W twos. And in the next you know, maybe three, four years, and just, you know, focus on real estate and focus on growing and doing stuff that, you know, I love real estate. So I want to focus on doing something I love and have more time, I know I could I could do this real estate, you know, work from from wherever and you know, make my own time for it. So that's pretty much the goal, the end goal, at least right is to have more time, not necessarily more money, but more time. But we want to get to a point where we do have, you know, the capital coming or the you know, the income coming in, but the goal is ever since the very beginning is to have more time. So that's that's what we're we're focused on.   Michael: Love it. So with that being the goal, what's next for you? And Michael and Molly?   Nick: You know, right now, the single families are just they're easy to get. You know, we get it we have a really good pipeline now in St. Louis. And people are, you know, people in the Midwest, think of California people as people that are make like strong offers, but don't don't capitalize it, right? They say oh, yeah, buy all these properties. And then, you know, it's just like kicking the tire down the road. So now that we've kind of made ourselves known in St. Louis, and the syndication world is very small. And, you know, brokers, you know, we're meeting with brokers meeting, you know, people that can bring us more deals, but they know now like, hey, you know, you have a portfolio here, you have a 24 unit apartment complex, we know that you can close on deals, you know, that really goes a long ways not to mention it goes a ton always with your lender, you know, we use local lender for for lending on the apartment building. But once you've kind of, you know, made yourself known out there, you can really get more access to better deals, more deals, and more qualified deals.   So the next what we want to do next, and I say like, you know, single families are easy to come by right now. It's because, you know, we get a handful of deals that are just, you know, off market stuff that people know like, hey, they can close and whatever days they have the capital for they know what they're doing. They have this track record. So you know, we were still buying single family homes.   Michael: Low hanging fruit   Nick: We Yeah, it's you know, we have a great return. I mean, we shoot for at least a minimum about $350 cash flow, pure cash flow and about an 18 to 20% return. And we're getting that in the markets that were that we're in. Now homes have gone up 35 40% in our market, which makes it tougher, but now we're not finding a ton of stuff on the MLS but like I said, you know, we're getting a lot of off market stuff. So it's hard to say no to the deal while we're waiting for another one, you know, the best time to buy real estate is yesterday, right? So, right. You know, we're trying to like, you know, build and build and still have the capital to get something along or something a little bit bigger.   But with syndications, the beauty of syndications, right is that you can really grow quickly because you have capital from investors that you know, really want a great return as well. So, we're, you know, we're in talks of, you know, talking to people that are pure capital raisers, KPs, which is people that can, like you know, have the bankroll essentially for bigger deals, because in syndications, you know, when you're a general partner, you have to have the, you know, you have to have the bankroll to support the loan. So eventually, you know, I don't have that bankroll.   You know, not a lot of people do. So there's people out there, it's actually quite interesting that just purely as their job is to, like, banker, all these properties. So it's quite interesting. So, you know, we're just learning, we're still learning more, you know, we're trying to get this deal off the ground as well, this first indication, you know, would you you know, we do the all the asset management behind it, everything.   So, you know, I think we're just really trying to make ourselves the best product that we can be as we move forward. We know we don't want to jump into something just to jump into, you know, single family stuff. Yes, we're trying to get stuff as they can. Because we know what a good deal is, we know our market really well. With syndications. It's a little bit different, you know, we don't want to just jump into a deal just for the fee that we're going to get, that's not our goal, right. So we want to actually get a great deal for investors. Not to mention a lot of them in this past deal. Were friends and family, you know, so, you know, we want to make sure we're getting their returns and that's the most important part in syndications is paying out your investors. So yeah, a lot, a lot more, a lot more, you know, a lot more work on the syndication side, a lot more stress, you know, constantly thinking about what's gonna go wrong next.   You know, there's always something you're like, I'm like, going through my mind like, Okay, what's, who's not going to pay next? What's gonna break next, you know, all this stuff. But, you know, we we underwrite really conservatively, and we make sure that we have the reserves, we make sure we have the capex account, kind of everything that goes into it. So that's kind of where we're going next. I mean, we're, you know, we briefly talked about short term rentals.   Another crazy story, we're using the same agent out in the Smokies…   Michael:   I rememver that conversation too, I am chatting with this agent, her their husbands and property managers, like, is it Jen, like, holy crap, it is.   Nick: Yeah, so, so the short term rental side not to get too sidetracked on that, but you know, we're, we want to get to the point, right, where we have enough monthly income coming in where we can kind of you know, break away from our job and short term rental right now, just popping in the Smokies is probably the best place in the whole world for short term rentals. I mean, it's just absolutely amazing. Molly did some did some studying in Tennessee, so she kind of grew up there a little bit gone to the smoky so we have some background in the Smokies. I've never actually personally been but yeah, we're trying to find a short term rental and Smokies you know, just, you know, to be diversified. For one, one thing, and also to just capitalize on this crazy Airbnb market right now. I mean, it's just absolutely exploding. There's so many benefits in the Smokies of the driving distance that we've talked about, you know, it's just, there's a lot of awesome things.   And, yeah, we want to get to that point where, like I said, we have that monthly income coming in, where we can start stepping away from other things and have more time. And, you know, we're, you know, underwriting there. And we really, you know, it's hard to get properties out there. So we want to make sure we do it the right way. So that's, that's kind of what we're, we're kind of focused on right now. That's so exciting.   Michael: So you have done a lot of things, you've got a lot more things on the horizon. What do you turn back? Kind of looking over your shoulder in a rearview mirror? What do you say to people who are just getting started? Who couldn't fathom doing any of the things that you're doing? I mean, what do you say to somebody who's trying to just get started?   Nick: I think that for someone that's just getting started, and we were actually helping a few people right now that are just getting started. One of them is you know, Molly's best friend,   Michael: Trying to put me out of a job at the Roofstock Academy man, take over my coaching role?   Nick: Honestly, she, she's finding properties on Roofstock, I said, look on Roofstock, because you can get so much done there. Like, you know, a lot of people you know, they, they need, you know, they need to learn all this stuff, like cash on cash returns, right, just like you taught us, right. And honestly, like, you know, you taught us a lot of that stuff and and, you know, sure, we probably would have learned it at some point, but you know, it really, you know, you're able to give us that info like right off the bat and then we can really analyze property the right way.   But you know, just telling people like, you know, make sure that you know your numbers, and then don't be scared to just jump in, you know, you have to be able to find a market. That makes sense. So, you know, we, we really do refer people on Roofstock quite a bit, because you guys have so much data on there, and it solves a lot of questions of, is this a good area? Well, you know, Roofstock gives you a pretty good idea. And then, you know, go on all these, you know, Zillow go on, you know, realtor.com, and you can see like, the crime rates, and you can see, you know, the, what the housing markets done there, how much is supposed to go up what the rent potential is, but also, you know, you need to call people, you know, you find your market and call a property manager and find out all the good and bad areas, you know, just like, you know, you got to put in some sweat equity in this deal, because you can't just find a deal. And then hopefully it makes it happen, real estate's active, right. So you got to as passive as people want it to be, you still got to be there, and you got to make sure you got to manage your property managers, I mean.   So, so first starting off, I think people need to be able to, one, be able to find your resources like Roofstock, or, you know, something that can help people kind of get going, and then have the time and the ability to say, Okay, this is a good deal, not a good deal on your numbers, and then find someone in your market and confirm those things. And then once you do that, you can try to find a good deal.   You know, I think that my background, so I, I recently started in hospitality for you know, right out of college, I was senior sales manager, I was sales managers that a lot of different hotels, I just wanted to keep on getting promoted in Santa Monica and I got a lot of customer service background, though. And then I transitioned to aerospace defense, very random, but I think   Michael: Those seem related.   Nick: Very different, right, right before you know, a couple of like, maybe six months before the pandemic, thankfully, because you know, hotels had a huge downturn during the pandemic. And then now I do contracts for, for for Northrop Grumman. So I do negotiating contracts on behalf of Northrop Grumman with the government. So I think all those things have helped me become a better landlord, because it's a people business, you know, you really have to put in your time with the people to make sure you have the best experience and best best returns possible. I mean, for all our tenants, we write them, you know, not not Christmas cards, but we send them you know, happy New Year cards with like a $20 gift card. Not necessarily saying like, Hey, call us, but just saying like, Hey, thanks for being you know, a great tenant. And, you know, we take care of our agent who's brought us a ton of deals like bottom, a golf club,   Michael: That's great,   Nick: You know, stuff, stuff like that, you know, I stay in contact with a lot of people that have helped us and just say, Thank you, you know, just talk to these people. And, you know, really put in the time to be more people oriented. And I think having my background of customer service that really got me to the point of where I've been able to make all these awesome connections and have the, you know, the network around me to say, like, hey, I can go out and check out your property for you, like, you know, don't worry about it, you know   We flew out to St. Louis, for our inspections for due diligence for this apartment complex. And like three of our property managers showed up to walk through every single unit with us, and we had a contractor come out that I've worked with, and it's like, these people would just came out at 8am on a Thursday with very little notice, and was like, I'm going to walk every apartment with you, I'm going to tell you the rent potential and all of it and it just, you know, they gave, they gave us so much. So much back, that was awesome. And it's just by building these, these relationships, you know, I, I don't treat it as like a transactional feature for all these people. I treat them as people. And   Michael: A novel concept.   Nick: And yeah, and it's, it's, it's interesting, because not everybody does think that way. But I think if you have that mentality of thinking, like, Hey, this is like people that are going to help you grow, you got to treat them, like like your family. And then you got you know, sometimes you got to treat them. Like it's more of like a business, of course. But to get going, you know, you need to make sure that, you know, hey, you're on the right track, you know, you're you're meeting these people, and they're going to help you out a lot more than you think. When you're first meeting them. So, you know, treat them well.   Michael: That's such a good point, Nick. And it's something that I try to tout too, and that relationships matter. This is not an individual or siloed business. And I love the example of those property managers and contractor coming out to meet you because you've you've poured in today. And so now it's coming back to you.   Nick: Yeah, yeah. Mike, my business partner, Michael is like, oh my gosh, this is crazy. I'm just like, Yeah, I mean, you know, this is what happens when you build good relationships. And he has his properties in Wisconsin, so he's not in St. Louis. So he he didn't have the same contacts, obviously. But I was like, Look, you know, I have some awesome people that I've met and I think we can do a great job and that was just you know, at one example,   Michael: So that is awesome, Nick. Well, dude, I'm gonna let you get out of here. But before I do if somebody is interested in investing with you in your syndication, learning more about you, what, what, where should they go? How can we get in touch with you?   Nick: Yeah, you can go or people can reach us a number of different ways. But the best ways to really just jump on our website, it's www.HudsonHallproperties.com. Or they can email email me at homes@HudsonHall properties.com. Either one of those works. And you know, there's a ton of, you know, information about syndications and real estate in general on our website, we really took the time to go through it. And people can get a lot more information just through that and then sign up to be on our message board essentially, like for, you know, different deals that are coming out or if they want to schedule a call, whatever it may be happy to jump on a call with anybody as well. So…   Michael: Right on, we'll do thank you so much for coming on and sharing your wisdom and past experience of this. Really appreciate you.   Nick: Yeah, thanks, Michael. Thanks for having me.   Michael: Of course. My pleasure, man. Talk to you soon.   Already, everybody. That was our episode, a big thank you to Nick for coming on the show. Definitely check out his website if you're interested in learning more about him and the syndications that he's working on. As always, if you liked the episode, feel free to leave us a rating or review. They are super helpful for us, and we look forward to seeing the next one. Happy investing  

Real Estate Coaching Radio
2022 Housing Prediction - IBuyers and Buyer Agency [Real Estate Training]

Real Estate Coaching Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:56


2022 Housing Prediction #7: With iBuyers having less competition from other iBuyers, and i-Buyers having to pay more to fund their businesses (to purchase the actual houses), we predict that i-Buyers will start offering and paying less for the homes, thus they won't be a competitor against the retail buyer anymore.  (Zillow's mistake). In Q3 2021, iBuyers accounted for 1.6 percent of all homes purchased in the U.S. That's around 28,000 homes, nearly double the 15,000 homes purchased by iBuyers in Q2. Also noteworthy: IBuyer Market share in Phoenix, the largest iBuyer market, peaked to a new high of 10.8 percent. This is the first time iBuyers have exceeded 10 percent market share in a major market — a significant if temporary, achievement. While Opendoor and Offerpad improved their net profit and loss in 2021 (benefiting from record home price appreciation), Zillow's just got worse (and that's excluding the $304 million inventory write-down) — another reason Zillow Offers just wasn't working out. Additionally, there is increasing scrutiny of i-Buyers from other entities, for example, The Los Angeles City Council voted last week to explore different ways of preventing i-Buyer companies like Zillow, Open Door, Rocket Homes, and Redfin from purchasing single-family homes.  They state that they believe the i-Buyer, tech-driven platforms are pushing home prices even further out of reach.   Important: 2022 top agent success secrets [Revealed]: New FREE Real Estate Coaching web event, revealing 17 surprising secrets of the top 100 $$ millionaire agents. Get your FREE spot for the 2022 Real Estate Coaching webinar now. After you have attended this event you will have a huge feeling of relief knowing you will FINALLY laugh at your money worries – You will have your own personalized 2022 Step-By-Step Real Estate Business Plan. Learn now how to generate 100's of motivated leads for FREE, without coming off as a pushy salesperson and losing your soul. You will soon know how to become one of the 1000s of agents making HUGE money who never thought they could. https://timandjulieharris.com/webinar-reservation.html 2022 Housing Prediction #8: Renters will also feel the pricing increases.  Renters will need to save an extra $369 per month on average just to keep up with the increases in home values / their landlords raising rent as a result.   *We could be wrong if some sort of legislation is passed to control rental price increases.  Remember the eviction moratoriums that were passed? 2022 Housing Prediction #9: Mortgage rates will continue to run at historically low rates, with massive pressure from all sides to keep them that way. According to Bankrate, who surveyed a collection of the nation's largest mortgage lenders, as of November 12th, 2021, the average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage is 3.07 percent.  The average rate for the benchmark 15-year fixed mortgage is 2.40 percent, down 8 basis points from a week ago. At the current average rate, you'll pay $421.60 per month in principal and interest for every $100,000 you borrow. That's lower by $6.50 than it would have been last week. Monthly payments on a 15-year fixed mortgage at that rate will cost roughly $390 per $100k borrowed. 2022 Housing Prediction #10: Buyer's Agent commissions will continue to erode, become more negotiable, and even optional.  Remember, the listing agent always wins!  The buyer's agent commission will no longer be seen as an ‘entitlement' to the agent. The National Association of Realtors just approved the public display of buyer agent commissions.  Agents may not filter based on this, but it is interesting that the ‘standard' commission is no longer assumed. Remember, there are no buyers who ‘have to' buy, only sellers who ‘have to' sell!  Make the commitment to being a powerful listing agent. Tomorrow's show is 2022 Real Estate Predictions 11-14 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Driven By with Sam Coates
Building What I Wish I Had with Sam Sawyer

Driven By with Sam Coates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 90:51


My guest today is Sam Sawyer. Not many would leave their career at the top of their field to launch a startup disrupting the space they once built their career in. After leaving Dallas, Texas, and working for Silicon Valley Based ZeroDown Sam launched Archetape, where he is Founder and CEO. After an early-stage investment round by Mucker Capital, Sam is building out Archetape and growing it throughout the Southeast U.S.A. Sam believes the future of residential real estate will continue to change dramatically and disrupt the old way agencies do business. I had a great time with Sam where you'll learn: Contrary to standard behavior- why you're better positioned to take risks and build companies in your 30's and 40's versus playing it safe   What makes a great early-stage investment relationship. Why Mucker Capital is a great partner and what they do to invest in and deliver value to their founders   Why raising too much funding can crush you.   The impact of Zillow and how this transformed the industry   First Principles thinking and why this drives how they build this company   And much more!   Please enjoy this week's episode with Sam Sawyer! Links: https://www.archetape.com/ https://zerodown.com/ https://www.mucker.com/ https://www.zillow.com/ https://www.ycombinator.com/ First principles- https://medium.com/the-mission/elon-musks-3-step-first-principles-thinking-how-to-think-and-solve-difficult-problems-like-a-ba1e73a9f6c0 Sam twitter- @samHsawyer

It's A Clue
Episode 33: Nancy Drew & the Singing Clam Digger

It's A Clue

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 82:01


In Episode 33 of "It's A Clue", we delve as deep as is humanly possible into "Nancy Drew and the Clue In the Crumbling Wall". From a series of Roger Rabbit-esque shenanigans, a spate of incredibly tame juevenile delinquent activity, and a full-on artisanal castle, this book has a little somethin' for everybody.  We also got an incredibly rare boating accident, twin towers, and for the first time ever, a sad little girl-child who needs Nancy's help. In other news, Kelly's having nightmares about the library, Karen feels like Carolyn Keene is a foot-shamer, and a Zillow listing sparks both inspiration and questions about HOAs.  Rated 9.75 / 12 stolen blouses.

Real Estate Rockstars
SOTM 84: Is Zillow Predicting a Housing Market Crash? - Kimberlee Meserve

Real Estate Rockstars

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 48:01


In early November, Zillow unexpectedly pulled the plug on its iBuyer business. What happened? On today's podcast with Kimberlee Meserve, we explore several possible reasons behind Zillow Offers shutting down. Is Zillow predicting a housing market crash, or was their aggressive home-buying strategy simply unsustainable? Find out on today's State of the Market! We also cover Boston's unique housing market, what other iBuyers are doing right now, and more. Visit hibandigital.com/toolbox Claim Real Estate Discounts, Free Trials, and More Visit hibandigital.com/resources Sponsors Rebus University - Get Over $10,000 in Real Estate Training for as Little as $97 Visit futureofrealestatetraining.com PadHawk - Find Your Market's Best Leads for FREE with a 7-Day Trial Visit padhawk.com Roddy's FLS - Discover Unbeatable Real Estate Deals with a FREE Foreclosure List Visit 4closure.info Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WSJ What’s News
Why Zillow's Home-Flipping Business Went Belly Up

WSJ What’s News

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 12:36


P.M. Edition for Nov. 17. Real-estate firm Zillow had high hopes for its AI-powered home-flipping business, Zillow Offers. But earlier this month, the company said it was shutting the outfit down. Housing reporter Will Parker joins host Annmarie Fertoli to discuss what happened. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Today, Explained
Is Zillow really buying all the houses?

Today, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 27:01


No. Vox's Jerusalem Demsas disproves a popular internet conspiracy theory. Today's show was produced by Hady Mawajdeh, edited by Matt Collette, engineered by Efim Shapiro, fact-checked by Laura Bullard and hosted by Sean Rameswaram. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained Support Today, Explained by making a financial contribution to Vox! bit.ly/givepodcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

HousingWire Daily
A look inside NAR's annual conference

HousingWire Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 39:33


This past week the National Association of Realtors held their annual conference, taking over the elephantine San Diego convention center for six days, 200 sessions, and a debate on everything from the right customer relationship management system to racism in housing to how to best deal with U.S. Justice Department antitrust officials.This week's episode of Houses in Motion, part of HousingWire Daily, features an interview with Lisa Dunn, of Laurel Real Estate Resources in Rancho Santa Margarita, California, who was at the conference from start to finish and is one of the 1.54 million-strong organization's 800-plus board members.HousingWire real estate reporter Matthew Blake spoke with Dunn on the conference's penultimate day about the topics being discussed in the convention, including changes in NAR committee structures and MLS information transparency. 

Chicago Dog Walk
Wednesday 11/17/21 - Mortgage Professional

Chicago Dog Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 24:22


Mortgage professional David Hochberg joins the show to talk about the housing market. We get into his take on the Zillow situation, how BlackRock is actually good in his eyes, when the major housing correction is going to come, and more.

Equity
Did Zillow get high on its own supply?

Equity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 23:53


This is our Wednesday episode when we niche down to a single topic, looking to expand our understanding of one particular technology trend or another. This week? iBuying.Zillow made a decision to get out of the iBuying market, with huge costs hanging over its head and a grip of layoffs to manage. Natasha and Alex were curious what went wrong.So we brought along Ryan Lawler, one of TechCrunch+'s reporting team, who has covered the space for a chat. Ryan helped us use Opendoor earnings as a comparison point -- it turns out that the iBuying model can work, even if Zillow itself struggled with the model. (Opendoor went public via a SPAC, recall.)We also talked about what the situation could mean for startups in the real estate market more broadly. It turns out that merely having data is not enough to make money in the housing space.Equity is back Friday morning with our weekly news roundup, and if all goes well, also back on Saturday with something both special and fun.And if you haven't given our sister podcast, Found, a listen, check it out!

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast
Day 2 - Deal Fast Track Challenge

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 65:38


Day 2 of the “Deal Fast Track Challenge”! Today we talked about sending Facebook Messages to properties on Facebook Marketplace, and/or emails to Realtors of older listings on Redfin.Day 1 was epic and we gave a homework of sending 10 text messages to properties on Zillow. One of our challengers got 6 positive responses out of the 10 text messages! That's crazy good! Another one got an appointment set up to look at a house!For Day 2, Gavin and I shared our marketing plan where you set your goal, get a scorecard and track your numbers. You can't control how much you make on a monthly basis. You can't control how many leads you need to do a deal or how much average profit you get per deal. But! You CAN control the amount of marketing you do every day.This marketing plan includes sending Facebook messages and emails to Realtors among other ways to get leads. And we get why a lot of people would think this is too hard or it's too difficult to keep up with. It's actually not that hard if you're ready and willing to take massive imperfect actions.You can learn all these and so much more. It's not too late to join our Deal Fast Track Challenge. You can still go to DealFastTrackChallenge.com to get access to the private Facebook group where all these goodies will be available. Or, invest in yourself a little bit more and get the VIP upgrade. You'll get access to our Leads Lab, recordings, and a complete workbook of the entire Challenge Training plus other great stuff!We still have 3 days left to this program and the next days are just going to be filled with so much more valuable information that can and will propel your real estate business. So, what are you waiting for?Go to DealFastTrackChallenge.com or get VIP access at DealFastTrackChallenge.com/vip-upgrade.What's Inside: —Creating your marketing plan.—It's not that hard.—How to keep track of your scorecard. —Messages and emails that work on Realtors on Redfin and properties listed on Facebook Marketplace.

Your Business Your Wealth
215 - Risky Zillow, Risky Crypto and Why do they hate ROTH?

Your Business Your Wealth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 31:41


Topics Covered: For full show notes visit: https://sfgway.com/ep215 Subscribe and click the bell on Youtube and Facebook to become notified when Paul and Cory go live next. This Material is Intended for General Public Use. By providing this material, we are not undertaking to provide investment advice for any specific individual or situation, or to otherwise act in a fiduciary capacity. Please contact one of our financial professionals for guidance and information specific to your individual situation. Sound Financial Inc. dba Sound Financial Group is a registered investment adviser.  Information presented is for educational purposes only and does not intend to make an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any specific securities, investments, or investment strategies.  Investments involve risk and, unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed herein. Past performance is not indicative of future performance. Insurance products and services are offered and sold through Sound Financial Inc. dba Sound Financial Group and individually licensed and appointed agents in all appropriate jurisdictions. This podcast is meant for general informational purposes and is not to be construed as tax, legal, or investment advice. You should consult a financial professional regarding your individual situation. Guest speakers are not affiliated with Sound Financial Inc. dba Sound Financial Group unless otherwise stated, and their opinions are their own. Opinions, estimates, forecasts, and statements of financial market trends are based on current market conditions and are subject to change without notice. Past performance is not a guarantee of future results. Each week, the Your Business Your Wealth podcast helps you Design and Build a Good Life. No one has a Good Life by default, only by design. Visit us here for more details: yourbusinessyourwealth.com 2021 Sound Financial Inc. yourbusinessyourwealth.com Podcast Produced by Greater North Productions LLC

Market Proof Marketing: New Home Builder Marketing Insights

Market Proof Marketing · Are All Marketers Liars? Kevin Oakley, Julie Jarnagin, and Samantha Matlock consider if all marketers are liars? They discuss the illusion of influencers and how it relates to home builder marketers, Kevin has some exciting news on upcoming guests that you won't want to miss, and the team discusses OpenDoor and Zillow's approach to iBuying. Story Time (2:11) Julie shares why she is waiting for Black Friday and how it relates to a homebuyers' fear of overpaying. Samantha is finally preapproved and aiming to move into a new home and out of her apartment in Colorado before the Summer. Kevin reflects on the illusion of influencers and if all marketers are liars. He gives a quick update on his house and why he will never purchase a pool again. Plus, Kevin teases some NEW GUESTS who are coming soon.In the NewsOpendoor shares soar as investors predict gains in home buying market after Zillow's exit (https://www.cnbc.com) (https://www.opendoor.com/w/partner/builder) Pretium Partners picks up 2,000 Zillow homes to kick off iBuying wind-down (https://therealdeal.com)Facebook-parent Meta will remove the ability to target ads based on sensitive categories (https://www.cnn.com) Google recommends placing videos on dedicated pages for maximum exposure (https://searchengineland.com) Advertising Spending Roars Back After Pandemic Pause (https://www.forbes.com)Questions? Comments? Email show@doyouconvert.com or call 404-369-2595 and we'll address them on the next episode.More insights, discussions, and opportunities in the Market Proof Marketing Facebook group.Subscribe on iTunes > https://now.doyouconvert.com/mpm-itunesFollow on Spotify > https://now.doyouconvert.com/mpm-spotifyListen On Stitcher > https://now.doyouconvert.com/mpm-stitcherA weekly new home marketing podcast for home builders and developers. Each week Kevin Oakley, Andrew Peek, and others from Do You Convert will break down the headlines, share best practices and stories from the front line, and perform a deep dive on a relevant marketing topic. We're here to help you – not to sell you! The post Ep 177: Are All Marketers Liars? appeared first on Online Sales and Marketing for Home Builders - DYC.

Chicago Dog Walk
Tuesday 11/16/21 - The Zillow Controversy

Chicago Dog Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 22:40


Chief joins the show to talk about the Zillow controversy. We get into how it first came to light by a guy on TikTok, a jarring Q3 report, the real estate market, and more.

The Daily Sun-Up
Zillow has been buying homes across Colorado; John P Porter Jr. lynched in Lincoln County

The Daily Sun-Up

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 12:57


Colorado residents and recent transplants looking for an affordable home may be surprised that for the past year, they've often been bidding against Zillow. The popular home shopping site has gotten into buying homes for itself in a big way, Colorado Sun reporter Jason Blevins tells us. And now they may be getting right back out again after a major failure in strategy. Jason talks with Michael Booth about what went wrong for Zillow and what it means for the rest of us looking for a good roof over our heads.  To read more go to coloradosun.com. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast
Day 1 - Deal Fast Track Challenge

Real Estate Investing Mastery Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 63:53


We are not in the real estate investing business - we are in the marketing business. I've said this many times before and I still teach it to all my students. Your real estate business will only be as good as your leads. I hear a lot of people say their backyard is competitive; it's hard to do deals. I hate to break it to you but it's actually not that hard as long as you know how to get leads.Leads are the lifeblood of our business. Without leads, you're a dead fish in the water. Every business out there needs leads to be able to make money. After that, it's all about the execution. So, this is day 1 of our Deal Fast Track challenge and you will learn here our first principle which is: “We are not in the real estate investing business. We are in the marketing business.”And the sooner you understand this, the sooner you are ready to take massive imperfect actions. You don't have to be afraid to make mistakes because taking action is the first step to you learning and fully understanding this principle and getting it right.Most investors are spending close to $5000 per marketing deal and not everyone can afford that. This will only get higher and the market is still hot. A lot of businesses are on the verge of closing down but it doesn't have to be that way. You can do this but only if you take action now.It's not too late to join our Deal Fast Track challenge and if you upgrade to VIP access for $97, we give you access to our Leads Lab where we roll up our sleeves and get down and dirty with you to get leads and deals.Take action NOW. The time is NOW. Go to DealFastTrackChallenge.com or get VIP access at DealFastTrackChallenge.com/VIP-Upgrade.What's Inside: —Principle number 1 of our Deal Fast Track challenge. —10 text messages to properties on Zillow. —Coaching client interview. —Taking massive imperfect actions.

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast
Free And Low Cost Marketing Tips For The Agent On A Shoestring Budget

Real Estate Uncensored - Real Estate Sales & Marketing Training Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 53:43


We've all heard the saying, “spend money to make money,” but what happens if we don't have any? The harsh reality is, some agents just don't.    So, what's an agent in a tight position to do? Are there ways to market ourselves without spending a dime? What should be our first splurge when we do have the means to invest in our businesses?   In this episode, we're weighing in on marketing budgets, and what to do when we don't have one.    Three Things You'll Learn in This Episode    How to compete with big tech Even a top producer is unlikely to have a marketing budget anywhere near that of a big tech company like Zillow. What can the average agent do to stay in the ring?    How to run ads on a shoestring Is it smarter to hold off on ads until we can afford to target everyone, or what should we be doing instead?    The best social media platforms for agents with no budget Social media is free, but with so many options available to us, knowing which platform to zone in on is tricky. Which networks are likely to get us the best results?

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast
The Real Estate News Brief: Fed Chair Finalist, Top Property Investing Sector, Adverse Market Fee Bonanza

Real Estate News: Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 6:27


In this Real Estate News Brief for the week ending November 13th, 2021... the two Fed Chair finalists, the top property investing sector, and the billions earned from a pandemic fee on refinancing loans. Hi, I'm Kathy Fettke and this is Real Estate News for Investors. If you like our podcast, please subscribe and leave us a review.Economic NewsWe begin with economic news from this past week. President Biden is reportedly close to a decision on who he'll nominate as chief of the Federal Reserve. Fed Chief Jerome Powell's four-year term is up in February, and it appears that Biden is now deciding whether to keep Powell or replace him with Fed Governor Lael Brainard. Brainard is considered more progressive than Powell. She's described in a Barron's article as more “dovish on monetary policy and stronger on bank regulation.” Some Fed watchers also believe that Brainard is more in tune with Biden's economic agenda, but Powell has strong support from moderate Democrats and Republicans, which gives him an edge over Brainard. Biden has said he'll make a decision “fairly quickly.” Some believe he'll announce a nomination by Thanksgiving. (1) (2) Whoever lands that job will be tackling inflation, which surged to a 31-year-high this last week. The consumer price index was up .9% in October, according to the government. That raises the annual rate of inflation from 5.4% in September to 6.2% in October, which is more than triple the Fed's target of 2%. It's also the highest rate of inflation since November of 1990. If you eliminate higher prices for food and energy, the core CPI is about 4.6%. That's up from 4% in September. (3)The gauge the Fed watches more closely is the PCE which stands for personal consumption expenditures. That's rising more slowly. The PCE was 4.4% in September and 3.6% for the core rate. October numbers haven't come out yet.Initial applications for state unemployment benefits dropped again. There were just 267,000 new claims last week while layoffs also fell to a record low. (4) Employers have been struggling to find enough workers to fill positions. There are currently 10.4 million job openings and just 7.4 million people listed as unemployed. One result of this lopsided situation: Companies are increasing hourly rates to attract candidates. Data from Indeed.com shows that jobs offering less than $15 an hour are scarce. (5)Consumers are not very happy about the current economic situation. The University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index fell to its lowest level in a decade. The November reading was 66.8. That's a drop of about five points from October, and about 35 points lower than the pre-pandemic reading of 101. (6)Mortgage RatesOn a more positive note, mortgage rates dipped below the 3% level this last week. Freddie Mac says the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was down 11 basis points to 2.98%. The 15-year was 2.27%. (7)In other news making headlines…Single-Family Build-to-Rent BoomInvestors are clamoring into the single-family build-to-rent market, as demand and rents soar. A new Green Street report shows that investors are earning 8% on average. That is the highest amount among the 18 property sectors analyzed by Green Street. As reported by the Wall Street Journal, the weighted average return for all property sectors is 6.1%. (8)Housing economics consultant, Brad Hunter, says that builders provided almost 100,000 new rental homes in 2021, and that investors have pumped about $30 billion into this corner of the real estate market. The momentum has created a frenzy for land that's suitable for build-to-rent. One builder told the Journal: “You almost have to find the land before it gets put on the market.”GSE Bonanza from Adverse Market FeeRemember the “adverse market fee” on refinancing loans during the pandemic? It was a 50 basis point fee for refi loans backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, and it earned those two GSEs a bundle!According to the Federal Housing Finance Agency, Fannie and Freddie earned $5.3 billion from that fee. (9) It says the money will cover about 70% of the cost of the GSE's Covid relief programs, such as the moratorium on foreclosures, and forbearance programs that allowed homeowners to skip their mortgage payments. The adverse market fee was in force for about 10 months, starting in October of last year.Opendoor Buys RedDooriBuyer Opendoor will be able to pre-approve applicants in just “one” minute, with the acquisition of online mortgage broker RedDoor. The mortgage company was founded in 2018 and has partnered up with more than 70 lenders. (10)The announcement comes at a time when Zillow has announced the elimination of its iBuying program, and has created doubts about the profitability of the iBuying business. But as HousingWire reports: “Some investors see add-on services… (like mortgages) as a possible way for iBuyers to eventually turn a profit.”Opendoor expanded into the mortgage business in 2019. And it reportedly “smashed through” earnings estimates for the third quarter with 5,988 homes sold. Year-over-year revenue was up 570%. With Zillow out of the picture, Opendoor now has one less competitor. That's it for today. Check the show notes for links. And please remember to hit the subscribe button, and leave a review!You can also join RealWealth for free at newsforinvestors.com. As a member, you have access to the Investor Portal where you can view sample property pro formas and connect with our network of resources, including experienced investment counselors, property teams, lenders, 1031 exchange facilitators, attorneys, CPAs and more.Thanks for listening. ​​I'm Kathy Fettke. ​​Links:1 -https://www.barrons.com/articles/federal-reserve-powell-brainard-biden-nomination-516367371032 -https://www.washingtonpost.com/us-policy/2021/11/11/brainard-fed-biden-powell/3 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/coming-up-u-s-consumer-price-index-for-october-11636550300?mod=economy-politics4 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/jobless-claims-slip-to-267-000-and-touch-new-pandemic-low-11636552204?mod=economic-report5 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/job-listings-offering-less-than-15-an-hour-are-starting-to-disappear-in-todays-tight-labor-market-116366575806 -https://www.marketwatch.com/story/u-s-consumer-sentiment-declined-in-early-november-to-decade-low-university-of-michigan-2716367302647 -http://www.freddiemac.com/pmms/8 -https://www.wsj.com/articles/building-and-renting-single-family-homes-is-top-performing-investment-11636453800?mod=hp_lead_pos109 -https://www.housingwire.com/articles/fannie-freddie-made-5-3b-from-adverse-market-fee/10 -https://www.housingwire.com/articles/opendoor-buys-mortgage-brokerage-reddoor/

Kottke Ride Home
Mon. 11/15 - Welcome To The Human Library

Kottke Ride Home

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 17:32


Zillow is out of the iBuying game. What does that mean for its competitors and for the future of real estate? Plus, a look into the Human Library. And astronauts aboard the International Space Station were forced to take shelter in their return ships this morning due to on-coming space junk.Sponsors:Shopify, Get a 14-day free trial at shopify.com/kottkeTentree, Use code KOTTKE to get 15% off at tentree.comLinks:Why Zillow Couldn't Make Algorithmic House Pricing Work (Wired)Is that viral TikTok about housing market manipulation true? (Input)Redfin CEO explains how its iBuyer home buying program avoided pitfalls that sunk Zillow Group (Geek Wire)Zillow (Saturday Night Live, YouTube)This library lets you borrow people instead of books. It just may help bridge our bitter divisions (CNN)Space debris forces astronauts on space station to take shelter in return ships (Space.com)NASA was forced to change the orbit of the ISS due to space junk (Slash Gear)Space Station Space Debris and Human Spacecraft (NASA)Russia blows up a satellite, creating a dangerous debris cloud in space (The Verge)Kottke.OrgJackson Bird on TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Clark Howard Podcast
11.15.21 New Retirement Contribution Limits / Home iBuyers: Industry Update.

The Clark Howard Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 32:01


It's the time of year to make elections for your retirement accounts. News on next year's new income and contribution limits for retirement accounts and tax implications moving forward. / Zillow is out of the home buying business, but other iBuyer companies are still thriving. Industry update and when & where using an iBuyer makes sense for home sellers. Ask Clark topics include: Amount of Roth IRA Contributions That You Can Make For 2021 / Ask Clark: What Is a Backdoor Roth IRA? / SIPC - Securities Investor Protection Corporation / A strong password isn't enough | Here's the best way to protect your online accounts Want more money advice? Sign up for Clark's free daily newsletter! Free Advice: Clark's Consumer Action Center Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

I Don't Get It
EP252: Neighbor Horror Stories

I Don't Get It

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 70:32


It's horror story time again! You think your neighbors are tough to live around? Do they walk into your apartment unannounced and act as if your family room is the complex's common area? Have they stolen your engagement ring? Have they brought you to court because you decided to buy a house? Have they told you that the sound of your laugh is disrupting their day or complain about the time of day you shower? All of these things have happened to the guests on this week's podcast episode. Listen to decide which neighbors would have you scrolling on Zillow for a new place to live. Get 20% off your first order at https://dadgrass.com/getit Get an extended 30 day free trial at https://www.dipseastories.com/getit Download Switchcraft for free and unlock the magical mystery! More podcasts at WAVE: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/artist/wave-podcast-network/1437831426

On Point
AI home-buying and how it could change real estate

On Point

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 47:23


Zillow went on an algorithmic home-buying spree. It didn't work. But what is algorithmic home-buying? We learn the impact AI home-buying is having on the housing market. Gregor Matvos and Jeff Meyers join Meghna Chakrabarti.

Yang Speaks
The Infrastructure Bill, The New University of Austin, and Why Zillow is the Poster Child for Capitalism in 2021

Yang Speaks

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 75:36


Democrats finally pass the infrastructure bill, Bari Weiss launches a university, and Zillow's home-buying algorithm gets them into trouble. Watch this episode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/cHdTxCOgIjw Follow Zach Graumann: https://twitter.com/zach_graumann Follow Andrew Yang: https://twitter.com/andrewyang | https://forwardparty.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth
1681: The Optimal Body Fat Percentage for Building Muscle, Staying Disciplined With Workout & Diet, the Best Intra-Workout Foods & Drinks & More

Mind Pump: Raw Fitness Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 91:39


In this episode, Sal, Adam & Justin discuss whether there is an optimal body fat percentage for building muscle, advice for someone who tends to hop between training programs and diet plans, the benefits of intra workout food & drinks, and how to get over the fear of failing when wanting to become an entrepreneur. Is the pump sometimes overrated? (5:20) Finally, a positive way to give your kids a ‘complex'. (13:03) The Caldera partnership has been fully received by the ‘pump heads'. (19:34) Why we should have exceptions to the rule in the criminal justice system. (22:34) Understanding the excitement surrounding the Metaverse. (26:27) Breaking down the Double-slit experiment and its relation to the simulation. (30:54) Revisiting the Zillow conversation and future of the housing market. (39:39) Yet another reason to increase your financial IQ and resiliency. (50:03) #Quah question #1 – Is there an optimal body fat percentage for building muscle? (58:43) #Quah question #2 – What advice do you have for someone who tends to hop between training programs and diet plans? (1:06:41) #Quah question #3 – What's your take on intra workouts and drinks? What are the benefits of incorporating them, and what are some good options? (1:13:36) #Quah question #4 - How to get over the fear of failing when wanting to become an entrepreneur? (1:18:12) Related Links/Products Mentioned November Promotion: MAPS Anywhere and the Fit Mom Bundle – Both 50% off! **Promo code “NOVEMBER50” at checkout** Mind Pump #1675: Eight Ways To Get The BEST Muscle Pump Visit Paleo Valley for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “Mindpump15” at checkout for 15% discount** Visit Caldera Lab for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Code “mindpump” at checkout for the discount** Man killed his daughter's boyfriend for selling her into sex trafficking ring, police say Microsoft Teams enters the metaverse race with 3D avatars and immersive meetings Double-slit experiment - Wikipedia Nick Bostrom: The Threat Of Artificial Intelligence - Elon Musks Biggest Fear Superintelligence: Paths, Dangers, Strategies – Book by Nick Bostrom Opendoor shares soar on optimism of gains in iBuying after Zillow exit 77% of people who inherit family wealth lose it in less than 3-years Visit Oli Pop for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! **Promo code “mindpump” at checkout for 15% off your first order** Mind Pump #1512: The Value Of Following A Workout Program Mind Pump #1522: How To Stay Consistent With Your Diet & Workout Visit Drink LMNT for an exclusive offer for Mind Pump listeners! Your Next Five Moves: Master the Art of Business Strategy – Book by Patrick Bet-David Mind Pump Podcast – YouTube Mind Pump Free Resources People Mentioned Patrick Bet-David (@patrickbetdavid)  Instagram Robert Kiyosaki (@therealkiyosaki)  Twitter