Podcasts about Dunedin

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    Latest podcast episodes about Dunedin

    RNZ: Saturday Morning
    The global adentures of a lifetlong listener

    RNZ: Saturday Morning

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 19:49


    Recording the sounds of our planet over four decades, American Jim Metzner is an audio legend. Host and producer of one of the longest running science programmes Pulse of the Planet, Metzner has recorded everywhere from Australian cloud forests to Brazilian favelas. The significance of Metzner's work has been acknowledged this month by thousands of his recordings being archived by the US Library of Congress. Metzner is currently visiting the University of Otago as a Fulbright Specialist. He will give a public talk in Dunedin on 6 October. While here he is also working with others to record soundscapes as part of Aotearoa Stories in Sound. Head here to contribute. Metzner recently published his first novel, Sacred Mounds, set among first nation American ancient earthworks.

    Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time
    Question Time for 28 September 2022

    Parliament - Live Stream and Question Time

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 55:02


    Questions to Ministers HELEN WHITE to the Minister of Finance: What recent reports has he seen on the New Zealand economy? CHRISTOPHER LUXON to the Prime Minister: Does she stand by all of her Government's statements and actions? ANGELA ROBERTS to the Minister for ACC: What changes has she announced to ACC? KAREN CHHOUR to the Minister for Children: Does he have confidence in Oranga Tamariki's relationships with staff and contractors? INGRID LEARY to the Minister of Health: What has the Government done recently to improve the availability of emergency mental health respite care in Dunedin? NICOLA WILLIS to the Minister of Finance: Does he agree with Otago University economist Dennis Wesselbaum that the Government's income insurance scheme will "increase unemployment, increase the duration of unemployment, reduce income, increase inequality, and lead to higher inflation"; if so, how can he justify asking Kiwis to pay for it? TAMATI COFFEY to the Minister for the Environment: How has fast-track consenting supported the development of infrastructure in New Zealand, and what reports, if any, has he seen on infrastructure consenting costs outside of the fast-track process? Dr SHANE RETI to the Minister of Health: Can he confirm that the response he gave to the House last week that 29,189 people have been waiting more than four months on the surgical waiting list is the highest number recorded since October 2017, and how many of the 5,513 waiting more than 12 months on that list have presented to an emergency department for that condition while they waited for surgery? Dr GAURAV SHARMA to the Prime Minister: Does she stand by all her Government's statements and actions? MELISSA LEE to the Minister for Broadcasting and Media: Does he stand by all his statements and actions regarding the Aotearoa New Zealand Public Media Bill? Dr ANAE NERU LEAVASA to the Minister of Immigration: What changes has he announced to the Recognised Seasonal Employer scheme? RICARDO MENÉNDEZ MARCH to the Minister for Social Development and Employment: Does she stand by her statement, "the welfare system should not be used as a tool for the justice system"; if so, does she still support the use of the warrant to arrest sanction policy?

    Write Spot with Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature
    Write Spot with Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature - 28-09-2022 - Dunedin Youth Writers Association - Shima Jack

    Write Spot with Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 10:29


    Dunedin Youth Writers Association - Shima Jack Broadcast on Otago Access Radio www.oar.org.nz

    RNZ: Our Changing World
    The prickly prize of ongaonga

    RNZ: Our Changing World

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 34:19


    It's spectacularly spiky and delivers a painful – or even deadly – sting. Why are a team of conservationists growing and planting up Orokonui Ecosanctuary near Dunedin with more and more native tree nettle, ongaonga? It's all because of a pretty little pollinator called the kahukura, or red admiral butterfly, and its prickly preferences. Claire Concannon visits Orokonui to learn more about the ongaonga-kahukura relationship, as well as new research investigating whether these native butterflies are the victims of a sneaky ecological 'trap'.

    SpyCast
    “The Past 75 Years” – with Historian of the CIA Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones

    SpyCast

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 64:39 Very Popular


    Summary Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones (Website; Wikipedia) joins Andrew (Twitter; LinkedIn) to discuss his book. He has studied American intelligence for 50 years. What You'll Learn Intelligence The CIA and the American presidents they served   The founding of the CIA just as America became a global superpower  Pearl Harbor, the USSR and covert action under Eisenhower Assassinations, controversy, the Church Committee, and 9/11 Reflections How much of the future can we predict Intention in history And much, much more… Episode Notes This week's guest, Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones, is Emeritus Professor of American History at the University of Edinburgh. He has been studying American intelligence for half a century and has written a history of the CIA to coincide with its 75th anniversary, entitled: A Question of Standing.    This episode with Rhodri is a counterpoint to last week's episode with Robert Gates: a career historian and a career intelligence officer; a European and an American; a 70,000 feet view and a 30,000 feet one. Interestingly, they were born continents apart within almost a year of each other.   Rhodri is the author of over a dozen books, has a Ph.D. from Cambridge University, and grew up in Harlech, Wales.   And… Harlech, Wales, where Rhodri grew up, has the steepest street in the Northern Hemisphere. The steepest street in the Southern Hemisphere, and the world according to Guinness Records, is in Dunedin, New Zealand (Dunedin is Gaelic for Edinburgh). The steepest street in the continental United States is Canton Avenue in Pittsburgh (to celebrate its Welsh heritage the Steel City has a St. David's Society). Espionage in Welsh is ysbïo. Quote of the Week "CIA can't afford to rest on its laurels and continue with systems it has. It has to change all the time." – Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones Resources *Andrew's Recommendation* “Documents on Origins of CIA,” Truman Library [pdf] *SpyCasts* “The 75th Anniversary” – with Robert Gates (2022) *Beginner Resources* History of CIA, CIA (n.d.) [web] A Brief History of US-Iran Relations, ABC News (n.d.) [video] CIA Involvement in 1953 Iranian Coup, CNN (n.d.] [video] Iran & Guatemala, 1953-4, NYT (2003) [article] Books Covert Action & USFP, L. Johnson (OUP, 2022) A Brief History of the CIA, R. Immerman (Wiley, 2014) The [Dulles] Brothers, S. Kinzer (St. Martin's, 2014) Mighty Wurlitzer: How CIA Played America, H. Wilford (HUP, 2009) Countercoup: Struggle for Iran, K. Roosevelt (McGraw-Hill, 1979) Articles 64 Years Later CIA Releases Details of Iranian Coup, B. Allen-Ebrahimian, FP (2017) Video “The Nazi Spy Ring in America,” R. Jeffreys-Jones, SPY (2021) “Secrecy, Democracy & the Birth of the CIA,” H. Wilford, Great Courses (n.d.) Photo “The 1953 Iranian Coup,” Radio Free Europe Archives (2013) Documentary The Spymasters, Showtime (2015) CIA: Secret Wars, Part 1, Roche (2003) CIA: Secret Wars, Part 2, Roche (2003) Curatorial Pocket History of CIA, CIA (2014) Primary Sources History Staff Analysis: CIA & Guatemala Assassination Proposals, 1952-4 (1995) Iran 1953: Transcript of Interview with MI6 Officer Norman Darbyshire (1985) DCI Dulles to President Eisenhower (1953) Telegram from CIA to Station in Iran (1953) Telegram from Station in Iran to CIA (1953) Monthly Report, Directorate of Plans, CIA (1953) Memo from Deputy Director for Plans (Wisner) to DCI Dulles (1953) National Security Act (1947) Website Intelligence Milestones During Eisenhower Administration, Eisenhower Library (n.d.] *Wildcard Resource* Tom Paine (Common Sense, 1776), Alexis de Tocqueville (Democracy in America, 1835) and Mork from Ork (Mork & Mindy, 1978-82) are all outsiders, like Rhodri, looking in. What can each of them tell us about the United States? What can they tell us that people born within an ecosystem can't?

    #BHN Big Hairy News
    #BHNDunedin | Ep8 | Mandy Mayhem-Bullock for Dunedin City Mayor

    #BHN Big Hairy News

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 80:41


    #BHNDunedin | Ep8 | Mandy Mayhem-Bullock for Dunedin City Mayor Candidate Statement My principal place of residence is in the Dunedin City Council area. I am also standing for Councillor. I am an approachable leader with experience in governance. As Mayor of Dunedin my priorities will include; advocating for climate change solutions and coastal plans for low lying communities; supporting cheap public transport; tackling the housing crisis and working on healthier affordable homes for all residents. I will argue the case for council to be social housing providers. Supporting the cultural and artistic community by enhancing current facilities and safeguarding our venues. I am driven to create a welcoming, inclusive and accessible city where all of its residents feel valued and listened to. I am committed to city growth while protecting the environment and the well being of all our people. Dunedin needs good decision making -I will lead a professional and collaborative Council that listens and engages. A Council that takes a holistic and strategic approach to decisions, considering social, cultural, environmental and economic well being. For the people.

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Dunedin council keen for inter-regional passenger rail

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 5:10


    Imagine hopping aboard a train from Christchurch to Dunedin. Dunedin City Council's keen to see it. It's called for a business case to get passenger rail back on track, with services to and from Mosgiel, Christchurch and Invercargill. At today's meeting 12 councillors said full steam ahead, with one voting against. Dunedin Mayor Aaron Hawkins talks to Nick Truebridge.  

    RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan
    Crimes NZ: Sophie Elliott murder

    RNZ: Afternoons with Jesse Mulligan

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 25:56


    For Crimes NZ this week, we look back at the horror killing of young Dunedin woman, Sophie Elliott. Since her death at the hands of her former partner, an Otago University tutor, her family have been tirelessly campaigning for changes to prevent another case like hers. 

    #BHN Big Hairy News
    #BHNDunedin | Ep10 | Jett Groshinski for Dunedin City Mayor

    #BHN Big Hairy News

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 64:44


    #BHNDunedin | Ep10 | Jett Groshinski for Dunedin City Mayor Candidate Statement My principal place of residence is in the Dunedin City Council area. I am also standing for Councillor. Kia Ora, my name is Jett Groshinski, I'm a fellow Dunedinite and student here at the University of Otago. I first came to Dunedin in 2014 in which time I have seen how our wonderful city has evolved. My partner and I live in Helensburgh, and my two younger sisters are at Dunedin North Intermediate and Logan Park High School. Dunedin is at a crossroads where there are lots of changes happening to local government and now is a more important time than ever to vote for who you think will represent your needs. There are challenges and opportunities in Dunedin's future, and we need a collaborative, intergenerational leadership to create a sustainable and equitable future Dunedin today. More transparency, climate change action, representation for all, sustainability practices, improved parking, recycling, road safety and community involvement all need to be priorities for the city.

    #BHN Big Hairy News
    #BHNDunedin | Ep9 | Aaron Hawkins for Dunedin City Mayor

    #BHN Big Hairy News

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 89:42


    #BHNDunedin | Ep9 | Aaron Hawkins for Dunedin City Mayor Candidate Statement My principal place of residence is in the Dunedin City Council area. It has been a privilege to serve as your Mayor, and I'm asking for your support to continue for another three years. Over the next ten years and beyond, we'll see billions of dollars of investment pumped into Dunedin. Our job is to grab that opportunity, and use it to shape a city that can look after its people - and our planet - for generations to come. A city that is accessible, inclusive, and welcoming. That builds more public housing, and a 21st century transport network. That tackles the causes, and effects, of our changing climate head on. And that does these things in ways that reflect our commitment to the Treaty of Waitangi. My commitment to you is to keep going with the work we've started. To keep revitalising Ötepoti Dunedin. And to ensure we are ready to face the future in a sustainable and inclusive way.

    The Mike Hosking Breakfast
    Aaron Hawkins: Dunedin Mayor says there is local demand for southern passenger rail

    The Mike Hosking Breakfast

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 4:16


    The call is out to bring passenger rail back in the south. Dunedin City Council has approved a submission to central government calling for the return of passenger rail between Christchurch, Dunedin and Invercargill. The Southerner express service ran between the three cities until 2002. Mayor Aaron Hawkins told Mike Hosking they know there's demand locally for this service. He says people are increasingly in search of options to travel around the country, without flying or driving. LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    #BHN Big Hairy News
    #BHNDunedin | Ep7 | Lee Vandervis for Dunedin City Mayor

    #BHN Big Hairy News

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 97:48


    #BHNDunedin | Ep7 | Lee Vandervis for Dunedin City Mayor Candidate Statement My principal place of residence is in the Dunedin City Council area. I am also standing for Councillor. As your independent Mayor free from Old-Boy or Party-Political pressures, I will fight to keep our $3 billion 3 Waters assets from Government/Iwi takeover, keep our One-Way traffic flowing, optimise more parking and ensure that Councillors know what most people want with regular informal referendums. I will promote Vibrant Dunedin and use my long Councillor and business experience to attract investment, get real returns from Council Companies, stop rates and debt increases of $100 million annually, defer $100 million+ of planned cycleways through George st, Princes st, Uni etc, and get progress on stalled decisions like Stadium use, Unitary Council, Sammy's, Mayfair Theatre, and Taieri Gorge Railway (that has been costing us $2.5 million annually just to mothball). Dunedin's glorious past shows that we can have a glorious future if we: encourage development rather than retreat (as with South Dunedin), open smaller easier contracts to everyone, and ensure Democratic decisions.

    Dunedin Multi Ethnic Council On Air
    Dunedin Multi Ethnic Council On Air - 27-09-2022 - Youth - Medical Imaging

    Dunedin Multi Ethnic Council On Air

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2022 26:30


    Youth - Medical Imaging. Broadcast on OAR FM Dunedin oar.org.nz

    Bookenz
    Bookenz - Paddy Richardson and Elizabeth Morton

    Bookenz

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 26:07


    Morrin chats with Dunedin author Paddy Richardson about her latest book 'By the Green of the Spring' and to poet Elizabeth Morton about her latest collection 'Naming the Beasts'

    Magic's Rural Exchange Catchup
    REX Saturday 24th September

    Magic's Rural Exchange Catchup

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 90:32


    This is The Rural Exchange Podcast for Saturday the 24th of September, with Hamish McKay & Rebecca Greaves, On this episode…  we put the spotlight on the dairy industry with NZX Head of Analytics Julia Jones…  We look at a joint initiative between NZ and Australia to boost training programmes in the wool sector…   And we put the spotlight on Dunedin agritech company OmniEye…  You can also listen to Rural Exchange on TodayFM Saturdays & Sundays 6 - 8amSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    Magic's Rural Exchange Catchup
    Grey Peyroux - OmniEye Chief Executive

    Magic's Rural Exchange Catchup

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 9:28


    Dunedin agritech company OmniEye has been selected as a finalist in the Fieldays Innovation Awards for the Growth and Scale category, so we found out what they're all about from Chief Executive Grey Peyroux.   See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    RNZ: The Detail
    Local elections: Three races you should know about

    RNZ: The Detail

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 26:40


    Outside our bigger cities, Aotearoa's smaller centres are seeing stacked races and fraught local issues.

    RNZ: Morning Report
    Man who died after reaction to Covid-19 vaccine should have been informed of risk - parents

    RNZ: Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 6:47


    The parents of Dunedin plumber Rory Nairn say their son was failed by health authorities. A coroner this week ruled the 26-year-old died in November last year as a result of myocarditis caused by the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine. The inquest heard that the pharmacist who vaccinated him wasn't aware of the risks of myocarditis and never warned him. Brett and Chris Nairn have spoken out for the first time about what happened to their son. They say the death of a woman in August last year from myocarditis should have been treated with greater urgency but instead authorities seemed more worried about creating vaccine hesitancy. The couple told RNZ Otago-Southland reporter, Timothy Brown, the coroner's findings simply confirmed what they had known since finding Rory dead at his home. Myocarditis is rare following vaccination, with international data showing 1 to 13 cases per 100,000 vaccine doses. It's a rare disease caused by many things, including viral infection and about 95 people with myocarditis are seen in hospitals in New Zealand each year. It is also treatable, with better outcomes the earlier symptoms are picked up and acted on.

    Kilts and Kiwis
    Kilts and Kiwi - 23-09-2022

    Kilts and Kiwis

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 110:42


    Blowing Bubbles
    Blowing Bubbles - 21-09-2022 - 433 - Intergenerational Bubble Systems - Elliot Weir

    Blowing Bubbles

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 56:12


    433 - Intergenerational Bubble Systems - Elliot Weir in Dunedin joins Samuel Mann in Sawyers Bay and Mawera Karetai in Whakatāne. With a contribution from Tahu Mackenzie. This show was broadcast on OAR 105.4FM Dunedin - oar.org.nz

    Two Chairs Talking
    Episode 80: Finding a place in the world

    Two Chairs Talking

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 78:07


    With co-host Perry still overseas, David discusses some recent awards and goes on to interview Rob Gerrand about writing and publishing in Australia, and then Murray MacLachlan about growing up in New Zealand and discovering science fiction and fantasy. Introduction (00:21) General News (03:31) 2022 Hugo Award Winners (01:05) David's Thoughts on the 2022 Hugos (00:44) 2022 Astounding Award (00:31) 2022 British Fantasy Awards (00:21) 2022 Davitt Awards (00:44) Interview with Rob Gerrand (30:02) The Millennium Job by Rob Gerrand (09:34) How to publish a novel (02:00) The Diplomat of Florence by Anthony Wildman (02:56) Charm, Strangeness, Mass & Spin by Stephen Dedman (05:18) The Future of Norstrilia Press (08:48) Publishing through Substack (00:39) Interview with Murray MacLachlan (43:28) Growing up in Dunedin, New Zealand (01:39) The ages of reading (01:46) Dangerous Visions and New Worlds by Andrew Nette et al. (01:28) The House at Pooh Corner by A. A. Milne (01:39) Anderson's Bay (01:40) Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea by Jules Verne (00:51) Tales from the Galaxies by Amabel Williams-Ellis (00:54) Children's library in Dunedin (01:19) Star Rangers by Andre Norton (00:12) Wumpworld by Bill Peet (00:50) Tintin by Hergé (00:06) Asterix the Gaul by René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo (00:37) Non-fiction (00:30) Chariots of the Gods by Eric Von Daniken (01:05) Librarians (00:17) The Ruins of Earth by Thomas Disch (01:41) Bullying (01:57) Comet in Moominland by Tove Janssen (00:34) The library (00:41) Noumenon (fanzine) (00:25) Discovering fannish community in NZ (00:17) National Association of Science Fiction (00:51) Aotereapa (03:01) Phillip Mann (02:08) Early New Zealand SF writing (01:03) Leaving Dunedin (00:56) Space Time Bucaneers (fanzine) by Ian Gunn (00:29) Attending conventions (01:22) Coming to Australia (00:53) Nova Mob (03:57) Galaxy Books and Bernard Brosnan (01:15) The Square Root of Man by William Tenn (00:14) Nine Hundred Grandmothers by R. A. Lafferty (00:21) The Dragon Masters by Jack Vance (00:26) The Futurological Congress by Stanisław Lem (00:14) The Ballad of Beta Two & Empire Star by Samuel R. Delany (00:09) The Unlimited Dream Company by J. G. Ballard (00:32) Collected Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges (00:40) Tales of the Arabian Nights by Richard Francis Burton (00:26) Underground comics (00:57) Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien (00:44) Conclusion (01:01) Link to unabridged version of this interview on SoundCloud Windup (00:20) Click here for more info and indexes Illustration generated by Wombo.art

    UBC News World
    Get Healthy In Dunedin, FL With New Yoga, Dance & Fitness Weekly Group Classes

    UBC News World

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 2:25


    Sign up for your first yoga class at Studio 131 (727-386-9639) in Dunedin, Florida. The welcoming and buzzy Largo, FL studio has more class options than ever. Go to https://studio131.info (https://studio131.info) to find out more.

    MS Momentum
    MS Momentum - 20-09-2022 - Dunedin Public Library Digital Services - Irene

    MS Momentum

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 26:11


    Dunedin Public Library Digital Services - Irene. Broadcast on OAR 105.4FM Dunedin www.oar.org.nz

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Dunedin man's death rare reaction to Covid-19 vaccine - coroner

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 2:55


    A coroner has ruled Dunedin plumber, Rory Nairn, died from myocarditis caused by the Pfizer Covid-19 vaccine. However, an immunologist says the tragedy shouldn't change how people view the vaccine. Timothy Brown reports.

    Meet Us On Main Street
    Top 5 Dunedin Activities

    Meet Us On Main Street

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 22:34


    We're Back Baby!! Season 4 brings our top picks for things to do, see and be in the local area. This weeks topic is Top Dunedin Activities. The episode is also loaded with fun Dunedin facts. Please excuse our dust as we are rusty from our hiatus. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/meetusonmainstreet/support

    The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
    Markus Stitz - Great British Gravel Rides

    The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 43:27 Very Popular


    This week we sit down with author and adventurer, Markus Stitz to discuss his new book, Great British Gravel Rides. Markus explores gravel cycling in Great Britain through the eyes of local gravel cyclists to discover amazing routes throughout the region. Markus Stitz Website  Episode Sponsor: Trek Travel - Come join us on the Girona Gravel Tour November 6th, 2022.  Support the Podcast Join The Ridership  Automated Transcription, please excuse the typos: Great British Gravel Rides [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: This week on the podcast. We welcome Marcus. Stets the author of great British gravel rides, a book of 25 routes throughout England, Wales and Scotland. . That brings us through the varied terrain in great Britain, through the eyes of community members throughout the aisle each route was designed by a gravel cyclists from that region. In an attempt to get the best. Gravel routes across England, Scotland and Wales. I enjoyed the conversation a lot and i enjoyed the approach to the book and i hope you will too Before we get started. I need to thank this week. Sponsor truck travel and the Girona gravel bike tour. Trek has been offering the Girona gravel bike tour for a number of years. And you may remember an episode I recorded with them about Yorona and what a gem it is for cycling in general, but more specifically gravel. I've been hoping and wanting to go over there myself for a number of years. And I'm excited to say that I'm going to be joining the November 6th trip. And I'd like you to join me. Yeah, I'm not kidding. Take a step back. You can do this. Come join me and ride gravel bikes in Girona trucks. Got everything organized for us from an, a wonderful hotel, right in the center of Girona as well as access to track bicycles to explore the countryside, we've got local guides that have designed amazing routes for us. So we're going to sample everything the region has to offer in this trip. I can't wait to get over there in November and I'm hoping you'll be able to join me too. It'll be so good to paddle with some of you listeners and members of the ridership community. I know we've got a handful of people signed up already and I would love to fill the hotel with people we know and love. As a special bonus, truck's going to give anybody who registers via the podcast or the ridership or free handlebar bag with their trip. So make sure when you go visit Trek, travel.com search Jarana gravel bike tour and mentioned the podcast during your registration process. There's a number of dates this year remaining, but I will be on the November 6th trip. So I'm hoping we can shape the demand and drive you to that trip. We'll have a great time. And I look forward to seeing you there. Remember that's www.trektravel.com. Search Girona gravel bike tour. With that said let's jump right into my conversation with marcus about the great british gravel rides Marcus welcome to the show. [00:02:28] Markus: Hello. [00:02:30] Craig Dalton: It's good to connect with you. I was super excited when I caught wind of this great, great Britain, gravel rides book that you penned and excited to learn a little bit more about your background as a cyclist, and what led to your passion to take on this project and do a great job kind of going throughout Britain and laying out some amazing roots for people. [00:02:51] Markus: Yeah. It's like, it's been an amazing project to work on and especially like, cuz I guess people who live in Britain have, you know, have a better idea of the country. But if you, if you're outside the country, it's such a diverse place. Like it's, it's, you know, from north to south, I think I've been to many countries in the world and it's like, it's, it's difficult to find a country, which is, which is gotten so many different places too, right. In terms of the conditions, but also the people. So my idea was really to kind of look at the community. With all the different shapes and forms it comes and, and, and do a book about it and, and recommend roots to people. Pretty much as an inspiration. [00:03:35] Craig Dalton: Yeah, I think that was a super interesting approach and look forward to getting into it with. Before we get started. Why don't we give the listener just a little bit about an idea about your background as a cyclist. [00:03:46] Markus: Yeah. So I, I think I generally came to cycling. I, I started cycling as a child. I grew up in Germany and you kind of know I'm cycling as default, I think. And I I'd never been in any cycling clubs and I wouldn't call myself like a keen cyclist when I was a child. And then pretty much picked up a mountain bike in, in my years at the university, cuz I lived in a place which had like pretty extensive for is a bit like what you possibly. Which comes really close to north American travel or the idea what we have, like big metal roads and, you know, loads of pine fors and all pretty straightforward. So it was a quite great location to, to be based and then do that. And then I finished university and went to New Zealand and. Think that spare really picked up the cycle, touring adventure, cycling mountain biking buck spent two years in Wellington, brilliant location. New Zealand in general is, is just a, a fascinating place to ride and is also one of those places like. There's. Yeah, there's, there's, there's so much outdoor possibilities and you, you know, you wouldn't, you wouldn't come to New Zealand. I would presume if you want like big city life or you want all the belts and visits of massive cities like New York or LA or whatever. I think I really like the, the mixture between having an outdoorsy life, but also still having a bit of a city lifestyle. Wellington is a capital store. Yeah. We enjoyed it. There did loads of cycling over there. And then. In my time in Wellington, I also decided in some shape or form I want to do around the world trip cycling around the world. And the initial idea was, was just a circus. So I finished my time in in Wellington and moved back to Europe. I moved to Edinburg. And while I was in Edinburgh, I had this idea, or maybe I could cycle from Edinburgh to Dunedin. Dunedin is one of the Southern cities in New Zealand. Then it's the old name for Edinburg. So there's interesting connection there. A lot of settled in that part of New Zealand. So like I could a trip from Edburg to dun and then. At some stage, I think that developed further to say, look, if I'm doing half the world anyway, I might as well do the other as well. [00:05:57] Craig Dalton: And when you, when you were approaching that Marcus, like, were you thinking at that point, like pedaling around the world is something I specifically want to do or were you more, I just wanna travel and experience different cultures and different parts of the world. [00:06:13] Markus: yeah, I think it's a travel aspect, which is which, which was the most important one. Like, and that's like, I think this is coming. I think if you look at all my work so far, like I'm I'm, I would certainly say like, for me, cycling is an amazing tool to connect with people. Like if you look at. Any cycling community. It doesn't matter which one you're looking at. I think they're all slightly different, but I think what they all have in common people who ride bike, speak to each. This is, this is I thing it's, it's like, and they either speak about bikes or you, you know, you just happen to have the same mode of transport. You talk about something else. And, and, and, and for me, that was the important one. I, you know, I was thinking about whether I'm gonna go this. I don't think there's, well, there is no single speed record for going around the world and I could have set that record. Like it would've been an easy task to do because there isn't such a thing. But that wasn't important for me that never played in my mind. I was just like, you know, it will be, you know, it'd be an interesting thing to do, but it would take away from the trip. So for me around the world trip was to meet interesting people. I met so many. Amazing people in New Zealand simply by being friends with a couple of guys that worked in a bike shop and they kind of introduced me to the cycling community in New Zealand. And when I back went back to, to Scotland, it was kind of the same. It was interesting. I came back to Scotland at night. Initially, didn't bring my bikes over to Edinburg and it was the first thing I missed. I was just like, I want my bikes here. There's such a convenient way to get around, but also to make friends if you place, that was the main, that was the main consideration. So yeah, it was, it was like, and is possibly, I guess a lot of people ask why singles speak? Why, why do you take a singles speak bike? And. I guess the most important reason for that one is you don't have to, you don't really need to care about your bike. Like, you know, it's got a chain which needs replacing every now and then there's no F around the bike. It was a pretty straightforward built. You know, everything was rock solid. Most of them were parts were steel. So, you know, like even, even transporting the bike by plane was super easy. Cuz it just Chuck it in a box. There's no area that bends or any, any other expensive part. So yeah, I think that was the, that is the kind of, and yeah, that comes across very clearly in the book right now as well. Like I'm, I'm always, there's always people first, you know, it's about. Is about the community and, and how I connect with them. And, you know, cycling is great. I really enjoy cycling. But I would, I don't think I'd be enjoying just the cycling bit as much as, as I do with the people, [00:08:58] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I mean, I think that's a big element that everybody talks about with our enjoyment of gravel. It's twofold. It's one just sort of getting off the beaten path and two, the community and the friendliness of it all. I think it's just at least today it exceeds any other form. Any other side of the sport of cycling? I don't think you just, you don't get the camaraderie that you do on the gravel side of. [00:09:20] Markus: Yeah. Yeah. And this, I mean, just on my, it's interesting to look back on around the world trip, cuz I was on the mountain bike. So I was on a SERE, which is, you know, it's a hard tail. You can, yeah, it's a typical, hard to mountain bike built. Basically. You could put some, I didn't have suspension forks, but it, you know, you could write a bit of suspension fork as well. But if I look back now and interestingly enough, I went Toor in Kansas. And I wasn't, I wasn't aware of, well, now I'm going, but back then dirty. And I wasn't really aware of that and impor and called Hedman and he introduced me to the whole Yeah, the Kansas travel community. It was awesome. It was amazing. I think there's still a, we picture in one of the pups of me and sitting, there was really sore on that. Kansas is flat a pancake and it isn't it's, it's just, that's a trade lie because the east of Kansas is very, very. The for the west, you get the, you know, the, the, the fluter it gets, but yeah, cycling along the east of is no piece of cake at all, but it's just the kinda thing. And so I kind got introduced to the idea of, I heard, you know, I had heard about bikes, but you could, you know, you might as well argue that I've a bike around the world is just, just to different bars. They have Jones's bars and instead of bars, like, and yeah, it's the, I think it's the least. There's no real conventions yet. There's no, there isn't really anything that you kind of, you don't have to have a certain thing to, to identify as Scrabble, cyclists, but you know, and that, that's the nice thing about it. It's a bit like. It's like, for me, it feels like I would've been, I, I, I would've loved to be there when mountain biking developed in Mo county. And, you know, kind of was literally about people kind of riding around on bikes, having a good time [00:11:27] Craig Dalton: Yeah. [00:11:27] Markus: doing some, doing some crazy things and not really caring about conventions whatsoever. And I think we are mid travel cycling. It's nice to be in the middle. You know, I think if I think things keep coming back, it's like the early days of the tour farms as well, which I, I basically think later foundations of what you now call ultra cycling. You know, again, there's people, you know, people just having a good time being, you know, also being ambitious about thing. And you can, you can, you can say the thing about mountain biking as well. You know, those things develop. And I think we're there with travel cycling at the moment, which is great to be right in the thick of it. No doubt. I think it will at some stage diversify as well. You know, we've got suspension forks. Now we basically have mountain bike tires now onto level bikes, but that's okay. You know, I think it's, you know, this is, this is the evolution where things go, but just being there right there right now is quite. [00:12:27] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's certainly one of the impetus behind this podcast, beginnings was it was just such an exciting time. I thought in the sport of cycling and someone, as you know, I'd been around cycling my whole life yet. I still made mistakes when I bought my first gravel bike and realized like, oh, I didn't set it up the way I should, or I didn't make the choices I should. And I was like, if I've been around bikes and worked in bike shops and worked in the bike industry and I still managed to screw up this Purchas. There's a lot of people and a lot of questions and fast forward three years, I, I still find myself having interesting conversations with product designers and seeing interesting innovations and new options that just allow people to personalize this equipment to wherever they call home or whatever they're intending to do. [00:13:11] Markus: Yeah. And, and I think it is, I think it, it has made pretty big leaps as well. If I, I think one thing for me, which sticks out is tires. Like if I, if I look back in. So I , I think if you wanna put an official day to it, when I started travel, riding was in 2017 when I had a LER and mapped the first bike packing route in Scotland. And I know back then, I mean, your choice of tires was the 30 yard, the bike. And I could have gone for a Schal G one old round and there were a few other. Tires kicking around on the market. But if you look at right now, just 12 alone has seven different travel tires. Whoa. You know, and, and not speaking about any of the mountain bike tires, you can now, you know, if you look at a fast rolling waste tire for a mountain bike, you can stick that on a co bike these days cuz the, you know, the clearance is wide enough to, to ride those. And so I think this is where you see like how much. You know how quickly the market or the, the, the industry has progressed in, in, in those kind of aspects. So a choice is, is, is huge right now. And yeah, it's, it's, it's great. But I also think, you know, I think it's interesting because I think one thing the book of working on the book has kind of like forced me to do, and I had a keen interest as well. It's just kind of, and, and this is, I think this is where Britain is really interesting is to kinda look back to. You know, what, what you can now call pu writing, where, where did it start? And if you look at Britain, like it started in the 1920s here, cause there's been the rough. So there's been an organization called the rough stuff fellowship. And that that's, if you wanna sum it up, is people starting to ride bikes? Off the beaten track in, in rails, in England and Scotland and various things. And you know, back then, there weren't really any Tomic roads. I don't think, you know, I don't think they had the intention. Like there, there weren't deliberately riding off road, but there they did ride them off road because there was literally no other network. To use there weren't any Timex cycling paths. You know, there were a few roads back then, but not nearly as much as you have these days and they just simply rode their bikes wherever they're placed to go. And I, I think like, I have that in the introduction of my book for me, that's kind of like where it all originates. And then you look at Australia, you look at the Overlands who, again, like this is like possibly the very early stages of bike, you know, who went from a to B I think it's tricky, cuz I think what we have now is modern crab bikes. They are definitely much more advanced I'm riding at the moment. I'm riding a 1970s club Butler bike. So it's one of those bikes, you know, that, that people potentially took when there were rough stuffing and. It's awesome. Fun to ride. I'm really enjoying it for a challenge, but you also see, you know, if you've got a modern gravel bike gear, I mean, this is much more forgiving. Like I was talking to a friend about that, this breaks, for example, whoa. Like they made such a difference, especially if you ride in Scotland, you know, if you've got wind breaks and you're going down the long downhill, you have to. Three times on the downhill, because otherwise you just, your, your ribs are afterwards. So, you know, things like this, which I found is super like you, I think the concept, I think there's also two, there's interesting. Two things to clever writing. I think there's clever riding as a concept of off. And then there's bikes, you know, which. Possibly are what we, what we have now as clever bikes, truck bars, you know, a geometry, which is possibly closer to a road bike than it is to a mountain bike. Tie with, I don't think you can define that any longer, because it's been going up and up and, you know, I don't think we're far off having, I don't know if we're ever gonna get the tweet inch tiles on the bike we might do. Who knows, but I think it's kind of in my book really much picking up on the idea of travel writing as a concept. It's why, when I, when people were asking me, well, like, oh, do I need to have a travel bike? Then it was like, Take whatever bike you think is suitable off road. Bear in mind that the people who will be reading this will potentially be riding this on a 45 millimeter tire to bar bike. So, you know, there shouldn't be any, any severe to above or whatever in there. But if you ride that on a clever bike, or if you take your full as mountain bike or whatever bike, your, your thing is suit. Please do that. I'm not gonna, I'm not gonna restrict anything to that concept. [00:17:56] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I thought that I saw that note at the beginning of your book and I think that's spot on. It's like ride. What you have, gravel is more about the sensation, the community. Exploration, all these different ideas above and beyond the type of bike you actually are throwing a leg over. [00:18:13] Markus: Yeah. Yeah. And this is, and yeah, and, and that, especially in Britain, this , there's many terrains. You can ride your bike over, [00:18:22] Craig Dalton: Yeah. Yeah, exactly. So just finishing your, your sort of backstory, you finished the round of the world trip, and then obviously like you continue to be inspired by the sport. Of mountain biking and did some other big adventures. [00:18:36] Markus: Yeah, I think that, so, I mean, if you look at my career, if you want to call it such, I've always been a person who's been, I've been, always been inspired by many things. Like I, you know, I can't, I didn't have a straightforward career path. I did a multitude of things in my life. And when I came back from the round the world trip, but basically I had a, I had a decision to make what I'm gonna do right now. Am I gonna go back to a nine to five? I never had a nine to five job as such, but, you know, am I gonna go back to to employment and let someone else paying my wages and I'll do my fair bit, or am I gonna use all the experience I have from the, around the world trip? Cause I think what the around the world trip has really taught me is to. You can take so much stuff out of a year on the bike, into, into the life afterwards, you know, it's about leadership. It's about decision making. It's about adapting to new environ. And so I had all of, you know, all of that came with the trip. It wasn't, it wasn't just about riding a bicycle. And I felt like, you know, you can, it's gonna be a tough one to start something new. No doubt about that. But. I'm in a good position to be there. So I started working freelance and, and I have designed a route around Edinburg before I left the world. And the feedback for that was great. And I felt like, well, I'm just gonna up there and this, you know, try to establish myself as. Yeah, offering something else in a tourism industry, tourism back then in Scotland was basically bikes didn't happen, you know, bike route. Didn't really happen either. And I thought like, you know, if I can, if I can make a living out of, of, of really pushing Scotland ahead in terms of cycling route and whatever, then that'd be a great thing. And my, my background before I was marketing so if you combine around the world, trip an interest in developing new roots and having the marketing background, because in the end of the day, You know, a roots only interesting if people know about it and, and actually write it, there's nothing, nothing worse in designing a great route and no one knows about it and no people are not using it. So I kind checked that all in one goal and then also found myself cause I wanted to have a little bit of financial acuity. So I accepted a two day a week marketing role at the book festival. Back then we we're going back then. And with the idea of writing it, because I always thought like, cool. If I ever gonna write a book, it will be, would be quite good to have some, some connections in the book trade and in the book world and kinda do that. So that job paid to rent and the, the other work was kind of like, whatever focus I make that direction is gonna be great. And those were the early days of bike in Scotland and, and yeah, that's pretty much progressed since 2017 and yeah. I don't know, my, my life's taken some interesting turns. I think right now I'm sitting here possibly quite a few people know my films, which is, which is great when I started that. I would've never thought that I've written the book now I've worked with several councils and destination marketing organizations in Scotland to really help them to understand cycling and understand cycle tubing and then, and developing products for them that they can actually put to people and say, look, if you wanna come to this part of Scotland, this is what you can do. And we help you doing this. And, and that's kind of in a nutshell, this with bike packing Scotland, and this it's not just. It's not just mood planning. It's not just filmmaking. It's not just bike, you know, it's like, there's a mixture of, of all the different things and yeah, it's been a, it's been a great journey. [00:22:13] Craig Dalton: Amazing. So let's, let's talk a little bit about the book. So you, you, you've sort of endeavored to kind of cover Scotland, England, and Wales, and give gravel riders a view of the entire country, the landscape through not only your eyes, but the eyes of, of very diverse set of athletes, which, as I mentioned earlier, I thought was a really refreshing approach. Because one of the things in, in my mind, these roots that we find online, they lack personality, right? You're getting a GPX file and you're, you're seeing where something goes, but it's very hard to understand what that's going to feel like. It's very hard to get data on, you know, what kind of bike tires do I need? What kind of equipment do I need for these. Or even more importantly, like what are the communities gonna be like when I go through them? And, you know, part that's part of the reason I started a community called the ridership, because I just, I wanted an online forum to be able to connect with riders around the world and just get that real world beta, you know, so if I'm going to Scotland, I wanna talk to someone who's ridden these roads and trails and just give you a few of the inside tips about what's going on. So I'd love for you to just kind of talk about. Why you decided to approach it that way and what it meant to you and how you connected with the, the numerous athletes that helped you design roots throughout the country. [00:23:34] Markus: Yeah, so I think there's this, this, there there's two basic thoughts I had on the back of my head when I started researching a book, I think the nice thing about clever writing that it seems to be attracting much more women into this sport than, than other. Than other sports in general do. I, I do think that road cycling, although this is changing and it's a good thing to see it changing, but I still feel that road cycling is such a male dominated domain of cycling, you know, and, and, and mountain biking is more diverse. I think by its very nature, but you know, still I was looking at many cycling magazines and thought like, why is there, why is there always a male, a man in his forties with white shoulders looking angry on the form of the cover? You know, it's just, it didn't really like, it, it didn't appeal to me. And I felt like, you know, I think I, I think it's particularly hard and, and, and I guess it's the same in the us. We've seen. We've seen cycling, attracting quite a lot of new people, thankfully. And there was mainly two to, to, to the COVID restrictions and people, all of a sudden recognized I can't do anything, but I can still jump on a bicycle and have a good time. So it was possibly one of the, it was one of the good things coming out of a pandemic, but. I always feel like we didn't really cater for the people who are new to the sport. And, and, and we also didn't really cater for, for, for people of a different ethnic background. It's, you know, is just like, I, I think it was always a bit too narrow and one thing I've found on around the world trip. That's the cool thing. If you go to different countries, you see how a diverse cycling actually is, you know, how like how, how, how it switches. And that's one thing I wanted to have in there. And then the other thing I was really keen on as well is. It's public transport. Like you gets a really bad reputation in Britain most of the times, and it's nowhere near ideal. I was, I was born in Germany. And my girlfriend dips in Norway. So there's this, this, this, this country is in the world, which do much, much better at that, but it, I also think that. We're still doing okay. In this country. so I felt like, right. Okay. I want people to get to those places, ideally by train or by bus. So they don't have to own a car. If they own a car. That's fine. There's nothing, there's nothing wrong with that, but it shouldn't be, it shouldn't be a pre-condition of riding your bike, having to get to those places by car. I want to have a nice mixture of mood. So I want some easy ones in there. I want also some really gnarly ones in there because you know, whoever's gonna buy the book. They'll be at different stages in their cycling thing cycling career or whatever you wanna call it. And I also want to have landscapes in there, which are where you representative of Britain as such a diverse country. And you can kind of imagine there's a lot of logistic. Kind of like, so I came up with this metrics of kind of like, ideally. This is kind of what I feel the book should be looked like. And then, and then, and then I feel like, well, I know a few people already Jenny and mark Beaumont and a couple of other people featured in the book. So this is gonna be a great starting point, but then I really want to reach out to people, which I don't know, you know, but to wide travel byte is the only. Or not even ride travel bikes, you know, they, you happen to be riding off road. I would ly keep it as, as, as, as far as that. And yeah. And then with the help of, of My connections with the sponsors of the book, I was just building this list of people and then the other, I think the additional challenge was also that I kind of needed to slot them in. So I did the book research within other projects as well. So yeah, and, and, and it, it turned out to work pretty well. Like I was, I was fascinated by the thing and I guess the, the big takeaway for me was. It kind of felt a little bit being transferred back to the process of the round, the world trip, you know, I think around the world trip. Very much. So the, I, I did ride my bike during the day. And then in the evening I was really looking forward to speak to people, have a conversation. And, and the nice thing about this book research was so there were some people I knew and you know, we rode our bikes together and, you know, it felt like, you know, being out on a great ride with a, with a friend, you unseen for ages. And then there were the new people in the book, which I didn't know much about it. And it, that was quite as well because, you know, Takes five to 10 minutes. And then you kind of know roughly what you wanna talk about. You know, you wanna talk about the roots and, and the nice thing about this poetry. It really felt like they are taking me on their favorite roots. And they're really showing me their neck of the roots, not from a tourist perspective, but from a local's perspective, this is where a white. This is a cool cafe. You should be going to cuz they've got amazing priorities. This is the proper we should be stopping at. And, and I think that made the whole experience so much richer. And, and ultimately also I think for the reader, you know, they, I think one thing I always miss like not so much cycling guidebooks, but if you look at places guide books like lonely planet or, you know, one of the big ones. I think with lonely planet, you used to get a really authentic experience. You know, it is debatable what the world authentic actually means, but you don't get these days. I don't think so. You know, you'd be shuttled into a range of accommodation and some places, and it's a bit hit or miss some places are good. Some of them. Not so much. , you know, and I think with this approach, I was kind of my, my, my pitch to people was just like, show me around your negative woods. Take me to the cool places. You know, like take me around as you would have a great ride that it is for you. And that also came up with very different approaches. You know, I had guy who speaked guy Kek. He's super fast so we kinda went fulling to the, to the tee shop, had an iced tea, and then we went fulling again. It was great. You know, it was like, there was a thing, whereas there were other approaches where everything was a bit slower and, and a bit more relaxed and, and yeah. And yeah, I really lost the process. It was just really personable. [00:30:09] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it's super interesting. I remember in the early days of the pandemic, when a lot of the big gravel events in the United States were getting canceled, one in particular, put a call out to kind of friends and people in the community to do a virtual event on the day of their race. And what I thought was the output of that exercise is that all around the country, you have these routes created by people who absolutely love the sport and absolutely love where they live. So it was just basically, I described it as sort of a, a love letter to the gravel cycling community [00:30:43] Markus: yeah. [00:30:44] Craig Dalton: this route. And it sounds like you got a lot of that out of this experience and this process that you entered for this. [00:30:51] Markus: Yeah. Yeah. And it was like, I mean, the pandemic pandemic played. I mean, it played a key role in the book because it was, I mean, the whole idea was, was based out of, I don't know, I've stopped counting how many lockdowns we went through in the process. And cause I initially thought like I didn't. I wouldn't say I had an idea of a book in my head and when the whole thing kicked off, I was just like, maybe this is exactly the right time to do a book. Because for me writing a book was always, there was always taking, there was always something else that was taking priority. Cuz it's a big daunting project, you know? It's like I spend about it. Yeah. Like a good part of a year doing this book. If. Count in all the things and it's, you know, it, it does take, especially the writing. It really takes you. You really need to sit down and kind of write. I'm just gonna concentrate on that. And it's, you know, it's just like, it's, it's easier to do smaller projects, no doubt. But yeah, when it all kicked off, I was like, okay, if there's something good about this, You possibly find time to do this now because you'll be less distracted by other stuff you can't, there's no such thing. And, and also when you, when I, I think the interesting thing about bikes is that when we were sitting in our living rooms or in, you know, in the best case scenario or with our garden and having a bit of nature around us . All the bikes, all the other bikes are quite difficult to ride from your front door. You can ride a road bike if you happen to live in a place that has some nice roads and is not too busy. You can ride a mountain bike if you happen to live next to mountain bike trails. But. I would say for the majority of people, like there was always something, you know, for roads, either the roads are too busy or the mountain bike twelves they're okay. But you, you know, they're not great. And with travel bikes in a way, the travel bike is a, is a perfect pandemic bike because you can take it off on roads. So you can ride all of those mountain bike trails, which are okay to ride on a gravel bike. But you possibly get a little bit bored on your full assess. and you can ride those cycle paths and you can ride those quiet roads, but, you know, it's just, it's such a, it's such a lovely mixture. Like you can get so much out of, of gravel bikes without. You know, having to push for one thing or the other. And, and that became very clear. And then there's one, one interesting story in the book. And the from Trumper cycles who basically had this idea of building a wooden travel bike, and the idea kind of got shelved initially. And then when lockdown kicked off, that was basically what he focused on and came up with this beautiful piece of work. And, and is all of those little stories I tried to, you know, I think we are all getting a little bit tired of what happened in the last two to three years and you know, it come of a dire consequences for some people as well. But I also. If, if you're looking the positives to take out of like being forced to reconnect with nature, being really seeing the value that if it all fails, you can still go out there and have a bit of an adventure. And even if it's, I dunno, 10 kilometers away from home, that's, what's coming to quite clearly in the book. And, and that was an interesting thing as well. [00:34:19] Craig Dalton: As you thought about the book. And obviously there was a, there was this notion of guide book as a concept, even though you strayed away from that and made it much more personal, but as you thought about great Britain, And across Scotland, England and Wales, presumably you had some notions of like, these are, must have areas that I need to cover. My question is how much of that drove? What ended up in the book versus people you got connected with and the roots that they were saying, you've gotta, you've gotta put this route in the book. [00:34:51] Markus: It was, yeah. So I knew Scotland. Well, you know, and I there's, obviously there's some, there's, there's some bits of Scotland I really want to have featured in there. So I think Scotland, if you look at it it was. It was a bit like looking around my personal environment and you know, this is a cool place to write who do I know in that place? And, you know, do they fit in there? For the other parts of Britain, it was pretty much applying canvas, you know, I and and I think this is, this is, this is quite interesting. I guess there was one another. Bit of a guiding principle behind it is like I'm. If you look at all my work in the UK especially in Scotland, I'm a, think I'm a firm believer in that. The best places to cycle are actually the places that don't get a lot of tourism that are not overwhelmed by people. Because I, I think. Like the popularity of some glaciers, especially in the last five years with channels like Instagram and TikTok and whatever. Like, I, I, I could name a few people in Scotland places in Scotland. I wouldn't want to travel to these days because they are just like, It's for me, it's not an authentic version of what Scotland is. Like. It's a very fabricated and, you know, kind of like influencer kind of based version of what the country is like. And, and, and my, especially in Scotland, my vision, my, my picture of Scotland has always been a very different one, you know, a country which has super friendly people who are actually really, really grateful about you being in a. And, you know, visiting them, whatever. And the other thing I also felt like we, I, I, I do think, you know, I was looking at, so where are people actually living in the UK and, and you will often not find London or Milton Keens or Newcastle upon. In a guidebook because they're big cities and I think your vision of a country to travel to. So would someone who travels to put and necessarily travel to Newcast possibly not. You know, would they, would they choose London for riding a bike? Maybe not. you know, so I thought like, I want to have some, some, I want to have some odd places in there. You know, I think Oakwood around London is amazing. Cause you know, this is, this is where like people sit on top of each other. This is exactly the place where people need to go out, have an adventure. [00:37:24] Craig Dalton: Yeah. I think that approach, it, it sort of serves two masters, right? It, it, one inspires people in London of this idea that they can be a gravel cyclist living in London. And the second thing is, you know, many travelers may find themselves in London. And see that as an opportunity to ride in a place that they never thought they could ride. I, I think about in the United States, I always loathe going to Las Vegas. And then I learned about this mountain bike terrain rights out outside of Vegas that's world class. And all of a sudden it's like, okay, maybe I, I will accept a trip to Vegas because I can go sneak off and do that and get my feel of the outdoors and then experience the Zs of, of, of Las Vegas. [00:38:05] Markus: Yeah. And I guess I think the approach that kind of like, I always found, like you can basically move to any place in the world, as long as you have cool people there, you can do stuff with, you know, you, you, you, you might be in the best place in the world to ride bikes. If there, if you know, if you don't know anyone there and, and, and you, you can't connect to the people. I just, I just think the people are first and, you know, they'll show you. I don't know. And, and then I think you, you get, you get quite, and that's the thing I love about clever riding, you know, you can. There isn't really any, like, there is no such thing as a gravel trail in, especially in Britain, like we don't have those big metal roads. We have some of them, but is the majority of riding over here? it's I would say varied. You know's. Expect some odd things, you know, expect a bit of single trail expect the odd bit of road or whatever. You know, we, we don't have hundreds and hundreds of miles of long, you know, really, really extensive travel roads as such. But I think this is also that, that thing that makes it such a unique place, you know, and it's also, it's also, I. What you find when you come to here, it's the oddity of the place, you know, that any place, the thing. And, and that really came through when I traveled to the places and rode there, especially the places I hadn't really been beforehand. Everyone's proud of the place they live in, which is quite like there hasn't been a single place where people say, oh, you know, it's a. You know, mixed? No, no, they were super, you know, they were, they were, they were, they were. Super passionate about the places they live and, you know, they accept it in some cases, you know, if you wanna go riding a new car, so yeah. You need to go to some areas which are, you know, they're not tourist destinations, but it's, I always find it fascinating. Those are actually the places where you meet some really cool people, some, you know, and you get a really interesting experience. And, and, and that's the thing I. And one thing for me on the political things, we had some, some pretty interesting years in this country of, of division people voted for and against Brexit and Scottish independence were. So there was loads of stuff that, you know, where people. Pitched against each other. And I, I, I, so one thing for me that came, came across in the whole research is there's actually so much more in the country that kind of unites people than it is that it's. Dividing them, you know, and, and, and, and, and the culture over here, like wherever you wanna go, just find a pop , you'll find some interesting people from all walks of life will happily share, you know, beer with you or whatsoever. And, and, and, and, and kind of like, that's the thing I loved. And there was only, it was, it was, for me, it was kind of back to the initial reasons why I moved to, to Britain, to Scotland. Cause people were welcoming. The love it. Good chat. The love to help you. And yeah, it's, it's all really welcoming. And that, that hopefully comes across in the book. [00:41:24] Craig Dalton: Yeah, it definitely does. And again, super interesting approach. I'll put a link to everything in the show notes that people can find this book and some of your other work. And I think it's, it's a fascinating way to explore what gravel looks like in great Britain and get to know a bunch of interesting people along the way. [00:41:42] Markus: Yeah. Yeah. And and it's also, I think one thing I've forgot, which is probably a bit of improvement. Like it's, it is also, I've always found that like the people featured in the book, they're also really happy to share their knowledge, you know? So, you know, just, yeah. Like yeah. If you happen to see them and meet them, speak to them [00:42:02] Craig Dalton: absolutely. Cool. Thanks Marcus. Thanks for the time. [00:42:06] Markus: Yeah. Awesome. Thank you. [00:42:08] Craig Dalton: That's going to do it for this week's edition of the gravel ride podcast. Big, thanks to Marcus for coming on the show. . I loved learning more about gravel riding in great Britain. And I hope you enjoyed it too. Special, thanks to our friends at Trek travel. And that's your own a gravel bike tour. I hope you'll be able to join me. On the November 6th. Trip. Remember, just go to Trek, travel.com and search Girona gravel bike tour during the registration process. Make sure to mention the podcast as they're throwing in a free handlebar bag. If you're interested in connecting with me, please join the ridership@wwwdottheridership.com. It's a free global cycling community. Where you can interact with riders from around the world that are as passionate about gravel cycling. As you are. If you're able to support the show, please visit buy me a coffee.com/the gravel ride. Or ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated. Until next time here's to finding some dirt under your wheels

    The Ryan Gorman Show
    Local Restaurants Introduce New Controversial Pay Scale for Employees

    The Ryan Gorman Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 8:24


    ABC Action News Reporter Stassy Olmos checks in to break down a story she covered on three Dunedin restaurants utilizing a commission-based pay scale for their employees.

    RNZ: Nine To Noon
    Dunedin mayoral race

    RNZ: Nine To Noon

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 9:26


    In Dunedin 11 mayoral hopefuls are vying for the top job at this year's local body elections. Incumbent Aaron Hawkins is being challenged by a group of fellow councillors who all say his leadership style leaves a lot to be desired.

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    No meteorite found yet in scientists' Otago farmland search

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 2:59


    A search of farmland near Dunedin has been unable to unearth any remnants of the meteorite which crashed down last month. Those behind the search say it's now unlikely it'll be found, but a tenacious optimist still holds out hope. Our Otago-Southland reporter, Timothy Brown, joined the hunt. [embed] https://players.brightcove.net/6093072280001/default_default/index.html?videoId=6312195530112

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin
    In the wake of Kiwifarms, is deplatforming enough to combat online hate speech and harassment? - Quintin Jane - Radio One 91FM

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


    Quintin Jane speaks to Joshua James (Research Fellow, Department of Politics, University of Otago) Tune into R1 News weekdays at 11am or catch up at https://www.r1.co.nz/news or https://instagram.com/r1newsnz

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin
    What the Puck?! Kinoko Home Beavers take out the DIHL B League finals - Quintin Jane - Radio One 91FM

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


    Quintin Jane speaks to Beavers Rookie of the Year, Dave Borrie. Tune into R1 News weekdays at 11am or catch up at https://www.r1.co.nz/news or https://instagram.com/r1newsnz

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin
    Bulletin: Rāhina/Monday September 12th - Eileen Corcoran - Radio One 91FM

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022


    Tune into R1 News weekdays at 11am or catch up at https://www.r1.co.nz/news or https://instagram.com/r1newsnz

    RNZ: Nine To Noon
    Raising spirits from bread - Dunedin Craft Distillers

    RNZ: Nine To Noon

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 12:08


    Like water into wine, two Dunedin women have also been performing miracles; turning bread into gin. Jenny McDonald and Sue Stockwell started Dunedin Craft Distillers in 2020, with the aim to reduce the amount of bakery waste. So far, the pair have diverted four tonnes of bread from the landfill, turning it instead into their Dunedin Dry Gin, and a Cacao Vodka.

    Florida Trail Runners Podcast
    #55: Stories from the Pinellas Trail Challenge

    Florida Trail Runners Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 55:54 Very Popular


    It was another year for the Pinellas Trail Challenge! This time we've got Matt Clapper, Katrina Pelican, Jeremy Hutson, and Shawn Eckert! Matt has run the PTC in 2021 for his first go at the race after overcoming a serious back injury. Katrina has run the race also in 2021! Jeremy has done the PTC four times now with 2018, 2019, 2020, and now 2022. Shawn is new into the ultra-running scene with this being his first trip to the PTC! Shawn has gone from 446lbs to ultra-runner! With an event like this, there are so many people in the community that a play a role into getting wheels moving and making the race the success it is. Folks like your Race Directors Kelley Hewett and Luis Gomez. Then you've got Brad Park, David Whiteside, Carrie Graves, Susan Murphy, Jeff Iosa, Sonja Craparo, and Staci Guten. All of the volunteers and local organizations from the eight aid stations, bib pick-up, the starting line, and the finish! Tonya Olson was your Medical Director; she's been saving feet at the Western States 100 for many years and was out at the Skunk Ape Night Run! The Pinellas is an Ultramarathon that runs the Pinellas Trail. The race is an out and back event that starts in St. Petersburg, Florida takes you to Tarpon Springs and then back to Dunedin. The length of the race is measured at just over 46 miles! The history of the Pinellas Trail goes back to Florida Railroad boom. The Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line railroads both served St. Petersburg and Clearwater for many years. They merged in 1967 to form the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad. After the SCL joined CSX Transportation in the 1980s, 34 miles of trackage in Pinellas County was abandoned, and purchased by the Florida Department of Transportation. After voter approval, the County acquired the property and began construction of what is now the beautiful Pinellas Trail.

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin
    Breakfast Buffet with RDU - Jamie Green - Radio One 91FM

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


    Tune into the Radio One 91FM Breakfast show weekdays, 7am - 10am NZDT or head to https://www.r1.co.nz

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin
    Interview - Neil McLeod on 'We Have Known Lost Days' EP release - Jamie Green - Radio One 91FM

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


    Tune into the Radio One 91FM Breakfast show weekdays, 7am - 10am NZDT or head to https://www.r1.co.nz

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Scientists, astronomy fans head to Otago to find meteorite

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 4:42


    Amateur enthusiasts and scientists alike are doubling down on efforts to find an elusive meteorite that crashed to earth last week - probably on farmland between Middlemarch and Outram in Otago. So far the lump of space rock has evaded searchers including geology students from Otago University, but reinforcements are on the way and footage from an array of cameras should narrow the search field. Planetary Astronomer and senior lecturer at Canterbury University Dr Michele Bannister is also a member of Fireballs Aotearoa - a group dedicated to finding freshly fallen meteorites. She is driving to Dunedin to join the hunt.  

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin
    Mayoral Candidate Interviews: Aaron Hawkins - Jamie Green - Radio One 91FM

    Radio One 91FM Dunedin

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022


    Tune into the Radio One 91FM Breakfast show weekdays, 7am - 10am NZDT or head to https://www.r1.co.nz

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Dunedin council mulls workers village for hospital construction

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 3:58


    Plans for a purpose built beach side workers village in Dunedin for out of town tradies is being considered by the council. It's expected construction of the new Dunedin hospital will bring an influx of fly in fly out workers. So developers are seeking resource consent to convert an old caravan park in Brighton into worker accommodation with 46 one bedroom units. Saddle Hill community board chairman Scott Weatherall talks to Lisa Owen.  

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Fun for some, frustration for others as snow blankets Dunedin

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 2:54


    A short, sharp wintry blast has brought snow to the south - turning Dunedin's roads into ice rinks, causing disruption to schools and giving farmers a headache. But for some it was a chance for adventure in a spring-time snow day. Our Otago-Southland reporter Timothy Brown donned the hat and gloves for this story.  

    RNZ: Morning Report
    Dunedin snow and roads update

    RNZ: Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 3:10


    Waka Kotahi is advising those affected by the wintery blast to be extra careful. In Wellington, listeners have been texting in saying there are snow flurries affecting Transmission Gully.. People in Christchurch are also reporting snow falling. Helen Harris is the National Journey Manager and says the snow down South has closed some important motorways. It's a sea of white through the streets of Dunedin where drivers are being asked to take care. Reporter Tim Brown spoke to Susie Ferguson.

    RNZ: Nine To Noon
    Wellington mayoralty race heating up

    RNZ: Nine To Noon

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 13:43


    With less than a month until voting closes for local body elections, we take a look at who is in the running for the mayoralty in Wellington. With nine candidates vying to become mayor, three main contenders are leading the pack; incumbent Andy Foster, Labour MP for Rongotai and former deputy mayor Paul Eagle, and former Green Party chief of staff Tory Whanau. So what are the key issues in Wellington and what policies are the mayoral hopefuls promising? Kathryn speaks with Tom Hunt, a journalist at Stuff and the Dominion Post, covering the Wellington region. We've also covered mayoralty races in Auckland, and Christchurch. We'll be in Dunedin next week.

    RNZ: Morning Report
    Top Stories for Tuesday 6 September 2022

    RNZ: Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 20:36


    Liz Truss will be the UK's next Prime Minister. A wintry blast has hit the country, snow has fallen in Dunedin and is falling in Christchurch as well as parts of Wellington, roads are closed in the centre of the North island and down south. Information provided to RNZ shows radiology scans cost 40 percent more here than in Australia.

    RNZ: Morning Report
    Waka Kotahi on snow affecting roads across NZ

    RNZ: Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 4:19


    It may now be spring but it's snowing across parts of the motu this morning. State Highway 1 through Desert Road is closed after a dumping of more than 10 centimetres overnight. It's much the same story for State Highway 5 between Napier and Taupo with slightly less snow, but still enough to cause closures, It's also a sea of white through the streets of Dunedin where drivers are being asked to take care. Waka Kotahi is advising those around the wintery blast to be extra careful. National journey manager Helen Harris spoke to Corin Dann.

    RNZ: Morning Report
    State Highway 5 among multiple highways closed due to snow

    RNZ: Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 3:27


    State Highway 5 between Napier and Taupo is covered in snow this morning and is closed. The Desert Road between Waiouru and Rangipo is also shut after being blanketed. State Highway 1 between Dunedin and Waitati is closed thanks to snow. There's even a chance that even Wellington's Remutaka Hill could get some snow as the cold weather settles in. The Napier-Taupo road is no stranger to weather related closures - road safety advocate Tony Alexander runs a Facebook community page on the Highway. He spoke to Corin Dann

    RNZ: Morning Report
    Dunedin albatross chick takes to the skies

    RNZ: Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 2:38


    QT, the first albatross of the season in Dunedin, has taken to the skies -- bound for South America. The young bird has been the Royal Cam chick of this season. The Royal Cam project, a collaboration between the Royal Albatross Centre and Cornell University in New York, live-steams a chosen chick continuously until they spread their wings for their long flight. Sharyn Broni, a community ranger with the Conservation Department, spoke with Corin Dann.

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Dunedin deli saves plastic with returnable packaging system

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:02


    A Dunedin deli is trialling a takeaway that you bring back - containers that is. It's all part of a project to get more businesses in the city to ditch single use and even recyclable containers and cups in favour of a returnable packaging system. That's where you basically borrow a lunch box from your local and bring it back later, or get billed for it. It's the brainchild of charitable trust Taste Nature. Managing director Clinton Chambers talks to Lisa Owen.  

    RNZ: Morning Report
    Race to find meteorite believed to have landed near Dunedin

    RNZ: Morning Report

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 4:18


    The race is on to find a meteorite which is believed to have landed somewhere near Dunedin. A spectacular fireball was captured by night-sky cameras shooting across the Otago region on the 28 August. Only nine meteorites are confirmed to have reached New Zealand soil over the last 150 years. University of Otago Department of Geology Associate Professor James Scott spoke to Corin Dann.

    RNZ: Checkpoint
    Inquest into Dunedin man's death after Covid-19 vaccine

    RNZ: Checkpoint

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 3:15


    A Dunedin man whose death is linked to the Covid-19 vaccine was not warned of the risk of Myocarditis when he received the shot. An inquest into the death began in the Dunedin District Court this morning. Dunedin plumber Rory Nairn died last November, less than a fortnight after the 26-year-old received his first dose of the Pfizer vaccine. RNZ Otago-Southland reporter, Timothy Brown, has been following the inquest. Myocarditis is rare following vaccination with international data showing 1 to 13 cases per 100,000 vaccine doses. It is also treatable, especially if symptoms are picked up early.  

    Dan Snow's History Hit
    The Voyage That Kickstarted Globalisation

    Dan Snow's History Hit

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 26:48 Very Popular


    In February 1882 the SS Dunedin departed New Zealand on a voyage that would revolutionise the way we eat and kickstart the globalisation of the world's food supply chain. Aboard were thousands of mutton, lamb and pig carcasses as well as 250 kegs of butter, hare, pheasant, turkey, chicken and 2226 sheep tongues. This cargo would be kept fresh in the ship's hold using a Bell-Coleman compression refrigeration machine and would mark the first time fresh goods had ever been transported over such a distance. However, the journey was far from plain sailing though as you will hear in this episode.To tell the Dunedin's story and to celebrate the new digitisation project by Lloyd's Register Foundation's Heritage & Education Centre Dan is joined by Charlotte Ward and Max Wilson from the Foundation. This episode was first released on 30th June 2021.The audio editor for this episode was Dougal Patmore.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe to History Hit today!To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.